Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Angel

Angel Quotes (10 quotes)

Butterflies are very interesting. Here these things are little grubs for a while. And then they go into a little coffin. There they are in a sarcophagus, and then they come out and dance with the angels.
As quoted by Lisa Foderado in 'In The Studio With Roger Tory Peterson; Reluctant Earthling', The New York Times (26 Aug 1993), C1.
Science quotes on:  |  Butterfly (9)  |  Coffin (2)  |  Dance (5)  |  Interesting (20)

If an angel were to tell us about his philosophy, I believe many of his statements might well sound like '2 x 2= 13'.
Lichtenberg: Aphorisms & Letters (1969), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (38)  |  Equation (46)  |  Philosophy (132)

It goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging, this majestic roof fretted with golden fire—why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is a man. How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and moving, how express and admirable, in action, how like an angel! in apprehension, how like a god—the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals! And yet to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me—no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.
Hamlet (1601), II, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (5)  |  Air (84)  |  Animal (143)  |  Apprehension (8)  |  Canopy (2)  |  Congregation (2)  |  Disposition (7)  |  Dust (20)  |  Earth (250)  |  Excellence (18)  |  Faculty (21)  |  Fire (59)  |  Foul (2)  |  Frame (9)  |  Infinite (39)  |  Man (258)  |  Nobility (3)  |  Paragon (2)  |  Pestilence (6)  |  Promontory (2)  |  Quintessence (2)  |  Reason (173)  |  Roof (5)  |  Sterile (2)  |  Vapor (2)  |  Work (198)

My practice as a scientist is atheistic. That is to say, when I set up an experiment I assume that no god, angel or devil is going to interfere with its course; and this assumption has been justified by such success as I have achieved in my professional career. I should therefore be intellectually dishonest if I were not also atheistic in the affairs of the world.
In Fact and Faith (1934), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (73)  |  Affair (10)  |  Assumption (27)  |  Atheist (6)  |  Career (29)  |  Course (25)  |  Devil (9)  |  Dishonesty (5)  |  Experiment (369)  |  God (234)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Interference (7)  |  Justification (20)  |  Practice (26)  |  Profession (26)  |  Science And Religion (159)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Success (114)  |  Word (97)

Science was false by being unpoetical. It assumed to explain a reptile or a mollusk, and isolated it—which is hunting for life in graveyards. Reptile or mollusk or man or angel only exists in system, in relation.
In 'Letters and Social Aims: Poetry and Imagination', Prose works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1880), Vol. 3, 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (27)  |  Existence (150)  |  Explanation (88)  |  False (29)  |  Graveyard (2)  |  Hunting (5)  |  Life (460)  |  Man (258)  |  Mollusk (3)  |  Poetry (63)  |  Relation (35)  |  Reptile (14)  |  Science (875)  |  System (66)

See, thro' this air, this ocean, and this earth,
All matter quick, and bursting into birth.
Above, how high progressive life may go!
Around, how wide! how deep extend below!
Vast chain of being, which from God began,
Natures ethereal, human, angel, man,
Beast, bird, fish, insect! what no eye can see,
No glass can reach! from Infinite to thee,
From thee to Nothing—On superior pow'rs
Were we to press, inferior might on ours:
Or in the full creation leave a void,
Where, one step broken, the great scale's destroy'd:
From Nature's chain whatever link you strike,
Tenth or ten thousandth, breaks the chain alike.
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Beast (14)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Being (34)  |  Below (4)  |  Bird (57)  |  Birth (47)  |  Break (18)  |  Burst (12)  |  Chain (21)  |  Creation (129)  |  Depth (10)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Earth (250)  |  Ether (15)  |  Extension (12)  |  Eye (67)  |  Glass (19)  |  God (234)  |  High (12)  |  Human (168)  |  Inferiority (4)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Insect (38)  |  Life (460)  |  Link (12)  |  Man (258)  |  Matter (135)  |  Might (3)  |  Nature (534)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Power (103)  |  Press (9)  |  Progress (200)  |  Quickness (2)  |  Reach (30)  |  Scale (21)  |  Step (26)  |  Strike (6)  |  Superiority (6)  |  Vastness (4)  |  Void (8)  |  Width (2)

The question is this: Is man an ape or an angel? I, my lord, am on the side of the angels.
[Debating Darwin's Origin of Species.]
Speech at the Diocesan Conference, Oxford (1864), chaired by Bishop Wilberforce. Quoted in James Anthony Froude, Lord Beaconsfield (4th ed. 1890), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Ape (26)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Man (258)  |  Origin Of Species (36)

The trouble is that all the investigators proceeded in exactly the same spirit, the spirit that is of scientific curiosity, and with no possibility of telling whether the issue of their work would prove them to be fiends, or dreamers, or angels.
'The Presidential Address: Part II Science and Warfare', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1938), 18-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Dreamer (3)  |  Investigator (13)  |  Proceeding (10)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Trouble (22)  |  Work (198)

When Death lurks at the door, the physician is considered as a God. When danger has been overcome, the physician is looked upon as an angel. When the patient begins to convalesce, the physician becomes a mere human. When the physician asks for his fees, he is considered as the devil himself.
In Harper's Magazine (1931-32), 164, 512.
Science quotes on:  |  Consideration (38)  |  Danger (32)  |  Death (183)  |  Devil (9)  |  Fee (6)  |  God (234)  |  Human (168)  |  Looking (15)  |  Lurking (2)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Patient (54)  |  Physician (172)

[T]he human desire to escape the flesh, which took one form in asceticism, might take another form in the creation of machines. Thus, the wish to rise above the bestial body manifested itself not only in angels but in mechanical creatures. Certainly, once machines existed, humans clearly attached to them feelings of escape from the flesh.
The Fourth Discontinuity: The Co-Evolution of Humans and Machines (1993), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Bestial (2)  |  Body (88)  |  Creation (129)  |  Creature (51)  |  Desire (46)  |  Escape (14)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Flesh (10)  |  Human (168)  |  Machine (56)  |  Manifestation (21)


Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton