Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Concern

Concern Quotes (30 quotes)

[About describing atomic models in the language of classical physics:] We must be clear that when it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The poet, too, is not nearly so concerned with describing facts as with creating images and establishing mental connections.
As quoted by Werner Heisenberg, as translated by Arnold J. Pomerans, in Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (1971), 41. The words are not verbatim, but as later recollected by Werner Heisenberg describing his early encounter with Bohr in 1920.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Classical Physics (4)  |  Connection (39)  |  Creation (129)  |  Description (40)  |  Establishing (4)  |  Fact (325)  |  Image (15)  |  Language (71)  |  Mental (16)  |  Poet (26)  |  Poetry (63)

A game is on, at the other end of this infinite distance, and heads or tails will turn up. What will you wager? According to reason you cannot leave either; according to reason you cannot leave either undone... Yes, but wager you must; there is no option, you have embarked on it. So which will you have. Come. Since you must choose, let us see what concerns you least. You have two things to lose: truth and good, and two things to stake: your reason and your will, your knowledge and your happiness. And your nature has two things to shun: error and misery. Your reason does not suffer by your choosing one more than the other, for you must choose. That is one point cleared. But your happiness? Let us weigh gain and loss in calling heads that God is. Reckon these two chances: if you win, you win all; if you lose, you lose naught. Then do not hesitate, wager that He is.
Pensées (1670), Section I, aphorism 223. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 117-119.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (77)  |  Choice (40)  |  Distance (26)  |  Embarkation (2)  |  Error (152)  |  Gain (23)  |  Game (28)  |  God (234)  |  Good (81)  |  Happiness (58)  |  Head (20)  |  Hesitation (6)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Loss (44)  |  Misery (11)  |  Nature (534)  |  Naught (4)  |  Option (3)  |  Point (29)  |  Reason (173)  |  Reckoning (3)  |  Shun (3)  |  Stake (7)  |  Suffering (20)  |  Tail (4)  |  Truth (450)  |  Win (8)

A scientifically unimportant discovery is one which, however true and however interesting for other reasons, has no consequences for a system of theory with which scientists in that field are concerned.
The Structure of Social Action (1937), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (44)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Field (69)  |  Importance (106)  |  Interest (82)  |  Reason (173)  |  Scientist (237)  |  System (66)  |  Theory (353)  |  Truth (450)

A theory is the more impressive the greater the simplicity of its premises is, the more different kinds of things it relates, and the more extended is its area of applicability. Therefore the deep impression which classical thermodynamics made upon me. It is the only physical theory of universal content concerning which I am convinced that within the framework of the applicability of its basic concepts, it will never be overthrown.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 33. Quoted in Gerald Holton and Yehuda Elkana, Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (1997), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (2)  |  Area (3)  |  Basic (18)  |  Classical (7)  |  Concept (38)  |  Content (17)  |  Convincing (6)  |  Difference (135)  |  Extension (12)  |  Framework (8)  |  Greater (16)  |  Impression (32)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Kind (27)  |  Overthrown (3)  |  Physical (28)  |  Premise (7)  |  Relation (35)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Theory (353)  |  Thermodynamics (17)  |  Universal (26)

All knowledge resolves itself into probability. ... In every judgment, which we can form concerning probability, as well as concerning knowledge, we ought always to correct the first judgment deriv'd from the nature of the object, by another judgment, deriv'd from the nature of the understanding.
In A treatise of Human Nature (1888), 181-182.
Science quotes on:  |  Correction (20)  |  Derivation (8)  |  Form (70)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Nature (534)  |  Object (47)  |  Ought (3)  |  Probability (56)  |  Resolution (10)  |  Understanding (231)

By what process of reasoning should the State of Texas be more concerned in the conviction of the guilty than in the acquittal of the innocent? [Urging the use of scopolamine “truth serum” to determine innocence.]
From paper read at the Section on State Medicine and Public Hygiene of the State Medical Association of Texas at El Paso (11 May 1922), 'The Use Of Scopolamine In Criminology', published in Texas State Journal of Medicine (Sep 1922). Reprinted in The American Journal of Police Science (Jul-Aug 1931), 2, No. 4, 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Conviction (26)  |  Innocence (5)  |  Innocent (2)  |  Reasoning (56)  |  Scopolamine (3)  |  Texas (3)  |  Truth Serum (2)

Concern should drive us into action, not into a depression.
The Collected Works of Karen Horney (1957), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Depression (8)

Entropy theory, on the other hand, is not concerned with the probability of succession in a series of items but with the overall distribution of kinds of items in a given arrangement.
In Entropy and Art: An Essay on Disorder and Order (1974), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Distribution (15)  |  Entropy (25)  |  Given (2)  |  Kind (27)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Probability (56)  |  Series (18)  |  Succession (30)  |  Theory (353)

Every phenomenon, however trifling it be, has a cause, and a mind infinitely powerful, and infinitely well-informed concerning the laws of nature could have foreseen it from the beginning of the ages. If a being with such a mind existed, we could play no game of chance with him; we should always lose.
Science and Method (1908), trans. Francis Maitland (1914), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (71)  |  Cause (122)  |  Chance (77)  |  Existence (150)  |  Foresight (3)  |  Game (28)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Law Of Nature (30)  |  Loss (44)  |  Mind (272)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Play (22)  |  Trifle (5)

I am particularly concerned to determine the probability of causes and results, as exhibited in events that occur in large numbers, and to investigate the laws according to which that probability approaches a limit in proportion to the repetition of events. That investigation deserves the attention of mathematicians because of the analysis required. It is primarily there that the approximation of formulas that are functions of large numbers has its most important applications. The investigation will benefit observers in identifying the mean to be chosen among the results of their observations and the probability of the errors still to be apprehended. Lastly, the investigation is one that deserves the attention of philosophers in showing how in the final analysis there is a regularity underlying the very things that seem to us to pertain entirely to chance, and in unveiling the hidden but constant causes on which that regularity depends. It is on the regularity of the main outcomes of events taken in large numbers that various institutions depend, such as annuities, tontines, and insurance policies. Questions about those subjects, as well as about inoculation with vaccine and decisions of electoral assemblies, present no further difficulty in the light of my theory. I limit myself here to resolving the most general of them, but the importance of these concerns in civil life, the moral considerations that complicate them, and the voluminous data that they presuppose require a separate work.
Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1825), trans. Andrew I. Dale (1995), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Application (72)  |  Approximation (8)  |  Cause (122)  |  Chance (77)  |  Complication (16)  |  Data (59)  |  Determine (15)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Error (152)  |  Event (49)  |  Formula (29)  |  Function (41)  |  Government (50)  |  Inoculation (5)  |  Institution (15)  |  Insurance (7)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Law (273)  |  Limit (34)  |  Mathematician (110)  |  Mean (7)  |  Morality (19)  |  Outcome (6)  |  Philosopher (67)  |  Probability (56)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Regularity (11)  |  Result (129)  |  Theory (353)  |  Vaccine (4)

I had a Meccano set with which I “played” endlessly. Meccano which was invented by Frank Hornby around 1900, is called Erector Set in the US. New toys (mainly Lego) have led to the extinction of Meccano and this has been a major disaster as far as the education of our young engineers and scientists is concerned. Lego is a technically trivial plaything and kids love it partly because it is so simple and partly because it is seductively coloured. However it is only a toy, whereas Meccano is a real engineering kit and it teaches one skill which I consider to be the most important that anyone can acquire: This is the sensitive touch needed to thread a nut on a bolt and tighten them with a screwdriver and spanner just enough that they stay locked, but not so tightly that the thread is stripped or they cannot be unscrewed. On those occasions (usually during a party at your house) when the handbasin tap is closed so tightly that you cannot turn it back on, you know the last person to use the washroom never had a Meccano set.
Nobel laureate autobiography in Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures 1996 (1997), 189.
Science quotes on:  |   (26)  |  Acquire (7)  |  Bolt (3)  |  Colour (32)  |  Disaster (15)  |  Education (177)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Extinction (38)  |  Important (20)  |  Invention (174)  |  Kid (4)  |  Kit (2)  |  Lock (2)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Need (57)  |  Nut (2)  |  Party (4)  |  Play (22)  |  Plaything (2)  |  Real (28)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Sensitive (5)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Skill (27)  |  Strip (3)  |  Tap (3)  |  Teach (19)  |  Technical (6)  |  Thread (6)  |  Touch (19)  |  Toy (8)  |  Trivial (14)  |  Young (20)

I strongly oppose cloning, as do most Americans. We recoil at the idea of growing human beings for spare body parts or creating life for our convenience. And while we must devote enormous energy to conquering disease, it is equally important that we pay attention to the moral concerns raised by the new frontier of human embryo stem cell research. Even the most noble ends do not justify any means.
'Address to the Nation on Stem Cell Research', (9 Aug 2001) in Public Papers Of The Presidents Of The United States, George W. Bush, 2001 (2004), Book 2, 955.
Science quotes on:  |  American (12)  |  Attention (37)  |  Body (88)  |  Cloning (3)  |  Convenience (11)  |  Creating (2)  |  Devote (5)  |  Disease (170)  |  Embryo (15)  |  Energy (103)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Frontier (5)  |  Growing (3)  |  Human Being (16)  |  Idea (226)  |  Important (20)  |  Life (460)  |  Moral (38)  |  New (107)  |  Noble (14)  |  Oppose (3)  |  Part (55)  |  Recoil (3)  |  Research (360)  |  Stem Cell (8)

Imagine a room awash in gasoline, and there are two implacable enemies in that room. One of them has nine thousand matches. The other has seven thousand matches. Each of them is concerned about who's ahead, who's stronger. Well that's the kind of situation we are actually in. The amount of weapons that are available to the United States and the Soviet Union are so bloated, so grossly in excess of what's needed to dissuade the other, that if it weren't so tragic, it would be laughable. What is necessary is to reduce the matches and to clean up the gasoline.
From Sagan's analogy about the nuclear arms race and the need for disarmament, during a panel discussion in ABC News Viewpoint following the TV movie The Day After (20 Nov 1983). Transcribed by Webmaster from a video recording. It is seen misquoted in summary form as “The nuclear arms race is like two sworn enemies standing waist deep in gasoline, one with three matches, the other with five.”
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (8)  |  Arms Race (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (71)  |  Enemy (26)  |  Excess (5)  |  Gasoline (2)  |  Match (7)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Need (57)  |  Nuclear (13)  |  Reduce (10)  |  Stronger (3)  |  Thousand (32)  |  Tragedy (9)  |  United States (12)  |  Weapon (35)

In fact, the thickness of the Earth's atmosphere, compared with the size of the Earth, is in about the same ratio as the thickness of a coat of shellac on a schoolroom globe is to the diameter of the globe. That's the air that nurtures us and almost all other life on Earth, that protects us from deadly ultraviolet light from the sun, that through the greenhouse effect brings the surface temperature above the freezing point. (Without the greenhouse effect, the entire Earth would plunge below the freezing point of water and we'd all be dead.) Now that atmosphere, so thin and fragile, is under assault by our technology. We are pumping all kinds of stuff into it. You know about the concern that chlorofluorocarbons are depleting the ozone layer; and that carbon dioxide and methane and other greenhouse gases are producing global warming, a steady trend amidst fluctuations produced by volcanic eruptions and other sources. Who knows what other challenges we are posing to this vulnerable layer of air that we haven't been wise enough to foresee?
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Assault (5)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Challenge (15)  |  Death (183)  |  Diameter (5)  |  Earth (250)  |  Eruption (3)  |  Freezing Point (2)  |  Global Warming (19)  |  Globe (20)  |  Greenhouse Gas (2)  |  Layer (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Light (117)  |  Methane (3)  |  Nurture (6)  |  Ozone (3)  |  Pump (4)  |  Ratio (9)  |  School (36)  |  Source (33)  |  Stuff (8)  |  Sun (115)  |  Surface (37)  |  Technology (98)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Thin (3)  |  Trend (8)  |  Volcano (24)  |  Vulnerability (2)  |  Water (122)  |  Wisdom (91)

In the world of physics we watch a shadowgraph performance of the drama of familiar life. The shadow of my elbow rests on the shadow table as the shadow ink flows over the shadow paper. It is all symbolic, and as a symbol the physicist leaves it. ... The frank realization that physical science is concerned with a world of shadows is one of the most significant of recent advances.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), xiv-xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (52)  |  Drama (4)  |  Elbow (2)  |  Ink (4)  |  Physical Science (32)  |  Physics (156)  |  Realization (22)  |  Shadow (16)  |  Significant (7)  |  Symbol (23)

It is not therefore the business of philosophy, in our present situation in the universe, to attempt to take in at once, in one view, the whole scheme of nature; but to extend, with great care and circumspection, our knowledge, by just steps, from sensible things, as far as our observations or reasonings from them will carry us, in our enquiries concerning either the greater motions and operations of nature, or her more subtile and hidden works. In this way Sir Isaac Newton proceeded in his discoveries.
An Account of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophical Discoveries, in Four Books (1748), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (41)  |  Business (27)  |  Care (37)  |  Circumspection (2)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Enquiry (72)  |  Extend (6)  |  Hidden (15)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Motion (64)  |  Nature (534)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (176)  |  Observation (264)  |  Operation (53)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Reasoning (56)  |  Scheme (8)  |  Sensible (11)  |  Situation (21)  |  Step (26)  |  Subtle (6)  |  Universe (291)  |  View (48)

Leo Szilard’s Ten Commandments:
1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men, so that you may know what you are doing.
2. Let your acts be directed towards a worthy goal, but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not means to an end.
3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world; lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out of sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of the creation.
4. Do not destroy what you cannot create.
5. Touch no dish, except that you are hungry.
6. Do not covet what you cannot have.
7. Do not lie without need.
8. Honor children. Listen reverently to their words and speak to them with infinite love.
9. Do your work for six years; but in the seventh, go into solitude or among strangers, so that the memory of your friends does not hinder you from being what you have become.
10. Lead your life with a gentle hand and be ready to leave whenever you are called.
Circulated by Mrs. Szilard in July 1964, in a letter to their friends (translated by Dr. Jacob Bronowski). As printed in Robert J. Levine, Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research (1988), 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Child (90)  |  Conduct (8)  |  Connection (39)  |  Creation (129)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Effect (72)  |  Example (21)  |  Friend (22)  |  Goal (36)  |  Honor (3)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Isolation (16)  |  Law (273)  |  Lie (23)  |  Life (460)  |  Listen (4)  |  Love (64)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Memory (42)  |  Model (31)  |  Need (57)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Solitude (5)  |  Speaking (30)  |  Stranger (7)  |  Work (198)

Logic is not concerned with human behavior in the same sense that physiology, psychology, and social sciences are concerned with it. These sciences formulate laws or universal statements which have as their subject matter human activities as processes in time. Logic, on the contrary, is concerned with relations between factual sentences (or thoughts). If logic ever discusses the truth of factual sentences it does so only conditionally, somewhat as follows: if such-and-such a sentence is true, then such-and-such another sentence is true. Logic itself does not decide whether the first sentence is true, but surrenders that question to one or the other of the empirical sciences.
Logic (1937). In The Language of Wisdom and Folly: Background Readings in Semantics (1967), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Decision (30)  |  Discuss (3)  |  Empirical Science (4)  |  Fact (325)  |  Formulation (14)  |  Human Behavior (2)  |  Law (273)  |  Logic (132)  |  Physiology (41)  |  Process (97)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Question (159)  |  Relation (35)  |  Sense (104)  |  Sentence (10)  |  Social Science (17)  |  Statement (28)  |  Subject (51)  |  Surrender (4)  |  Thought (170)  |  Time (170)  |  True (29)  |  Universal (26)

Man is not a machine, ... although man most certainly processes information, he does not necessarily process it in the way computers do. Computers and men are not species of the same genus. .... No other organism, and certainly no computer, can be made to confront genuine human problems in human terms. ... However much intelligence computers may attain, now or in the future, theirs must always be an intelligence alien to genuine human problems and concerns.
Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation, (1976) 203 and 223. Also excerpted in Ronald Chrisley (ed.), Artificial Intelligence: Critical Concepts (2000), Vol. 3, 313 and 321. Note that the second ellipsis spans 8 pages.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (16)  |  Artificial Intelligence (6)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Computer (51)  |  Confront (3)  |  Future (110)  |  Genuine (9)  |  Genus (13)  |  Human (168)  |  Information (56)  |  Machine (56)  |  Man (258)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Organism (70)  |  Problem (180)  |  Process (97)  |  Species (96)  |  Term (34)

Man is not only part of a field, but a part and member of his group. When people are together, as when they are at work, then the most unnatural behavior, which only appears in late stages or abnormal cases, would be to behave as separate Egos. Under normal circumstances they work in common, each a meaningfully functioning part of the whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (44)  |  Ego (5)  |  Enterprise (6)  |  Field (69)  |  Function (41)  |  Group (24)  |  Independent (16)  |  Man (258)  |  Meaningful (4)  |  Mutual (12)  |  Part (55)  |  People (72)  |  Whole (46)  |  Work (198)

Science and Theology. We should endow neither; we should treat them as we treat conservatism and liberalism, encouraging both, so that they may keep watch upon one another, and letting them go in and out of power with the popular vote concerning them
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 340.
Science quotes on:  |  Encouragement (9)  |  Endowment (4)  |  Liberalism (2)  |  Neither (4)  |  Popular (10)  |  Power (103)  |  Theology (21)  |  Treatment (61)  |  Vote (7)  |  Watch (16)

Science is concerned with what is possible while engineering is concerned with choosing, from among the many possible ways, one that meets a number of often poorly stated economic and practical objectives.
From Turing Award lecture (1968), 'One Man's View of Computer Science', collected in ACM Turing Award Lectures: The First Twenty Years, 1966 to 1985 (1987), 209. ACM is the Association for Computing Machinery. Also in Journal of the ACM (Jan 1969), 16, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Choice (40)  |  Economic (5)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Objective (18)  |  Poor (18)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Practicality (4)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Engineering (9)  |  State (43)  |  Way (31)

Somewhere in the arrangement of this world there seems to be a great concern about giving us delight, which shows that, in the universe, over and above the meaning of matter and forces, there is a message conveyed through the magic touch of personality. ...
Is it merely because the rose is round and pink that it gives me more satisfaction than the gold which could buy me the necessities of life, or any number of slaves. ... Somehow we feel that through a rose the language of love reached our hearts.
The Religion of Man (1931), 102. Quoted in H. E. Hunter, The Divine Proportion (1970), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (25)  |  Delight (22)  |  Force (75)  |  Gold (19)  |  Language (71)  |  Life (460)  |  Magic (22)  |  Matter (135)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Message (11)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Personality (19)  |  Rose (3)  |  Satisfaction (31)  |  Slave (9)  |  Touch (19)  |  Universe (291)  |  World (231)

That ability to impart knowledge ... what does it consist of? ... a deep belief in the interest and importance of the thing taught, a concern about it amounting to a sort of passion. A man who knows a subject thoroughly, a man so soaked in it that he eats it, sleeps it and dreams it—this man can always teach it with success, no matter how little he knows of technical pedagogy. That is because there is enthusiasm in him, and because enthusiasm is almost as contagious as fear or the barber's itch. An enthusiast is willing to go to any trouble to impart the glad news bubbling within him. He thinks that it is important and valuable for to know; given the slightest glow of interest in a pupil to start with, he will fan that glow to a flame. No hollow formalism cripples him and slows him down. He drags his best pupils along as fast as they can go, and he is so full of the thing that he never tires of expounding its elements to the dullest.
This passion, so unordered and yet so potent, explains the capacity for teaching that one frequently observes in scientific men of high attainments in their specialties—for example, Huxley, Ostwald, Karl Ludwig, Virchow, Billroth, Jowett, William G. Sumner, Halsted and Osler—men who knew nothing whatever about the so-called science of pedagogy, and would have derided its alleged principles if they had heard them stated.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 241-2.
For a longer excerpt, see H. L. Mencken on Teaching, Enthusiasm and Pedagogy.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (37)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Barber (3)  |  Belief (139)  |  Theodor Billroth (2)  |  Contagion (4)  |  Derision (2)  |  Dream (39)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Fear (53)  |  Flame (13)  |  Formalism (4)  |  Glow (4)  |  William Stewart Halsted (2)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (77)  |  Importance (106)  |  Interest (82)  |  Itch (4)  |  Benjamin Jowett (2)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig (3)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  News (6)  |  Sir William Osler (16)  |  Ostwald_Carl (2)  |  Passion (24)  |  Pupil (10)  |  Sleep (25)  |  Specialty (6)  |  Subject (51)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Value (63)  |  Rudolf Virchow (27)

The mind of man may be compared to a musical instrument with a certain range of notes, beyond which in both directions we have an infinitude of silence. The phenomena of matter and force lie within our intellectual range, and as far as they reach we will at all hazards push our inquiries. But behind, and above, and around all, the real mystery of this universe [Who made it all?] lies unsolved, and, as far as we are concerned, is incapable of solution.
In 'Matter and Force', Fragments of Science for Unscientific People (1871), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Above (3)  |  Around (3)  |  Behind (4)  |  Beyond (19)  |  Certain (14)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Creation (129)  |  Direction (27)  |  Enquiry (72)  |  Force (75)  |  Hazard (7)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Incapability (2)  |  Infinite (39)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Lie (23)  |  Matter (135)  |  Music (26)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Note (10)  |  Origin Of The Universe (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Push (6)  |  Range (12)  |  Reach (30)  |  Science And Religion (159)  |  Silence (12)  |  Solution (109)  |  Universe (291)  |  Unsolved (3)  |  Within (4)

The most important discoveries will provide answers to questions that we do not yet know how to ask and will concern objects we have not yet imagined.
In Hubble Space Telescope flaw: hearing before the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, second session, July 13, 1990 (1990), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Object (47)  |  Question (159)

The nature of light is a subject of no material importance to the concerns of life or to the practice of the arts, but it is in many other respects extremely interesting.
Lecture 39, 'On the Nature of Light and Colours', A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), Vol. 1, 359.
Science quotes on:  |  Importance (106)  |  Interest (82)  |  Life (460)  |  Light (117)  |  Science And Art (58)

The same society which receives the rewards of technology must, as a cooperating whole, take responsibility for control. To deal with these new problems will require a new conservation. We must not only protect the countryside and save it from destruction, we must restore what has been destroyed and salvage the beauty and charm of our cities. Our conservation must be not just the classic conservation of protection and development, but a creative conservation of restoration and innovation. Its concern is not with nature alone, but with the total relation between man and the world around him. Its object is not just man's welfare, but the dignity of man's spirit.
In his 'Message to Congress on Conservation and Restoration of Natural Beauty' written to Congress (8 Feb 1965). It was a broad initiative aimed at beautifying America, guaranteeing water and air quality, and preserving natural areas. In Lyndon B. Johnson: Containing the Public Messages, Speeches, and Statements of the President (1965), Vol.1, 156. United States. President (1963-1969 : Johnson), Lyndon Baines Johnson, United States. Office of the Federal Register - 1970
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (88)  |  Charm (9)  |  City (12)  |  Conservation (44)  |  Control (41)  |  Cooperation (15)  |  Countryside (2)  |  Creativity (45)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Development (122)  |  Dignity (7)  |  Environment (75)  |  Innovation (28)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Nature (534)  |  New (107)  |  Object (47)  |  Problem (180)  |  Protection (13)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Requirement (27)  |  Responsibility (24)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Reward (21)  |  Saving (12)  |  Society (84)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Technology (98)  |  Welfare (9)  |  World (231)

Through the ages, man's main concern was life after death. Today, for the first time, we find we must ask questions about whether there will be life before death.
The Crazy Ape (1970), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Death (183)  |  Life (460)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Question (159)  |  Today (24)

You could write the story of man's growth in terms of his epic concerns with water.
Opening sentence of 'Our Need For Water', United States Department of Agriculture, The Yearbook of Agriculture, 1955 (1955), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (44)  |  Growth (70)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Story (16)  |  Term (34)  |  Water (122)  |  Writing (50)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton