Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Duty

Duty Quotes (26 quotes)

Hoc age ['do this'] is the great rule, whether you are serious or merry; whether ... learning science or duty from a folio, or floating on the Thames. Intentions must be gathered from acts.
In James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1821), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Float (8)  |  Gather (7)  |  Intention (20)  |  Learn (23)  |  Merry (2)  |  Rule (52)  |  Science (875)  |  Serious (13)

Imprimisque hominis est propria veri inquisitio atque investigatio.
The first duty of man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth.
De Officiis I., 4, 18. In Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (classical) (3rd Ed., 1906), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  First (42)  |  Investigate (7)  |  Man (258)  |  Seek (15)  |  Truth (450)

Les Leucocytes Et L'esprit De Sacrifice. — Il semble, d'après les recherches de De Bruyne (Phagocytose, 1895) et de ceux qui le citent, que les leucocytes des Lamellibranches — probablement lorsqu'ils ont phagocyté, qu'ils se sont chargés de résidus et de déchets, qu'ils ont, en un mot, accompli leur rôle et bien fait leur devoir — sortent du corps de l'animal et vont mourir dans le milieu ambiant. Ils se sacrifient. Après avoir si bien servi l'organisme par leur activité, ils le servent encore par leur mort en faisant place aux cellules nouvelles, plus jeunes.
N'est-ce pas la parfaite image du désintéressement le plus noble, et n'y a-t-il point là un exemple et un modèle? Il faut s'en inspirer: comme eux, nous sommes les unités d'un grand corps social; comme eux, nous pouvons le servir et envisager la mort avec sérénité, en subordonnant notre conscience individuelle à la conscience collective.
(30 Jan 1896)
Leukocytes and The Spirit Of Sacrifice. - It seems, according to research by De Bruyne (Phagocytosis, 1885) and those who quote it, that leukocytes of Lamellibranches [bivalves] - likely when they have phagocytized [ingested bacteria], as they become residues and waste, they have, in short, performed their role well and done their duty - leave the body of the animal and will die in the environment. They sacrifice themselves. Having so well served the body by their activities, they still serve in their death by making room for new younger cells.
Isn't this the perfect image of the noblest selflessness, and thereby presents an example and a model? It should be inspiring: like them, we are the units of a great social body, like them, we can serve and contemplate death with equanimity, subordinating our individual consciousness to collective consciousness.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 194. Google translation by Webmaster. Please give feedback if you can improve it.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Animal (143)  |  Body (88)  |  Cell (90)  |  Collective (4)  |  Consciousness (36)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Death (183)  |  Example (21)  |  Image (15)  |  Individual (59)  |  Inspiration (30)  |  Leaving (4)  |  Leukocyte (2)  |  Model (31)  |  New (107)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Performance (16)  |  Research (360)  |  Residue (4)  |  Role (17)  |  Sacrifice (12)  |  Service (27)  |  Society (84)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Waste (31)

A story about the Jack Spratts of medicine [was] told recently by Dr. Charles H. Best, co-discoverer of insulin. He had been invited to a conference of heart specialists in North America. On the eve of the meeting, out of respect for the fat-clogs-the-arteries theory, the delegates sat down to a special banquet served without fats. It was unpalatable but they all ate it as a duty. Next morning Best looked round the breakfast room and saw these same specialists—all in the 40-60 year old, coronary age group—happily tucking into eggs, bacon, buttered toast and coffee with cream.
'Objections To High-Fat Diets', Eat Fat And Grow Slim (1958), Ch. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Artery (5)  |  Charles Best (2)  |  Breakfast (3)  |  Butter (5)  |  Coffee (7)  |  Cream (3)  |  Eat (15)  |  Egg (27)  |  Fat (8)  |  Heart (46)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Meeting (11)  |  Specialist (10)  |  Toast (5)

But nothing of a nature foreign to the duties of my profession [clergyman] engaged my attention while I was at Leeds so much as the, prosecution of my experiments relating to electricity, and especially the doctrine of air. The last I was led into a consequence of inhabiting a house adjoining to a public brewery, where first amused myself with making experiments on fixed air [carbon dioxide] which found ready made in the process of fermentation. When I removed from that house, I was under the necessity making the fixed air for myself; and one experiment leading to another, as I have distinctly and faithfully noted in my various publications on the subject, I by degrees contrived a convenient apparatus for the purpose, but of the cheapest kind. When I began these experiments I knew very little of chemistry, and had in a manner no idea on the subject before I attended a course of chymical lectures delivered in the Academy at Warrington by Dr. Turner of Liverpool. But I have often thought that upon the whole, this circumstance was no disadvantage to me; as in this situation I was led to devise an apparatus and processes of my own, adapted to my peculiar views. Whereas, if I had been previously accustomed to the usual chemical processes, I should not have so easily thought of any other; and without new modes of operation I should hardly have discovered anything materially new.
Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley, in the Year 1795 (1806), Vol. 1, 61-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Apparatus (18)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fermentation (10)  |  Fixed Air (2)  |  Lecture (31)  |  Mode (8)  |  Operation (53)  |  Profession (26)  |  Publication (75)  |  Thought (170)  |  View (48)

For it is the duty of an astronomer to compose the history of the celestial motions or hypotheses about them. Since he cannot in any certain way attain to the true causes, he will adopt whatever suppositions enable the motions to be computed correctly from the principles of geometry for the future as well as for the past.
From unauthorized preface Osiander anonymously added when he was entrusted with arranging the printing of the original work by Copernicus. As translated in Nicolaus Copernicus and Jerzy Dobrzycki (ed.), Nicholas Copernicus on the Revolutions (1978), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomer (28)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Cause (122)  |  Celestial (5)  |  Computation (7)  |  Correct (14)  |  Enabling (6)  |  Future (110)  |  Geometry (68)  |  History (156)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Motion (64)  |  Past (42)  |  Principle (97)  |  Supposition (25)

From whence it is obvious to conclude that, since our Faculties are not fitted to penetrate into the internal Fabrick and real Essences of Bodies; but yet plainly discover to us the Being of a GOD, and the Knowledge of our selves, enough to lead us into a full and clear discovery of our Duty, and great Concernment, it will become us, as rational Creatures, to imploy those Faculties we have about what they are most adapted to, and follow the direction of Nature, where it seems to point us out the way.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 4, Chapter 12, Section 11, 646.
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (51)  |  Essence (19)  |  Faculty (21)  |  God (234)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Rational (18)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (18)  |  Deserving (3)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Discouragement (4)  |  Exaggeration (4)  |  Eye (67)  |  Good (81)  |  Harder (3)  |  Humble (4)  |  Importance (106)  |  Ineffective (2)  |  Person (38)  |  Professor (21)  |  Ridiculous (6)  |  Right (49)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Work (198)  |  Worth (30)

I believe scientists have a duty to share the excitement and pleasure of their work with the general public, and I enjoy the challenge of presenting difficult ideas in an understandable way.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Challenge (15)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Idea (226)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Presentation (9)  |  Public (35)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Sharing (6)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Way (31)  |  Work (198)

I should be the last to discard the law of organic heredity ... but the single word “heredity” cannot dispense science from the duty of making every possible inquiry into the mechanism of organic growth and of organic formation. To think that heredity will build organic beings without mechanical means is a piece of unscientific mysticism.
In 'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1888), 15, 294-295. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (23)  |  Discard (11)  |  Formation (34)  |  Growth (70)  |  Heredity (43)  |  Inquiry (14)  |  Law (273)  |  Means (25)  |  Mechanical (11)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Mysticism (4)  |  Organic (19)  |  Think (16)  |  Unscientific (6)

I think it is a duty I owe to my profession and to my sex to show that a woman has a right to the practice of her profession and cannot be condemned to abandon it merely because she marries. I cannot conceive how women's colleges, inviting and encouraging women to enter professions can be justly founded or maintained denying such a principle.
(From a letter Brooks wrote to her dean, knowing that she would be told to resign if she married, she asked to keep her job. Nevertheless, she lost her teaching position at Barnard College in 1906. Dean Gill wrote that “The dignity of women's place in the home demands that your marriage shall be a resignation.”)
As quoted by Margaret W. Rossiter in Women Scientists in America: Struggles and Strategies to 1940. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (13)  |  College (15)  |  Condemnation (8)  |  Denial (3)  |  Founding (2)  |  Invitation (4)  |  Maintenance (7)  |  Marriage (19)  |  Practice (26)  |  Principle (97)  |  Profession (26)  |  Right (49)  |  Role Model (5)  |  Sex (30)  |  Woman (36)

In my view, aiming at simplicity and lucidity is a moral duty of all intellectuals: lack of clarity is a sin, and pretentiousness is a crime.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 44
Science quotes on:  |  Clarity (24)  |  Crime (11)  |  Intellectual (13)  |  Lack (14)  |  Lucidity (2)  |  Moral (38)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Sin (13)

It becomes the urgent duty of mathematicians, therefore, to meditate about the essence of mathematics, its motivations and goals and the ideas that must bind divergent interests together.
In 'Mathematics in the Modern World', Scientific American (Sep 1964) 211, No. 3, 42. Collected in Ronald J. Comer and Morris Kline, Mathematics in the Modern World: Readings from Scientific American (1988), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Binding (6)  |  Divergence (3)  |  Essence (19)  |  Idea (226)  |  Interest (82)  |  Mathematician (110)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Mediation (3)  |  Motivation (16)  |  Together (15)  |  Urgency (6)

It is a right, yes a duty, to search in cautious manner for the numbers, sizes, and weights, the norms for everything [God] has created. For He himself has let man take part in the knowledge of these things ... For these secrets are not of the kind whose research should be forbidden; rather they are set before our eyes like a mirror so that by examining them we observe to some extent the goodness and wisdom of the Creator.
Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. In Michael B. Foster, Mystery and Philosophy, 61. Cited by Max Casper and Doris Hellman, trans., ed. Kepler (1954), 381. Cited by Gerald J. Galgan, Interpreting the Present: Six Philosophical Essays (1993), 105. Gerald J. Galgan
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (8)  |  Creation (129)  |  Examination (47)  |  Forbidden (6)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Mirror (10)  |  Number (90)  |  Research (360)  |  Search (40)  |  Size (21)  |  Weight (41)

It is the business of the future to be dangerous; and it is among the merits of science that it equips the future for its duties.
Science and the Modern World: Lowell Lectures, 1925 (1925), 291.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (27)  |  Dangerous (11)  |  Future (110)  |  Merit (14)  |  Science (875)

Man at last knows that he is alone in the unfeeling immensity of the universe, out of which he emerged only by chance. Neither his destiny nor his duty have been written down. The kingdom above or the darkness below: it is for him to choose.
Concluding remarks in Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1972), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (13)  |  Chance (77)  |  Choice (40)  |  Darkness (11)  |  Destiny (12)  |  Emergence (17)  |  Immensity (7)  |  Kingdom (18)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Universe (291)  |  Writing (50)

No physiologist who calmly considers the question in connection with the general truths of his science, can long resist the conviction that different parts of the cerebrum subserve different kinds of mental action. Localization of function is the law of all organization whatever: separateness of duty is universally accompanied with separateness of structure: and it would be marvellous were an exception to exist in the cerebral hemispheres.
The Principles of Psychology (1855), 607.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (3)  |  Action (57)  |  Calm (6)  |  Cerebrum (4)  |  Connection (39)  |  Conviction (26)  |  Difference (135)  |  Exception (16)  |  Existence (150)  |  Function (41)  |  Hemisphere (3)  |  Law (273)  |  Localization (2)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Mental (16)  |  Organization (51)  |  Part (55)  |  Physiologist (6)  |  Question (159)  |  Resistance (14)  |  Science (875)  |  Serve (13)  |  Structure (104)  |  Truth (450)  |  Universality (9)

One of the first and foremost duties of the teacher is not to give his students the impression that mathematical problems have little connection with each other, and no connection at all with anything else. We have a natural opportunity to investigate the connections of a problem when looking back at its solution.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (17)  |  Connection (39)  |  First (42)  |  Giving (5)  |  Impression (32)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Look (32)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Natural (48)  |  Opportunity (20)  |  Problem (180)  |  Solution (109)  |  Student (54)  |  Teacher (54)

The advancement of science is slow; it is effected only by virtue of hard work and perseverance. And when a result is attained, should we not in recognition connect it with the efforts of those who have preceded us, who have struggled and suffered in advance? Is it not truly a duty to recall the difficulties which they vanquished, the thoughts which guided them; and how men of different nations, ideas, positions, and characters, moved solely by the love of science, have bequeathed to us the unsolved problem? Should not the last comer recall the researches of his predecessors while adding in his turn his contribution of intelligence and of labor? Here is an intellectual collaboration consecrated entirely to the search for truth, and which continues from century to century.
[Respecting how the work of prior researchers had enabled his isolation of fluorine.]
Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1897). In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to July 1897 (1898), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (26)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Century (38)  |  Character (39)  |  Collaboration (9)  |  Consecration (2)  |  Continuation (13)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Effort (40)  |  Guide (17)  |  Idea (226)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Labour (27)  |  Love (64)  |  Nation (47)  |  Perseverance (10)  |  Position (18)  |  Predecessor (13)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Recollection (3)  |  Research (360)  |  Result (129)  |  Search (40)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Thought (170)  |  Truth (450)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Work (198)

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased by affection and by marks of honour, nay more it possesses virtues rare even in man, honesty, wisdom, justice, also respect for the stars and reverence for the sun and moon.
Natural History, 8, I. Trans. H. Rackham, Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 3, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (8)  |  Animal (143)  |  Country (43)  |  Elephant (5)  |  Honesty (11)  |  Honour (20)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Justice (11)  |  Language (71)  |  Largest (4)  |  Man (258)  |  Mark (14)  |  Moon (78)  |  Obedience (9)  |  Order (60)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Possession (24)  |  Rarity (6)  |  Remembering (3)  |  Respect (24)  |  Reverence (14)  |  Star (132)  |  Sun (115)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Wisdom (91)

The science of government is my duty. ... I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history, naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.
Letter to Abigail Adams, (1780). In John Adams and Charles Francis Adams, Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife (1841), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (19)  |  Architecture (24)  |  Commerce (9)  |  Geography (14)  |  Government (50)  |  Liberty (9)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Natural History (23)  |  Navigation (6)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Politics (52)  |  Porcelain (2)  |  Sculpture (5)  |  Son (6)  |  Tapestry (2)  |  War (79)

The wise man should study the acquisition of science and riches as if he were not subject to sickness and death; but to the duties of religion he should attend as if death had seized him by the hair.
In Charles Wilkins (trans.) Fables and Proverbs from the Sanskrit: being the Hitopadesa (1885), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (21)  |  Death (183)  |  Religion (120)  |  Riches (5)  |  Sickness (15)  |  Study (157)  |  Subject (51)  |  Wisdom (91)

We cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individual. Toward this end, each of us must work for his own highest development, accepting at the same time his share of responsibility in the general life of humanity—our particular duty being to aid those to whom we think we can be most useful.
Quoted in Eve Curie Labouisse and Eve Curie, trans. by Vincent Sheean, Madame Curie (1937), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Responsibility (24)

With moth cytochrome C there are 30 differences and 74 identities. With bread yeast and humans, there are about 45 amino acids that are different and about 59 that are identical. Think how close together man and this other organism, bread yeast, are. What is the probability that in 59 positions the same choice out of 20 possibilities would have been made by accident? It is impossibly small. There is, there must be, a developmental explanation of this. The developmental explanation is that bread yeast and man have a common ancestor, perhaps two billion years ago. And so we see that not only are all men brothers, but men and yeast cells, too, are at least close cousins, to say nothing about men and gorillas or rhesus monkeys. It is the duty of scientists to dispel ignorance of such relationships.
'The Social Responsibilities of Scientists and Science', The Science Teacher (1933), 33, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (17)  |  Brother (7)  |  Cell (90)  |  Choice (40)  |  Closeness (3)  |  Common (44)  |  Development (122)  |  Difference (135)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Gorilla (13)  |  Human (168)  |  Identity (7)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Monkey (26)  |  Moth (3)  |  Organism (70)  |  Position (18)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Probability (56)  |  Relationship (37)  |  Yeast (4)

[Florence Nightingale] was a great administrator, and to reach excellence here is impossible without being an ardent student of statistics. Florence Nightingale has been rightly termed the “Passionate Statistician.” Her statistics were more than a study, they were indeed her religion. For her, Quetelet was the hero as scientist, and the presentation copy of his Physique Sociale is annotated by her on every page. Florence Nightingale believed—and in all the actions of her life acted upon that belief—that the administrator could only be successful if he were guided by statistical knowledge. The legislator—to say nothing of the politician—too often failed for want of this knowledge. Nay, she went further: she held that the universe—including human communities—was evolving in accordance with a divine plan; that it was man's business to endeavour to understand this plan and guide his actions in sympathy with it. But to understand God's thoughts, she held we must study statistics, for these are the measure of his purpose. Thus the study of statistics was for her a religious duty.
In Karl Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1924), Vol. 2, 414-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (2)  |  Belief (139)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Florence Nightingale (24)  |  Plan (40)  |  Statistics (82)  |  Understand (11)

[M]y work, which I've done for a long time, was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more than in most other men. And therewithal, whenever I found out anything remarkable, I have thought it my duty to put down my discovery on paper, so that all ingenious people might be informed thereof.
Letter (27 Jun 1716) thanking the University of Louvain for ending him a medal designed in honour of his research. (Leeuwenhoek was then in his 84th year.) As cited by Charles-Edward Amory Winslow in The Conquest of Epidemic Disease: A Chapter in the History of Ideas (), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Craving (5)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Find (50)  |  Inform (3)  |  Ingenious (4)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Notice (11)  |  Praise (9)  |  Remarkable (14)  |  Research (360)  |  Reside (4)  |  Thought (170)  |  Work (198)  |  Write (21)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton