Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Extraction

Extraction Quotes (5 quotes)

I prefer the spagyric chemical physicians, for they do not consort with loafers or go about gorgeous in satins, silks and velvets, gold rings on their fingers, silver daggers hanging at their sides and white gloves on their hands, but they tend their work at the fire patiently day and night. They do not go promenading, but seek their recreation in the laboratory, wear plain learthern dress and aprons of hide upon which to wipe their hands, thrust their fingers amongst the coals, into dirt and rubbish and not into golden rings. They are sooty and dirty like the smiths and charcoal burners, and hence make little show, make not many words and gossip with their patients, do not highly praise their own remedies, for they well know that the work must praise the master, not the master praise his work. They well know that words and chatter do not help the sick nor cure them... Therefore they let such things alone and busy themselves with working with their fires and learning the steps of alchemy. These are distillation, solution, putrefaction, extraction, calcination, reverberation, sublimination, fixation, separation, reduction, coagulation, tinction, etc.
Quoted in R. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 150. [Spagyric is a form of herbalism based on alchemic procedures of preparation.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (17)  |  Busy (6)  |  Calcination (3)  |  Charcoal (5)  |  Chatter (2)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Coal (20)  |  Cure (49)  |  Dagger (2)  |  Dirt (5)  |  Distillation (7)  |  Finger (14)  |  Fire (59)  |  Glove (2)  |  Gold (19)  |  Gossip (3)  |  Hand (34)  |  Help (18)  |  Hide (13)  |  Laboratory (75)  |  Leather (2)  |  Loafer (2)  |  Master (19)  |  Patience (16)  |  Patient (54)  |  Physician (172)  |  Praise (9)  |  Putrefaction (3)  |  Recreation (6)  |  Reduction (22)  |  Remedy (23)  |  Ring (6)  |  Rubbish (5)  |  Satin (2)  |  Separation (23)  |  Show (13)  |  Sick (6)  |  Silk (4)  |  Silver (11)  |  Solution (109)  |  Soot (4)  |  Step (26)  |  Velvet (2)  |  White (12)  |  Wipe (3)  |  Word (97)  |  Work (198)

If we range through the whole territory of nature, and endeavour to extract from each department the rich stores of knowledge and pleasure they respectively contain, we shall not find a more refined or purer source of amusement, or a more interesting and unfailing subject for recreation, than that which the observation and examination of the structure, affinities, and habits of plants and vegetables, afford.
In A Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Dahlia (1838), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (6)  |  Amusement (14)  |  Botany (30)  |  Department (11)  |  Endeavour (23)  |  Examination (47)  |  Find (50)  |  Habit (42)  |  Interesting (20)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Plant (96)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Purity (8)  |  Range (12)  |  Recreation (6)  |  Rich (17)  |  Source (33)  |  Store (6)  |  Structure (104)  |  Subject (51)  |  Territory (6)  |  Vegetable (12)  |  Whole (46)

Logic is the last scientific ingredient of Philosophy; its extraction leaves behind only a confusion of non-scientific, pseudo problems.
The Unity of Science, trans. Max Black (1934), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Confusion (22)  |  Ingredient (6)  |  Leave (5)  |  Logic (132)  |  Non-Scientific (3)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Scientific (55)

Man does not limit himself to seeing; he thinks and insists on learning the meaning of phenomena whose existence has been revealed to him by observation. So he reasons, compares facts, puts questions to them, and by the answers which he extracts, tests one by another. This sort of control, by means of reasoning and facts, is what constitutes experiment, properly speaking; and it is the only process that we have for teaching ourselves about the nature of things outside us.
In Claude Bernard and Henry Copley Greene (trans.), An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (5)  |  Answer (96)  |  Comparison (33)  |  Control (41)  |  Existence (150)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Fact (325)  |  Insistence (5)  |  Learning (130)  |  Limit (34)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Nature Of Things (4)  |  Observation (264)  |  Outside (10)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Process (97)  |  Question (159)  |  Reasoning (56)  |  Revelation (24)  |  See (43)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Test (46)  |  Thinking (166)

Who would not have been laughed at if he had said in 1800 that metals could be extracted from their ores by electricity or that portraits could be drawn by chemistry.
[Commenting on Becquerel's process for extracting metals by voltaic means.]
Letter (20 Aug 1847), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), footnote, 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Henri Becquerel (5)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Drawing (15)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Laugh (8)  |  Ore (4)


Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton