Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Formation

Formation Quotes (34 quotes)

Question: State what are the conditions favourable for the formation of dew. Describe an instrument for determining the dew point, and the method of using it.
Answer: This is easily proved from question 1. A body of gas as it ascends expands, cools, and deposits moisture; so if you walk up a hill the body of gas inside you expands, gives its heat to you, and deposits its moisture in the form of dew or common sweat. Hence these are the favourable conditions; and moreover it explains why you get warm by ascending a hill, in opposition to the well-known law of the Conservation of Energy.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179, Question 12. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Ascension (2)  |  Body (88)  |  Condition (68)  |  Cooling (3)  |  Deposition (2)  |  Description (40)  |  Determination (37)  |  Dew (2)  |  Easy (14)  |  Examination (47)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Favour (6)  |  Gas (30)  |  Heat (48)  |  Hill (14)  |  Howler (15)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Method (73)  |  Moisture (5)  |  Opposition (22)  |  Proof (136)  |  Question (159)  |  State (43)  |  Sweat (7)  |  Use (54)  |  Walk (24)  |  Well-Known (2)

Question: What is the difference between a “real” and a “virtual” image? Give a drawing showing the formation of one of each kind.
Answer: You see a real image every morning when you shave. You do not see virtual images at all. The only people who see virtual images are those people who are not quite right, like Mrs. A. Virtual images are things which don't exist. I can't give you a reliable drawing of a virtual image, because I never saw one.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 177-8, Question 6. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Difference (135)  |  Drawing (15)  |  Examination (47)  |  Existence (150)  |  Howler (15)  |  Image (15)  |  Kind (27)  |  Mirror (10)  |  Morning (11)  |  People (72)  |  Question (159)  |  Real (28)  |  Reliability (9)  |  Right (49)  |  Shave (2)  |  Showing (3)

The classification of facts, the recognition of their sequence and relative significance is the function of science, and the habit of forming a judgment upon these facts unbiassed by personal feeling is characteristic of what may be termed the scientific frame of mind.
The Grammar of Science (1900), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (36)  |  Classification (56)  |  Fact (325)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Function (41)  |  Habit (42)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Personal (16)  |  Recognition (38)  |  Relative (11)  |  Science (875)  |  Sequence (15)  |  Significance (30)  |  Term (34)

As I have already mentioned, wherever cells are formed, this tough fluid precedes the first solid structures that indicate the presence of future cells. Moreover, we must assume that this substance furnishes the material for the formation of the nucleus and of the primitive sac, not only because these structures are closely apposed to it, but also because,they react to iodine in the same way. We must assume also that the organization of this substance is the process that inaugurates the formation of new cells. It therefore seems justifiable for me to propose a name that refers to its physiological function: I propose the word protoplasma.
H. Mohl, Botanisch Zeitung (1846), 4, col. 73, trans. Henry Harris, The Birth of the Cell (1999), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (90)  |  Iodine (6)  |  Nomenclature (102)  |  Protoplasm (7)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (5)  |  Abundance (10)  |  Appearance (47)  |  Change (133)  |  Combination (37)  |  Convincing (6)  |  Development (122)  |  Earth (250)  |  Emphasis (9)  |  Genus (13)  |  Gradual (9)  |  Law (273)  |  Life (460)  |  Mammal (17)  |  Nature (534)  |  Organic (19)  |  Progression (8)  |  Proof (136)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Quadruped (3)  |  Repeat (11)  |  Secondary (6)  |  Structure (104)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (30)  |  Tertiary (2)  |  Unknown (40)

By the agitation of water and silt, and their gradual accumulation and consolidation... the rocks were formed gradually by the evolution of sediments in water.
Ye Zi-qi
Cao Mu Zi (1959), trans. Yang, Jing-Yi, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (16)  |  Agitation (5)  |  Consolidation (2)  |  Gradual (9)  |  Rock (54)  |  Sediment (4)  |  Water (122)

Combining in our survey then, the whole range of deposits from the most recent to the most ancient group, how striking a succession do they present:– so various yet so uniform–so vast yet so connected. In thus tracing back to the most remote periods in the physical history of our continents, one system of operations, as the means by which many complex formations have been successively produced, the mind becomes impressed with the singleness of nature's laws; and in this respect, at least, geology is hardly inferior in simplicity to astronomy.
The Silurian System (1839), 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Combination (37)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Connection (39)  |  Continent (22)  |  Deposit (5)  |  History (156)  |  Impression (32)  |  Law (273)  |  Law Of Nature (30)  |  Mind (272)  |  Nature (534)  |  Operation (53)  |  Production (72)  |  Range (12)  |  Recent (14)  |  Succession (30)  |  Survey (5)  |  System (66)  |  Trace (10)  |  Uniformity (12)  |  Variety (29)  |  Vast (20)

Dick Drew took a bunch of misfits—people who wouldn’t fly in formation—and he put together a lab that created technologies that account for 20 percent of 3M's sales in 2000.
Art Fry
As quoted in W. James McNerney Jr., A Century of Innovation: The 3M Story (2002), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Bunch (3)  |  Create (15)  |  Richard G. Drew (6)  |  Fly (28)  |  Invention (174)  |  Laboratory (75)  |  Research (360)  |  Technology (98)

I love crystals, the beauty of their forms and formation; liquids, dormant, distilling, sloshing! The fumes, the odors—good or bad, the rainbow of colors; the gleaming vessels of every size, shape and purpose.
In Arthur Clay Cope Address, Chicago (28 Aug 1973). As cited in Oxford Dictionary of Quotations by Subject (2010), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (21)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Color (9)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Distillation (7)  |  Dormant (2)  |  Form (70)  |  Fume (5)  |  Gleam (2)  |  Good (81)  |  Liquid (12)  |  Love (64)  |  Odor (5)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Rainbow (3)  |  Shape (20)  |  Size (21)  |  Vessel (9)

I should be the last to discard the law of organic heredity ... but the single word “heredity” cannot dispense science from the duty of making every possible inquiry into the mechanism of organic growth and of organic formation. To think that heredity will build organic beings without mechanical means is a piece of unscientific mysticism.
In 'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1888), 15, 294-295. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (23)  |  Discard (11)  |  Duty (26)  |  Growth (70)  |  Heredity (43)  |  Inquiry (14)  |  Law (273)  |  Means (25)  |  Mechanical (11)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Mysticism (4)  |  Organic (19)  |  Think (16)  |  Unscientific (6)

I tell my students, with a feeling of pride that I hope they will share, that the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen that make up ninety-nine per cent of our living substance were cooked in the deep interiors of earlier generations of dying stars. Gathered up from the ends of the universe, over billions of years, eventually they came to form, in part, the substance of our sun, its planets, and ourselves. Three billion years ago, life arose upon the earth. It is the only life in the solar system.
From speech given at an anti-war teach-in at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, (4 Mar 1969) 'A Generation in Search of a Future', as edited by Ron Dorfman for Chicago Journalism Review, (May 1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (24)  |  Carbon (28)  |  Cooking (5)  |  Death (183)  |  Earth (250)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Generation (56)  |  Interior (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Nitrogen (14)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Planet (84)  |  Pride (21)  |  Solar System (27)  |  Star (132)  |  Substance (39)  |  Sun (115)  |  Universe (291)  |  Year (69)

If atoms do, by chance, happen to combine themselves into so many shapes, why have they never combined together to form a house or a slipper? By the same token, why do we not believe that if innumerable letters of the Greek alphabet were poured all over the market-place they would eventually happen to form the text of the Iliad?
The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, Book 2, Chapter 12, 'Apology for Raymond Sebond', trans. M. A. Screech (1991), 612.
Science quotes on:  |  Alphabet (4)  |  Atom (164)  |  Belief (139)  |  Chance (77)  |  Combination (37)  |  Greek (17)  |  House (19)  |  Innumerable (10)  |  Letter (16)  |  Pour (4)  |  Shape (20)  |  Text (3)  |  Token (3)

If we consider what science already has enabled men to know—the immensity of space, the fantastic philosophy of the stars, the infinite smallness of the composition of atoms, the macrocosm whereby we succeed only in creating outlines and translating a measure into numbers without our minds being able to form any concrete idea of it—we remain astounded by the enormous machinery of the universe.
Address (10 Sep 1934) to the International Congress of Electro-Radio Biology, Venice. In Associated Press, 'Life a Closed Book, Declares Marconi', New York Times (11 Sep 1934), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Astounding (2)  |  Atom (164)  |  Composition (30)  |  Concrete (7)  |  Consideration (38)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Fantastic (4)  |  Idea (226)  |  Immensity (7)  |  Infinity (44)  |  Machinery (11)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Mind (272)  |  Number (90)  |  Outline (3)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Remaining (8)  |  Science (875)  |  Smallness (2)  |  Space (68)  |  Star (132)  |  Success (114)  |  Translation (10)  |  Universe (291)

It was obvious—to me at any rate—that the answer was to why an enzyme is able to speed up a chemical reaction by as much as 10 million times. It had to do this by lowering the energy of activation—the energy of forming the activated complex. It could do this by forming strong bonds with the activated complex, but only weak bonds with the reactants or products.
Quoted In Thomas Hager, Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling (1995), 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Activation (4)  |  Answer (96)  |  Bond (11)  |  Chemical Reaction (2)  |  Complex (20)  |  Energy (103)  |  Enzyme (11)  |  Lowering (2)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Product (33)  |  Speed (11)  |  Strong (8)  |  Weak (10)

Lately we have been getting facts pointing to the “oceanic” nature of the floor of so-called inland seas. Through geological investigations it has been definitely established that in its deepest places, for instance, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, the Earth's crust is devoid of granite stratum. The same may be said quite confidently about the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Could the interpretation of these data be that inland seas were the primary stage of the formation of oceanic basins?
From 'O geologicheskom stroyenii i razvitii okeanicheskikh vpadm' (The Geological Structure and Development of Ocean Hollows ), News of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Geology Series (1955), 3, 3-18. As given in N. Zhirov, Atlantis: Atlantology: Basic Problems (2001), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Crust (10)  |  Earth (250)  |  Floor (6)  |  Geology (145)  |  Granite (3)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (2)  |  Interpretation (38)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Mediterranean Sea (2)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Primary (9)  |  Stage (15)  |  Stratum (3)

My present and most fixed opinion regarding the nature of alcoholic fermentation is this: The chemical act of fermentation is essentially a phenomenon correlative with a vital act, beginning and ending with the latter. I believe that there is never any alcoholic fermentation without their being simultaneously the organization, development, multiplication of the globules, or the pursued, continued life of globules which are already formed.
Memoire sur la fermentation alcoolique', Annales de Chemie et de Physique (1860), 58:3, 359-360, as translated in Joseph S. Fruton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (22)  |  Alcohol (9)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Correlation (5)  |  Development (122)  |  Ending (2)  |  Essential (41)  |  Fermentation (10)  |  Globule (3)  |  Multiplication (11)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Organization (51)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Simultaneity (2)  |  Vitality (7)

Nature, … in order to carry out the marvelous operations [that occur] in animals and plants has been pleased to construct their organized bodies with a very large number of machines, which are of necessity made up of extremely minute parts so shaped and situated as to form a marvelous organ, the structure and composition of which are usually invisible to the naked eye without the aid of a microscope. … Just as Nature deserves praise and admiration for making machines so small, so too the physician who observes them to the best of his ability is worthy of praise, not blame, for he must also correct and repair these machines as well as he can every time they get out of order.
'Reply to Doctor Sbaraglia in Opera Posthuma, 1697', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 568.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (37)  |  Admiration (23)  |  Aid (10)  |  Animal (143)  |  Blame (4)  |  Body (88)  |  Composition (30)  |  Construction (36)  |  Correction (20)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Machine (56)  |  Making (18)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Microscope (47)  |  Minuteness (3)  |  Naked Eye (4)  |  Nature (534)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Observation (264)  |  Operation (53)  |  Organ (40)  |  Organization (51)  |  Out Of Order (2)  |  Part (55)  |  Physician (172)  |  Plant (96)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Praise (9)  |  Repair (5)  |  Shape (20)  |  Small (35)  |  Structure (104)

No anatomist ever discovered a system of organization, calculated to produce pain and disease; or, in explaining the parts of the human body, ever said, this is to irritate; this is to inflame; this duct is to convey the gravel to the kidneys; this gland to secrete the humour which forms the gout: if by chance he come at a part of which he knows not the use, the most he can say is, that it is useless; no one ever suspects that it is put there to incommode, to annoy, or torment.
The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785), Vol. 1, 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (8)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Chance (77)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Disease (170)  |  Duct (2)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Gland (7)  |  Gout (3)  |  Gravel (2)  |  Human Body (15)  |  Humour (96)  |  Irritation (2)  |  Kidney (7)  |  Organization (51)  |  Pain (49)  |  Part (55)  |  Production (72)  |  Secretion (3)  |  Suspicion (14)  |  System (66)  |  Torment (5)  |  Uselessness (19)

On the whole, I cannot help saying that it appears to me not a little extraordinary, that a theory so new, and of such importance, overturning every thing that was thought to be the best established in chemistry, should rest on so very narrow and precarious a foundation, the experiments adduced in support of it being not only ambiguous or explicable on either hypothesis, but exceedingly few. I think I have recited them all, and that on which the greatest stress is laid, viz. That of the formation of water from the decomposition of the two kinds of air, has not been sufficiently repeated. Indeed it required so difficult and expensive an apparatus, and so many precautions in the use of it, that the frequent repetition of the experiment cannot be expected; and in these circumstances the practised experimenter cannot help suspecting the accuracy of the result and consequently the certainty of the conclusion.
Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston (1796), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Air (84)  |  Ambiguity (6)  |  Apparatus (18)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Circumstance (25)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Decomposition (10)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Establish (10)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Extraordinary (18)  |  Foundation (31)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Importance (106)  |  Narrow (10)  |  New (107)  |  Precarious (4)  |  Repeat (11)  |  Result (129)  |  Support (26)  |  Theory (353)  |  Water (122)

Organized Fossils are to the naturalist as coins to the antiquary; they are the antiquities of the earth; and very distinctly show its gradual regular formation, with the various changes inhabitants in the watery element.
Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils (1817), ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquary (2)  |  Antiquity (5)  |  Change (133)  |  Coin (3)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Inhabitant (7)  |  Naturalist (27)  |  Organization (51)  |  Water (122)

Pavlov’s data on the two fundamental antagonistic nervous processes—stimulation and inhibition—and his profound generalizations regarding them, in particular, that these processes are parts of a united whole, that they are in a state of constant conflict and constant transition of the one to the other, and his views on the dominant role they play in the formation of the higher nervous activity—all those belong to the most established natural—scientific validation of the Marxist dialectal method. They are in complete accord with the Leninist concepts on the role of the struggle between opposites in the evolution, the motion of matter.
In E. A. Asratyan, I. P. Pavlov: His Life and Work (1953), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (7)  |  Activity (48)  |  Belonging (8)  |  Concept (38)  |  Conflict (27)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Data (59)  |  Dominance (2)  |  Establishment (19)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Generalization (16)  |  Higher (18)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Lenin_Vladimir (2)  |  Karl Marx (11)  |  Matter (135)  |  Motion (64)  |  Natural (48)  |  Nerve (53)  |  Opposite (21)  |  Part (55)  |  Particular (24)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (12)  |  Play (22)  |  Process (97)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Regard (17)  |  Role (17)  |  Stimulation (7)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Transition (8)  |  Union (6)  |  Whole (46)

That the universe was formed by a fortuitous concourse of atoms, I will no more believe than that the accidental jumbling of the alphabet would fall into a most ingenious treatise of philosophy.
In 'A Tritical Essay Upon the Faculties of the Mind', collected in The Works of Jonathan Swift (1746), Vol. 1, 174. Also in Jonathan Swift and Temple Scott (ed.), The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift: A Tale of a Tub: the Battle of the Books, and Other Early Works (1897, reprint 1907), Vol. 1, 291 in which the editor footnotes that “this essay is a parody on the pseudo-philosophical essays of the time, in which all sense was lost in the maze of inconsequential quotations. It was written in 1707-8, and the “Miscellanies” of 1711 places its publication in August, 1707.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (25)  |  Alphabet (4)  |  Atom (164)  |  Belief (139)  |  Concourse (2)  |  Fall (30)  |  Fortuitous (2)  |  Ingenuity (16)  |  Jumble (2)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Treatise (8)  |  Universe (291)

The Builder of this Universe was wise,
He plann’d all souls, all systems, planets, particles:
The Plan He shap'd all Worlds and Æons by,
Was—Heavens!—was thy small Nine-and-thirty Articles!
In 'Practical-Devotional', Past and Present, Book 2, Chap 15, collected in On Heroes, Hero-Worship and the Heroic in History (1840), 101. Note: “Nine-and-thirty Articles” of the Church of England.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (7)  |  Builder (5)  |  Eon (3)  |  Heaven (55)  |  Particle (45)  |  Plan (40)  |  Planet (84)  |  Poem (76)  |  Small (35)  |  Soul (54)  |  System (66)  |  Universe (291)  |  Wisdom (91)  |  World (231)

The classification of facts and the formation of absolute judgments upon the basis of this classification—judgments independent of the idiosyncrasies of the individual mind—essentially sum up the aim and method of modern science. The scientific man has above all things to strive at self-elimination in his judgments, to provide an argument which is as true for each individual mind as for his own.
The Grammar of Science (1900), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (32)  |  Aim (21)  |  Argument (26)  |  Basis (25)  |  Classification (56)  |  Essential (41)  |  Fact (325)  |  Independent (16)  |  Individual (59)  |  Judgment (39)  |  Method (73)  |  Mind (272)  |  Provide (13)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Strive (7)  |  Truth (450)

The elementary parts of all tissues are formed of cells in an analogous, though very diversified manner, so that it may be asserted, that there is one universal principle of development for the elementary parts of organisms, however different, and that this principle is the formation of cells.
Mikroskopische Untersuchungen über die Uebereinstimmung in der Struktur und dem Wachsthum der Thiere und Pflanzen (1839). Microscopic Researches into the Accordance in the Structure and Growth of Animals and Plants, trans. Henry Smith (1847), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (26)  |  Assertion (16)  |  Cell (90)  |  Development (122)  |  Difference (135)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Elementary (11)  |  Manner (11)  |  Organism (70)  |  Principle (97)  |  Tissue (15)  |  Universality (9)

The energy of a covalent bond is largely the energy of resonance of two electrons between two atoms. The examination of the form of the resonance integral shows that the resonance energy increases in magnitude with increase in the overlapping of the two atomic orbitals involved in the formation of the bond, the word ‘overlapping” signifying the extent to which regions in space in which the two orbital wave functions have large values coincide... Consequently it is expected that of two orbitals in an atom the one which can overlap more with an orbital of another atom will form the stronger bond with that atom, and, moreover, the bond formed by a given orbital will tend to lie in that direction in which the orbital is concentrated.
Nature of the Chemical Bond and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals (1939), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Bond (11)  |  Concentration (6)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Direction (27)  |  Electron (43)  |  Energy (103)  |  Examination (47)  |  Expectation (26)  |  Extent (11)  |  Increase (36)  |  Integral (3)  |  Magnitude (14)  |  Nomenclature (102)  |  Overlap (2)  |  Region (9)  |  Resonance (2)  |  Significance (30)  |  Strength (25)  |  Value (63)  |  Word (97)

The fundamental hypothesis of genetic epistemology is that there is a parallelism between the progress made in the logical and rational organization of knowledge and the corresponding formative psychological processes. With that hypothesis, the most fruitful, most obvious field of study would be the reconstituting of human history—the history of human thinking in prehistoric man. Unfortunately, we are not very well informed in the psychology of primitive man, but there are children all around us, and it is in studying children that we have the best chance of studying the development of logical knowledge, physical knowledge, and so forth.
'Genetic Epistemology', Columbia Forum (1969), 12, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (77)  |  Child (90)  |  Correspondence (6)  |  Development (122)  |  Epistemology (4)  |  Field (69)  |  Fruitful (9)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Genetics (79)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Information (56)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Logic (132)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Organization (51)  |  Parallelism (2)  |  Prehistoric (2)  |  Process (97)  |  Progress (200)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Rational (18)  |  Study (157)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Unfortunately (5)

The injurious agent in cigarettes comes principally from the burning paper wrapper. The substance thereby formed is called “acrolein.” It has a violent action on the nerve centers, producing degeneration of the cells of the brain, which is quite rapid among boys. Unlike most narcotics, this degeneration is permanent and uncontrollable. I employ no person who smokes cigarettes.
[From the Laboratory of Thomas A. Edison, Orange, N.J., April 26, 1914.]
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Agent (13)  |  Boy (16)  |  Brain (106)  |  Burning (13)  |  Cell (90)  |  Cigarette (16)  |  Employment (16)  |  Injury (9)  |  Nerve (53)  |  Paper (25)  |  Permanent (5)  |  Person (38)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Smoker (2)  |  Substance (39)  |  Uncontrollable (3)  |  Violence (4)

The principal result of my investigation is that a uniform developmental principle controls the individual elementary units of all organisms, analogous to the finding that crystals are formed by the same laws in spite of the diversity of their forms.
Mikroskopische Untersuchungen über die Uebereinstimmung in der Struktur und dem Wachsthum der Thiue und Pflanzen (1839). Microscopic Researches into the Accordance in the Structure and Growth of Animals and Plants, trans. Henry Smith (1847), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (26)  |  Control (41)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Development (122)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Elementary (11)  |  Form (70)  |  Individual (59)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Law (273)  |  Organism (70)  |  Result (129)  |  Uniform (5)  |  Unit (15)

The ridge of the Lammer-muir hills... consists of primary micaceous schistus, and extends from St Abb's head westward... The sea-coast affords a transverse section of this alpine tract at its eastern extremity, and exhibits the change from the primary to the secondary strata... Dr HUTTON wished particularly to examine the latter of these, and on this occasion Sir JAMES HALL and I had the pleasure to accompany him. We sailed in a boat from Dunglass ... We made for a high rocky point or head-land, the SICCAR ... On landing at this point, we found that we actually trode [sic] on the primeval rock... It is here a micaceous schistus, in beds nearly vertical, highly indurated, and stretching from S.E. to N. W. The surface of this rock... has thin covering of red horizontal sandstone laid over it, ... Here, therefore, the immediate contact of the two rocks is not only visible, but is curiously dissected and laid open by the action of the waves... On us who saw these phenomena for the first time, the impression will not easily be forgotten. The palpable evidence presented to us, of one of the most extraordinary and important facts in the natural history of the earth, gave a reality and substance to those theoretical speculations, which, however probable had never till now been directly authenticated by the testimony of the senses... What clearer evidence could we have had of the different formation of these rocks, and of the long interval which separated their formation, had we actually seen them emerging from the bosom of the deep? ... The mind seemed to grow giddy by looking so far into the abyss of time; and while we listened with earnestness and admiration to the philosopher who was now unfolding to us the order and series of these wonderful events, we became sensible how much farther reason may sometimes go than imagination can venture to follow.
'Biographical Account of the Late Dr James Hutton, F.R.S. Edin.' (read 1803), Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1805), 5, 71-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (57)  |  Contact (12)  |  Earth (250)  |  Evidence (83)  |  James Hutton (16)  |  Rock (54)  |  Sea (57)  |  Stratum (3)  |  Surface (37)  |  Wave (32)

The words are strung together, with their own special grammar—the laws of quantum theory—to form sentences, which are molecules. Soon we have books, entire libraries, made out of molecular “sentences.” The universe is like a library in which the words are atoms. Just look at what has been written with these hundred words! Our own bodies are books in that library, specified by the organization of molecules—but the universe and literature are organizations of identical, interchangeable objects; they are information systems.
In The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the Language of Nature (1983), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Body (88)  |  Book (100)  |  Element (68)  |  Entire (7)  |  Grammar (5)  |  Hundred (11)  |  Identical (9)  |  Information (56)  |  Library (22)  |  Literature (33)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Object (47)  |  Organization (51)  |  Quantum Theory (36)  |  Sentence (10)  |  Special (25)  |  Specification (3)  |  String (11)  |  System (66)  |  Universe (291)  |  Word (97)  |  Writing (50)

Those of us who were familiar with the state of inorganic chemistry in universities twenty to thirty years ago will recall that at that time it was widely regarded as a dull and uninteresting part of the undergraduate course. Usually, it was taught almost entirely in the early years of the course and then chiefly as a collection of largely unconnected facts. On the whole, students concluded that, apart from some relationships dependent upon the Periodic table, there was no system in inorganic chemistry comparable with that to be found in organic chemistry, and none of the rigour and logic which characterised physical chemistry. It was widely believed that the opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry were few, and that in any case the problems were dull and uninspiring; as a result, relatively few people specialized in the subject... So long as inorganic chemistry is regarded as, in years gone by, as consisting simply of the preparations and analysis of elements and compounds, its lack of appeal is only to be expected. The stage is now past and for the purpose of our discussion we shall define inorganic chemistry today as the integrated study of the formation, composition, structure and reactions of the chemical elements and compounds, excepting most of those of carbon.
Inaugural Lecture delivered at University College, London (1 Mar 1956). In The Renaissance of Inorganic Chemistry (1956), 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Appeal (8)  |  Carbon (28)  |  Composition (30)  |  Compound (35)  |  Dull (12)  |  Element (68)  |  Expectation (26)  |  Few (7)  |  Inorganic Chemistry (4)  |  Opportunity (20)  |  Preparation (22)  |  Reaction (48)  |  Recall (3)  |  Research (360)  |  Result (129)  |  Specialization (8)  |  Structure (104)  |  Study (157)  |  University (29)

We cannot see how the evidence afforded by the unquestioned progressive development of organised existence—crowned as it has been by the recent creation of the earth's greatest wonder, MAN, can be set aside, or its seemingly necessary result withheld for a moment. When Mr. Lyell finds, as a witty friend lately reported that there had been found, a silver-spoon in grauwacke, or a locomotive engine in mica-schist, then, but not sooner, shall we enrol ourselves disciples of the Cyclical Theory of Geological formations.
Review of Murchison's Silurian System, Quarterly Review (1839), 64, 112-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (2)  |  Creation (129)  |  Crown (11)  |  Cycle (12)  |  Development (122)  |  Disciple (2)  |  Earth (250)  |  Engine (10)  |  Evidence (83)  |  Existence (150)  |  Friend (22)  |  Geology (145)  |  Greatest (23)  |  Locomotive (6)  |  Sir Charles Lyell (36)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Necessary (19)  |  Organization (51)  |  Progress (200)  |  Recent (14)  |  Report (15)  |  Result (129)  |  Silver (11)  |  Theory (353)  |  Wit (13)  |  Wonder (64)

Why has not anyone seen that fossils alone gave birth to a theory about the formation of the earth, that without them, no one would have ever dreamed that there were successive epochs in the formation of the globe.
Discours sur les révolutions du globe, (Discourse on the Revolutions of the Surface of the Globe), originally the introduction to Recherches sur les ossemens fossiles des quadrupèdes (1812). Translated by Ian Johnston from the 1825 edition. Online at Vancouver island University website.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Theory (353)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton