Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Honour

Honour Quotes (20 quotes)

'Yes,' he said. 'But these things (the solutions to problems in solid geometry such as the duplication of the cube) do not seem to have been discovered yet.' 'There are two reasons for this,' I said. 'Because no city holds these things in honour, they are investigated in a feeble way, since they are difficult; and the investigators need an overseer, since they will not find the solutions without one. First, it is hard to get such an overseer, and second, even if one did, as things are now those who investigate these things would not obey him, because of their arrogance. If however a whole city, which did hold these things in honour, were to oversee them communally, the investigators would be obedient, and when these problems were investigated continually and with eagerness, their solutions would become apparent.'
Plato
The Republic 7 528bc, trans. R. W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (9)  |  Arrogance (6)  |  City (12)  |  Community (27)  |  Continuity (17)  |  Cube (9)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Eagerness (3)  |  Feebleness (2)  |  Geometry (68)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Investigator (13)  |  Obedience (9)  |  Problem (180)  |  Reason (173)  |  Solution (109)

Decus et pretium recte petit experiens vir.
The man who makes the attempt justly aims at honour and reward.
Horace
Epistles bk. 1, no. 17, 1. 42. In Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetiea, trans. H. Rushton Fairclough (1926), 364-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Effort (40)  |  Reward (21)

In scientia veritas, in arte honestas.
In science truth, in art honour.
Anonymous
In Jon R. Stone, The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations (2005), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Science And Art (58)  |  Truth (450)

And this is the ultimate lesson that our knowledge of the mode of transmission of typhus has taught us: Man carries on his skin a parasite, the louse. Civilization rids him of it. Should man regress, should he allow himself to resemble a primitive beast, the louse begins to multiply again and treats man as he deserves, as a brute beast. This conclusion would have endeared itself to the warm heart of Alfred Nobel. My contribution to it makes me feel less unworthy of the honour which you have conferred upon me in his name.
'Investigations on Typhus', Nobel Lecture, 1928. In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Beast (14)  |  Brute (5)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Lesson (14)  |  Louse (3)  |  Man (258)  |  Mode (8)  |  Alfred Bernhard Nobel (8)  |  Parasite (17)  |  Primitive (17)  |  Resemblance (15)  |  Skin (8)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Transmission (18)  |  Typhus (2)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Unworthy (4)

I have been branded with folly and madness for attempting what the world calls impossibilities, and even from the great engineer, the late James Watt, who said ... that I deserved hanging for bringing into use the high-pressure engine. This has so far been my reward from the public; but should this be all, I shall be satisfied by the great secret pleasure and laudable pride that I feel in my own breast from having been the instrument of bringing forward new principles and new arrangements of boundless value to my country, and however much I may be straitened in pecuniary circumstances, the great honour of being a useful subject can never be taken from me, which far exceeds riches.
From letter to Davies Gilbert, written a few months before Trevithick's last illness. Quoted in Francis Trevithick, Life of Richard Trevithick: With an Account of his Inventions (1872), Vol. 2, 395-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (41)  |  Biography (199)  |  Boundless (6)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Folly (10)  |  Hanging (2)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Invention (174)  |  Madness (15)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Poverty (21)  |  Pressure (18)  |  Pride (21)  |  Public (35)  |  Reward (21)  |  Riches (5)  |  Satisfaction (31)  |  Steam Engine (21)  |  Use (54)  |  Value (63)  |  James Watt (6)

If we had nothing but pecuniary rewards and worldly honours to look to, our profession would not be one to be desired. But in its practice you will find it to be attended with peculiar privileges, second to none in intense interest and pure pleasures. It is our proud office to tend the fleshly tabernacle of the immortal spirit, and our path, rightly followed, will be guided by unfettered truth and love unfeigned. In the pursuit of this noble and holy calling I wish you all God-speed.
Conclusion of Graduation Address, University of Edinburgh (1876). In John Vaughan, 'Lord Lister', The Living Age (1918), 297, 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Flesh (10)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Privilege (6)  |  Profession (26)  |  Reward (21)  |  Tabernacle (2)

In 1944 Erwin Schroedinger, stimulated intellectually by Max Delbruck, published a little book called What is life? It was an inspiration to the first of the molecular biologists, and has been, along with Delbruck himself, credited for directing the research during the next decade that solved the mystery of how 'like begat like.' Max was awarded this Prize in 1969, and rejoicing in it, he also lamented that the work for which he was honored before all the peoples of the world was not something which he felt he could share with more than a handful. Samuel Beckett's contributions to literature, being honored at the same time, seemed to Max somehow universally accessible to anyone. But not his. In his lecture here Max imagined his imprisonment in an ivory tower of science.
'The Polymerase Chain Reaction', Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1993). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1991-1995 (1997), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (3)  |  Samuel Beckett (2)  |  Book (100)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Credit (10)  |  Decade (8)  |  Max Ludwig Henning Delbrόck (8)  |  Inspiration (30)  |  Intellect (99)  |  Ivory Tower (2)  |  Life (460)  |  Literature (33)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Nobel Prize (17)  |  Publication (75)  |  Research (360)  |  Erwin Schrφdinger (20)  |  Share (11)  |  Simulation (4)  |  Work (198)

In scientific matters ... the greatest discoverer differs from the most arduous imitator and apprentice only in degree, whereas he differs in kind from someone whom nature has endowed for fine art. But saying this does not disparage those great men to whom the human race owes so much in contrast to those whom nature has endowed for fine art. For the scientists' talent lies in continuing to increase the perfection of our cognitions and on all the dependent benefits, as well as in imparting that same knowledge to others; and in these respects they are far superior to those who merit the honour of being called geniuses. For the latter's art stops at some point, because a boundary is set for it beyond which it cannot go and which has probably long since been reached and cannot be extended further.
The Critique of Judgement (1790), trans. J. C. Meredith (1991), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprentice (3)  |  Benefit (21)  |  Boundary (10)  |  Cognition (2)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Genius (92)  |  Imitator (2)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Science And Art (58)

In the vestibule of the Manchester Town Hall are placed two life-sized marble statues facing each other. One of these is that of John Dalton ... the other that of James Prescott Joule. ... Thus the honour is done to Manchester's two greatest sons—to Dalton, the founder of modern Chemistry and of the atomic theory, and the laws of chemical-combining proportions; to Joule, the founder of modern physics and the discoverer of the Law of Conservation of Energy.
One gave to the world the final proof ... that in every kind of chemical change no loss of matter occurs; the other proved that in all the varied modes of physical change, no loss of energy takes place.
John Dalton and the Rise of Modern Chemistry (1895), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Theory (11)  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Combination (37)  |  Conservation Of Energy (17)  |  Conservation Of Mass (2)  |  John Dalton (20)  |  Founder (8)  |  James Prescott Joule (7)  |  Law (273)  |  Loss (44)  |  Manchester (3)  |  Marble (5)  |  Matter (135)  |  Modern (44)  |  Physical Change (4)  |  Physics (156)  |  Proof (136)  |  Statue (5)  |  Town Hall (2)

It is not easy to imagine how little interested a scientist usually is in the work of any other, with the possible exception of the teacher who backs him or the student who honors him.
Pensιes d'un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Ease (20)  |  Exception (16)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Interest (82)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Student (54)  |  Teacher (54)  |  Work (198)

Sir Hiram Maxim is a genuine and typical example of the man of science, romantic, excitable, full of real but somewhat obvious poetry, a little hazy in logic and philosophy, but full of hearty enthusiasm and an honorable simplicity. He is, as he expresses it, “an old and trained engineer,” and is like all of the old and trained engineers I have happened to come across, a man who indemnifies himself for the superhuman or inhuman concentration required for physical science by a vague and dangerous romanticism about everything else.
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (199)  |  Concentration (6)  |  Danger (32)  |  Else (4)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Everything (38)  |  Example (21)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Expression (44)  |  Full (10)  |  Genuine (9)  |  Logic (132)  |  Sir Hiram Maxim (4)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Old (23)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Physical Science (32)  |  Poetry (63)  |  Real (28)  |  Requirement (27)  |  Romance (6)  |  Romanticism (3)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Somewhat (2)  |  Superhuman (2)  |  Training (21)  |  Typical (6)  |  Vagueness (8)

The fact that Science walks forward on two feet, namely theory and experiment, is nowhere better illustrated than in the two fields for slight contributions to which you have done me the great honour of awarding the the Nobel Prize in Physics for the year 1923. Sometimes it is one foot that is put forward first, sometimes the other, but continuous progress is only made by the use of both—by theorizing and then testing, or by finding new relations in the process of experimenting and then bringing the theoretical foot up and pushing it on beyond, and so on in unending alterations.
'The Electron and the Light-quant from the Experimental Point of View', Nobel Lecture (23 May 1924). In Nobel Lectures: Physics 1922-1941 (1998), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (15)  |  Beyond (19)  |  Continuous (7)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Nobel Prize (17)  |  Physics (156)  |  Process (97)  |  Progress (200)  |  Relation (35)  |  Science (875)  |  Test (46)  |  Theory (353)  |  Unending (2)

The great testimony of history shows how often in fact the development of science has emerged in response to technological and even economic needs, and how in the economy of social effort, science, even of the most abstract and recondite kind, pays for itself again and again in providing the basis for radically new technological developments. In fact, most people—when they think of science as a good thing, when they think of it as worthy of encouragement, when they are willing to see their governments spend substance upon it, when they greatly do honor to men who in science have attained some eminence-have in mind that the conditions of their life have been altered just by such technology, of which they may be reluctant to be deprived.
The Open Mind (1955), 89-90.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (19)  |  Alteration (15)  |  Attainment (23)  |  Basis (25)  |  Condition (68)  |  Deprivation (4)  |  Development (122)  |  Effort (40)  |  Emergence (17)  |  Eminence (8)  |  Encouragement (9)  |  Government (50)  |  History (156)  |  Life (460)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Pay (8)  |  People (72)  |  Providing (3)  |  Radical (9)  |  Reluctance (2)  |  Response (8)  |  Science (875)  |  Social (16)  |  Substance (39)  |  Technology (98)  |  Testimony (5)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Willing (2)  |  Worthy (4)

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased by affection and by marks of honour, nay more it possesses virtues rare even in man, honesty, wisdom, justice, also respect for the stars and reverence for the sun and moon.
Natural History, 8, I. Trans. H. Rackham, Pliny: Natural History (1947), Vol. 3, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (8)  |  Animal (143)  |  Country (43)  |  Duty (26)  |  Elephant (5)  |  Honesty (11)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Justice (11)  |  Language (71)  |  Largest (4)  |  Man (258)  |  Mark (14)  |  Moon (78)  |  Obedience (9)  |  Order (60)  |  Pleasure (52)  |  Possession (24)  |  Rarity (6)  |  Remembering (3)  |  Respect (24)  |  Reverence (14)  |  Star (132)  |  Sun (115)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Virtue (27)  |  Wisdom (91)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (82)  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Calculation (41)  |  Celestial (5)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Chance (77)  |  Complexity (51)  |  Difference (135)  |  Distance (26)  |  Event (49)  |  Human Mind (21)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Law (273)  |  Likelihood (3)  |  Mass (23)  |  Mathematician (110)  |  Motion (64)  |  Nature (534)  |  Observation (264)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Position (18)  |  Prediction (48)  |  Probability (56)  |  Relation (35)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Theory (353)  |  Time (170)  |  Uncertainty (25)  |  Universe (291)  |  Velocity (5)  |  Weakness (14)

There is a reward structure in science that is very interesting: Our highest honors go to those who disprove the findings of the most revered among us. So Einstein is revered not just because he made so many fundamental contributions to science, but because he found an imperfection in the fundamental contribution of Isaac Newton.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Contribution (23)  |  Albert Einstein (174)  |  Finding (19)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Imperfection (11)  |  Interest (82)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (176)  |  Proof (136)  |  Reverence (14)  |  Reward (21)  |  Science (875)  |  Structure (104)

There is scarce any one invention, which this nation has produced in our age, but it has some way or other been set forward by his assistance. ... He is indeed a man born for the good of mankind, and for the honour of his country. ... So I may thank God, that Dr. Wilkins was an Englishman, for wherever he had lived, there had been the chief seat of generous knowledge and true philosophy.
In Micrographia, Preface. Cited in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1976), Vol. 14, 369-370.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Assistance (3)  |  Born (5)  |  Chief (9)  |  Country (43)  |  Englishman (2)  |  Forward (7)  |  God (234)  |  Good (81)  |  Invention (174)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Man (258)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Nation (47)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Production (72)  |  Scarce (2)  |  Seat (3)  |  Thank (3)  |  Truth (450)  |  Way (31)  |  John Wilkins (2)

This boulder seemed like a curious volume, regularly paged, with a few extracts from older works. Bacon tells us that “some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Of the last honour I think the boulder fully worthy.
In The Story of a Boulder: or, Gleanings from the Note-book of a Field Geologist (1858), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Francis Bacon (127)  |  Book (100)  |  Boulder (2)  |  Curious (6)  |  Extract (3)  |  Geology (145)  |  Page (9)  |  Swallow (5)  |  Taste (16)  |  Worthy (4)

To me there never has been a higher source of earthly honour or distinction than that connected with advances in science. I have not possessed enough of the eagle in my character to make a direct flight to the loftiest altitudes in the social world; and I certainly never endeavored to reach those heights by using the creeping powers of the reptile, who, in ascending, generally chooses the dirtiest path, because it is the easiest.
In Maturin Murray Ballou, Treasury of Thought (1894), 459.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (199)  |  Recognition (38)

[Audubon's works are] the most splendid monuments which art has erected in honor of ornithology.
Introduction by Jas. Grant Wilson's to John James Audubon and Lucy Audubon (editor), The Life of John James Audubon: the Naturalist (1869), iv.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (80)  |  John James Audubon (8)  |  Monument (13)  |  Ornithology (3)  |  Splendid (4)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton