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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Inhibition

Inhibition Quotes (11 quotes)

Few males achieve any real freedom in their sexual relations even with their wives. Few males realise how badly inhibited they are on these matters.
Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948), 545.
Science quotes on:  |  Male (10)  |  Sex (31)  |  Wife (9)

If we denote excitation as an end-effect by the sign plus (+), and inhibition as end-effect by the sign minus (–), such a reflex as the scratch-reflex can be termed a reflex of double-sign, for it develops excitatory end-effect and then inhibitory end-effect even during the duration of the exciting stimulus.
The Integrative Action of the Nervous System (1906), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Excitation (7)  |  Reflex (8)  |  Scratch (4)  |  Sign (17)  |  Stimulus (6)  |  Term (34)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (23)  |  Bitterness (2)  |  Cause (116)  |  Clash (3)  |  Condition (66)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Difference (129)  |  Disturbance (12)  |  Dog (24)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Function (41)  |  Grief (3)  |  Insult (2)  |  Intensity (14)  |  Interference (7)  |  Loss (43)  |  Man (258)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathology (9)  |  Production (70)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (4)  |  Psychology (67)  |  Reaction (47)  |  Restraint (4)  |  Similarity (14)  |  Stimulus (6)  |  Unusual (4)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (23)  |  Bitterness (2)  |  Cause (116)  |  Clash (3)  |  Condition (66)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Difference (129)  |  Disturbance (12)  |  Dog (24)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experiment (367)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Function (41)  |  Grief (3)  |  Insult (2)  |  Intensity (14)  |  Interference (7)  |  Loss (43)  |  Man (258)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathology (9)  |  Production (70)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (4)  |  Psychology (67)  |  Reaction (47)  |  Restraint (4)  |  Similarity (14)  |  Stimulus (6)  |  Unusual (4)

One most necessary function of the brain is to exert an inhibitory power over the nerve centres that lie below it, just as man exercises a beneficial control over his fellow animals of a lower order of dignity; and the increased irregular activity of the lower centres surely betokens a degeneration: it is like the turbulent, aimless action of a democracy without a head.
The Physiology and Pathology of Mind (1868), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (138)  |  Brain (105)  |  Democracy (5)  |  Function (41)  |  Man (258)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Nerve (52)  |  Turbulent (2)

Pavlov's data on the two fundamental antagonistic nervous processes—stimulation and inhibition—and his profound generalizations regarding them, in particular, that these processes are parts of a united whole, that they are in a state of constant conflict and constant transition of the one to the other, and his views on the dominant role they play in the formation of the higher nervous activity—all those belong to the most established natural—scientific validation of the Marxist dialectal method. They are in complete accord with the Leninist concepts on the role of the struggle between opposites in the evolution, the motion of matter.
In E. A. Asratyan, I. P. Pavlov: His Life and Work (1953), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (7)  |  Activity (48)  |  Belonging (8)  |  Concept (36)  |  Conflict (24)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Data (53)  |  Establishment (18)  |  Evolution (332)  |  Formation (32)  |  Fundamental (56)  |  Generalization (16)  |  Higher (18)  |  Lenin_Vladimir (2)  |  Karl Marx (10)  |  Matter (131)  |  Motion (64)  |  Natural (47)  |  Nerve (52)  |  Opposite (20)  |  Part (55)  |  Particular (22)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (12)  |  Play (20)  |  Process (97)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Regard (15)  |  Role (17)  |  Role (17)  |  Stimulation (7)  |  Struggle (18)  |  Transition (7)  |  Union (6)  |  Whole (46)

The brain seems a thoroughfare for nerve-action passing its way to the motor animal. It has been remarked that Life's aim is an act not a thought. To-day the dictum must be modified to admit that, often, to refrain from an act is no less an act than to commit one, because inhibition is coequally with excitation a nervous activity.
The Brain and its Mechanism (1933), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (20)  |  Action (52)  |  Activity (48)  |  Brain (105)  |  Commit (2)  |  Dictum (3)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Life (439)  |  Modification (21)  |  Motor (7)  |  Nerve (52)  |  Thought (168)

The first attribute that characterizes the greater man from the moron is his thicker layer of inhibition."
Science quotes on:  |  Man (258)  |  Moron (2)

The Law of Inhibition. The strength of a reflex may be decreased through presentation of a second stimulus which has no other relation to the effector involved.
The Behavior of Organisms: An Experimental Analysis (1938), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Decrease (6)  |  Involve (5)  |  Law (269)  |  Presentation (9)  |  Reflex (8)  |  Relationship (35)  |  Stimulus (6)  |  Strength (25)

The role of inhibition in the working of the central nervous system has proved to be more and more extensive and more and more fundamental as experiment has advanced in examining it. Reflex inhibition can no longer be regarded merely as a factor specially developed for dealing with the antagonism of opponent muscles acting at various hinge-joints. Its role as a coordinative factor comprises that, and goes beyond that. In the working of the central nervous machinery inhibition seems as ubiquitous and as frequent as is excitation itself. The whole quantitative grading of the operations of the spinal cord and brain appears to rest upon mutual interaction between the two central processes 'excitation' and 'inhibition', the one no less important than the other. For example, no operation can be more important as a basis of coordination for a motor act than adjustment of the quantity of contraction, e.g. of the number of motor units employed and the intensity of their individual tetanic activity. This now appears as the outcome of nice co-adjustment of excitation and inhibition upon each of all the individual units which cooperate in the act.
Inhibition as a Coordinative Factor', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1932). Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 288.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (105)  |  Central (8)  |  Contraction (5)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Joint (5)  |  Motor (7)  |  Nervous System (7)  |  Spinal Cord (2)

Visualize yourself confronted with the task of killing, one after the other, a cabbage, a fly, a fish, a lizard, a guinea pig, a cat, a dog, a monkey and a baby chimpanzee. In the unlikely case that you should experience no greater inhibitions in killing the chimpanzee than in destroying the cabbage or the fly, my advice to you is to commit suicide at your earliest possible convenience, because you are a weird monstrosity and a public danger.
'The Enmity Between Generations and Its Probable Ethological Causes'. In Richard I. Evans, Konrad Lorenz: The Man and his Ideas (1975), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabbage (3)  |  Cat (16)  |  Chimpanzee (4)  |  Danger (30)  |  Dog (24)  |  Fish (31)  |  Fly (28)  |  Kill (13)  |  Lizard (3)  |  Monkey (25)  |  Monster (8)  |  Suicide (10)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Sophie Germain
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Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
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Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
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Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
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Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
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Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
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- 60 -
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- 40 -
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- 30 -
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Richard Feynman
James Hutton
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- 20 -
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- 10 -
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