Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Objective

Objective Quotes (18 quotes)

A scientific or technical study always consists of the following three steps:
1. One decides the objective.
2. One considers the method.
3. One evaluates the method in relation to the objective.
System of Experimental Design (1987), xxix.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (37)  |  Evaluation (2)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Method (73)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Kingdom (4)  |  Art (80)  |  Attempt (41)  |  Consideration (38)  |  Consistency (14)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Darkness (11)  |  Dog (24)  |  Employment (16)  |  Essential (41)  |  Fact (325)  |  History (156)  |  Human (168)  |  Interest (82)  |  Lecture (31)  |  Life (460)  |  Literature (33)  |  Manifestation (21)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Method (73)  |  Numerous (6)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Progress (200)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Religion (120)  |  Representative (5)  |  Resource (15)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Study (157)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Wrap (2)

I am convinced that an important stage of human thought will have been reached when the physiological and the psychological, the objective and the subjective, are actually united, when the tormenting conflicts or contradictions between my consciousness and my body will have been factually resolved or discarded.
Physiology of the Higher Nervous Activity (1932), 93-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (7)  |  Body (88)  |  Conflict (27)  |  Consciousness (36)  |  Contradiction (22)  |  Convincing (6)  |  Discard (11)  |  Fact (325)  |  Human (168)  |  Importance (106)  |  Physiology (41)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Reach (30)  |  Resolve (7)  |  Stage (15)  |  Subjective (4)  |  Thought (170)  |  Torment (5)  |  Unite (6)

If the question were, “What ought to be the next objective in science?” my answer would be the teaching of science to the young, so that when the whole population grew up there would be a far more general background of common sense, based on a knowledge of the real meaning of the scientific method of discovering truth.
Marion Savin Selections from the Scientific Correspondence of Elihu Thomson (1971), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Background (13)  |  Base (10)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Discovery (360)  |  General (26)  |  Growth (70)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Meaning (52)  |  Next (4)  |  Population (41)  |  Question (159)  |  Real (28)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientific Method (101)  |  Teaching (64)  |  Truth (450)  |  Whole (46)  |  Young (20)

It is perfectly possible to be objective about an angry man, but it is inadvisable, for it will only make him angrier.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Anger (10)

Language is a guide to 'social reality.' Though language is not ordinarily thought of as essential interest to the students of social science, it powerfully conditions all our thinking about social problems and processes. Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of solving specific problems of communication or reflection. The fact of the matter is that the 'real world' is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group. No two languages are ever sufficiently similar to be considered as representing the same social reality. The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached.
'The Status of Linguistics as a Science', Language (1929), 5, 207-14. In David Mandelbaum (ed.), Selected Writings of Edward Sapir in Language, Culture, and Personality (1949), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (68)  |  Difference (135)  |  Essential (41)  |  Habit (42)  |  Human (168)  |  Illusion (14)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Incidental (2)  |  Label (4)  |  Language (71)  |  Problem (180)  |  Reality (67)  |  Social Science (17)  |  Society (84)  |  Solution (109)  |  Thinking (166)

Looking back over the last thousand years, one can divide the development of the machine and the machine civilization into three successive but aver-lapping and interpenetrating phases: eotechnic, paleotechnic, neotechnic ... Speaking in terms of power and characteristic materials, the eotechnic phase is a water-and-wood complex: the paleotechnic phase is a coal-and-wood complex... The dawn-age of our modern technics stretches roughly from the year 1000 to 1750. It did not, of course, come suddenly to an end in the middle of the eighteenth century. A new movement appeared in industrial society which had been gathering headway almost unnoticed from the fifteenth century on: after 1750 industry passed into a new phase, with a different source of power, different materials, different objectives.
Technics and Civilisation (1934), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (36)  |  Civilisation (6)  |  Coal (20)  |  Complex (20)  |  Dawn (2)  |  Development (122)  |  Headway (2)  |  Industry (49)  |  Machine (56)  |  Material (60)  |  Movement (31)  |  Paleotechnic (2)  |  Phase (7)  |  Power (103)  |  Society (84)  |  Technology (98)  |  Wood (16)

Philosophy is a game with objectives and no rules. Mathematics is a game with rules and no objectives.
Anonymous
In Wieslaw Krawcewicz, Bindhyachal Rai, Calculus with Maple Labs (2003), 328. In this book, and also in Julian Havil, Nonplussed!: Mathematical Proof of Implausible Ideas? (2007), 68, the quote is attributed to Ian Ellis, but most sources vite it as Anonymous.
Science quotes on:  |  Game (28)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Rule (52)

Pursuit of the objective of maximum species diversity or even maximum species richness could lead to serious negative consequences if taken literally‎.
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (44)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Lead (33)  |  Literal (4)  |  Maximum (5)  |  Negative (10)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Richness (8)  |  Serious (13)  |  Species (96)

Science is concerned with what is possible while engineering is concerned with choosing, from among the many possible ways, one that meets a number of often poorly stated economic and practical objectives.
From Turing Award lecture (1968), 'One Man's View of Computer Science', collected in ACM Turing Award Lectures: The First Twenty Years, 1966 to 1985 (1987), 209. ACM is the Association for Computing Machinery. Also in Journal of the ACM (Jan 1969), 16, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Choice (40)  |  Concern (30)  |  Economic (5)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Poor (18)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Practicality (4)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Engineering (9)  |  State (43)  |  Way (31)

Scientists alone can establish the objectives of their research, but society, in extending support to science, must take account of its own needs. As a layman, I can suggest only with diffidence what some of the major tasks might be on your scientific agenda, but ... First, I would suggest the question of the conservation and development of our natural resources. In a recent speech to the General Assembly of the United Nations, I proposed a world-wide program to protect land and water, forests and wildlife, to combat exhaustion and erosion, to stop the contamination of water and air by industrial as well as nuclear pollution, and to provide for the steady renewal and expansion of the natural bases of life.
From Address to the Centennial Convocation of the National Academy of Sciences (22 Oct 1963), 'A Century of Scientific Conquest'. Online at The American Presidency Project.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Alone (13)  |  Combat (3)  |  Conservation (44)  |  Development (122)  |  Erosion (12)  |  Establish (10)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Forest (54)  |  Industrial (3)  |  Land (27)  |  Layman (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Major (6)  |  Natural Resource (11)  |  Need (57)  |  Nuclear (13)  |  Pollution (16)  |  Program (7)  |  Propose (2)  |  Protect (4)  |  Question (159)  |  Recent (14)  |  Renewal (2)  |  Research (360)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Society (84)  |  Speech (19)  |  Stop (25)  |  Suggest (2)  |  Support (26)  |  Task (32)  |  United Nations (2)  |  Water (122)  |  Wildlife (5)  |  Worldwide (4)

Scientists constantly get clobbered with the idea that we spent 27 billion dollars on the Apollo programs, and are asked “What more do you want?” We didn't spend it; it was done for political reasons. ... Apollo was a response to the Bay of Pigs fiasco and to the successful orbital flight of Yuri Gagarin. President Kennedy's objective was not to find out the origin of the moon by the end of the decade; rather it was to put a man on the moon and bring him back, and we did that.
Quoted by Dennis Meredith, in 'Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection and Extraterrestrial Life-Wish', Science Digest (Jun 1979), 85, 38 & 89. Reproduced in Carl Sagan and Tom Head, Conversations With Sagan (2006), 55-56.
Science quotes on:  |  Dollar (11)  |  Flight (29)  |  Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (3)  |  Idea (226)  |  John F. Kennedy (20)  |  Moon (78)  |  Orbit (36)  |  Politics (52)  |  Reason (173)  |  Response (8)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Spending (5)

The conception of objective reality ... has thus evaporated ... into the transparent clarity of mathematics that represents no longer the behavior of particles but rather our knowledge of this behavior.
In 'The Representation of Nature in Contemporary Physics', Daedalus (1958), 87, 95-108. As cited in Karl Popper, Quantum Theory and the Schism in Physics (1992), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (13)  |  Clarity (24)  |  Conception (29)  |  Evaporation (3)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Particle (45)  |  Reality (67)  |  Representation (17)  |  Transparency (3)

The only level of the hierarchy [of biological communities] that is both necessary and sufficient to meet all objectives is the ecosystem or some higher-level approach. The strategy selected should not only ensure the conservation of spotted owls, but all the intricate linkages that are associated with natural populations of spotted owls in naturally functioning ecosystems. Many of these are as yet unknown.
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Associate (4)  |  Biology (83)  |  Community (27)  |  Conservation (44)  |  Ecosystem (10)  |  Ensure (4)  |  Hierarchy (6)  |  Intricate (6)  |  Linkage (3)  |  Natural (48)  |  Necessary (19)  |  Population (41)  |  Strategy (5)  |  Sufficient (8)  |  Unknown (40)

Though much new light is shed by ... studies in radioactivity, the nucleus of the atom, with its hoard of energy, thus continues to present us with a fascinating mystery. ... Our assault on atoms has broken down the outer fortifications. We feel that we know the fundamental rules according to which the outer part of the atom is built. The appearance and properties of the electron atmosphere are rather familiar. Yet that inner citadel, the atomic nucleus, remains unconquered, and we have reason to believe that within this citadel is secreted a great treasure. Its capture may form the main objective of the physicists’ next great drive.
'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (47)  |  Assault (5)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Atom (164)  |  Believe (14)  |  Capture (3)  |  Citadel (2)  |  Drive (14)  |  Electron (43)  |  Energy (103)  |  Familiar (5)  |  Fascinating (4)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Great (62)  |  Inner (9)  |  Main (6)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Nucleus (21)  |  Outer (3)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Property (46)  |  Radioactivity (21)  |  Reason (173)  |  Remain (18)  |  Rule (52)  |  Study (157)  |  Treasure (16)

We only have to look around us to see how complexity ... and psychic “temperature” are still rising: and rising no longer on the scale of the individual but now on that of the planet. This indication is so familiar to us that we cannot but recognize the objective, experiential, reality of a directionally controlled transformation of the Noosphere “as a whole.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and Renι Hague (trans.), The Heart of Matter (1950, 1978), 38. His term Noosphere refers to the collective sphere of human consciousness.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Familiar (5)  |  Indication (15)  |  Individual (59)  |  Planet (84)  |  Psychic (2)  |  Reality (67)  |  Recognize (11)  |  Rising (3)  |  Scale (21)  |  See (43)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Whole (46)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial Intelligence (6)  |  Automatic (8)  |  Class (27)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Deduction (39)  |  Definition (86)  |  Effective (9)  |  Experience (132)  |  Human (168)  |  Immediate (8)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Learn (23)  |  Make (10)  |  Sufficient (8)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Wide (3)

You believe in the God who plays dice, and I in complete law and order in a world that objectively exists, and which I, in a wildly speculative way, am trying to capture. … Even the great initial success of the quantum theory does not make me believe in the fundamental dice-game, although I am well aware that our younger colleagues interpret this as a consequence of senility. No doubt the day will come when we will see whose instinctive attitude was the correct one.
Letter to Max Born (7 Sep 1944). In Born-Einstein Letters, 146. Einstein Archives 8-207. In Albert Einstein, Alice Calaprice, Freeman Dyson, The Ultimate Quotable Einstein (2011), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (139)  |  Completion (13)  |  Dice (8)  |  Existence (150)  |  God (234)  |  Law (273)  |  Order (60)  |  World (231)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton