Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Real

Real Quotes (27 quotes)

... semantics ... is a sober and modest discipline which has no pretensions of being a universal patent-medicine for all the ills and diseases of mankind, whether imaginary or real. You will not find in semantics any remedy for decayed teeth or illusions of grandeur or class conflict. Nor is semantics a device for establishing that everyone except the speaker and his friends is speaking nonsense
In 'The Semantic Conception of Truth and the Foundations of Semantics', collected in Leonard Linsky (ed.), Semantics and the Philosophy of Language: A Collection of Readings (1952), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Decay (19)  |  Device (14)  |  Discipline (15)  |  Disease (169)  |  Establishing (4)  |  Everyone (6)  |  Friend (21)  |  Grandeur (11)  |  Ill (7)  |  Illusion (14)  |  Imaginary (5)  |  Mankind (105)  |  Modest (2)  |  Nonsense (13)  |  Pretension (3)  |  Remedy (23)  |  Semantics (3)  |  Sober (5)  |  Speaking (29)  |  Teeth (6)  |  Universal (25)

Question: What is the difference between a “real” and a “virtual” image? Give a drawing showing the formation of one of each kind.
Answer: You see a real image every morning when you shave. You do not see virtual images at all. The only people who see virtual images are those people who are not quite right, like Mrs. A. Virtual images are things which don't exist. I can't give you a reliable drawing of a virtual image, because I never saw one.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 177-8, Question 6. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (91)  |  Difference (129)  |  Drawing (15)  |  Examination (46)  |  Existence (145)  |  Formation (32)  |  Howler (15)  |  Image (15)  |  Kind (26)  |  Mirror (10)  |  Morning (8)  |  People (72)  |  Question (152)  |  Reliability (9)  |  Right (48)  |  Shave (2)  |  Showing (3)

“Pieces” almost always appear 'as parts' in whole processes. ... To sever a “'part” from the organized whole in which it occurs—whether it itself be a subsidiary whole or an “element”—is a very real process usually involving alterations in that “part”. Modifications of a part frequently involve changes elsewhere in the whole itself. Nor is the nature of these alterations arbitrary, for they too are determined by whole-conditions.
From 'Untersuchungen zur Lehre von der Gestalt, I', Psychol. Forsch. (1922), 1, 47-58. As translated in 'The General Theoretical Situation' (1922), collected in W. D. Ellis (ed.), A Source Book of Gestalt Psychology (1938, 1967), Vol. 2, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (16)  |  Appear (7)  |  Arbitrary (6)  |  Change (129)  |  Determine (15)  |  Element (68)  |  Frequently (7)  |  Involve (5)  |  Modification (21)  |  Nature (524)  |  Organized (2)  |  Part (55)  |  Piece (12)  |  Process (97)  |  Subsidiary (2)  |  Whole (46)

A mathematician who can only generalise is like a monkey who can only climb UP a tree. ... And a mathematician who can only specialise is like a monkey who can only climb DOWN a tree. In fact neither the up monkey nor the down monkey is a viable creature. A real monkey must find food and escape his enemies and so must be able to incessantly climb up and down. A real mathematician must be able to generalise and specialise. ... There is, I think, a moral for the teacher. A teacher of traditional mathematics is in danger of becoming a down monkey, and a teacher of modern mathematics an up monkey. The down teacher dishing out one routine problem after another may never get off the ground, never attain any general idea. and the up teacher dishing out one definition after the other may never climb down from his verbiage, may never get down to solid ground, to something of tangible interest for his pupils.
From 'A Story With A Moral', Mathematical Gazette (Jun 1973), 57, No. 400, 86-87
Science quotes on:  |  Climb (6)  |  Creature (45)  |  Down (11)  |  Enemy (24)  |  Escape (14)  |  Find (46)  |  Food (73)  |  Generalization (16)  |  Incessant (3)  |  Mathematician (105)  |  Monkey (25)  |  Specialization (8)  |  Tree (81)  |  Up (3)

And now the announcement of Watson and Crick about DNA. This is for me the real proof of the existence of God.
In Playboy Magazine (Jul 1964), as cited in Alan Lindsay Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (5)  |  Francis Crick (31)  |  DNA (48)  |  Existence (145)  |  God (229)  |  Proof (133)  |  James Watson (16)

Benford's Law of Controversy: Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.
In novel, Timescape (1992), no page numbering. The reference in the orginal text uses the past tense.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (10)  |  Availability (9)  |  Controversy (13)  |  Information (51)  |  Inverse (3)  |  Passion (23)  |  Proportion (23)

By convention sweet is sweet, by convention bitter is bitter, by convention hot is hot, by convention cold is cold, by convention colour is colour. But in reality there are atoms and the void. That is, the objects of sense are supposed to be real and it is customary to regard them as such, but in truth they are not. Only the atoms and the void are real.
Cited as from Sext. Emp. Math. VII. 135, in Charles Montague Bakewell, Source Book in Ancient Philosophy (1907), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Bitter (6)  |  Cold (22)  |  Colour (31)  |  Convention (5)  |  Hot (4)  |  Reality (62)  |  Sense (100)  |  Sweet (2)  |  Truth (440)  |  Void (8)

I despise Birth-Control first because it is ... an entirely meaningless word; and is used so as to curry favour even with those who would first recoil from its real meaning. The proceeding these quack doctors recommend does not control any birth. ... But these people know perfectly well that they dare not write the plain word Birth-Prevention, in any one of the hundred places where they write the hypocritical word Birth-Control. They know as well as I do that the very word Birth-Prevention would strike a chill into the public... Therefore they use a conventional and unmeaning word, which may make the quack medicine sound more innocuous. ... A child is the very sign and sacrament of personal freedom. He is a fresh will added to the wills of the world; he is something that his parents have freely chosen to produce ... he is their own creative contribution to creation.
In 'Babies and Distributism', The Well and the Shadows (1935). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 272.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (80)  |  Choice (38)  |  Control (42)  |  Creation (124)  |  Creativity (43)  |  Doctor (54)  |  Favour (6)  |  Hypocrite (2)  |  Meaning (53)  |  Medicine (187)  |  Parent (23)  |  Prevention (23)  |  Proceeding (10)  |  Quack (9)  |  Recoil (3)  |  Recommendation (6)  |  Word (96)

I had a Meccano set with which I “played” endlessly. Meccano which was invented by Frank Hornby around 1900, is called Erector Set in the US. New toys (mainly Lego) have led to the extinction of Meccano and this has been a major disaster as far as the education of our young engineers and scientists is concerned. Lego is a technically trivial plaything and kids love it partly because it is so simple and partly because it is seductively coloured. However it is only a toy, whereas Meccano is a real engineering kit and it teaches one skill which I consider to be the most important that anyone can acquire: This is the sensitive touch needed to thread a nut on a bolt and tighten them with a screwdriver and spanner just enough that they stay locked, but not so tightly that the thread is stripped or they cannot be unscrewed. On those occasions (usually during a party at your house) when the handbasin tap is closed so tightly that you cannot turn it back on, you know the last person to use the washroom never had a Meccano set.
Nobel laureate autobiography in Les Prix Nobel/Nobel Lectures 1996 (1997), 189.
Science quotes on:  |   (23)  |  Acquire (7)  |  Bolt (3)  |  Colour (31)  |  Concern (30)  |  Disaster (14)  |  Education (173)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Engineering (59)  |  Extinction (37)  |  Important (20)  |  Invention (167)  |  Kid (4)  |  Kit (2)  |  Lock (2)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Need (54)  |  Nut (2)  |  Party (3)  |  Play (20)  |  Plaything (2)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Sensitive (5)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Skill (25)  |  Strip (3)  |  Tap (3)  |  Teach (19)  |  Technical (6)  |  Thread (6)  |  Touch (19)  |  Toy (7)  |  Trivial (13)  |  Young (19)

If the question were, “What ought to be the next objective in science?” my answer would be the teaching of science to the young, so that when the whole population grew up there would be a far more general background of common sense, based on a knowledge of the real meaning of the scientific method of discovering truth.
Marion Savin Selections from the Scientific Correspondence of Elihu Thomson (1971), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (91)  |  Background (10)  |  Base (10)  |  Common Sense (34)  |  Discovery (354)  |  General (23)  |  Growth (65)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Meaning (53)  |  Next (4)  |  Objective (18)  |  Population (41)  |  Question (152)  |  Science (850)  |  Scientific Method (98)  |  Teaching (60)  |  Truth (440)  |  Whole (46)  |  Young (19)

In 1975, ... [speaking with Shiing Shen Chern], I told him I had finally learned ... the beauty of fiber-bundle theory and the profound Chern-Weil theorem. I said I found it amazing that gauge fields are exactly connections on fiber bundles, which the mathematicians developed without reference to the physical world. I added, “this is both thrilling and puzzling, since you mathematicians dreamed up these concepts out of nowhere.” He immediately protested: “No, no. These concepts were not dreamed up. They were natural and real.”
In 'Einstein's Impact on Theoretical Physics', collected in Jong-Ping Hsu, Leonard Hsu (eds.), JingShin Theoretical Physics Symposium in Honor of Professor Ta-You Wu (1998), 70. Reprinted from Physics Today (Jun 1980), 49. The article was adapted from a talk given at the Second Marcel Grossman meeting, held in Trieste, Italy (Jul 1979), in honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Albert Einstein.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (7)  |  Beautiful (15)  |  Concept (36)  |  Develop (11)  |  Immediately (3)  |  Mathematician (105)  |  Natural (47)  |  Nowhere (7)  |  Physical World (3)  |  Protest (3)  |  Theory (346)

Like Molière’s M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole’s The Mathematical Analysis of Logic.
Co-authored with James R. Newman in Gödel's Proof (1986, 2005), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (78)  |  Aware (3)  |  Begin (5)  |  George Boole (9)  |  Craft (3)  |  Evident (2)  |  Logic (131)  |  Mathematician (105)  |  Modern (42)  |  Moliere (2)  |  Moliere (2)  |  Nature (524)  |  Principle (96)  |  Prose (5)  |  Publication (75)  |  Reasoning (54)  |  Recent (13)  |  Renaissance (5)  |  Study (149)  |  Time (160)  |  Tool (30)

One should not understand this compulsion to construct concepts, species, forms, purposes, laws ('a world of identical cases') as if they enabled us to fix the real world; but as a compulsion to arrange a world for ourselves in which our existence is made possible:—we thereby create a world which is calculable, simplified, comprehensible, etc., for us.
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 3, no. 521. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (38)  |  Comprehension (29)  |  Compulsion (6)  |  Concept (36)  |  Construct (5)  |  Enable (9)  |  Existence (145)  |  Form (65)  |  Identical (9)  |  Law (269)  |  Purpose (62)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Species (91)  |  Understanding (222)

Our ignorance is God; what we know is science. When we abandon the doctrine that some infinite being created matter and force, and enacted a code of laws for their government ... the real priest will then be, not the mouth-piece of some pretended deity, but the interpreter of nature.
In The Gods, and Other Lectures, (1874), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (13)  |  Being (34)  |  Code (8)  |  Creation (124)  |  Deity (6)  |  Doctrine (32)  |  Force (72)  |  God (229)  |  Government (48)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Infinite (37)  |  Interpreter (2)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Law (269)  |  Matter (131)  |  Nature (524)  |  Pretence (2)  |  Priest (8)  |  Science (850)

Our imagination is stretched to the utmost, not as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which are there.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965), 127-128. As cited in Daniel F. Styer, The Strange World of Quantum Mechanics (2000), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehend (4)  |  Fiction (8)  |  Imagination (125)  |  Imagine (10)  |  Stretch (2)  |  Utmost (4)

Publication has been extended far beyond our present ability to make real use of the record.
From article 'As We May Think', in Atlantic Magazine (Jul 1945). Bush was expressing concern that the vastly increasing body of research information and knowledge needed mechanical systems to store and effectively manage its retrieval.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (38)  |  Beyond (17)  |  Extend (6)  |  Far (9)  |  Present (32)  |  Publication (75)  |  Record (22)

Science is the way—a powerful way, indeed—to study the natural world. Science is not particularly effective—in fact, it's rather ineffective—in making commentary about the supernatural world. Both worlds, for me, are quite real and quite important. They are investigated in different ways. They coexist. They illuminate each other.
From transcript of interview by Bob Abernathy with Francis Collins on PBS TV program 'Religion and Ethics'(16 Jun 2000).
Science quotes on:  |  Coexist (2)  |  Commentary (2)  |  Different (15)  |  Illuminate (2)  |  Important (20)  |  Natural World (2)  |  Powerful (12)  |  Science (850)  |  Science And Religion (153)  |  Study (149)  |  Supernatural (8)  |  Way (31)  |  World (206)

Sir Hiram Maxim is a genuine and typical example of the man of science, romantic, excitable, full of real but somewhat obvious poetry, a little hazy in logic and philosophy, but full of hearty enthusiasm and an honorable simplicity. He is, as he expresses it, “an old and trained engineer,” and is like all of the old and trained engineers I have happened to come across, a man who indemnifies himself for the superhuman or inhuman concentration required for physical science by a vague and dangerous romanticism about everything else.
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (198)  |  Concentration (6)  |  Danger (30)  |  Else (4)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Everything (33)  |  Example (21)  |  Excitement (20)  |  Expression (43)  |  Full (10)  |  Genuine (8)  |  Honour (19)  |  Logic (131)  |  Sir Hiram Maxim (4)  |  Men Of Science (90)  |  Obvious (24)  |  Old (19)  |  Philosophy (128)  |  Physical Science (31)  |  Poetry (61)  |  Requirement (26)  |  Romance (5)  |  Romanticism (3)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Somewhat (2)  |  Superhuman (2)  |  Training (21)  |  Typical (6)  |  Vagueness (8)

The difference between myth and science is the difference between divine inspiration of 'unaided reason' (as Bertrand Russell put it) on the one hand and theories developed in observational contact with the real world on the other. It is the difference between the belief in prophets and critical thinking, between Credo quia absurdum (I believe because it is absurd–Tertullian) and De omnibus est dubitandum (Everything should be questioned–Descartes). To try to write a grand cosmical drama leads necessarily to myth. To try to let knowledge substitute ignorance in increasingly large regions of space and time is science.
In 'Cosmology: Myth or Science?'. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy (1984), 5, 79-98.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (135)  |  Contact (12)  |  Cosmology (8)  |  René Descartes (32)  |  Difference (129)  |  Divine (16)  |  Drama (4)  |  Ignorance (110)  |  Inspiration (28)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Myth (24)  |  Observation (256)  |  Prophet (3)  |  Question (152)  |  Reason (172)  |  Bertrand Russell (78)  |  Science (850)  |  Space And Time (4)  |  Substitute (10)  |  Theory (346)  |  Thinking (163)  |  World (206)  |  Write (21)

The real trouble with this world of ours is not that it is an unreasonable world, nor even that it is a reasonable one. The commonest kind of trouble is that it is nearly reasonable, but not quite. … It looks just a little more mathematical and regular than it is; its exactitude is obvious, but its inexactitude is hidden; its wilderness lies in wait.
In Orthodoxy (1909), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (42)  |  Exactitude (3)  |  Hidden (13)  |  Kind (26)  |  Lying (4)  |  Mathematics (355)  |  Regular (2)  |  Trouble (22)  |  Unreasonable (2)  |  Wait (14)  |  Wilderness (11)  |  World (206)

The saying that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing is, to my mind, a very dangerous adage. If knowledge is real and genuine, I do not believe that it is other than a very valuable posession, however infinitesimal its quantity may be. Indeed, if a little knowledge is dangerous, where is a man who has so much as to be out of danger?
'Instruction in Physiology', in Science and Culture and Other Essays (1882), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Danger (30)  |  Genuine (8)  |  Knowledge (662)  |  Possession (24)  |  French Saying (51)  |  Valuable (4)

There can never be any real opposition between religion and science; for the one is the complement of the other.
In Where is Science Going? (1932), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Opposition (22)  |  Science And Religion (153)

There is no branch of mathematics, however abstract, which may not some day be applied to phenomena of the real world.
From a page of quotations, without citations, in G.E. Martin The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1975), 225. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (18)  |  Application (68)  |  Branch (23)  |  Mathematics (355)  |  Phenomenon (113)  |  World (206)

Truth and falsity, indeed understanding, is not necessarily something purely intellectual, remote from feelings and attitudes. ... It is in the total conduct of men rather than in their statements that truth or falsehood lives, more in what a man does, in his real reaction to other men and to things, in his will to do them justice, to live at one with them. Here lies the inner connection between truth and justice. In the realm of behavior and action, the problem recurs as to the difference between piece and part.
From 'On Truth', collected in Mary Henle (ed.), Documents of Gestalt Psychology (1961), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (52)  |  Attitude (16)  |  Behavior (10)  |  Conduct (8)  |  Connection (39)  |  Difference (129)  |  Falsehood (11)  |  Falsity (9)  |  Feeling (42)  |  Inner (9)  |  Intellectual (13)  |  Life (439)  |  Man (258)  |  Part (55)  |  Piece (12)  |  Problem (178)  |  Purely (4)  |  Reaction (47)  |  Realm (16)  |  Recur (2)  |  Remote (10)  |  Statement (26)  |  Total (13)  |  Truth (440)  |  Understanding (222)

[For] men to whom nothing seems great but reason ... nature ... is a cosmos, so admirable, that to penetrate to its ways seems to them the only thing that makes life worth living. These are the men whom we see possessed by a passion to learn ... Those are the natural scientific men; and they are the only men that have any real success in scientific research.
From 'Lessons from the History of Science: The Scientific Attitude' (c.1896), in Collected Papers (1931), Vol. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (5)  |  Cosmos (21)  |  Learn (23)  |  Life (439)  |  Living (23)  |  Natural (47)  |  Nature (524)  |  Passion (23)  |  Penetrate (4)  |  Reason (172)  |  Research (358)  |  Scientist (224)  |  Success (110)  |  Worth (24)

[S]ome physicists describe gravity in terms of ten dimensions all curled up. But those aren't real words—just placeholders, used to refer to parts of abstract equations.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 20-21.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (18)  |  Curl (2)  |  Dimension (12)  |  Equation (45)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Physicist (70)  |  Reference (6)  |  Ten (3)  |  Term (34)  |  Word (96)

[The purpose of flight research] is to separate the real from the imagined problems and to make known the overlooked and the unexpected.
Description of the purpose of the X-15 program given in a meeting at the Langley Research Center (Oct 1956). Quoted in Michael H. Gorn, Expanding the Envelope (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Imagination (125)  |  Overlook (6)  |  Problem (178)  |  Research (358)  |  Unexpected (13)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

New Book


The Simpsons and their Mathematical Secrets,
by Simon Singh

Cleverly embedded in many Simpsons plots are subtle references to mathematics, because the show's brilliant comedy writers with advanced degrees in math or science. Singh offers an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.