Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Water

Water Quotes (122 quotes)

... in time of war, soldiers, however sensible, care a great deal more on some occasions about slaking their thirst than about the danger of enteric fever.
[Better known as typhoid, the disease is often spread by drinking contaminated water.]
Parliamentaray Debate (21 Mar 1902). Quoted in Winston Churchill and Richard Langworth (ed.), Churchill by Himself: The Definitive Collection of Quotations (2008), 469.
Science quotes on:  |  Typhoid (4)  |  War (79)

Die nicht wãsserigen Losungen leiten ja nicht.
Non-aqueous solutions don't conduct.
Translation by W. H. Brock of Ostwald inZeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie (1901), 5, 341.
Science quotes on:  |  Conduction (3)  |  Solution (109)

Question: Explain why pipes burst in cold weather.
Answer: People who have not studied acoustics think that Thor bursts the pipes, but we know that is nothing of the kind for Professor Tyndall has burst the mythologies and has taught us that it is the natural behaviour of water (and bismuth) without which all fish would die and the earth be held in an iron grip. (1881)
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1881), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 186-7, Question 10. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.) Webmaster notes that “fish would die” may refer to being taught that water's greatest density is at 4°C, and sinks below a frozen surface, so bodies of water can remain liquid underneath, to the benefit of the fish. The student was likely taught that bismuth, like water, expands when it freezes.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (96)  |  Behaviour (23)  |  Bismuth (4)  |  Blunder (9)  |  Burst (12)  |  Cold (24)  |  Death (183)  |  Earth (250)  |  Examination (47)  |  Fish (33)  |  Freezing (8)  |  Grip (4)  |  Ice (17)  |  Iron (33)  |  Mythology (3)  |  Natural (48)  |  Pipe (4)  |  Question (159)  |  Schoolboy (3)  |  Study (157)  |  Teaching (64)  |  John Tyndall (38)  |  Weather (10)

Question: On freezing water in a glass tube, the tube sometimes breaks. Why is this? An iceberg floats with 1,000,000 tons of ice above the water line. About how many tons are below the water line?
Answer: The water breaks the tube because of capallarity. The iceberg floats on the top because it is lighter, hence no tons are below the water line. Another reason is that an iceberg cannot exceed 1,000,000 tons in weight: hence if this much is above water, none is below. Ice is exceptional to all other bodies except bismuth. All other bodies have 1090 feet below the surface and 2 feet extra for every degree centigrade. If it were not for this, all fish would die, and the earth be held in an iron grip.
P.S.—When I say 1090 feet, I mean 1090 feet per second.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179-80, Question 13. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Above (3)  |  Answer (96)  |  Below (4)  |  Bismuth (4)  |  Break (18)  |  Death (183)  |  Degree (18)  |  Earth (250)  |  Examination (47)  |  Exception (16)  |  Extra (4)  |  Fish (33)  |  Freezing (8)  |  Glass (19)  |  Grip (4)  |  Howler (15)  |  Ice (17)  |  Iceberg (3)  |  Iron (33)  |  Question (159)  |  Reason (173)  |  Ton (2)  |  Tube (2)  |  Weight (41)

[When questioned on his longevity] First of all, I selected my ancestors very wisely. ... They were long-lived, healthy people. Then, as a chemist, I know how to eat, how to exercise, keep my blood circulating. ... I don't worry. I don't get angry at people. I don't worry about things I can't help. I do what I can to make the world a better place to live, but I don't complain if things aren't right. As a scientist I take the world as I find it.
[About celebrating his 77th birthday by swimming a half mile in 22 minutes] I used swim fins and webbed gloves because a man of intelligence should apply his power efficiently, not just churn the water.
As quoted in obituary by Wallace Turner, 'Joel Hildebrand, 101', New York Times (3 May 1983), D27.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (17)  |  Anger (10)  |  Application (72)  |  Better (41)  |  Blood (63)  |  Chemist (49)  |  Churn (2)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Complaint (7)  |  Eating (13)  |  Efficiency (15)  |  Exercise (26)  |  Glove (2)  |  Health (93)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Keeping (6)  |  Life (460)  |  Obituary (9)  |  Person (38)  |  Power (103)  |  Selection (20)  |  Swimming (3)  |  Web (5)  |  Wisdom (91)  |  World (231)  |  Worry (11)

A beautiful blonde is chemically three-fourths water, but what lovely surface tension.
Anonymous
In Evan Esar, 20,000 Quips and Quotes, 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Surface Tension (2)

A marine protozoan is an aqueous salty system in an aqueous salty medium, but a man is an aqueous salty system in a medium in which there is but little water and most of that poor in salts.
Quoted in Larry R. Squire (ed.), The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography (1996), Vol. 1, 558.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (258)  |  Marine Biology (11)  |  Medium (7)  |  Protozoan (2)  |  Salt (17)  |  System (66)

A Miracle is a Violation of the Laws of Nature; and as a firm and unalterable Experience has established these Laws, the Proof against a Miracle, from the very Nature of the Fact, is as entire as any Argument from Experience can possibly be imagined. Why is it more than probable, that all Men must die; that Lead cannot, of itself, remain suspended in the Air; that Fire consumes Wood, and is extinguished by Water; unless it be, that these Events are found agreeable to the Laws of Nature, and there is required a Violation of these Laws, or in other Words, a Miracle to prevent them? Nothing is esteem'd a Miracle, if it ever happen in the common Course of Nature... There must, therefore, be a uniform Experience against every miraculous Event, otherwise the Event would not merit that Appellation. And as a uniform Experience amounts to a Proof, there is here a direct and full Proof, from the Nature of the Fact, against the Existence of any Miracle; nor can such a Proof be destroy'd, or the Miracle render'd credible, but by an opposite Proof, which is superior.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (26)  |  Death (183)  |  Experience (132)  |  Fact (325)  |  Fire (59)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Law (273)  |  Lead (33)  |  Miracle (25)  |  Nature (534)  |  Probable (6)  |  Proof (136)  |  Violation (5)

A tree is beautiful, but what’s more, it has a right to life; like water, the sun and the stars, it is essential. Life on earth is inconceivable without trees. Forests create climate, climate influences peoples’ character, and so on and so forth. There can be neither civilization nor happiness if forests crash down under the axe, if the climate is harsh and severe, if people are also harsh and severe. ... What a terrible future!
In letter to A.S. Suvorin (18 Oct 1888).
Science quotes on:  |  Axe (4)  |  Beauty (88)  |  Character (39)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Climate (28)  |  Crash (2)  |  Deforestation (27)  |  Essential (41)  |  Forest (54)  |  Future (110)  |  Happiness (58)  |  Harsh (2)  |  Inconceivable (2)  |  Influence (47)  |  Life (460)  |  People (72)  |  Right (49)  |  Severe (4)  |  Star (132)  |  Sun (115)  |  Terrible (4)  |  Tree (88)

All things are from water and all things are resolved into water.
Thales
Aetius 1.3.1., in H. Diels, Doxographi Graeci (1879), 276. Trans. R. W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (129)  |  Resolution (10)

An ocean traveller has even more vividly the impression that the ocean is made of waves than that it is made of water.
Gifford Lecture at the University of Edinburgh (Mar 1927). In The Nature of the Physical World (1929, reprint 2005), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Impression (32)  |  Made (9)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Traveler (8)  |  Vivid (8)  |  Wave (32)

Aristotle, in spite of his reputation, is full of absurdities. He says that children should be conceived in the Winter, when the wind is in the North, and that if people marry too young the children will be female. He tells us that the blood of females is blacker then that of males; that the pig is the only animal liable to measles; that an elephant suffering from insomnia should have its shoulders rubbed with salt, olive-oil, and warm water; that women have fewer teeth than men, and so on. Nevertheless, he is considered by the great majority of philosophers a paragon of wisdom.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 19. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (9)  |  Aristotle (101)  |  Black (6)  |  Blood (63)  |  Child (90)  |  Conception (29)  |  Elephant (5)  |  Female (10)  |  Fewer (3)  |  Insomnia (2)  |  Male (11)  |  Marriage (19)  |  North (2)  |  Paragon (2)  |  Philosopher (67)  |  Pig (4)  |  Reputation (7)  |  Rub (2)  |  Salt (17)  |  Shoulder (4)  |  Teeth (7)  |  Warm (4)  |  Wind (28)  |  Winter (11)  |  Wisdom (91)  |  Woman (36)  |  Young (20)

As I show you this liquid, I too could tell you, 'I took my drop of water from the immensity of creation, and I took it filled with that fecund jelly, that is, to use the language of science, full of the elements needed for the development of lower creatures. And then I waited, and I observed, and I asked questions of it, and I asked it to repeat the original act of creation for me; what a sight it would be! But it is silent! It has been silent for several years, ever since I began these experiments. Yes! And it is because I have kept away from it, and am keeping away from it to this moment, the only thing that it has not been given to man to produce, I have kept away from it the germs that are floating in the air, I have kept away from it life, for life is the germ, and the germ is life.'
Quoted in Patrice Debré, Louis Pasteur, trans. Elborg Forster (1994), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Creation (129)  |  Creature (51)  |  Development (122)  |  Element (68)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Float (8)  |  Germ (16)  |  Gift (26)  |  Immensity (7)  |  Jelly (2)  |  Language (71)  |  Life (460)  |  Low (3)  |  Observation (264)  |  Origin Of Life (11)  |  Production (72)  |  Question (159)  |  Repetition (18)  |  Science (875)  |  Wait (15)

By blending water and minerals from below with sunlight and CO2 from above, green plants link the earth to the sky. We tend to believe that plants grow out of the soil, but in fact most of their substance comes from the air. The bulk of the cellulose and the other organic compounds produced through photosynthesis consists of heavy carbon and oxygen atoms, which plants take directly from the air in the form of CO2. Thus the weight of a wooden log comes almost entirely from the air. When we burn a log in a fireplace, oxygen and carbon combine once more into CO2, and in the light and heat of the fire we recover part of the solar energy that went into making the wood.
The Web of Life: A New Scientific Understanding of Living Systems (1997), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Burning (13)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Earth (250)  |  Energy (103)  |  Heat (48)  |  Link (12)  |  Mineral (24)  |  Photosynthesis (12)  |  Plant (96)  |  Respiration (10)  |  Sky (32)  |  Soil (24)  |  Solar Energy (13)  |  Sunlight (9)  |  Wood (16)

By felling the trees which cover the tops and sides of mountains, men in all climates seem to bring upon future generations two calamities at once; want of fuel and a scarcity of water.
In Alexander von Humboldt, Aimé Bonpland and Thomasina Ross (trans. and ed.) Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America: During the Years 1799-1804 (1852), Vol. 2, 9. (Translated from the original in French.)
Science quotes on:  |  Calamity (4)  |  Climate (28)  |  Cover (10)  |  Deforestation (27)  |  Fuel (16)  |  Future (110)  |  Generation (56)  |  Mountain (66)  |  Scarcity (2)  |  Side (16)  |  Top (7)  |  Tree (88)  |  Want (32)

By the agitation of water and silt, and their gradual accumulation and consolidation... the rocks were formed gradually by the evolution of sediments in water.
Ye Zi-qi
Cao Mu Zi (1959), trans. Yang, Jing-Yi, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (16)  |  Agitation (5)  |  Consolidation (2)  |  Formation (34)  |  Gradual (9)  |  Rock (54)  |  Sediment (4)

Chemistry works with an enormous number of substances, but cares only for some few of their properties; it is an extensive science. Physics on the other hand works with rather few substances, such as mercury, water, alcohol, glass, air, but analyses the experimental results very thoroughly; it is an intensive science. Physical chemistry is the child of these two sciences; it has inherited the extensive character from chemistry. Upon this depends its all-embracing feature, which has attracted so great admiration. But on the other hand it has its profound quantitative character from the science of physics.
In Theories of Solutions (1912), xix.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (23)  |  Air (84)  |  Alcohol (9)  |  Analysis (82)  |  Care (37)  |  Character (39)  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Child (90)  |  Enormous (16)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Extensive (6)  |  Feature (14)  |  Few (7)  |  Glass (19)  |  Inheritance (8)  |  Intensive (2)  |  Mercury (26)  |  Number (90)  |  Physical Chemistry (5)  |  Physics (156)  |  Property (46)  |  Quantitative (9)  |  Result (129)  |  Substance (39)  |  Through (3)

Chuang Tzu and Hui Tzu were standing on the bridge across the Hao River. Chuang Tzu said, “Look how the minnows are shooting to and fro! How joyful they are!”
“You are not a fish,” said Hui Tzu. “How can you know that the fishes are joyful?”
“You are not I,” answered Chuang Tzu, “How can you know I do not know about the joy of fishes? ... I know it from my own joy of the water.”
An ancient Chinese story
As related in ‘Evolution of the Mind’, Scientific American (Jun 1957). Cited in Jo Carr, Beyond Fact: Nonfiction for Children and Young People (1982), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Fish (33)  |  Joy (25)  |  Swim (3)

Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.
[Muir was aghast that the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite was to be flooded by the O'Shaughnessy Dam to provide water for San Francisco. Muir lost this land conservation battle; the dam was completed in 1914.]
John Muir
Closing remark in The Yosemite (1912), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Cathedral (9)  |  Church (16)  |  Consecration (2)  |  Dam (2)  |  Heart (46)  |  Holiness (2)  |  Tank (2)  |  Temple (12)  |  Valley (10)

Etna presents us not merely with an image of the power of subterranean heat, but a record also of the vast period of time during which that power has been exerted. A majestic mountain has been produced by volcanic action, yet the time of which the volcanic forms the register, however vast, is found by the geologist to be of inconsiderable amount, even in the modem annals of the earth's history. In like manner, the Falls of Niagara teach us not merely to appreciate the power of moving water, but furnish us at the same time with data for estimating the enormous lapse of ages during which that force has operated. A deep and long ravine has been excavated, and the river has required ages to accomplish the task, yet the same region affords evidence that the sum of these ages is as nothing, and as the work of yesterday, when compared to the antecedent periods, of which there are monuments in the same district.
Travels in North America (1845), Vol. 1, 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Erosion (12)  |  Lava (2)  |  Mountain (66)  |  Niagara Falls (3)  |  Ravine (3)  |  Volcano (24)

Examining this water...I found floating therein divers earthy particles, and some green streaks, spirally wound serpent-wise...and I judge that some of these little creatures were above a thousand times smaller than the smallest ones I have ever yet seen, upon the rind of cheese, in wheaten flour, mould, and the like.
[The first recorded observation of protozoa.]
Letter to the Royal Society, London (7 Sep 1674). In John Carey, Eyewitness to Science (1997), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheese (5)  |  Microorganism (19)  |  Mold (6)  |  Protozoa (2)  |  Science (875)

Filthy water cannot be washed.
Anonymous
African proverb
Science quotes on:  |  Proverb (18)

For I took an Earthen Vessel, in which I put 200 pounds of Earth that had been dried in a Furnace, which I moystened with Rain-water, and I implanted therein the Trunk or Stem of a Willow Tree, weighing five pounds: and about three ounces: But I moystened the Earthen Vessel with Rain-water, or distilled water (alwayes when there was need) and it was large, and implanted into the Earth, and leaft of the Vessel, with an Iron-Plate covered with Tin, and easily passable with many holes. I computed not the weight of the leaves that fell off in the four Autumnes. At length, I again dried the Earth of the Vessel, and there were found the same 200 pounds, wanting about two ounces. Therefore 164 pounds of Wood, Barks, and Roots, arose out of water onely.
Oriatrike: Or, Physick Refined, trans. john Chandler (1662), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Growth (70)  |  Photosynthesis (12)  |  Plant (96)

For many of us, water simply flows from a faucet, and we think little about it beyond this point of contact. We have lost a sense of respect for the wild river, for the complex workings of a wetland, for the intricate web of life that water supports.
Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity (1997), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (51)  |  Contact (12)  |  Little (29)  |  Respect (24)  |  River (34)  |  Sense (104)  |  Support (26)  |  Thinking (166)  |  Web Of Life (3)  |  Wild (12)  |  Working (11)

For, as the element of water lies in the middle of the globe, so, the branches run out from the root in its circuit on all sides towards the plains and towards the light. From this root very many branches are born. One branch is the Rhine, another the Danube, another the Nile, etc.
'The Philosophy of the Generation of the Elements', Book the Fourth, Text II. In The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Aureolus Philippus Theophrastus Bombast, of Hohenheim, called Paracelsus the Great, trans. A. E. Waite (1894), Vol. 1, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (23)  |  Circuit (10)  |  Element (68)  |  Globe (20)  |  Light (117)  |  Middle (7)  |  Plain (11)  |  Root (19)

From birth, man carries the weight of gravity on his shoulders. He is bolted to earth. But man has only to sink beneath the surface and he is free.
Quoted in 'Sport: Poet of the Depths', Time (28 Mar 1960)
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (3)  |  Birth (47)  |  Bolt (3)  |  Earth (250)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Marine Biology (11)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Sea (57)  |  Shoulder (4)  |  Sinking (4)  |  Surface (37)  |  Weight (41)

From packaging materials, through fibers, foams and surface coatings, to continuous extrusions and large-scale moldings, plastics have transformed almost every aspect of life. Without them, much of modern medicine would be impossible and the consumer electronics and computer industries would disappear. Plastic sewage and water pipes alone have made an immeasurable contribution to public health worldwide.
'Plastics—No Need To Apologize', Trends in Polymer Science (Jun 1996), 4, 172. In Paul C. Painter and Michael M. Coleman, Essentials of Polymer Science and Engineering (2008), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (16)  |  Computer (51)  |  Consumer (3)  |  Contribution (23)  |  Disappearance (15)  |  Electronics (6)  |  Fiber (2)  |  Health (93)  |  Immeasurable (2)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Industry (49)  |  Life (460)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Modern (44)  |  Pipe (4)  |  Plastic (11)  |  Public (35)  |  Sewage (3)  |  Surface (37)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Worldwide (4)

He who knows what sweets and virtues are in the ground, the waters, the plants, the heavens, and how to come at these enchantments, is the rich and royal man.
Essays, Second Series (1844).
Science quotes on:  |  Enchantment (6)  |  Ground (18)  |  Heaven (55)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Man (258)  |  Plant (96)  |  Rich (17)  |  Royal (2)  |  Sweet (2)  |  Virtue (27)

Heat energy of uniform temperature [is] the ultimate fate of all energy. The power of sunlight and coal, electric power, water power, winds and tides do the work of the world, and in the end all unite to hasten the merry molecular dance.
Matter and Energy (1911), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Coal (20)  |  Dance (5)  |  Electricity (82)  |  End (51)  |  Energy (103)  |  Entropy (25)  |  Fate (16)  |  Haste (3)  |  Merry (2)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Power (103)  |  Solar Power (7)  |  Sunlight (9)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Thermodynamics (17)  |  Tidal Power (2)  |  Tide (8)  |  Ultimate (27)  |  Uniform (5)  |  Unite (6)  |  Water Power (3)  |  Wind Power (6)  |  Work (198)  |  World (231)

Heat may be considered, either in respect of its quantity, or of its intensity. Thus two lbs. of water, equally heated, must contain double the quantity that one of them does, though the thermometer applied to them separately, or together, stands at precisely the same point, because it requires double the time to heat two lbs. as it does to heat one.
In Alexander Law, Notes of Black's Lectures, vol. 1, 5. Cited in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography: Volumes 1-2 (1981), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Heat (48)  |  Intensity (15)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Thermometer (3)

How did I discover saccharin? Well, it was partly by accident and partly by study. I had worked a long time on the compound radicals and substitution products of coal tar... One evening I was so interested in my laboratory that I forgot about my supper till quite late, and then rushed off for a meal without stopping to wash my hands. I sat down, broke a piece of bread, and put it to my lips. It tasted unspeakably sweet. I did not ask why it was so, probably because I thought it was some cake or sweetmeat. I rinsed my mouth with water, and dried my moustache with my napkin, when, to my surprise the napkin tasted sweeter than the bread. Then I was puzzled. I again raised my goblet, and, as fortune would have it, applied my mouth where my fingers had touched it before. The water seemed syrup. It flashed on me that I was the cause of the singular universal sweetness, and I accordingly tasted the end of my thumb, and found it surpassed any confectionery I had ever eaten. I saw the whole thing at once. I had discovered some coal tar substance which out-sugared sugar. I dropped my dinner, and ran back to the laboratory. There, in my excitement, I tasted the contents of every beaker and evaporating dish on the table.
Interview with American Analyst. Reprinted in Pacific Record of Medicine and Surgery (1886), 1, No. 3, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (25)  |  Artificial (13)  |  Bread (7)  |  Cake (2)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Finger (14)  |  Fortune (15)  |  Meal (9)  |  Mouth (10)  |  Puzzle (16)  |  Research (360)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Serendipity (10)  |  Sugar (8)  |  Sweetness (4)  |  Taste (16)  |  Thumb (4)  |  Touch (19)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrival (7)  |  Curiosity (52)  |  Damned (2)  |  Death (183)  |  Department (11)  |  Dream (39)  |  Effect (72)  |  Eternity (22)  |  Experience (132)  |  Fever (5)  |  Fire (59)  |  Freeze (3)  |  Game (28)  |  Happening (23)  |  Hell (13)  |  Imagination (130)  |  Impossibility (32)  |  Improbable (3)  |  Kettle (2)  |  Monkey (26)  |  Opening (8)  |  Order (60)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Physicist (74)  |  Possibility (70)  |  Room (11)  |  Rush (5)  |  William Shakespeare (63)  |  Shuffle (3)  |  Sonnet (3)  |  Special (25)  |  Torment (5)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (16)  |  Walk (24)  |  Window (11)

I had this experience at the age of eight. My parents gave me a microscope. I don’t recall why, but no matter. I then found my own little world, completely wild and unconstrained, no plastic, no teacher, no books, no anything predictable. At first I did not know the names of the water-drop denizens or what they were doing. But neither did the pioneer microscopists. Like them, I graduated to looking at butterfly scales and other miscellaneous objects. I never thought of what I was doing in such a way, but it was pure science. As true as could be of any child so engaged, I was kin to Leeuwenhoek, who said that his work “was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more that most other men.”
In The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth (2010), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (60)  |  Book (100)  |  Butterfly (9)  |  Child (90)  |  Complete (13)  |  Craving (5)  |  Drop (7)  |  Enjoyment (14)  |  Experience (132)  |  Find (50)  |  Graduation (3)  |  Kin (5)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (15)  |  Little (29)  |  Microscope (47)  |  Name (58)  |  Parent (24)  |  Pioneer (8)  |  Plastic (11)  |  Praise (9)  |  Predictability (5)  |  Pure Science (7)  |  Pursuit (34)  |  Reside (4)  |  Scale (21)  |  Teacher (54)  |  Wild (12)  |  Work (198)  |  World (231)

I have satisfied myself that the [cosmic] rays are not generated by the formation of new matter in space, a process which would be like water running up a hill. Nor do they come to any appreciable amount from the stars. According to my investigations the sun emits a radiation of such penetrative power that it is virtually impossible to absorb it in lead or other substances. ... This ray, which I call the primary solar ray, gives rise to a secondary radiation by impact against the cosmic dust scattered through space. It is the secondary radiation which now is commonly called the cosmic ray, and comes, of course, equally from all directions in space. [The article continues: The phenomena of radioactivity are not the result of forces within the radioactive substances but are caused by this ray emitted by the sun. If radium could be screened effectively against this ray it would cease to be radioactive, he said.]
Quoted in 'Tesla, 75, Predicts New Power Source', New York Times (5 Jul 1931), Section 2, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (2)  |  Cosmic Ray (5)  |  Emit (2)  |  Hill (14)  |  Investigation (83)  |  Lead (33)  |  Matter (135)  |  Penetration (10)  |  Power (103)  |  Radiation (13)  |  Radioactivity (21)  |  Solar Energy (13)  |  Space (68)  |  Star (132)  |  Sun (115)

I now saw very distinctly that these were little eels or worms... Lying huddled together and wriggling, just as if you saw with your naked eye a whole tubful of very little eels and water, the eels moving about in swarms; and the whole water seemed to be alive with the multitudinous animalcules. For me this was among all the marvels that I have discovered in nature the most marvellous of all, and I must say that, for my part, no more pleasant sight has yet met my eye than this of so many thousands of living creatures in one small drop of water, all huddling and moving, but each creature having its own motion.
Letter to H. Oldenburg, 9 Oct 1676. In The Collected Letters of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (l957), Vol. 2, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Animalcule (8)  |  Microorganism (19)  |  Microscope (47)

I think it would be a very rash presumption to think that nowhere else in the cosmos has nature repeated the strange experiment which she has performed on earth—that the whole purpose of creation has been staked on this one planet alone. It is probable that dotted through the cosmos there are other suns which provide the energy for life to attendant planets. It is apparent, however, that planets with just the right conditions of temperature, oxygen, water and atmosphere necessary for life are found rarely.
But uncommon as a habitable planet may be, non-terrestrial life exists, has existed and will continue to exist. In the absence of information, we can only surmise that the chance that it surpasses our own is as good as that it falls below our level.
As quoted by H. Gordon Garbedian in 'Ten Great Riddles That Call For Solution by Scientists', New York Times (5 Oct 1930), XX4. Garbedian gave no citation to a source for Shapley’s words. However, part of this quote is very similar to that of Sir Arthur Eddington: “It would indeed be rash to assume that nowhere else has Nature repeated the strange experiment which she has performed on the earth,” from 'Man’s Place in the Universe', Harper’s Magazine (Oct 1928), 157 573.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (5)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Chance (77)  |  Condition (68)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Creation (129)  |  Earth (250)  |  Energy (103)  |  Existence (150)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (16)  |  Information (56)  |  Life (460)  |  Nature (534)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Nowhere (8)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Planet (84)  |  Presumption (6)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Rare (14)  |  Rash (2)  |  Repeat (11)  |  Stake (7)  |  Strange (17)  |  Sun (115)  |  Surpass (4)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Uncommon (4)

I took a glass retort, capable of containing eight ounces of water, and distilled fuming spirit of nitre according to the usual method. In the beginning the acid passed over red, then it became colourless, and lastly again all red: no sooner did this happen, than I took away the receiver; and tied to the mouth of the retort a bladder emptied of air, which I had moistened in its inside with milk of lime lac calcis, (i.e. lime-water, containing more quicklime than water can dissolve) to prevent its being corroded by the acid. Then I continued the distillation, and the bladder gradually expanded. Here-upon I left every thing to cool, tied up the bladder, and took it off from the mouth of the retort.— I filled a ten-ounce glass with this air and put a small burning candle into it; when immediately the candle burnt with a large flame, of so vivid a light that it dazzled the eyes. I mixed one part of this air with three parts of air, wherein fire would not burn; and this mixture afforded air, in every respect familiar to the common sort. Since this air is absolutely necessary for the generation of fire, and makes about one-third of our common air, I shall henceforth, for shortness sake call it empyreal air, [literally fire-air] the air which is unserviceable for the fiery phenomenon, and which makes abut two-thirds of common air, I shall for the future call foul air [literally corrupted air].
Chemische Abhandlung von der Luft und dem Feuer (1777), Chemical Observations and Experiments on Air and Fire (1780), trans. J. R. Forster, 34-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (14)  |  Air (84)  |  Bladder (2)  |  Burning (13)  |  Candle (9)  |  Corrosion (3)  |  Dazzling (7)  |  Distillation (7)  |  Fire (59)  |  Flame (13)  |  Fume (5)  |  Generation (56)  |  Glass (19)  |  Light (117)  |  Mixture (11)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Receiver (4)  |  Retort (2)  |  Spirit (52)  |  Vivid (8)

I want to get out in the water. I want to see fish, real fish, not fish in a laboratory.
Interview (27 Jan 1991), on Academy of Achievement website.
Science quotes on:  |  Fish (33)  |  Laboratory (75)

If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in Water.
From essay 'The Flow of the River', collected in The Immense Journey: An Imaginative Naturalist Explores the Mysteries of Man and Nature (1957, 1959), 15. The author is commenting on a rain pond on a flat roof seen from his office window, commenting on its “spatter of green algae” and a submarining water beetle representing how life can spring from even this puddle of water.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)  |  Magic (22)

If [science] tends to thicken the crust of ice on which, as it were, we are skating, it is all right. If it tries to find, or professes to have found, the solid ground at the bottom of the water it is all wrong. Our business is with the thickening of this crust by extending our knowledge downward from above, as ice gets thicker while the frost lasts; we should not try to freeze upwards from the bottom.
Samuel Bulter, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 329.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (8)  |  Business (27)  |  Crust (10)  |  Extend (6)  |  Freezing (8)  |  Frost (6)  |  Ground (18)  |  Ice (17)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Profess (2)  |  Right (49)  |  Solid (14)  |  Tendency (18)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Try (34)  |  Upward (2)  |  Wrong (50)

In a great number of the cosmogonic myths the world is said to have developed from a great water, which was the prime matter. In many cases, as for instance in an Indian myth, this prime matter is indicated as a solution, out of which the solid earth crystallized out.
In Theories of Solutions (1912), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmogony (3)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Development (122)  |  Great (62)  |  Indian (7)  |  Matter (135)  |  Myth (24)  |  Origin Of Earth (6)  |  Prime (4)  |  Solid (14)  |  Solution (109)  |  World (231)

In fact, the thickness of the Earth's atmosphere, compared with the size of the Earth, is in about the same ratio as the thickness of a coat of shellac on a schoolroom globe is to the diameter of the globe. That's the air that nurtures us and almost all other life on Earth, that protects us from deadly ultraviolet light from the sun, that through the greenhouse effect brings the surface temperature above the freezing point. (Without the greenhouse effect, the entire Earth would plunge below the freezing point of water and we'd all be dead.) Now that atmosphere, so thin and fragile, is under assault by our technology. We are pumping all kinds of stuff into it. You know about the concern that chlorofluorocarbons are depleting the ozone layer; and that carbon dioxide and methane and other greenhouse gases are producing global warming, a steady trend amidst fluctuations produced by volcanic eruptions and other sources. Who knows what other challenges we are posing to this vulnerable layer of air that we haven't been wise enough to foresee?
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Assault (5)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Carbon Dioxide (14)  |  Challenge (15)  |  Concern (30)  |  Death (183)  |  Diameter (5)  |  Earth (250)  |  Eruption (3)  |  Freezing Point (2)  |  Global Warming (19)  |  Globe (20)  |  Greenhouse Gas (2)  |  Layer (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Light (117)  |  Methane (3)  |  Nurture (6)  |  Ozone (3)  |  Pump (4)  |  Ratio (9)  |  School (36)  |  Source (33)  |  Stuff (8)  |  Sun (115)  |  Surface (37)  |  Technology (98)  |  Temperature (23)  |  Thickness (4)  |  Thin (3)  |  Trend (8)  |  Volcano (24)  |  Vulnerability (2)  |  Wisdom (91)

In my understanding of God I start with certain firm beliefs. One is that the laws of nature are not broken. We do not, of course, know all these laws yet, but I believe that such laws exist. I do not, therefore, believe in the literal truth of some miracles which are featured in the Christian Scriptures, such as the Virgin Birth or water into wine. ... God works, I believe, within natural laws, and, according to natural laws, these things happen.
Essay 'Science Will Never Give Us the Answers to All Our Questions', collected in Henry Margenau, and Roy Abraham Varghese (eds.), Cosmos, Bios, Theos (1992), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  According (7)  |  Belief (139)  |  Birth (47)  |  Broken (5)  |  Christian (5)  |  Exist (13)  |  God (234)  |  Happen (8)  |  Know (25)  |  Law Of Nature (30)  |  Literal (4)  |  Miracle (25)  |  Natural Law (7)  |  Science And Religion (159)  |  Scripture (3)  |  Truth (450)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Virgin (2)  |  Wine (11)  |  Work (198)

In the beginning was the book of Nature. For eon after eon, the pages of the book turned with no human to read them. No eye wondered at the ignition of the sun, the coagulation of the earth, the birth of the moon, the solidification of a terrestrial continent, or the filling of the seas. Yet when the first primitive algae evolved to float on the waters of this ocean, a promise was born—a hope that someday all the richness and variety of the phenomena of the universe would be read with appreciative eyes.
Opening paragraph in Gary G. Tibbetts, How the Great Scientists Reasoned: The Scientific Method in Action (2012), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Algae (3)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Birth (47)  |  Book (100)  |  Born (5)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Continent (22)  |  Eon (3)  |  Evolution (342)  |  Eye (67)  |  Filling (3)  |  Float (8)  |  Hope (50)  |  Human (168)  |  Moon (78)  |  Nature (534)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Page (9)  |  Phenomenon (114)  |  Primitive (17)  |  Promise (13)  |  Read (32)  |  Richness (8)  |  Sea (57)  |  Someday (3)  |  Sun (115)  |  Terrestrial (7)  |  Turn (22)  |  Universe (291)  |  Variety (29)  |  Wonder (64)

In war, science has proven itself an evil genius; it has made war more terrible than it ever was before. Man used to be content to slaughter his fellowmen on a single plane — the earth's surface. Science has taught him to go down into the water and shoot up from below and to go up into the clouds and shoot down from above, thus making the battlefield three times a bloody as it was before; but science does not teach brotherly love. Science has made war so hellish that civilization was about to commit suicide; and now we are told that newly discovered instruments of destruction will make the cruelties of the late war seem trivial in comparison with the cruelties of wars that may come in the future.
Proposed summation written for the Scopes Monkey Trial (1925), in Genevieve Forbes Herrick and John Origen Herrick ,The Life of William Jennings Bryan (1925), 405. This speech was prepared for delivery at the trial, but was never heard there, as both sides mutually agreed to forego arguments to the jury.
Science quotes on:  |  Aircraft (4)  |  Battlefield (2)  |  Brother (7)  |  Civilization (90)  |  Contentment (8)  |  Cruelty (7)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Earth (250)  |  Evil (31)  |  Future (110)  |  Genius (92)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Love (64)  |  Proof (136)  |  Science (875)  |  Submarine (5)  |  Suicide (10)  |  Surface (37)  |  Trivial (14)  |  War (79)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (48)  |  Air (84)  |  Assignment (6)  |  Author (18)  |  Being (34)  |  Constitution (12)  |  Crowd (4)  |  Delight (22)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Earth (250)  |  Employment (16)  |  Equality (7)  |  Evening (9)  |  Existence (150)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (67)  |  Faculty (21)  |  Feeling (47)  |  Fly (28)  |  Gratification (8)  |  Happy (4)  |  Insect (38)  |  Intent (5)  |  Joy (25)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (6)  |  Motion (64)  |  Myriad (8)  |  Nature (534)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (3)  |  Office (8)  |  Probability (56)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (16)  |  Sport (7)  |  Spring (17)  |  Summer (10)  |  Swarm (3)  |  Tribe (2)  |  Try (34)  |  Variety (29)  |  View (48)  |  Whole (46)  |  Wing (16)  |  World (231)  |  Youth (32)

It is in the nature of water ... to become transformed into earth through a predominating earthy virtue; ... it is in the nature of earth to become transformed into water through a predominating aqueous virtue.
Avicenna
Congelatione et Conglutinatione Lapidium (1021-23), trans. E. J. Hohnyard and D. C. Mandeville (1927), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (250)

It is only those who know a little of nature, who fancy they know much. I have heard a young man say, after hearing a few popular chemical lectures, and seeing a few bottle and squirt experiments: Oh, water—water is only oxygen and hydrogen!—as if he knew all about it. While the true chemist would smile sadly enough at the the youth's hasty conceit, and say in his heart: 'Well, he is a lucky fellow.'
'Thoughts in a Gravel Pit', a lecture delivered at the Mechanics' Institute, Odiham (1857). The Works of Charles Kingsley (1880), 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Knowledge (679)

It is scientists, not sceptics, who are most willing to consider explanations that conflict with their own. And far from quashing dissent, it is the scientists, not the sceptics, who do most to acknowledge gaps in their studies and point out the limitations of their data—which is where sceptics get much of the mud they fling at the scientists. By contrast, the [sceptics] are not trying to build a theory of anything. They have set the bar much lower, and are happy muddying the waters.
Editorial, Nature (28 Jul 2011), 475, 423-424.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgement (5)  |  Build (23)  |  Climate Change (25)  |  Conflict (27)  |  Consider (12)  |  Contrast (3)  |  Data (59)  |  Dissent (5)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Gap (9)  |  Global Warming (19)  |  Happiness (58)  |  Limitation (10)  |  Mud (12)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Skeptic (5)  |  Study (157)  |  Theory (353)  |  Trying (5)  |  Willing (2)

It is supposed that the ancients were ignorant of the law in hydraulics, by which water, in a tube, will rise as high as the fountain-head; and hence they carried their stupendous aqueducts horizontally, from hill-top to hill-top, upon lofty arches, with an incredible expenditure of labor and money. The knowledge of a single law, now familiar to every well-instructed school-boy,— namely, that water seeks a level, and, if not obstructed, will find it,—enables the poorest man of the present day to do what once demanded the wealth of an empire. The beautiful fragments of the ancient Roman aqueducts, which have survived the ravage of centuries, are often cited to attest the grandeur and power of their builders. To me, they are monuments, not of their power, but of their weakness.
In Thoughts Selected From the Writings of Horace Mann (1872), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Grandeur (11)  |  Level (16)  |  Monument (13)  |  Roman (4)  |  Weakness (14)

It is the triumph of civilization that at last communities have obtained such a mastery over natural laws that they drive and control them. The winds, the water, electricity, all aliens that in their wild form were dangerous, are now controlled by human will, and are made useful servants.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (90)  |  Community (27)  |  Control (41)  |  Dangerous (11)  |  Electricity (82)  |  Mastery (10)  |  Natural Law (7)  |  Obtain (14)  |  Servant (5)  |  Triumph (21)  |  Wild (12)  |  Wind (28)

It would indeed be a great delusion, if we stated that those sports of Nature [we find] enclosed in rocks are there by chance or by some vague creative power. Ah, that would be superficial indeed! In reality, those shells, which once were alive in water and are now dead and decomposed, were made thus by time not Nature; and what we now find as very hard, figured stone, was once soft mud and which received the impression of the shape of a shell, as I have frequently demonstrated.
La vana speculazione disingannata del senso (1670), trans. Ezio Vaccari, 83-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (77)  |  Creation (129)  |  Dead (16)  |  Decomposition (10)  |  Delusion (5)  |  Demonstration (29)  |  Figure (13)  |  Impression (32)  |  Life (460)  |  Mud (12)  |  Nature (534)  |  Power (103)  |  Reality (67)  |  Rock (54)  |  Shape (20)  |  Shell (17)  |  Sport (7)  |  Stone (20)  |  Superficial (6)  |  Time (170)

It's a numbers game—in a dense urban area there are so many of us that even unintentional pollution would cause all the crap we see in the water.
Anonymous
Posted by 'Lisa' (6 Mar 2008), Reply in blog 'Emerald City' to item 'The Plague that is the plastic bag, in photos', Los Angeles Times website (1 Mar 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Environment (75)  |  Pollution (16)

Life can be thought of as water kept at the right temperature in the right atmosphere in the right light for a long enough period of time.
You and The Universe (1958), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Life (460)

Life is water, dancing to the tune of solids.
From Perspect. Biol. Med. (1971), 12, 239. As cited by John G Watterson, 'The Wave-Cluster Model of Water-Protein Interactions',in David G Green, Complex Systems: From Biology to Computation (1993), 36. Also quoted as "Life is water, dancing to the tune of macro molecules," by Gerald H. Pollack and Ivan L. Cameron, in Water and the Cell (2006), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Dance (5)  |  Life (460)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Tune (3)

Medicine rests upon four pillars—philosophy, astronomy, alchemy, and ethics. The first pillar is the philosophical knowledge of earth and water; the second, astronomy, supplies its full understanding of that which is of fiery and airy nature; the third is an adequate explanation of the properties of all the four elements—that is to say, of the whole cosmos—and an introduction into the art of their transformations; and finally, the fourth shows the physician those virtues which must stay with him up until his death, and it should support and complete the three other pillars.
Vas Buch Paragranum (c.1529-30), in J. Jacobi (ed.), Paracelsus: Selected Writings (1951), 133-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (4)  |  Air (84)  |  Alchemy (17)  |  Art (80)  |  Astronomy (105)  |  Completion (13)  |  Cosmos (23)  |  Death (183)  |  Earth (250)  |  Element (68)  |  Ethic (7)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Fire (59)  |  Four (3)  |  Introduction (15)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Physician (172)  |  Pillar (2)  |  Property (46)  |  Stay (3)  |  Supply (15)  |  Transformation (27)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Virtue (27)

Modern masters of science are much impressed with the need of beginning all inquiry with a fact. The ancient masters of religion were quite equally impressed with that necessity. They began with the fact of sin—a fact as practical as potatoes. Whether or not man could be washed in miraculous waters, there was no doubt at any rate that he wanted washing.
In Orthodoxy (1908, 1909), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Beginning (71)  |  Doubt (67)  |  Fact (325)  |  Impression (32)  |  Inquiry (14)  |  Master (19)  |  Miraculous (3)  |  Modern (44)  |  Necessity (78)  |  Need (57)  |  Potato (3)  |  Practical (30)  |  Religion (120)  |  Sin (13)  |  Want (32)  |  Wash (3)

My sense is that the most under-appreciated–and perhaps most under-researched–linkages between forests and food security are the roles that forest-based ecosystem services play in underpinning sustainable agricultural production. Forests regulate hydrological services including the quantity, quality, and timing of water available for irrigation. Forest-based bats and bees pollinate crops. Forests mitigate impacts of climate change and extreme weather events at the landscape scale.
In 'Forests and food security: What we know and need to know', Forest News online blog by the Center for International Forestry Research (20 Apr 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Availability (9)  |  Bat (3)  |  Bee (13)  |  Climate Change (25)  |  Crop (10)  |  Ecosystem (10)  |  Extreme (17)  |  Food (77)  |  Forest (54)  |  Impact (9)  |  Irrigation (3)  |  Landscape (14)  |  Linkage (3)  |  Production (72)  |  Quality (29)  |  Quantity (23)  |  Regulation (13)  |  Research (360)  |  Role (17)  |  Scale (21)  |  Security (14)  |  Weather (10)

Natural powers, principally those of steam and falling water, are subsidized and taken into human employment Spinning-machines, power-looms, and all the mechanical devices, acting, among other operatives, in the factories and work-shops, are but so many laborers. They are usually denominated labor-saving machines, but it would be more just to call them labor-doing machines. They are made to be active agents; to have motion, and to produce effect; and though without intelligence, they are guided by laws of science, which are exact and perfect, and they produce results, therefore, in general, more accurate than the human hand is capable of producing.
Speech in Senate (12 Mar 1838). In The Writings and Speeches of Daniel Webster (1903), Vol. 8, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Active (6)  |  Agent (13)  |  Capability (27)  |  Device (15)  |  Effect (72)  |  Employment (16)  |  Exact (16)  |  Factory (7)  |  Falling (3)  |  Hand (34)  |  Human (168)  |  Intelligence (76)  |  Labor-Saving (2)  |  Law (273)  |  Machine (56)  |  Mechanical (11)  |  Motion (64)  |  Natural (48)  |  Perfect (14)  |  Power (103)  |  Principal (6)  |  Production (72)  |  Result (129)  |  Science (875)  |  Steam (15)  |  Workshop (5)

New sources of power ... will surely be discovered. Nuclear energy is incomparably greater than the molecular energy we use today. The coal a man can get in a day can easily do five hundred times as much work as himself. Nuclear energy is at least one million times more powerful still. If the hydrogen atoms in a pound of water could be prevailed upon to combine and form helium, they would suffice to drive a thousand-horsepower engine for a whole year. If the electrons, those tiny planets of the atomic systems, were induced to combine with the nuclei in hydrogen, the horsepower would be 120 times greater still. There is no question among scientists that this gigantic source of energy exists. What is lacking is the match to set the bonfire aight, or it may be the detonator to cause the dynamite to explode. The scientists are looking for this.
[In his last major speech to the House of Commons on 1 Mar 1955, Churchill quoted from his original printed article, nearly 25 years earlier.]
'Fifty Years Hence'. Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57:3, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Dynamite (2)  |  Electron (43)  |  Energy (103)  |  Engine (10)  |  Fusion (7)  |  Helium (6)  |  Hydrogen (25)  |  Nuclear Bomb (4)  |  Nucleus (21)

Ninety-nine and nine-tenths of the earth’s volume must forever remain invisible and untouchable. Because more than 97 per cent of it is too hot to crystallize, its body is extremely weak. The crust, being so thin, must bend, if, over wide areas, it becomes loaded with glacial ice, ocean water or deposits of sand and mud. It must bend in the opposite sense if widely extended loads of such material be removed. This accounts for … the origin of chains of high mountains … and the rise of lava to the earth’s surface.
Presidential speech to the Geological Society of America at Cambridge, Mass. (1932). As quoted in New York Times (20 Sep 1957), 23. Also summarized in Popular Mechanics (Apr 1933), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Bend (3)  |  Chain (21)  |  Crust (10)  |  Crystal (22)  |  Deposit (5)  |  Earth (250)  |  Glacier (7)  |  Ice (17)  |  Lava (2)  |  Load (3)  |  Material (60)  |  Mountain (66)  |  Mud (12)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Opposite (21)  |  Origin (36)  |  Removal (8)  |  Rise (14)  |  Sand (9)  |  Surface (37)

Nothing cools so fast as undue enthusiasm. Water that has boiled freezes sooner than any other.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Boil (4)  |  Cool (2)  |  Enthusiasm (20)  |  Fast (11)  |  Freeze (3)  |  Nothing (89)  |  Undue (3)

Now when you cut a forest, an ancient forest in particular, you are not just removing a lot of big trees and a few birds fluttering around in the canopy. You are drastically imperiling a vast array of species within a few square miles of you. The number of these species may go to tens of thousands. ... Many of them are still unknown to science, and science has not yet discovered the key role undoubtedly played in the maintenance of that ecosystem, as in the case of fungi, microorganisms, and many of the insects.
On Human Nature (2000). In John H. Morgan, Naturally Good (2005), 252.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (27)  |  Bird (57)  |  Canopy (2)  |  Deforestation (27)  |  Ecosystem (10)  |  Environment (75)  |  Forest (54)  |  Fungus (2)  |  Insect (38)  |  Key (18)  |  Microorganism (19)  |  Role (17)  |  Tree (88)  |  Unknown (40)

Nurses that attend lying-in women ought to have provided, and in order, every thing that may be necessary for the woman, accoucheur, midwife, and child; such as linnen and cloaths, well aired and warm, for the woman and the bed, which she must know how to prepare when there is occasion; together with nutmeg, sugar, spirit of hartshorn, vinegar, Hungary water, white or brown caudle ready made, and a glyster-pipe fitted.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 444
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Attend (3)  |  Bed (8)  |  Child (90)  |  Childbirth (2)  |  Cloth (2)  |  Know (25)  |  Linen (3)  |  Midwife (2)  |  Necessary (19)  |  Nurse (13)  |  Order (60)  |  Prepare (2)  |  Provide (13)  |  Ready-Made (2)  |  Sugar (8)  |  Vinegar (3)  |  Warm (4)  |  Woman (36)

On the whole, I cannot help saying that it appears to me not a little extraordinary, that a theory so new, and of such importance, overturning every thing that was thought to be the best established in chemistry, should rest on so very narrow and precarious a foundation, the experiments adduced in support of it being not only ambiguous or explicable on either hypothesis, but exceedingly few. I think I have recited them all, and that on which the greatest stress is laid, viz. That of the formation of water from the decomposition of the two kinds of air, has not been sufficiently repeated. Indeed it required so difficult and expensive an apparatus, and so many precautions in the use of it, that the frequent repetition of the experiment cannot be expected; and in these circumstances the practised experimenter cannot help suspecting the accuracy of the result and consequently the certainty of the conclusion.
Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston (1796), 57-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (34)  |  Air (84)  |  Ambiguity (6)  |  Apparatus (18)  |  Certainty (59)  |  Circumstance (25)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Decomposition (10)  |  Difficulty (76)  |  Establish (10)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Explanation (88)  |  Extraordinary (18)  |  Formation (34)  |  Foundation (31)  |  Hypothesis (150)  |  Importance (106)  |  Narrow (10)  |  New (107)  |  Precarious (4)  |  Repeat (11)  |  Result (129)  |  Support (26)  |  Theory (353)

One might talk about the sanity of the atom
the sanity of space
the sanity of the electron
the sanity of water—
For it is all alive
and has something comparable to that which we call sanity in ourselves.
The only oneness is the oneness of sanity.
'The Sane Universe', David Herbert Lawrence, The Works of D.H. Lawrence (1994), 428.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Electron (43)  |  Poem (76)  |  Space (68)

One tragic example of the loss of forests and then water is found in Ethiopia. The amount of its forested land has decreased from 40 to 1 percent in the last four decades. Concurrently, the amount of rainfall has declined to the point where the country is rapidly becoming a wasteland.
Al Gore
Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit (2006), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Environment (75)  |  Forest (54)

Organized Fossils are to the naturalist as coins to the antiquary; they are the antiquities of the earth; and very distinctly show its gradual regular formation, with the various changes inhabitants in the watery element.
Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils (1817), ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  Antiquary (2)  |  Antiquity (5)  |  Change (133)  |  Coin (3)  |  Formation (34)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Inhabitant (7)  |  Naturalist (27)  |  Organization (51)

Our studies have shown that all cases of typhoid of this type have arisen by contact, that is, carried directly from one person to another. There was no trace of a connection to drinking water.
'Die Bekämpfing des Typhus', Veröffentlichungen aus dem Gebiete des Militär-Sanitätswesens (1903), 21. Quoted in English in Thomas D. Brock, Robert Koch: A Life in Medicine and Bacteriology (1988), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Carrier (2)  |  Typhoid (4)

Passing just lately over this lake, … and examining this water next day, I found floating therein divers earthy particles, and some green streaks, spirally wound serpent-wise, and orderly arranged, after the manner of the copper or tin worms, which distillers use to cool their liquors as they distil over. The whole circumference of each of these streaks was about the thickness of a hair of one's head. … all consisted of very small green globules joined together: and there were very many small green globules as well. [The earliest recorded observation of the common green alga Spyrogyra.]
Letter to the Royal Society, London (7 Sep 1674). In John Carey, Eyewitness to Science (1997), 28-29
Science quotes on:  |  Globule (3)  |  Hair (9)  |  Lake (6)  |  Microscope (47)  |  Observation (264)  |  Serpent (3)

Penguins are an indicator of the health of our watery planet, and if they are unable to survive, we had better take notice or we might find our own survival threatened.
In Penguins (1998), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Health (93)  |  Indicator (4)  |  Penguin (3)  |  Planet (84)  |  Survival (32)  |  Survive (4)  |  Threat (9)  |  Unable (2)

Perhaps the most impressive illustration of all is to suppose that you could label the molecules in a tumbler of water. ... threw it anywhere you please on the earth, and went away from the earth for a few million years while all the water on the earth, the oceans, rivers, lakes and clouds had had time to mix up perfectly. Now supposing that perfect mixing had taken place, you come back to earth and draw a similar tumbler of water from the nearest tap, how many of those marked molecules would you expect to find in it? Well, the answer is 2000. There are 2000 times more molecules in a tumbler of water than there are tumblers of water in the whole earth.
In Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Atomic Theory', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 99-100.
Science quotes on:  |  Cloud (22)  |  Illustration (17)  |  Impressive (2)  |  Lake (6)  |  Million (29)  |  Mix (5)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Perfect (14)  |  River (34)  |  Thousand (32)  |  Time (170)  |  Year (69)

Pervasive depletion and overuse of water supplies, the high capital cost of new large water projects, rising pumping costs and worsening ecological damage call for a shift in the way water is valued, used and managed.
From a study Postel wrote for Worldwatch Institute, quoted in New York Times (22 Sep 1985), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Capital (9)  |  Cost (15)  |  Dam (2)  |  Damage (9)  |  Depletion (3)  |  Ecology (21)  |  High (12)  |  Large (22)  |  Management (6)  |  Pervasive (2)  |  Project (5)  |  Pump (4)  |  Shift (9)  |  Supply (15)  |  Use (54)  |  Value (63)

Plasma seems to have the kinds of properties one would like for life. It's somewhat like liquid water-—unpredictable and thus able to behave in an enormously complex fashion. It could probably carry as much information as DNA does. It has at least the potential for organizing itself in interesting ways.
Quoted in T.A. Heppenheimer, 'After The Sun Dies', Omni (1986), 8, No. 11, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  DNA (50)  |  Plasma (6)

POTABLE, n. Suitable for drinking. Water is said to be potable; indeed, some declare it our natural beverage, although even they find it palatable only when suffering from the recurrent disorder known as thirst, for which it is a medicine. Upon nothing has so great and diligent ingenuity been brought to bear in all ages and in all countries, except the most uncivilized, as upon the invention of substitutes for water. To hold that this general aversion to that liquid has no basis in the preservative instinct of the race is to be unscientific—and without science we are as the snakes and toads.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  260-261.
Science quotes on:  |  Humour (96)  |  Medicine (185)  |  Thirst (7)

Salt water when it turns into vapour becomes sweet, and the vapour does not form salt water when it condenses again. This I know by experiment. The same thing is true in every case of the kind: wine and all fluids that evaporate and condense back into a liquid state become water. They all are water modified by a certain admixture, the nature of which determines their flavour.
[Aristotle describing his distillation experiment.]
Aristotle
Meteorology (350 B.C.), Book II, translated by E. W. Webster. Internet Classics Archive, (classics.mit.edu).
Science quotes on:  |  Admixture (2)  |  Brine (3)  |  Condensation (6)  |  Desalination (2)  |  Distillation (7)  |  Evaporation (3)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Liquid (12)  |  Salt (17)  |  Solution (109)  |  Wine (11)

Science has thus, most unexpectedly, placed in our hands a new power of great but unknown energy. It does not wake the winds from their caverns; nor give wings to water by the urgency of heat; nor drive to exhaustion the muscular power of animals; nor operate by complicated mechanism; nor summon any other form of gravitating force, but, by the simplest means—the mere contact of metallic surfaces of small extent, with feeble chemical agents, a power everywhere diffused through nature, but generally concealed from our senses, is mysteriously evolved, and by circulation in insulated wires, it is still more mysteriously augmented, a thousand and a thousand fold, until it breaks forth with incredible energy.
Comment upon 'The Notice of the Electro-Magnetic Machine of Mr. Thomas Davenport, of Brandon, near Rutland, Vermont, U.S.', The Annals of Electricity, Magnetism, & Chemistry; and Guardian of Experimental Science (1838), 2, 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (143)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Cavern (3)  |  Circulation (12)  |  Complicated (14)  |  Concealment (7)  |  Contact (12)  |  Electromagnetism (14)  |  Energy (103)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Gravity (59)  |  Heat (48)  |  Means (25)  |  Mechanism (25)  |  Mere (9)  |  Metal (19)  |  Muscle (24)  |  Mystery (74)  |  Operation (53)  |  Power (103)  |  Science (875)  |  Sense (104)  |  Simplicity (92)  |  Summon (3)  |  Unknown (40)  |  Wind (28)  |  Wing (16)  |  Wire (10)

Scientists alone can establish the objectives of their research, but society, in extending support to science, must take account of its own needs. As a layman, I can suggest only with diffidence what some of the major tasks might be on your scientific agenda, but ... First, I would suggest the question of the conservation and development of our natural resources. In a recent speech to the General Assembly of the United Nations, I proposed a world-wide program to protect land and water, forests and wildlife, to combat exhaustion and erosion, to stop the contamination of water and air by industrial as well as nuclear pollution, and to provide for the steady renewal and expansion of the natural bases of life.
From Address to the Centennial Convocation of the National Academy of Sciences (22 Oct 1963), 'A Century of Scientific Conquest'. Online at The American Presidency Project.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Alone (13)  |  Combat (3)  |  Conservation (44)  |  Development (122)  |  Erosion (12)  |  Establish (10)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Expansion (18)  |  Forest (54)  |  Industrial (3)  |  Land (27)  |  Layman (8)  |  Life (460)  |  Major (6)  |  Natural Resource (11)  |  Need (57)  |  Nuclear (13)  |  Objective (18)  |  Pollution (16)  |  Program (7)  |  Propose (2)  |  Protect (4)  |  Question (159)  |  Recent (14)  |  Renewal (2)  |  Research (360)  |  Science (875)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Society (84)  |  Speech (19)  |  Stop (25)  |  Suggest (2)  |  Support (26)  |  Task (32)  |  United Nations (2)  |  Wildlife (5)  |  Worldwide (4)

Scientists themselves readily admit that they do not fully understand the consequences of our many-faceted assault upon the interwoven fabric of atmosphere, water, land and life in all its biological diversity. But things could also turn out to be worse than the current scientific best guess. In military affairs, policy has long been based on the dictum that we should be prepared for the worst case. Why should it be so different when the security is that of the planet and our long-term future?
Speech, 'Global Security Lecture' at Cambridge University (28 Apr 1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (5)  |  Assault (5)  |  Atmosphere (42)  |  Biodiversity (4)  |  Biology (83)  |  Consequence (44)  |  Diversity (32)  |  Fabric (6)  |  Future (110)  |  Guess (14)  |  Interwoven (3)  |  Land (27)  |  Life (460)  |  Military (6)  |  Planet (84)  |  Policy (10)  |  Scientist (237)  |  Security (14)  |  Understanding (231)  |  Worst (7)

Scripture and Nature agree in this, that all things were covered with water; how and when this aspect began, and how long it lasted, Nature says not, Scripture relates. That there was a watery fluid, however, at a time when animals and plants were not yet to be found, and that the fluid covered all things, is proved by the strata of the higher mountains, free from all heterogeneous material. And the form of these strata bears witness to the presence of a fluid, while the substance bears witness to the absence of heterogeneous bodies. But the similarity of matter and form in the strata of mountains which are different and distant from each other, proves that the fluid was universal.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 263-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (5)  |  Agreement (18)  |  Animal (143)  |  Covering (2)  |  Distance (26)  |  Fluid (6)  |  Heterogeneous (2)  |  Material (60)  |  Mountain (66)  |  Nature (534)  |  Plant (96)  |  Scripture (3)  |  Similarity (14)  |  Strata (15)  |  Substance (39)  |  Universality (9)  |  Witness (9)

See with what force yon river's crystal stream
Resists the weight of many a massy beam.
To sink the wood the more we vainly toil,
The higher it rebounds, with swift recoil.
Yet that the beam would of itself ascend
No man will rashly venture to contend.
Thus too the flame has weight, though highly rare,
Nor mounts but when compelled by heavier air.
De Rerum Natura, second book, as quoted in translation in Thomas Young, A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Beam (6)  |  Buoyancy (4)  |  Contend (2)  |  Flame (13)  |  Force (75)  |  Higher (18)  |  Mass (23)  |  Rare (14)  |  Rashness (2)  |  Recoil (3)  |  River (34)  |  Sink (6)  |  Stream (10)  |  Swift (2)  |  Toil (6)  |  Vain (15)  |  Venture (5)  |  Weight (41)  |  Wood (16)

Suppose a number of equal waves of water to move upon the surface of a stagnant lake, with a certain constant velocity, and to enter a narrow channel leading out of the lake. Suppose then another similar cause to have excited another equal series of waves, which arrive at the same time, with the first. Neither series of waves will destroy the other, but their effects will be combined: if they enter the channel in such a manner that the elevations of one series coincide with those of the other, they must together produce a series of greater joint elevations; but if the elevations of one series are so situated as to correspond to the depressions of the other, they must exactly fill up those depressions. And the surface of the water must remain smooth; at least I can discover no alternative, either from theory or from experiment.
A Reply to the Animadversions of the Edinburgh Reviewers on Some Papers Published in the Philosophical Transactions (1804), 17-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (11)  |  Channel (6)  |  Coincidence (6)  |  Combination (37)  |  Constant (14)  |  Depression (8)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Elevation (4)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Greater (16)  |  Interference (7)  |  Lake (6)  |  Narrow (10)  |  Smooth (8)  |  Stagnant (2)  |  Supposition (25)  |  Surface (37)  |  Theory (353)  |  Velocity (5)  |  Wave (32)

Technology, when misused, poisons air, soil, water and lives. But a world without technology would be prey to something worse: the impersonal ruthlessness of the natural order, in which the health of a species depends on relentless sacrifice of the weak.
Editorial, 'Nature As Demon', (29 Aug 1986), A26.
Science quotes on:  |  Dependance (3)  |  Health (93)  |  Impersonal (2)  |  Misuse (6)  |  Natural Order (2)  |  Poison (23)  |  Prey (6)  |  Relentless (3)  |  Ruthlessness (3)  |  Sacrifice (12)  |  Soil (24)  |  Species (96)  |  Technology (98)  |  Weak (10)  |  Worse (10)

That Mettals, Small Stones, Rocky-Stones, Sulphurs, Salts, and so the whole rank of Minerals, do find their Seeds in the Matrix or Womb of the Waters, which contain the Reasons, Gifts, Knowledges, Progresses, Appointments, Offices, and Durations of the same.
Oriatrike: Or, Physick Refined, trans. John Chandler (1662), 693.
Science quotes on:  |  Mineral (24)  |  Sulphur (9)

That's all right, but you still haven't found out what makes the bath water gargle when you pull the plug out.
[Remark to a scientist who was showing him around the National Physical Laboratory.]
Quoted in Laura Ward, Foolish Words: The Most Stupid Words Ever Spoken (2003), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Bath (4)  |  Discovery (360)  |  Finding (19)

The 31th of May, I perceived in the same water more of those Animals, as also some that were somewhat bigger. And I imagine, that [ten hundred thousand] of these little Creatures do not equal an ordinary grain of Sand in bigness: And comparing them with a Cheese-mite (which may be seen to move with the naked eye) I make the proportion of one of these small Water-creatures to a Cheese-mite, to be like that of a Bee to a Horse: For, the circumference of one of these little Animals in water, is not so big as the thickness of a hair in a Cheese-mite.
Letter to H. Oldenburg, 9 Oct 1676. In The Collected Letters of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1957), Vol. 2, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (13)  |  Creature (51)  |  Horse (17)  |  Microorganism (19)  |  Microscope (47)

The air, the water and the ground are free gifts to man and no one has the power to portion them out in parcels. Man must drink and breathe and walk and therefore each man has a right to his share of each.
The Prairie (1827).
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Breathe (9)  |  Drink (15)  |  Free (13)  |  Gift (26)  |  Ground (18)  |  Man (258)  |  Portion (6)  |  Power (103)  |  Right (49)  |  Share (11)  |  Walk (24)

The body of the earth is of the nature of a fish... because it draws water as its breath instead of air.
'Philosophy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Breath (15)  |  Earth (250)  |  Fish (33)

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea.
Quoted in Reader's Digest (Apr 1964). In M. P. Singh, Quote Unquote (2007), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (49)  |  Salt (17)  |  Sea (57)  |  Sweat (7)  |  Tear (11)

The fall of a given weight from a height of around 365 meters corresponds to the heating of an equal weight of water from 0° to 1°.
'Bemerkungen über die Käfte der unbelebten Natur', Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie (1842), 42:2, 29. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation Of Energy (17)  |  Fall (30)  |  Heat (48)  |  Weight (41)

The first drizzling shower is born...
[Then] the flood comes down,
Threatening with deluge this devoted town. ...
Now from all parts the swelling kennels flow,
And bear their trophies with them as they go:
Filth of all hues and odors seem to tell
What street they sailed from, by their sight and smell.
They, as each torrent drives with rapid force,
From Smithfield or St. Pulchre’s shape their course,
And in huge confluence joined at Snow Hill ridge,
Fall from the conduit prone to Holborn Bridge.
Sweepings from butchers’ stalls, dung, guts, and blood.
Drowned puppies, stinking sprats, all drenched in mud,
Dead cats, and turnip tops, come tumbling down the flood.
Poem, 'A Description of a City Shower', first published in the Tatler, No. 238 (17 Oct 1710). Reprinted in Pope and Swift's Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711, 1721), 225-227. Swift wrote at the time in London that the street surface open gutters (kennels) were the primary means for handling stormwater flows and disposing of every kind of human and animal waste. “Devoted” means overwhelmed. Smithfield was a market with butchers' shops and cattle and sheep pens. St. Sepulchre refers to a church in Holborn. The Holborn Conduit was taken down in 1746. Below Holborn Bridge ran the Fleet Ditch (a stagnant remnant of the former Fleet River after its water supply had been diverted). It was joined by a stream called Snow Hill. Notes printed with the poem collected in Jay Parini, The Wadsworth Anthology Of Poetry (2005), 723-724.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (63)  |  Butcher (3)  |  Cat (16)  |  Deluge (5)  |  Dung (2)  |  Flood (16)  |  Guts (2)  |  Mud (12)  |  Sewer (2)  |  Shower (2)  |  Smell (9)  |  Stall (2)  |  Torrent (2)  |  Turnip (2)

The first possibility of rural cleanliness lies in water supply.
Letter to the Medical Officer of Health (Nov 1891)
Science quotes on:  |  Hygiene (7)  |  Rural (2)

The first principles of the universe are atoms and empty space. Everything else is merely thought to exist. The worlds are unlimited. They come into being and perish. Nothing can come into being from that which is not nor pass away into that which is not. Further, the atoms are unlimited in size and number, and they are borne along in the whole universe in a vortex, and thereby generate all composite things—-fire, water, air, earth. For even these are conglomerations of given atoms. And it is because of their solidarity that these atoms are impassive and unalterable. The sun and the moon have been composed of such smooth and spherical masses [i.e. atoms], and so also the soul, which is identical with reason.
Diogenes Laertius IX, 44. Trans. R. D. Hicks (1925), Vol. 2, 453-5. An alternate translation of the opening is "Nothing exists except atoms and empty space; everything else is opinion."
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Fire (59)  |  Matter (135)  |  Moon (78)  |  Sun (115)  |  Universe (291)

The next decade will perhaps raise us a step above despair to a cleaner, clearer wisdom and biology cannot fail to help in this. As we become increasingly aware of the ethical problems raised by science and technology, the frontiers between the biological and social sciences are clearly of critical importance—in population density and problems of hunger, psychological stress, pollution of the air and water and exhaustion of irreplaceable resources.
As quoted in 'H. Bentley Glass', New York Times (12 Jan 1970), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Awareness (14)  |  Biology (83)  |  Clearer (3)  |  Decade (8)  |  Despair (13)  |  Environment (75)  |  Ethics (23)  |  Exhaustion (11)  |  Frontier (5)  |  Help (18)  |  Hunger (7)  |  Importance (106)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Pollution (16)  |  Population (41)  |  Problem (180)  |  Psychology (69)  |  Resource (15)  |  Science (875)  |  Social Science (17)  |  Stress (4)  |  Technology (98)  |  Wisdom (91)

The quality of Mersey is not strained. A century ago the river of that name, in England, afforded not less than sixty varieties of fish; now it affords none. (1876)
Newspaper
Description of the turbid, polluted River Mersey, Liverpool, England in the nineteenth century. In Daily Alta California (21 Aug 1876), 28, No. 9633, 2. The expression “The quality of Mersey is not strained” is seen repeated in various sources through the years to the present. The pun refers a line in Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice that “The quality of mercy is not strained.” An earlier mention appears in Harper's New Monthly Magazine (Dec 1870), 42, No. 247, 158.
Science quotes on:  |  Environment (75)  |  Fish (33)  |  Pun (2)  |  Quality (29)  |  River (34)  |  River Mersey (2)  |  Strained (2)  |  Water Pollution (2)

The ruthless destruction of their forests by the Chinese is one of the reasons why famine and plague today hold this nation in their sinister grasp. Denudation, wherever practiced, leaves naked soil; floods and erosion follow, and when the soil is gone men must also go—and the process does not take long. The great plains of Eastern China were centuries ago transformed from forest into agricultural land. The mountain plateau of Central China have also within a few hundred years been utterly devastated of tree growth, and no attempt made at either natural or artificial reforestation. As a result, the water rushes off the naked slopes in veritable floods, gullying away the mountain sides, causing rivers to run muddy with yellow soil, and carrying enormous masses of fertile earth to the sea. Water courses have also changed; rivers become uncontrollable, and the water level of the country is lowered perceptibly. In consequence, the unfortunate people see their crops wither and die for lack of water when it is most needed.
Statement (11 May 1921) by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) concerning the famine in China in seven out of every ten years. Reported in 'Blames Deforestation: Department of Agriculture Ascribes Chinese Famine to it', New York Times (12 May 1921), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (19)  |  Artificial (13)  |  Attempt (41)  |  Central (8)  |  Century (38)  |  China (5)  |  Chinese (2)  |  Consequence (44)  |  Country (43)  |  Course (25)  |  Crop (10)  |  Deforestation (27)  |  Destruction (52)  |  Die (5)  |  Earth (250)  |  Erosion (12)  |  Famine (5)  |  Fertile (5)  |  Flood (16)  |  Follow (20)  |  Forest (54)  |  Grasp (11)  |  Growth (70)  |  Lack (14)  |  Land (27)  |  Level (16)  |  Mountain (66)  |  Naked (5)  |  Nation (47)  |  Natural (48)  |  Need (57)  |  People (72)  |  Plague (30)  |  Plain (11)  |  Reason (173)  |  Reforestation (2)  |  Result (129)  |  River (34)  |  Sea (57)  |  Sinister (7)  |  Soil (24)  |  Transform (3)  |  Tree (88)  |  Uncontrollable (3)  |  Unfortunate (3)  |  Utterly (4)  |  Wither (2)  |  Yellow (3)

The smallest particles of matter were said [by Plato] to be right-angled triangles which, after combining in pairs, ... joined together into the regular bodies of solid geometry; cubes, tetrahedrons, octahedrons and icosahedrons. These four bodies were said to be the building blocks of the four elements, earth, fire, air and water ... [The] whole thing seemed to be wild speculation. ... Even so, I was enthralled by the idea that the smallest particles of matter must reduce to some mathematical form ... The most important result of it all, perhaps, was the conviction that, in order to interpret the material world we need to know something about its smallest parts.
[Recalling how as a teenager at school, he found Plato's Timaeus to be a memorable poetic and beautiful view of atoms.]
In Werner Heisenberg and A.J. Pomerans (trans.) The Physicist's Conception of Nature (1958), 58-59. Quoted in Jagdish Mehra and Helmut Rechenberg, The Historical Development of Quantum Theory (2001), Vol. 2, 12. Cited in Mauro Dardo, Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics (2004), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Atom (164)  |  Body (88)  |  Building Block (4)  |  Conviction (26)  |  Cube (9)  |  Earth (250)  |  Element (68)  |  Fire (59)  |  Form (70)  |  Idea (226)  |  Importance (106)  |  Interpretation (38)  |  Material World (2)  |  Mathematics (367)  |  Matter (135)  |  Pair (2)  |  Particle (45)  |  Plato (29)  |  Result (129)  |  Speculation (44)  |  Tetrahedron (3)  |  Triangle (3)  |  Wild (12)

The velocity of light is one of the most important of the fundamental constants of Nature. Its measurement by Foucault and Fizeau gave as the result a speed greater in air than in water, thus deciding in favor of the undulatory and against the corpuscular theory. Again, the comparison of the electrostatic and the electromagnetic units gives as an experimental result a value remarkably close to the velocity of light–a result which justified Maxwell in concluding that light is the propagation of an electromagnetic disturbance. Finally, the principle of relativity gives the velocity of light a still greater importance, since one of its fundamental postulates is the constancy of this velocity under all possible conditions.
Studies in Optics (1927), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Conclusion (74)  |  Condition (68)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Constant (14)  |  Corpuscle (5)  |  Electrostatic (2)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Jean-Bernard-Léon Foucault (3)  |  Fundamental (59)  |  Importance (106)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (63)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Postulate (19)  |  Principle (97)  |  Propagation (7)  |  Relativity (33)  |  Result (129)  |  Speed Of Light (10)  |  Theory (353)  |  Unit (15)  |  Wave (32)

There are fewer chemical pollutants in the air. Our drinking water is safer. Our food standards have been raised. We've cleaned up more toxic waste sites in three years than the previous administrations did in twelve. The environment is cleaner, and we have fought off the most vigorous assault on environmental protection since we began to protect the environment in 1970. We are moving in the right direction to the 21st century.
Remarks at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (29 Oct 1996) while seeking re-election. American Presidency Project web page.
Science quotes on:  |  21st Century (3)  |  Administration (4)  |  Assault (5)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Drink (15)  |  Environment (75)  |  Food (77)  |  Protection (13)  |  Safety (22)  |  Site (5)  |  Standard (15)  |  Toxic Waste (2)

There are those who say that the human kidney was created to keep the blood pure, or more precisely, to keep our internal environment in an ideal balanced state. This I must deny. I grant that the human kidney is a marvelous organ, but I cannot grant that it was purposefully designed to excrete urine or to regulate the composition of the blood or to subserve the physiological welfare of Homo sapiens in any sense. Rather I contend that the human kidney manufactures the kind of urine that it does, and it maintains the blood in the composition which that fluid has, because this kidney has a certain functional architecture; and it owes that architecture not to design or foresight or to any plan, but to the fact that the earth is an unstable sphere with a fragile crust, to the geologic revolutions that for six hundred million years have raised and lowered continents and seas, to the predacious enemies, and heat and cold, and storms and droughts; to the unending succession of vicissitudes that have driven the mutant vertebrates from sea into fresh water, into desiccated swamps, out upon the dry land, from one habitation to another, perpetually in search of the free and independent life, perpetually failing, for one reason or another, to find it.
From Fish to Philosopher (1953), 210-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (24)  |  Balance (24)  |  Blood (63)  |  Cold (24)  |  Composition (30)  |  Contention (7)  |  Continent (22)  |  Creation (129)  |  Crust (10)  |  Denial (3)  |  Design (37)  |  Drought (6)  |  Dry (8)  |  Earth (250)  |  Enemy (26)  |  Environment (75)  |  Excretion (3)  |  Fact (325)  |  Failure (58)  |  Fluid (6)  |  Foresight (3)  |  Free (13)  |  Fresh (8)  |  Function (41)  |  Geology (145)  |  Grant (8)  |  Heat (48)  |  Homo Sapiens (11)  |  Human (168)  |  Ideal (26)  |  Independent (16)  |  Internal (6)  |  Keep (9)  |  Kidney (7)  |  Land (27)  |  Life (460)  |  Lowering (2)  |  Maintenance (7)  |  Manufacturing (16)  |  Marvel (16)  |  Organ (40)  |  Perpetual (3)  |  Physiology (41)  |  Plan (40)  |  Predator (3)  |  Purity (8)  |  Purpose (66)  |  Raise (6)  |  Reason (173)  |  Regulation (13)  |  Revolution (34)  |  French Saying (51)  |  Sea (57)  |  Search (40)  |  Sense (104)  |  Serve (13)  |  Sphere (12)  |  State (43)  |  Storm (13)  |  Succession (30)  |  Swamp (2)  |  Unstable (4)  |  Vertebrate (11)  |  Vicissitude (3)  |  Welfare (9)

There are three distinctions in the kinds of bodies, or three states, which have more especially claimed the attention of philosophical chemists; namely, those which are marked by the terms elastic fluids, liquids, and solids. A very familiar instance is exhibited to us in water, of a body, which, in certain circumstances, is capable of assuming all the three states. In steam we recognise a perfectly elastic fluid, in water, a perfect liquid, and in ice of a complete solid. These observations have tacitly led to the conclusion which seems universally adopted, that all bodies of sensible magnitude, whether liquid or solid, are constituted of a vast number of extremely small particles, or atoms of matter bound together by a force of attraction.
A New System of Chemical Philosophy (1808), Vol. 1, 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Theory (11)

There are various causes for the generation of force: a tensed spring, an air current, a falling mass of water, fire burning under a boiler, a metal that dissolves in an acid—one and the same effect can be produced by means of all these various causes. But in the animal body we recognise only one cause as the ultimate cause of all generation of force, and that is the reciprocal interaction exerted on one another by the constituents of the food and the oxygen of the air. The only known and ultimate cause of the vital activity in the animal as well as in the plant is a chemical process.
'Der Lebensprocess im Thiere und die Atmosphare', Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie (1841), 41, 215-7. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mo.yer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (14)  |  Activity (48)  |  Air (84)  |  Animal (143)  |  Boiler (4)  |  Cause (122)  |  Chemical (38)  |  Dissolve (5)  |  Effect (72)  |  Fire (59)  |  Food (77)  |  Force (75)  |  Interaction (11)  |  Metal (19)  |  Oxygen (34)  |  Plant (96)  |  Process (97)  |  Reaction (48)  |  Spring (17)  |  Steam (15)  |  Tension (4)  |  Wind (28)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Sea. It is the Gulf Stream.
Opening paragraph of The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (2)  |  Bottom (8)  |  Cold (24)  |  Drought (6)  |  Failure (58)  |  Flood (16)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (2)  |  Ocean (56)  |  River (34)  |  Warm (4)

There is more evidence to prove that saltiness [of the sea] is due to the admixture of some substance ... It is this stuff which makes salt water heavy (it weighs more than fresh water) and thick. The difference in consistency is such that ships with the same cargo very nearly sink in a river when they are quite fit to navigate in the sea. This circumstance has before now caused loss to shippers freighting their ships in a river. That the thicker consistency is due to an admixture of something is proved by the fact that if you make strong brine by the admixture of salt, eggs, even when they are full, float in it. It almost becomes like mud; such a quantity of earthy matter is there in the sea.
[Aristotle recognised the different density of fresh (river) or salty (sea) water. He describes an experiment using an egg (which sinks in fresh water) that floats in a strong brine solution.]
Aristotle
Meteorology (350 B.C.), Book II, translated by E. W. Webster. Internet Classics Archive, (classics.mit.edu).
Science quotes on:  |  Admixture (2)  |  Brine (3)  |  Buoyancy (4)  |  Cargo (2)  |  Density (8)  |  Experiment (369)  |  Navigation (6)  |  River (34)  |  Salt (17)  |  Sea (57)  |  Ship (18)  |  Sinking (4)  |  Solution (109)

There is no instrument for measuring the pressure of the Ether, which is probably millions of times greater: it is altogether too uniform for direct apprehension. A deep-sea fish has probably no means of apprehending the existence of water, it is too uniformly immersed in it: and that is our condition in regard to the Ether.
Ether and Reality: A Series of Discourses on the Many Functions of the Ether of Space (1925), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Continuity (17)  |  Ether (15)  |  Fish (33)  |  Instrument (40)  |  Measurement (112)  |  Sea (57)

There was once an Editor of the Chemical Society, given to dogmatic expressions of opinion, who once duly said firmly that 'isomer' was wrong usage and 'isomeride' was correct, because the ending 'er' always meant a 'do-er'. 'As in water?' snapped Sidgwick.
Obituary of Nevil Vincent Sidgwick by L. E Sutton, Proceedings of the Chemical Society (1958), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (14)  |  Dogmatism (5)  |  Editor (3)  |  Ending (2)  |  Expression (44)  |  Isomer (4)  |  Nomenclature (102)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Wrong (50)

There's plenty of water in the universe without life, but nowhere is there life without water.
In Sea Change: A Message of the Oceans (1995), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Life (460)  |  Nowhere (8)  |  Plenty (2)  |  Universe (291)

To have a railroad, there must have been first the discoverers, who found out the properties of wood and iron, fire and water, and their latent power to carry men over the earth; next the organizers, who put these elements together, surveyed the route, planned the structure, set men to grade the hill, to fill the valley, and pave the road with iron bars; and then the administrators, who after all that is done, procure the engines, engineers, conductors, ticket-distributors, and the rest of the “hands;” they buy the coal and see it is not wasted, fix the rates of fare, calculate the savings, and distribute the dividends. The discoverers and organizers often fare hard in the world, lean men, ill-clad and suspected, often laughed at, while the administrator is thought the greater man, because he rides over their graves and pays the dividends, where the organizer only called for the assessments, and the discoverer told what men called a dream. What happens in a railroad happens also in a Church, or a State.
Address at the Melodeon, Boston (5 Mar 1848), 'A Discourse occasioned by the Death of John Quincy Adams'. Collected in Discourses of Politics: The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Part 4 (1863), 139. Note: Ralph Waldo Emerson earlier used the phrase “pave the road with iron bars,” in Nature (1836), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (2)  |  Buy (8)  |  Calculate (3)  |  Church (16)  |  Coal (20)  |  Conductor (6)  |  Discoverer (3)  |  Dividend (2)  |  Dream (39)  |  Element (68)  |  Engine (10)  |  Engineer (32)  |  Fare (2)  |  Fill (13)  |  Fire (59)  |  Fix (3)  |  Grade (3)  |  Grave (7)  |  Hand (34)  |  Hill (14)  |  Iron (33)  |  Latent (5)  |  Pave (2)  |  Pay (8)  |  Plan (40)  |  Power (103)  |  Property (46)  |  Railroad (7)  |  Rate (11)  |  Road (18)  |  Route (4)  |  Saving (12)  |  State (43)  |  Structure (104)  |  Survey (5)  |  Tell (13)  |  Valley (10)  |  Waste (31)  |  Wood (16)

Today's water institutions—the policies and laws, government agencies and planning and engineering practices that shape patterns of water use—are steeped in a supply-side management philosophy no longer appropriate to solving today's water problems.
From a study Postel wrote for Worldwatch Institute, quoted in New York Times (22 Sep 1985), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (5)  |  Appropriateness (5)  |  Engineering (60)  |  Government (50)  |  Institution (15)  |  Law (273)  |  Management (6)  |  Pattern (18)  |  Philosophy (132)  |  Plan (40)  |  Policy (10)  |  Practice (26)  |  Shaping (2)  |  Solution (109)  |  Use (54)

Water is H2O, hydrogen two parts, oxygen one,
but there is also a third thing, that makes it water
and nobody knows what it is.
The atom locks up two energies
but it is a third thing present which makes it an atom.
'The Third Thing', David Herbert Lawrence, The Works of D.H. Lawrence (1994), 428.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Poem (76)

Water is the best of all things.
Pindar
Olympian Odes.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (42)

When the well's dry, we know the worth of water.
Poor Richard's Almanac (1757, 1900), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Dry (8)  |  Knowledge (679)  |  Well (7)  |  Worth (30)

Whereas the chemico-chemists always find in industry a beautiful field of gold-laden soil, the physico-chemists stand somewhat farther off, especially those who seek only the greatest dilution, for in general there is little to make with watery solutions.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (143)  |  Dilution (2)

Why are atoms so small? ... Many examples have been devised to bring this fact home to an audience, none of them more impressive than the one used by Lord Kelvin: Suppose that you could mark the molecules in a glass of water, then pour the contents of the glass into the ocean and stir the latter thoroughly so as to distribute the marked molecules uniformly throughout the seven seas; if you then took a glass of water anywhere out of the ocean, you would find in it about a hundred of your marked molecules.
What is life?: the Physical Aspect of the Living Cell (1944). Collected in What is Life? with Mind And Matter & Autobiographical Sketches (1967, 1992), 6-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (164)  |  Audience (5)  |  Distribution (15)  |  Example (21)  |  Glass (19)  |  Illustration (17)  |  Impressive (2)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (23)  |  Mark (14)  |  Molecule (82)  |  Ocean (56)  |  Size (21)  |  Small (35)  |  Stir (5)

You can swim (uncomfortably) in water at a temperature slightly above freezing; a tiny drop in temperature—or a miracle—allows you to walk on water.
Co-authored with Bruce A. Albrecht.
Craig F. Bohren and Bruce A. Albrecht. In Michael Dudley Sturge , Statistical and Thermal Physics (2003), 273.

You could write the story of man's growth in terms of his epic concerns with water.
Opening sentence of 'Our Need For Water', United States Department of Agriculture, The Yearbook of Agriculture, 1955 (1955), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (30)  |  Conservation (44)  |  Growth (70)  |  Mankind (111)  |  Story (16)  |  Term (34)  |  Writing (50)

[Bobby Clark:] What causes the water in a watermelon?
[Paul McCullough:] They plant the seeds in the spring.
From short movie Love and Hisses (1934). Writer, Ben Holmes (6 Nov 1890 - 2 Dec 1943). In Larry Langman and Paul Gold, Comedy Quotes from the Movies (2001), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Joke (25)  |  Seed (19)  |  Spring (17)

[Henry Cavendish] fixed the weight of the earth; he established the proportions of the constituents of the air; he occupied himself with the quantitative study of the laws of heat; and lastly, he demonstrated the nature of water and determined its volumetric composition. Earth, air, fire, and water—each and all came within the range of his observations.
Essays in Historical Chemistry (1894), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Henry Cavendish (5)  |  Composition (30)  |  Constituent (8)  |  Density (8)  |  Earth (250)  |  Fire (59)  |  Gravitation (9)  |  Law (273)  |  Observation (264)  |  Proportion (24)  |  Quantitative (9)  |  Study (157)  |  Weight (41)

[L]et us not overlook the further great fact, that not only does science underlie sculpture, painting, music, poetry, but that science is itself poetic. The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. ... On the contrary science opens up realms of poetry where to the unscientific all is a blank. Those engaged in scientific researches constantly show us that they realize not less vividly, but more vividly, than others, the poetry of their subjects. Whoever will dip into Hugh Miller's works on geology, or read Mr. Lewes's “Seaside Studies,” will perceive that science excites poetry rather than extinguishes it. And whoever will contemplate the life of Goethe will see that the poet and the man of science can co-exist in equal activity. Is it not, indeed, an absurd and almost a sacrilegious belief that the more a man studies Nature the less he reveres it? Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses anything in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force which, if suddenly liberated, would produce a flash of lightning? Think you that what is carelessly looked upon by the uninitiated as a mere snow-flake, does not suggest higher associations to one who has seen through a microscope the wondrously varied and elegant forms of snow-crystals? Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded. Whoever has not in youth collected plants and insects, knows not half the halo of interest which lanes and hedge-rows can assume. Whoever has not sought for fossils, has little idea of the poetical associations that surround the places where imbedded treasures were found. Whoever at the seaside has not had a microscope and aquarium, has yet to learn what the highest pleasures of the seaside are. Sad, indeed, is it to see how men occupy themselves with trivialities, and are indifferent to the grandest phenomena—care not to understand the architecture of the Heavens, but are deeply interested in some contemptible controversy about the intrigues of Mary Queen of Scots!—are learnedly critical over a Greek ode, and pass by without a glance that grand epic written by the finger of God upon the strata of the Earth!
Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1889), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (9)  |  Blank (3)  |  Collection (26)  |  Contemplation (17)  |  Current (16)  |  Delusion (5)  |  Drop (7)  |  Excitation (6)  |  Flash (8)  |  Fossil (73)  |  Glacier (7)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (44)  |  George Henry Lewes (4)  |  Lightning (16)  |  Microscope (47)  |  Hugh Miller (14)  |  Music (26)  |  Nature (534)  |  Opinion (81)  |  Opposition (22)  |  Painting (17)  |  Poetry (63)  |  Research (360)  |  Science (875)  |  Science And Art (58)  |  Sculpture (5)  |  Seaside (2)  |  Snowflake (4)  |  Strata (15)

[On common water.] Its substance reaches everywhere; it touches the past and prepares the future; it moves under the poles and wanders thinly in the heights of air. It can assume forms of exquisite perfection in a snowflake, or strip the living to a single shining bone cast up by the sea.
From essay 'The Flow of the River', collected in The Immense Journey: An Imaginative Naturalist Explores the Mysteries of Man and Nature (1957, 1959), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (84)  |  Assume (6)  |  Bone (26)  |  Cast (9)  |  Common (44)  |  Everywhere (4)  |  Exquisite (2)  |  Form (70)  |  Future (110)  |  Height (13)  |  Living (24)  |  Move (10)  |  Past (42)  |  Perfection (43)  |  Prepare (2)  |  Reach (30)  |  Sea (57)  |  Shining (4)  |  Single (26)  |  Snowflake (4)  |  Strip (3)  |  Substance (39)  |  Touch (19)  |  Under (3)  |  Wander (7)

[The natural world cleans water, pollinates plants and provides pharmaceuticals, among many other gifts.] Thirty trillion dollars worth of services, scot-free to humanity, every year.
From transcript of PBS TV program 'Religion and Ethics' (17 Nov 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Clean (7)  |  Dollar (11)  |  Gift (26)  |  Humanity (46)  |  Natural World (2)  |  Pharmaceutical (2)  |  Plant (96)  |  Provide (13)  |  Service (27)  |  Year (69)

[To] explain the phenomena of the mineral kingdom ... systems are usually reduced to two classes, according as they refer to the origin of terrestrial bodies to FIRE or to WATER; and ... their followers have of late been distinguished by the fanciful names of Vulcanists and Neptunists. To the former of these Dr HUTTON belongs much more than to the latter; though, as he employs the agency both of fire and water in his system, he cannot, in strict propriety, be arranged with either.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802) collected in The Works of John Playfair (1822), Vol. 1, 21
Science quotes on:  |  Fire (59)  |  Geology (145)  |  James Hutton (16)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
Author Icon
who invites your feedback

Today in Science History

Most Popular

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton