Celebrating 17 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday
TODAY IN SCIENCE NEWS

Maternal micronutrients, nurturing environment boost child development
A new study offers a recipe for parents who want smarter kids: maternal micronutrient supplements during pregnancy, early life nurturing, happy moms, and educated parents.  01/16/2017 07:04 PM

Smoking related imagery absent from only one James Bond movie to date
Smoking related imagery is conspicuous by its absence from only one Bond movie since 007 first graced cinema screens in 1962, finds a new analysis.  01/16/2017 07:04 PM

Acupuncture may alleviate babies' excessive crying (infantile colic)
Acupuncture may be an effective treatment option for babies with infantile colic -- those who cry for more than three hours a day on three or more days of the week -- reveals research.  01/16/2017 07:03 PM

Student, professor use sports analytics to discover NCAA ranking patterns
Does conference size impact conference rankings in NCAA men's basketball? According to research and analysis, it does.  01/16/2017 05:14 PM

Access to health care strengthens communities
New research has focused on an aspect of the ACA/health care debate that hasn’t really been discussed—the social impact on communities. The author of a new report was able to control for income level and other factors and still finds issues with trust, support and other issues in communities where members are uninsured.  01/16/2017 04:11 PM

For first time ever, x-ray imaging captures material defect process
A new approach has been uncovered to detail the formation of material defects at the atomic scale and in near-real time, an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.  01/16/2017 04:10 PM

Study finds high survival rate for elderly patients with implantable defibrillator
Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac arrest or a near-fatal arrhythmia, almost 80 percent survived two years—a higher rate than found in past trials performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the devices in this situation, according to a study.  01/16/2017 04:06 PM

Persistent infection keeps immune memory sharp, leading to long-term protection
For many infectious diseases, a single bout of the illness protects a person against contracting it again. Sometimes, the infecting microbe persists in the body long after symptoms resolve. Now, researchers studying the tropical parasite Leishmania have found a clue to explain the link between long-term immunity and long-term infection: The parasite is constantly multiplying and being killed by immune cells, keeping the immune system alert and prepared for any new encounters with the parasite.  01/16/2017 04:05 PM

Now drivers can hear ambulances no matter how loud their music is playing
If you’ve ever been startled by the sudden appearance of an ambulance while blasting music in your car, then you appreciate the value of a loud siren. Fortunately, your car is probably equipped already to receive warning signals on its audio system, thanks to a new solution developed by students in Sweden.  01/16/2017 12:19 PM

Every meal triggers inflammation
When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients – we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. This triggers an inflammatory response that activates the immune systems of healthy individuals and has a protective effect, as doctors have proven for the first time. In overweight individuals, however, this inflammatory response fails so dramatically that it can lead to diabetes.  01/16/2017 12:19 PM

Metabolic sensor causes granulomas to form
Granulomas are tissue nodules of immune cells that occur in diseases such as tuberculosis and sarcoidosis and can damage many organs. For the first time, a team of researchers has identified what causes them to form. It is the chronic activation of the metabolic sensor mTOR (mammalian Target Of Rapamycin) that is responsible for the formation of granulomas. The scientists also discovered that, in sarcoidosis (in which granulomas cause damage to the lungs), this mechanism leads to a course that is chronic and difficult to treat. Since mTOR inhibitors belong to a group of drugs already licensed for clinical use, these findings offer new and quickly testable treatment options.  01/16/2017 12:19 PM

Genome sequence of polar alga explains evolutionary adaptation to extreme variable climate
An international team of researchers has identified the genetic mutations which allowed microalgae (phytoplankton) from the Southern Ocean to adapt to extreme and highly variable climates -- a step towards understanding how polar organisms are impacted by climate change.  01/16/2017 12:18 PM

The lasting effects of ministrokes may contribute to dementia
Investigators report preclinical research showing that microinfarcts induce prolonged dysfunction in brain areas estimated to be 12-times larger than the visible injury site. Data from c-Fos assays and in vivo hemodynamic imaging reveal how individually miniscule microinfarcts might collectively contribute to broader brain dysfunction in patients with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.  01/16/2017 12:18 PM

Tracking Antarctic adaptations in diatoms
In the Antarctic Ocean, large populations of the diatom Fragillariopsis cylindrus dominate the phytoplankton communities. To learn more about how F. cylindrus adapted to its extremely cold environment, a team of researchers conducted a comparative genomic analysis involving three diatoms. The results provided insights into the genome structure and evolution of F. cylindrus, as well as this diatom's role in the Southern Ocean.  01/16/2017 12:18 PM

Study tracks 'memory' of soil moisture
SMAP's first year of observational data has now been analyzed and is providing some significant surprises that will help in the modeling of climate, forecasting of weather, and monitoring of agriculture around the world.  01/16/2017 12:18 PM

Best treatment option written in cancer's genetic script
An international collaboration has shown proof-of-concept that truly personalized therapy will be possible in the future for people with cancer. Details of how a knowledge bank could be used to find the best treatment option for people with acute myeloid leukemia are published in a new report.  01/16/2017 12:18 PM

Seeing the quantum future, literally
Scientists have demonstrated the ability to 'see' the future of quantum systems and used that knowledge to preempt their demise, in a major achievement that could help bring the strange and powerful world of quantum technology closer to reality. Although applications of quantum-enabled technologies are compelling, quantum physicists had previously been stymied by the most significant obstacle to building reliable quantum technologies -- 'decoherence' or the randomization of quantum systems by their environments.  01/16/2017 09:29 AM

Nanoscale view of energy storage
Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers have recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. Their success is another step toward building a better battery.  01/16/2017 09:29 AM

Considering cattle could help eliminate malaria in India
The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers.  01/16/2017 09:29 AM

Common crop chemical leaves bees susceptible to deadly viruses
A chemical that is thought to be safe and is, therefore, widely used on crops -- such as almonds, wine grapes and tree fruits -- to boost the performance of pesticides, makes honey bee larvae significantly more susceptible to a deadly virus, according to researchers.  01/16/2017 09:29 AM

from ScienceDaily

More Science Newsfeeds --- Next >>


who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.