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Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior
Star-shaped cells called astrocytes, long considered boring, 'support cells,' are finally coming into their own. To everyone's surprise they even play an important role in the body's master clock, which schedules everything from the release of hormones to the onset of sleepiness.  03/24/2017 07:26 PM

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution
A team of scientists has described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date, in a newly published article. The new specimen from the rich Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota (approximately 131 to 120 million years old) is referred to as Eoconfuciusornis, the oldest and most primitive member of the Confuciusornithiformes, a group of early birds characterized by the first occurrence of an avian beak.  03/24/2017 07:26 PM

A little vigorous exercise may help boost kids' cardiometabolic health
As little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to an international study.  03/24/2017 07:26 PM

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to neurons.  03/24/2017 07:26 PM

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensors
Researchers have found that a class of water soluble liquid crystals, called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, exhibited unexpected characteristics that could be harnessed for use in sensors and other potential applications.  03/24/2017 07:26 PM

In a quantum race, everyone is both a winner and a loser
Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be ‘scrambled’. It is possible for different orders of quantum operations to coexist in a superposition. New work by a team of physicists is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition.  03/24/2017 07:25 PM

Parents' perceptions play key role in teens' driving preparedness, study finds
Overall, parents believe their teens are safer than other drivers. A new article offers insight into how parents can react when their teen gets licensed.  03/24/2017 07:24 PM

Which drugs effectively treat diabetic nerve pain?
Certain antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs are among medications that effectively treat diabetic nerve pain, a federal health agency has found.  03/24/2017 07:23 PM

Immunotherapy drug becomes first therapy approved by FDA for rare skin cancer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted accelerated approval to the checkpoint inhibitor Bavencio (avelumab) for the treatment of patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.  03/24/2017 07:23 PM

Sniffing out a new strategy against Alzheimer's disease
Neurologists are conducting an 18-month clinical trial testing a type of insulin delivered in a nasal spray – which is used to treat diabetes in some patients – in the Study of Nasal Insulin to Fight Forgetfulness (SNIFF).  03/24/2017 07:23 PM

Discovery showcases membranes that can fix themselves
Scientists have developed a self-healing membrane for hydrogen fuel cells; typical membranes, a crucial component of the cells, are prone to cracks and pinholes. This discovery showcases membranes that can fix themselves.  03/24/2017 07:23 PM

An increasing proportion of women who are 60 years of age and older are drinking
Most older Americans drink alcohol. Given that this segment of the population is projected to almost double by 2050, reaching 112 million, in the future, there will likely be many more older drinkers in the United States than currently. Importantly, older individuals are more sensitive to alcohol’s effects than their younger counterparts, and are also more likely to take prescription medications that can interact negatively with alcohol, potentially leading to falls and other injuries. This study examined trends in drinking status among U.S. adults 60 years of age and older.  03/24/2017 07:23 PM

'Bench to bedside to bench'
It's time to update the old 'bench-to-bedside' shorthand, researchers across the US declare.  03/24/2017 02:45 PM

New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathology
Investigators have reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.  03/24/2017 02:45 PM

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warming
Researchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects of global warming.  03/24/2017 02:45 PM

Moderate drinking linked to lower risk of some -- but not all -- heart conditions
Moderate drinking is associated with a lower risk of several, but not all, cardiovascular diseases, finds a large study of UK adults. The finding that moderate drinking is not universally associated with a lower risk of all cardiovascular conditions suggests a more nuanced approach to the role of alcohol in prevention of cardiovascular disease is necessary.  03/24/2017 01:58 PM

'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampage
A new study pinpoints a protein that may be essential to Ewing's sarcoma metastasis -- when researchers knocked down the protein KDM3A in Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells, one of a family known as Jumonji proteins, they also inhibited the cancer's metastatic ability.  03/24/2017 12:37 PM

Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industry
Neurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment, say authors of a new report.  03/24/2017 12:37 PM

Prescription weight-loss medication helps with opiate addiction recovery, study confirms
A prescription weight-loss pill decreases the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone, new research confirms. The researchers found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.  03/24/2017 12:37 PM

Could my excessive sweating be hyperhidrosis?
Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that is more than what is needed to regulate body temperature. About 7 million Americans suffer from hyperhidrosis, a disorder that often goes undiagnosed. Hyperhidrosis sufferers often feel a loss of control because the sweating happens independently—without a high body temperature or highly charged emotional situation. The condition may make you avoid social situations, especially when they involve shaking hands. Anxiety can make hyperhidrosis worse. The condition can also be triggered by certain foods and drinks, nicotine, caffeine, and some smells.  03/24/2017 12:35 PM

from ScienceDaily

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