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New catalyst meets challenge of cleaning exhaust from modern engines
Researchers have created a catalyst capable of reducing pollutants at the lower temperatures expected in advanced engines.  12/14/2017 06:46 PM

Visitor patterns and emerging activities in Finish national parks revealed by social media posts
Social media data provide a reliable information to support decision-making in national parks.  12/14/2017 06:18 PM

First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control
Researchers successfully constructed a first-of-its-kind chemical oscillator that uses DNA components. DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.  12/14/2017 06:18 PM

Computational strategies overcome obstacles in peptide therapeutics development
Recently developed computational strategies could help realize the promise of peptide-based drugs. Researchers were able to sample the diverse landscape of shapes that peptides can form as a guide for designing the next generation of stable, potent, selective drugs. They compiled a library of peptide scaffolds upon which drug candidates might be designed. Their methods also can be used to design additional custom peptides with arbitrary shapes on demand.  12/14/2017 04:40 PM

Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study
Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers. They also found that ketamine's anti-suicidal effects occurred within hours after its administration.  12/14/2017 04:40 PM

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers.  12/14/2017 04:33 PM

MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches
A study conducted in 2015 shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

Valley fever cases see major spike in November, experts say
An uptick in reported cases of Valley fever indicates a likely sharp increase in infections next year. At the same time, federal clearance for a rapid assay test developed with assistance from the University of Arizona should help reduce delays in diagnosing the respiratory fungal disease caused by spores found in area soils.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

Computer systems predict objects' responses to physical forces
New research examines the fundamental cognitive abilities that an intelligent agent requires to navigate the world: discerning distinct objects and inferring how they respond to physical forces.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

One in five materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests
Can companies rely on the results of one or two scientific studies to design a new industrial process or launch a new product? In at least one area of materials chemistry, the answer may be yes -- but only 80 percent of the time.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowers
Researchers have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, found to have ferritin with the fastest catalytic performance ever described.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

National MagLab's latest magnet snags world record, marks new era of scientific discovery
The Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has shattered another world record with the testing of a 32-tesla magnet -- 33 percent stronger than what had previously been the world's strongest superconducting magnet used for research and more than 3,000 times stronger than a small refrigerator magnet.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

Intervention offered in school readiness program boosts children's self-regulation skills
Adding a daily 20 to 30 minute self-regulation intervention to a kindergarten readiness program significantly boosted children's self-regulation and early academic skills, a researcher has found.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

Hope for one of the world's rarest primates: First census of Zanzibar Red Colobus monkey
A team of scientists recently completed the first-ever range-wide population census of the Zanzibar red colobus monkey (Piliocolobus kirkii) an endangered primate found only on the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa.  12/14/2017 03:33 PM

New antbird species discovered in Peru
LSU describes a distinctive new species of antbird from humid montane forest of the Cordillera Azul, Martin Region, Peru.  12/14/2017 03:31 PM

To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlock
The debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight. Now, an international team is working to break the policy stalemate.  12/14/2017 02:45 PM

Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagement
Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research.  12/14/2017 02:45 PM

Scrap the stethoscope: engineers create new way to measure vital signs with radio waves
Engineers have demonstrated a method for gathering blood pressure, heart rate and breath rate using a cheap and covert system of radio-frequency signals and microchip 'tags,' similar to the anti-theft tags department stores place on clothing and electronics.  12/14/2017 02:45 PM

Coloring books make you feel better, but real art therapy much more potent
Many adult coloring books claim to be art therapy and can reduce negative feelings, but art therapists are significantly more impactful, a new study shows.  12/14/2017 02:45 PM

Nanoparticle staircase: Atomic blasting creates new devices to measure nanoparticles
A standard machining technique has been used to fabricate a 'nanofluidic staircase' that allows precise measurement of the size of nanoparticles in a liquid, report scientists.  12/14/2017 02:45 PM

from ScienceDaily

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