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Organized sports not enough to fulfill activity requirements
Organized sports don't provide children with nearly as much exercise as many parents might expect, according to a new study.  05/23/2017 09:54 AM

Critical thinking can be taught
10-12-years-olds can be taught how to think critically at school, even with few teachers and limited resources. Parents can also be taught to assess claims about health effects.  05/23/2017 08:44 AM

Solar cells more efficient thanks to new material standing on edge
Researchers have designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. The study shows that solar cells increase in efficiency thanks to the material’s ability to self-organize by standing on edge.  05/23/2017 08:42 AM

7.2-million-year-old pre-human remains found in the Balkans
Scientists analyzing 7.2 million-year-old fossils uncovered in modern-day Greece and Bulgaria suggest a new hypothesis about the origins of humankind, placing it in the Eastern Mediterranean and not -- as customarily assumed -- in Africa, and earlier than currently accepted. The researchers conclude that Graecopithecus freybergi represents the first pre-humans to exist following the split from the last chimpanzee-human common ancestor.  05/23/2017 08:35 AM

Rare tooth find reveals horned dinosaurs in eastern North America
A chance discovery in Mississippi provides the first evidence of an animal closely related to Triceratops in eastern North America. The fossil, a tooth from rocks between 68 and 66 million years old, shows that two halves of the continent previously thought to be separated by seaway were probably connected before the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.  05/23/2017 08:25 AM

Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malaria
Researchers have modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days.  05/22/2017 09:10 AM

Sleep loss affects your waistline
Sleep loss increases the risk of obesity through a combination of effects on energy metabolism. This research will highlight how disrupted sleep patterns, a common feature of modern living, can predispose to weight gain, by affecting people’s appetite and responses to food and exercise.  05/22/2017 08:11 AM

Air pollution may disrupt sleep
High levels of air pollution over time may get in the way of a good night's sleep, according to new research.  05/22/2017 08:08 AM

Standardized assessment for students graduating from UK medical schools
A new study describes a standardized assessment that ensures that students who graduate from UK medical schools have achieved a minimum standard of knowledge and skill related to prescribing medications.  05/22/2017 08:08 AM

Moderate drinking may not ward off heart disease
Many people believe that having a glass of wine with dinner -- or moderately drinking any kind of alcohol -- will protect them from heart disease. But a hard look at the evidence finds little support for that. That's the conclusion of a new research review in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.  05/22/2017 08:08 AM

Magnetic order in a two-dimensional molecular chessboard
Achieving magnetic order in low-dimensional systems consisting of only one or two dimensions has been a research goal for some time. Researchers now show that magnetic order can be created in a two-dimensional chessboard lattice consisting of organometallic molecules that are only one atomic layer thick.  05/22/2017 08:07 AM

Practical clinical trials can help find alternatives to opioids
Pressures on primary care doctors to move away from opioid pain management are increasing, but practitioners need practical, evidence-based information on how to employ multidisciplinary pain care successfully in everyday clinical practice. A senior investigator believes wider use of practical clinical trials and more emphasis on patient self-management are key solutions for achieving wider use of multidisciplinary pain care to improve patient function and help lower use and misuse of opioids.  05/20/2017 08:53 AM

Wearable Devices Communicate Vital Brain Activity Information
What can we learn about emotions, the brain and behavior from a wristband? Plenty, according to a prominent engineer.  05/20/2017 08:53 AM

Patients' own fat tissue can help treat joint problems
A new device gently suctions, processes and uses a patient’s own fat tissue to provide a potential source of stem cells and growth factors to promote healing.  05/19/2017 03:35 PM

Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
A new process triples the fraction of biomass converted to high-value products to nearly 80 percent, also tripling the expected rate of return for an investment in the technology from roughly 10 percent (for one end product) to 30 percent.  05/19/2017 03:35 PM

Traffic-related air pollution linked to DNA damage in children
Children and teens exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution have evidence of a specific type of DNA damage called telomere shortening, reports a new study.  05/19/2017 03:35 PM

Caution urged in using PRP or stem cells to treat young athletes' injuries
Physicians, parents and coaches should be cautious when considering treating injured young athletes with platelet rich plasma (PRP), stem cells or other types of regenerative medicine, says a nationally recognized sports medicine clinician.  05/19/2017 03:14 PM

Insects resist genetic methods to control disease spread, study finds
Insects possess a naturally occurring resistance to the use of gene-editing technology to prevent diseases such as malaria, new research shows.  05/19/2017 03:14 PM

First-ever global study finds massive health care inequity
A first-ever global study has found massive inequity of access to and quality of health care among and within countries, and concludes people are dying from causes with well-known treatments.  05/19/2017 03:14 PM

Self-ventilating workout suit keeps athletes cool and dry
A breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat has now been developed by researchers. These flaps, which range from thumbnail- to finger-sized, are lined with live microbial cells that shrink and expand in response to changes in humidity.  05/19/2017 03:14 PM

from ScienceDaily

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