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Who sweats more: Men or women?
Sex differences in heat loss responses are dependent on body size and not sex, meaning that larger individuals sweat more than smaller ones during cycle exercise in warm and tolerable conditions.  02/23/2017 08:20 PM

SARS and MERS: What’s Next?
It may be difficult to remember now, but when SARS was first recognized in February 2003, people were scared. This heretofore unknown disease was killing people—nearly 10 percent of those infected with what came to be recognized as the SARS-associated coronavirus. Before the end of the year, cases were reported in 29 countries.  02/23/2017 02:47 PM

Desks join the internet of things
The internet of things promises to revolutionize the way we live, connecting the objects in our homes to one another and to the vast array of information available online. The possibilities are enormous, and one benefit may be improving our health.  02/23/2017 02:47 PM

Researchers develop model for studying rare polio-like illness
Scientists have developed the first animal model for studying paralysis caused by virus linked to a polio-like illness that paralyzed 120 children in 2014.  02/23/2017 02:21 PM

Understanding the impact of delays in high-speed networks
In a world increasingly reliant on high-speed networks, introducing microsecond delays into such systems can have profound effects.  02/23/2017 02:21 PM

Computer bots are more like humans than you might think, having fights lasting years
Bots appear to behave differently in culturally distinct online environments. A new paper says the findings are a warning to those using artificial intelligence for building autonomous vehicles, cyber security systems or for managing social media.  02/23/2017 02:21 PM

Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning
Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities.  02/23/2017 02:21 PM

Melting sea ice may be speeding nature's clock in the Arctic
Spring is coming sooner to some plant species in the low Arctic of Greenland, while other species are delaying their emergence amid warming winters. The changes are associated with diminishing sea ice cover, according to a study.  02/23/2017 01:44 PM

Values gap in workplace can lead millennials to look elsewhere
Much has been made in popular culture about millennials as they join the working world, including their tendency to job hop. Although this behavior often is explained as a loyalty issue, new research reveals one reason young workers choose to leave a firm is because they find a disconnect between their beliefs and the culture they observe in the workplace.  02/23/2017 01:44 PM

Global vaccine injury system needed to improve public health
A global vaccine injury compensation system administered through the World Health Organization would address the global public health issue of vaccine injuries, experts argue.  02/23/2017 01:44 PM

Nematode resistance in soybeans beneficial even at low rates of infestation
Soybeans with resistance to soybean cyst nematodes seem to have a yield advantage compared to susceptible varieties when SCN is present. Until now, scientists did not know what level of SCN infestation is needed to achieve the yield advantage. A new study shows that SCN resistance from the soybean accession PI 88788 offers yield advantages even at very low infestation rates.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

Gene mutations cause leukemia, but which ones?
New research sought to better understand one 'typo' in a standard leukemia assay, or test. The study, however, encountered a new problem: an issue with the model system itself.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

Contact tracing and targeted insecticide spraying can curb dengue outbreaks
Contact tracing -- a process of identifying everyone who has come into contact with those infected by a particular disease -- combined with targeted, indoor spraying of insecticide can greatly reduce the spread of the mosquito-borne dengue virus, finds a study.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

Air pollution may have masked mid-20th Century sea ice loss
Humans may have been altering Arctic sea ice longer than previously thought, according to researchers studying the effects of air pollution on sea ice growth in the mid-20th Century.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

Vast luminous nebula poses a cosmic mystery
Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an 'enormous Lyman-alpha nebula' (ELAN), it is the brightest and among the largest of these rare objects, only a handful of which have been observed.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

New link found between sex and viruses
Sexual reproduction and viral infections both rely on a functionally identical protein, according to new research. The protein enables the fusion of two cells, such as a sperm cell and egg cell, or the fusion of a virus with a cell membrane. The discovery suggests that the protein evolved early in the history of life on Earth, and new details about the protein's function could help fight parasitic diseases such as malaria.  02/23/2017 12:43 PM

Almost 4 decades later, mini eyeless catfish gets a name
Discovered in a 1978-79 expedition, a pale, eyeless catfish that doesn't even measure an inch long is now known as Micromyzon orinoco, for the South American river in which it was discovered.  02/23/2017 12:42 PM

Why is pancreatic cancer so hard to treat? Stroma provides new clues
Why are pancreatic tumors so resistant to treatment? One reason is that the 'wound'-like tissue that surrounds the tumors, called stroma, is so dense, likely preventing cancer-killing drugs from reaching the tumor. A team has now discovered heterogeneity in the fibroblast portion of the stroma, opening up the possibility of targeted treatment.  02/23/2017 12:42 PM

Fructose is generated in the human brain
Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior.  02/23/2017 11:48 AM

Removing barriers to early intervention for autistic children: A new model shows promise
Acting on recommendations from the South Carolina Act Early Team, South Carolina changed its policies to pay for early intensive behavioral intervention in children under three revealed to be at high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by a two-stage screening process. Previously, a formal diagnosis of ASD had been required. As a result, the number of children under three receiving early intervention grew five-fold.  02/23/2017 11:48 AM

from ScienceDaily

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