Celebrating 17 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Continuing

Continuing Quotes (4 quotes)

Before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned—the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted—nature's answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of the theorist, who finds himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics. Of course, this does not mean that the experimenter does not also engage in theoretical deliberations. The foremost classical example of a major achievement produced by such a division of labor is the creation of spectrum analysis by the joint efforts of Robert Bunsen, the experimenter, and Gustav Kirchoff, the theorist. Since then, spectrum analysis has been continually developing and bearing ever richer fruit.
'The Meaning and Limits of Exact Science', Science (30 Sep 1949), 110, No. 2857, 325. Advance reprinting of chapter from book Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (27)  |  Achievement (96)  |  Answer (119)  |  Bearing (8)  |  Robert Bunsen (8)  |  Collaboration (9)  |  Creation (171)  |  Dependence (28)  |  Development (172)  |  Example (33)  |  Experiment (460)  |  Experimenter (14)  |  Formulation (17)  |  Fruit (49)  |  Interpretation (48)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Labor (27)  |  Mathematics (471)  |  Measurement (136)  |  Nature (688)  |  Performance (21)  |  Plan (53)  |  Properly (3)  |  Question (202)  |  Result (167)  |  Richness (8)  |  Spectral Analysis (2)  |  Task (44)  |  Theorist (20)  |  Tool (40)  |  Understanding (297)  |  Use (69)

He who studies it [Nature] has continually the exquisite pleasure of discerning or half discerning and divining laws; regularities glimmer through an appearance of confusion, analogies between phenomena of a different order suggest themselves and set the imagination in motion; the mind is haunted with the sense of a vast unity not yet discoverable or nameable. There is food for contemplation which never runs short; you are gazing at an object which is always growing clearer, and yet always, in the very act of growing clearer, presenting new mysteries.
From 'Natural History', Macmillan's Magazine (1875), 31, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (40)  |  Analogy (36)  |  Appearance (64)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Confusion (26)  |  Contemplation (27)  |  Different (26)  |  Discerning (6)  |  Discover (35)  |  Exquisite (4)  |  Food (100)  |  Gaze (6)  |  Glimmer (2)  |  Growing (12)  |  Half (18)  |  Haunting (2)  |  Imagination (175)  |  Law (334)  |  Mind (346)  |  Motion (95)  |  Mystery (87)  |  Nature (688)  |  New (178)  |  Object (68)  |  Order (90)  |  Phenomenon (160)  |  Pleasure (75)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Regularity (17)  |  Sense (141)  |  Study (233)  |  Suggestion (20)  |  Unity (29)  |  Vast (31)

It was noted long ago that the front row of burlesque houses was occupied predominantly by bald-headed men. In fact, such a row became known as the bald-headed row. It might be assumed from this on statistical evidence that the continued close observation of chorus girls in tights caused loss of hair from the top of the head.
[Disputing a statistical study for the American Cancer Society showing smoking to be a cancer causative.]
In Bess Furman, '2 Cite Extraction of Cigarette Tar', New York Times (26 Jul 1957), 21. The article reported on testimony before the Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee of the House Government Operations Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (33)  |  Cancer (30)  |  Conclusion (91)  |  Evidence (107)  |  Front (3)  |  Hair (13)  |  Head (32)  |  Observation (339)  |  Occupy (8)  |  Predominantly (2)  |  Row (3)  |  Smoking (21)  |  Statistics (106)

When we have amassed a great store of such general facts, they become the objects of another and higher species of classification, and are themselves included in laws which, as they dispose of groups, not individuals have a far superior degree of generality, till at length, by continuing the process, we arrive at axioms of the highest degree of generality of which science is capable. This process is what we mean by induction.
In A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Amassed (2)  |  Arrive (5)  |  Axiom (16)  |  Become (25)  |  Capable (11)  |  Classification (66)  |  Degree (22)  |  Dispose (4)  |  Fact (414)  |  General (55)  |  Generality (20)  |  Great (110)  |  Group (33)  |  Higher (23)  |  Highest (10)  |  Included (2)  |  Individual (90)  |  Induction (32)  |  Law (334)  |  Length (8)  |  Nomenclature (118)  |  Object (68)  |  Process (144)  |  Science (1133)  |  Species (119)  |  Store (11)  |  Superior (22)


Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.