TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®  •  TODAYINSCI ®
Celebrating 24 Years on the Web
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Must

Must Quotes (1525 quotes)

... every chemical combination is wholly and solely dependent on two opposing forces, positive and negative electricity, and every chemical compound must be composed of two parts combined by the agency of their electrochemical reaction, since there is no third force. Hence it follows that every compound body, whatever the number of its constituents, can be divided into two parts, one of which is positively and the other negatively electrical.
Essai sur la théorie des proportions chemiques (1819), 98. Quoted by Henry M. Leicester in article on Bessel in Charles Coulston Gillespie (editor), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1981), Vol. 2, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (557)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Combination (150)  |  Compound (117)  |  Constituent (47)  |  Divided (50)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Follow (389)  |  Force (497)  |  Ion (21)  |  Negative (66)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Positive (98)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Two (936)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wholly (88)

... finding that in [the Moon] there is a provision of light and heat; also in appearance, a soil proper for habitation fully as good as ours, if not perhaps better who can say that it is not extremely probable, nay beyond doubt, that there must be inhabitants on the Moon of some kind or other?
Letter to Astronomer Royal, Nevil Maskelyne (1780). Quoted in Patrick Moore, Patrick Moore on the Moon (2006), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (35)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Better (493)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Good (906)  |  Habitation (7)  |  Heat (180)  |  Inhabitant (50)  |  Kind (564)  |  Light (635)  |  Moon (252)  |  Other (2233)  |  Proper (150)  |  Say (989)  |  Soil (98)

... If I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.
The Scientific Basis of Morals (1884), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Back (395)  |  Become (821)  |  Belief (615)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Danger (127)  |  Doing (277)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Great (1610)  |  Habit (174)  |  Lose (165)  |  Man (2252)  |  Merely (315)  |  Myself (211)  |  Never (1089)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Sink (38)  |  Society (350)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Wrong (246)

… on these expanded membranes [butterfly wings] Nature writes, as on a tablet, the story of the modifications of species, so truly do all changes of the organisation register themselves thereon. Moreover, the same colour-patterns of the wings generally show, with great regularity, the degrees of blood-relationship of the species. As the laws of nature must be the same for all beings, the conclusions furnished by this group of insects must be applicable to the whole world.
From The Naturalist on the River Amazons: A record of Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator, During Eleven Years of Travel (1864), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (257)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blood (144)  |  Butterfly (26)  |  Change (639)  |  Color (155)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Degree (277)  |  Do (1905)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Expand (56)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Furnishing (4)  |  Great (1610)  |  Group (83)  |  Insect (89)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Nature (80)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Modification (57)  |  Natural Selection (98)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Organization (120)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Register (22)  |  Registration (2)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Show (353)  |  Species (435)  |  Story (122)  |  Tablet (6)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truly (118)  |  Whole (756)  |  Whole World (29)  |  Wing (79)  |  World (1850)  |  Write (250)  |  Writing (192)

… the reasoning process [employed in mathematics] is not different from that of any other branch of knowledge, … but there is required, and in a great degree, that attention of mind which is in some part necessary for the acquisition of all knowledge, and in this branch is indispensably necessary. This must be given in its fullest intensity; … the other elements especially characteristic of a mathematical mind are quickness in perceiving logical sequence, love of order, methodical arrangement and harmony, distinctness of conception.
In Treatise on Infinitesimal Calculus (1868), Vol. 8, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (46)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Attention (196)  |  Branch (155)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Conception (160)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Element (322)  |  Employ (115)  |  Great (1610)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Indispensable (31)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Logical (57)  |  Love (328)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perceive (46)  |  Process (439)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Required (108)  |  Sequence (68)

... we must first base such words as “between” upon clear concepts, a thing which is quite feasible but which I have not seen done.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (120)  |  Clear (111)  |  Concept (242)  |  Feasible (3)  |  First (1302)  |  See (1094)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Word (650)

George E.P. Box quote: …all models are approximations. Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful. However,
[Co-author with Norman R. Draper] (source)
…all models are approximations. Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful. However, the approximate nature of the model must always be borne in mind… [Co-author with Norman R. Draper]
In George E.P. Box, Norman R. Draper, Response Surfaces, Mixtures, and Ridge Analyses (2nd ed. 2007), 414.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Approximation (32)  |  Author (175)  |  Essential (210)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Model (106)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Useful (260)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Wrong (246)

...for the animals, which we resemble and which would be our equals if we did not have reason, do not reflect upon the actions or the passions of their external or internal senses, and do not know what is color, odor or sound, or if there is any differences between these objects, to which they are moved rather than moving themselves there. This comes about by the force of the impression that the different objects make on their organs and on their senses, for they cannot discern if it is more appropriate to go and drink or eat or do something else, and they do not eat or drink or do anything else except when the presence of objects or the animal imagination [l'imagination brutalle], necessitates them and transports them to their objects, without their knowing what they do, whether good or bad; which would happen to us just as to them if we were destitute of reason, for they have no enlightenment except what they must have to take their nourishment and to serve us for the uses to which God has destined them.
[Arguing the uniqueness of man by regarding animals to be merely automatons.].
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Animal (651)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Bad (185)  |  Color (155)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Destitution (2)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Discern (35)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drink (56)  |  Eat (108)  |  Enlightenment (21)  |  Equal (88)  |  Force (497)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Happen (282)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Impression (118)  |  Internal (69)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Merely (315)  |  More (2558)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Object (438)  |  Odor (11)  |  Organ (118)  |  Passion (121)  |  Presence (63)  |  Reason (766)  |  Resemblance (39)  |  Resemble (65)  |  Sense (785)  |  Serve (64)  |  Something (718)  |  Sound (187)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Transport (31)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Use (771)

...it is not to be taken in the sense of our day, which we reckon by the course of the sun; but it must have another meaning, applicable to the
three days mentioned before the creation of the heavenly bodies.
iv.26
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Body (557)  |  Course (413)  |  Creation (350)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  Mean (810)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Mention (84)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sun (407)

...We must be on our guard against giving interpretations that are hazardous or opposed to science, and so exposing the Word of God to the ridicule of unbelievers.
Genesis in the Literal Sense
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Expose (28)  |  Give (208)  |  God (776)  |  Guard (19)  |  Hazardous (3)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Oppose (27)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Unbeliever (3)  |  Word (650)

“Crawling at your feet,” said the Gnat … “you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. …”
“And what does it live on?”
“Weak tea with cream in it.”
A new difficulty came into Alice's head. “Supposing it couldn't find any?” she suggested.
“Then it would die, of course.”
“But that must happen very often,” Alice remarked thoughtfully.
“It always happens,” said the Gnat.
In Through the Looking Glass: And what Alice Found There (1893), 66-67.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice In Wonderland (8)  |  Bread (42)  |  Butterfly (26)  |  Course (413)  |  Crawling (2)  |  Cream (6)  |  Death (406)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Ecology (81)  |  Extinction (80)  |  Find (1014)  |  Food (213)  |  Food Chain (7)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habitat Destruction (2)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happening (59)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  New (1273)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observe (179)  |  Often (109)  |  Tea (13)  |  Weak (73)

“Every moment dies a man,/ Every moment one is born”:
I need hardly point out to you that this calculation would tend to keep the sum total of the world's population in a state of perpetual equipoise whereas it is a well-known fact that the said sum total is constantly on the increase. I would therefore take the liberty of suggesting that in the next edition of your excellent poem the erroneous calculation to which I refer should be corrected as follows:
'Every moment dies a man / And one and a sixteenth is born.” I may add that the exact figures are 1.167, but something must, of course, be conceded to the laws of metre.
Unpublished letter to Tennyson in response to his Vision of Sin (1842). Quoted in Philip and Emily Morrison, Charles Babbage and his Calculating Engines: Selected Writings by Charles Babbage and Others (1961), xxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (134)  |  Course (413)  |  Erroneous (31)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Figure (162)  |  Follow (389)  |  Increase (225)  |  Known (453)  |  Law (913)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Moment (260)  |  Next (238)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Poem (104)  |  Point (584)  |  Population (115)  |  Something (718)  |  State (505)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Sum (103)  |  Tend (124)  |  Total (95)  |  World (1850)

“In order to ascertain the height of the tree I must be in such a position that the top of the tree is exactly in a line with the top of a measuring-stick—or any straight object would do, such as an umbrella—which I shall secure in an upright position between my feet. Knowing then that the ratio that the height of the tree bears to the length of the measuring stick must equal the ratio that the distance from my eye to the base of the tree bears to my height, and knowing (or being able to find out) my height, the length of the measuring stick and the distance from my eye to the base of the tree, I can, therefore, calculate the height of the tree.”
“What is an umbrella?”
In Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Base (120)  |  Bear (162)  |  Being (1276)  |  Calculate (58)  |  Distance (171)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eye (440)  |  Find (1014)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Height (33)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Measure (241)  |  Object (438)  |  Order (638)  |  Ratio (41)  |  Straight (75)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Top (100)  |  Tree (269)  |  Umbrella (4)

“One must go further, one must go further.” This impulse to go further is an ancient thing in the world.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 5
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (198)  |  Far (158)  |  Impulse (52)  |  Thing (1914)  |  World (1850)

“Talent is a long patience.” We must look on what we wish to express long enough and with enough attention to discover an aspect that has not been seen and portrayed by another. There is, in everything, something unexplored, because we always use our eyes only with the recollection of what has been thought before on the subject we are contemplating.
From Pierre et Jean (1888), as translated by Alexina Loranger in 'Introduction', Pierre et Jean (Peter and John) (1890), 38-39. The opening words are quoted from Gustave Flaubert. From the original French, “Le talent est une longue patience. — Il s’agit de regarder tout ce qu’on veut exprimer assez longtemps et avec assez d’attention pour en découvrir un aspect qui n’ait été vu et dit par personne. Il y a, dans tout, de l’inexploré, parce que nous sommes habitués à ne nous servir de nos yeux qu’avec le souvenir de ce qu’on a pensé avant nous sur ce que nous contemplons.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (129)  |  Attention (196)  |  Contemplate (29)  |  Discover (571)  |  Enough (341)  |  Everything (489)  |  Express (192)  |  Eye (440)  |  Long (778)  |  Look (584)  |  Patience (58)  |  Portray (6)  |  Recollection (12)  |  See (1094)  |  Something (718)  |  Subject (543)  |  Talent (99)  |  Thought (995)  |  Unexplored (15)  |  Use (771)  |  Wish (216)

(1) A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
(2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law.
(3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
'The Three Laws of Robotics', in I, Robot (1950), Frontispiece.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Conflict (77)  |  Existence (481)  |  First (1302)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Law (913)  |  Long (778)  |  Obey (46)  |  Order (638)  |  Protect (65)  |  Protection (41)  |  Robot (14)  |  Through (846)

[A man] must learn to understand the motives of human beings, their illusions, and their sufferings human beings, their illusions, and their sufferings in order to acquire a proper relationship to individual fellow-men and to the community. These precious things … primarily constitutes and preserves culture. This is what I have in mind when I recommend the “humanities” as important, not just dry specialized knowledge in the fields of history and philosophy.
From interview with Benjamin Fine, 'Einstein Stresses Critical Thinking', New York Times (5 Oct 1952), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Community (111)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Culture (157)  |  Dry (65)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Field (378)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Humanities (21)  |  Illusion (68)  |  Important (229)  |  Individual (420)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Motive (62)  |  Order (638)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Precious (43)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Proper (150)  |  Recommend (27)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Specialized (9)  |  Suffering (68)  |  Sufferings (2)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Understand (648)

[A significant invention] must be startling, unexpected. It must come to a world that is not prepared for it.
Speaking at a shareholders' meeting (1975) as quoted by Victor K. McElheny, in Insisting On The Impossible: The Life Of Edwin Land (1999), 403-404.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (56)  |  Invention (400)  |  Preparation (60)  |  Significance (114)  |  Significant (78)  |  Startling (15)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  World (1850)

[Concerning] phosphorescent bodies, and in particular to uranium salts whose phosphorescence has a very brief duration. With the double sulfate of uranium and potassium ... I was able to perform the following experiment: One wraps a Lumière photographic plate with a bromide emulsion in two sheets of very thick black paper, such that the plate does not become clouded upon being exposed to the sun for a day. One places on the sheet of paper, on the outside, a slab of the phosphorescent substance, and one exposes the whole to the sun for several hours. When one then develops the photographic plate, one recognizes that the silhouette of the phosphorescent substance appears in black on the negative. If one places between the phosphorescent substance and the paper a piece of money or a metal screen pierced with a cut-out design, one sees the image of these objects appear on the negative. One can repeat the same experiments placing a thin pane of glass between the phosphorescent substance and the paper, which excludes the possibility of chemical action due to vapors which might emanate from the substance when heated by the sun's rays. One must conclude from these experiments that the phosphorescent substance in question emits rays which pass through the opaque paper and reduces silver salts.
[Although the sun is irrelevant, and he misinterprets the role of phosphorescence, he has discovered the effect of radioactivity.]
Read at French Academy of Science (24 Feb 1896). In Comptes Rendus (1896), 122, 420. As translated by Carmen Giunta on the Classic Chemistry web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Become (821)  |  Being (1276)  |  Brief (37)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Cut (116)  |  Design (203)  |  Develop (278)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Due (143)  |  Effect (414)  |  Emit (15)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Expose (28)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Glass (94)  |  Heat (180)  |  Hour (192)  |  Image (97)  |  Metal (88)  |  Money (178)  |  Negative (66)  |  Object (438)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (192)  |  Pass (241)  |  Perform (123)  |  Phosphorescence (2)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Photograph (23)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Potassium (12)  |  Question (649)  |  Radioactivity (33)  |  Ray (115)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Role (86)  |  Salt (48)  |  See (1094)  |  Silhouette (4)  |  Silver (49)  |  Substance (253)  |  Sun (407)  |  Through (846)  |  Two (936)  |  Uranium (21)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Whole (756)

[D]iscovery should come as an adventure rather than as the result of a logical process of thought. Sharp, prolonged thinking is necessary that we may keep on the chosen road but it does not itself necessarily lead to discovery. The investigator must be ready and on the spot when the light comes from whatever direction.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (69)  |  Choice (114)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Direction (185)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Lead (391)  |  Leading (17)  |  Light (635)  |  Logic (311)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Process (439)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prolonged (7)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Result (700)  |  Sharp (17)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Thought (995)  |  Whatever (234)

[Florence Nightingale] was a great administrator, and to reach excellence here is impossible without being an ardent student of statistics. Florence Nightingale has been rightly termed the “Passionate Statistician.” Her statistics were more than a study, they were indeed her religion. For her, Quetelet was the hero as scientist, and the presentation copy of his Physique Sociale is annotated by her on every page. Florence Nightingale believed—and in all the actions of her life acted upon that belief—that the administrator could only be successful if he were guided by statistical knowledge. The legislator—to say nothing of the politician—too often failed for want of this knowledge. Nay, she went further: she held that the universe—including human communities—was evolving in accordance with a divine plan; that it was man's business to endeavour to understand this plan and guide his actions in sympathy with it. But to understand God's thoughts, she held we must study statistics, for these are the measure of his purpose. Thus the study of statistics was for her a religious duty.
In Karl Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1924), Vol. 2, 414-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Action (342)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belief (615)  |  Business (156)  |  Copy (34)  |  Divine (112)  |  Duty (71)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Excellence (40)  |  Fail (191)  |  God (776)  |  Great (1610)  |  Guide (107)  |  Hero (45)  |  Human (1512)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Measure (241)  |  More (2558)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Plan (122)  |  Politician (40)  |  Presentation (24)  |  Purpose (336)  |   Lambert Adolphe Jacques Quételet (2)  |  Reach (286)  |  Religion (369)  |  Religious (134)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Student (317)  |  Study (701)  |  Successful (134)  |  Sympathy (35)  |  Term (357)  |  Thought (995)  |  Understand (648)  |  Universe (900)  |  Want (504)

[In mathematics] we behold the conscious logical activity of the human mind in its purest and most perfect form. Here we learn to realize the laborious nature of the process, the great care with which it must proceed, the accuracy which is necessary to determine the exact extent of the general propositions arrived at, the difficulty of forming and comprehending abstract concepts; but here we learn also to place confidence in the certainty, scope and fruitfulness of such intellectual activity.
In Ueber das Verhältnis der Naturwissenschaften zur Gesammtheit der Wissenschaft, Vorträge und Reden (1896), Bd. 1, 176. Also seen translated as “In mathematics we see the conscious logical activity of our mind in its purest and most perfect form; here is made manifest to us all the labor and the great care with which it progresses, the precision which is necessary to determine exactly the source of the established general theorems, and the difficulty with which we form and comprehend abstract conceptions; but we also learn here to have confidence in the certainty, breadth, and fruitfulness of such intellectual labor”, in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 20. From the original German, “Hier sehen wir die bewusste logische Thätigkeit unseres Geistes in ihrer reinsten und vollendetsten Form; wir können hier die ganze Mühe derselben kennen lernen, die grosse Vorsicht, mit der sie vorschreiten muss, die Genauigkeit, welche nöthig ist, um den Umfang der gewonnenen allgemeinen Sätze genau zu bestimmen, die Schwierigkeit, abstracte Begriffe zu bilden und zu verstehen; aber ebenso auch Vertrauen fassen lernen in die Sicherheit, Tragweite und Fruchtbarkeit solcher Gedankenarbeit.”
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Activity (218)  |  Arrive (40)  |  Behold (19)  |  Care (203)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Comprehend (44)  |  Concept (242)  |  Confidence (75)  |  Conscious (46)  |  Determine (152)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Exact (75)  |  Extent (142)  |  Form (976)  |  Forming (42)  |  Fruitfulness (2)  |  General (521)  |  Great (1610)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Laborious (17)  |  Learn (672)  |  Logical (57)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mathematics And Logic (27)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Place (192)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Process (439)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Pure (299)  |  Realize (157)  |  Scope (44)

[In relation to business:] Invention must be its keynote—a steady progression from one thing to another. As each in turn approaches a saturated market, something new must be produced.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 55, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (112)  |  Business (156)  |  Invention (400)  |  Keynote (2)  |  Market (23)  |  New (1273)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (190)  |  Progression (23)  |  Saturation (9)  |  Something (718)  |  Steady (45)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Turn (454)

[It has been ascertained by statistical observation that in engineering enterprises one man is killed for every million francs that is spent on the works.] Supposing you have to build a bridge at an expense of one hundred million francs, you must be prepared for the death of one hundred men. In building the Eiffel Tower, which was a construction costing six million and a half, we only lost four men, thus remaining below the average. In the construction of the Forth Bridge, 55 men were lost in over 45,000,000 francs’ worth of work. That would appear to be a large number according to the general rule, but when the special risks are remembered, this number shows as a very small one.
As quoted in 'M. Eiffel and the Forth Bridge', The Tablet (15 Mar 1890), 75, 400. Similarly quoted in Robert Harborough Sherard, Twenty Years in Paris: Being Some Recollections of a Literary Life (1905), 169, which adds to the end “, and reflects very great credit on the engineers for the precautions which they took on behalf of their men.” Sherard gave the context that Eiffel was at the inauguration [4 Mar 1890] of the Forth Bridge, and gave this compliment when conversing there with the Prince of Wales.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Average (89)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Build (211)  |  Building (158)  |  Construction (114)  |  Cost (94)  |  Death (406)  |  Eiffel Tower (13)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Enterprise (56)  |  Expense (21)  |  General (521)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Kill (100)  |  Large (398)  |  Man (2252)  |  Million (124)  |  Number (710)  |  Observation (593)  |  Prepare (44)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Remember (189)  |  Risk (68)  |  Rule (307)  |  Show (353)  |  Small (489)  |  Special (188)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spent (85)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Tower (45)  |  Work (1402)  |  Worth (172)

[J.J.] Sylvester’s methods! He had none. “Three lectures will be delivered on a New Universal Algebra,” he would say; then, “The course must be extended to twelve.” It did last all the rest of that year. The following year the course was to be Substitutions-Théorie, by Netto. We all got the text. He lectured about three times, following the text closely and stopping sharp at the end of the hour. Then he began to think about matrices again. “I must give one lecture a week on those,” he said. He could not confine himself to the hour, nor to the one lecture a week. Two weeks were passed, and Netto was forgotten entirely and never mentioned again. Statements like the following were not unfrequent in his lectures: “I haven’t proved this, but I am as sure as I can be of anything that it must be so. From this it will follow, etc.” At the next lecture it turned out that what he was so sure of was false. Never mind, he kept on forever guessing and trying, and presently a wonderful discovery followed, then another and another. Afterward he would go back and work it all over again, and surprise us with all sorts of side lights. He then made another leap in the dark, more treasures were discovered, and so on forever.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265-266.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (117)  |  Back (395)  |  Confine (26)  |  Course (413)  |  Dark (145)  |  Deliver (30)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  End (603)  |  Extend (129)  |  False (105)  |  Follow (389)  |  Forever (111)  |  Forget (125)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Frequent (26)  |  Go Back (4)  |  Guess (67)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (192)  |  Keep (104)  |  Last (425)  |  Leap (57)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Light (635)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mention (84)  |  Mentioned (3)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Never (1089)  |  New (1273)  |  Next (238)  |  Pass (241)  |  Prove (261)  |  Rest (287)  |  Say (989)  |  Side (236)  |  Statement (148)  |  Surprise (91)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time (1911)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (454)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Two (936)  |  Universal (198)  |  Week (73)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonderful (155)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)

[Jethro Tull] was the first Englishman—perhaps the first writer, ancient and modern—who has attempted, with any tolerable degree of success, to reduce the art of agriculture to certain and uniform principles; and it must be acknowledged that he has done more towards establishing a rational and practical method of husbandry than all the writers who have gone before him.
Anonymous
In Letter (18 Oct 1764), signed only “D.Y.” from Hungerford, in Sylvanus Urban (ed.), 'Observations on the late Improvements in Agriculture', The Gentleman’s Magazine (Nov 1764), 525.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (78)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Art (680)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Certain (557)  |  Degree (277)  |  Englishman (5)  |  Establishing (7)  |  First (1302)  |  Husbandry (2)  |  Method (531)  |  Modern (402)  |  More (2558)  |  Practical (225)  |  Principle (530)  |  Rational (95)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Success (327)  |  Jethro Tull (8)  |  Uniform (20)  |  Writer (90)

[Man] … his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labour of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man's achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins…
From 'A Free Man's Worship', Independent Review (Dec 1903). Collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1918), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (31)  |  Achievement (187)  |  Age (509)  |  Atom (381)  |  Belief (615)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Death (406)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devotion (37)  |  Extinction (80)  |  Fear (212)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Fire (203)  |  Genius (301)  |  Grave (52)  |  Growth (200)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Individual (420)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Love (328)  |  Man (2252)  |  Origin (250)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Ruin (44)  |  Solar System (81)  |  System (545)  |  Temple (45)  |  Thought (995)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vast (188)  |  Whole (756)

[Molecular biology] is concerned particularly with the forms of biological molecules and with the evolution, exploitation and ramification of these forms in the ascent to higher and higher levels of organisation. Molecular biology is predominantly three-dimensional and structural—which does not mean, however, that it is merely a refinement of morphology. It must at the same time inquire into genesis and function.
From Harvey lecture (1951). As cited by John Law in 'The Case of X-ray Protein Crystallography', collected in Gerard Lemaine (ed.), Perspectives on the Emergence of Scientific Disciplines, 1976, 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (232)  |  Concern (239)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Form (976)  |  Function (235)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Inquire (26)  |  Mean (810)  |  Merely (315)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Ramification (8)  |  Refinement (19)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (365)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Time (1911)

[N]o scientist likes to be criticized. … But you don’t reply to critics: “Wait a minute, wait a minute; this is a really good idea. I’m very fond of it. It’s done you no harm. Please don’t attack it.” That's not the way it goes. The hard but just rule is that if the ideas don't work, you must throw them away. Don't waste any neurons on what doesn’t work. Devote those neurons to new ideas that better explain the data. Valid criticism is doing you a favor.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (86)  |  Better (493)  |  Critic (21)  |  Criticism (85)  |  Data (162)  |  Doing (277)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Favor (69)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Good (906)  |  Hard (246)  |  Harm (43)  |  Idea (881)  |  Minute (129)  |  Neuron (10)  |  New (1273)  |  Please (68)  |  Reply (58)  |  Rule (307)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Validity (50)  |  Wait (66)  |  Waste (109)  |  Way (1214)  |  Work (1402)

[Our work on the structure of DNA] was fairly fast, but you know, we were lucky. One must remember, it was based on the X-ray work done here in London started off by Morris Wilkins and carried on by Rosalind Franklin, and we wouldn’t have got to the stage of at least having a molecular model, if it hadn't been for their work.
Quoted and cited from BBC radio (1999) in transcript of Australian ABC radio program PM (30 Jul 2004) on the ABC website.
Science quotes on:  |  DNA (81)  |  Rosalind Franklin (18)  |  Know (1538)  |  Model (106)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Ray (115)  |  Remember (189)  |  Stage (152)  |  Start (237)  |  Structure (365)  |  Structure Of DNA (5)  |  Maurice Wilkins (4)  |  Work (1402)  |  X-ray (43)

[Professional engineers] must for years abandon their white collars except for Sunday.
Reprint of his 1916 statement in 'Engineering as a Profession', Engineer’s Week (1954).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Professional (77)  |  Sunday (8)  |  White (132)  |  Year (963)

[Science] is not perfect. It can be misused. It is only a tool. But it is by far the best tool we have, self-correcting, ongoing, applicable to everything. It has two rules. First: there are no sacred truths; all assumptions must be critically examined; arguments from authority are worthless. Second: whatever is inconsistent with the facts must be discarded or revised. ... The obvious is sometimes false; the unexpected is sometimes true.
Cosmos (1985), 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Argument (145)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Authority (99)  |  Best (467)  |  Discard (32)  |  Everything (489)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  False (105)  |  First (1302)  |  Inconsistent (9)  |  Misuse (12)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rule (307)  |  Sacred (48)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  Self (268)  |  Self-Correcting (5)  |  Self-Correction (2)  |  Tool (129)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Two (936)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Worthless (22)

[T]he yeoman’s work in any science, and especially physics, is done by the experimentalist, who must keep the theoreticians honest.
In Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and The Tenth Dimension (1994), 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Honest (53)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Research (753)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Work (1402)

[The blame for the future 'plight of civilization] must rest on scientific men, equally with others, for being incapable of accepting the responsibility for the profound social upheavals which their own work primarily has brought about in human relationships.
Quoted in Thaddeus Trenn, 'The Central Role of Energy in Soddy's Holistic and Critical Approach to Nuclear Science, Economics, and Social Responsibility', British Journal for the History of Science (1979), 42, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (56)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blame (31)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Equality (34)  |  Equally (129)  |  Future (467)  |  Human (1512)  |  Incapable (41)  |  Other (2233)  |  Plight (5)  |  Profound (105)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Responsibility (71)  |  Rest (287)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Social (261)  |  Upheaval (4)  |  Work (1402)

[The center must be more than just] old junk in a box. [It must be a] living dynamic thing to attract people to public service at all levels.
At a meeting (21 Apr 1997) describing his vision to university officials for the John Glenn Institute of Public Service and Public Policy Institute. As quoted on the Ohio State University website.
Science quotes on:  |  Attract (25)  |  Box (22)  |  Dynamic (16)  |  Institute (8)  |  Junk (6)  |  Living (492)  |  More (2558)  |  Old (499)  |  People (1031)  |  Public Service (6)  |  Service (110)  |  Thing (1914)

[The famous attack of Sir William Hamilton on the tendency of mathematical studies] affords the most express evidence of those fatal lacunae in the circle of his knowledge, which unfitted him for taking a comprehensive or even an accurate view of the processes of the human mind in the establishment of truth. If there is any pre-requisite which all must see to be indispensable in one who attempts to give laws to the human intellect, it is a thorough acquaintance with the modes by which human intellect has proceeded, in the case where, by universal acknowledgment, grounded on subsequent direct verification, it has succeeded in ascertaining the greatest number of important and recondite truths. This requisite Sir W. Hamilton had not, in any tolerable degree, fulfilled. Even of pure mathematics he apparently knew little but the rudiments. Of mathematics as applied to investigating the laws of physical nature; of the mode in which the properties of number, extension, and figure, are made instrumental to the ascertainment of truths other than arithmetical or geometrical—it is too much to say that he had even a superficial knowledge: there is not a line in his works which shows him to have had any knowledge at all.
In Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy (1878), 607.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (88)  |  Acknowledgment (13)  |  Acquaintance (38)  |  Afford (19)  |  Apparently (22)  |  Applied (176)  |  Apply (170)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Ascertainment (2)  |  Attack (86)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Case (102)  |  Circle (117)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Degree (277)  |  Direct (228)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Express (192)  |  Extension (60)  |  Famous (12)  |  Figure (162)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Geometrical (11)  |  Give (208)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Ground (222)  |  Hamilton (2)  |  Hamilton_William (2)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Intellect (32)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Important (229)  |  Indispensable (31)  |  Instrumental (5)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Investigate (106)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Line (100)  |  Little (717)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Mode (43)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Physical (518)  |  Prerequisite (9)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Process (439)  |  Property (177)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Requisite (12)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Show (353)  |  Study (701)  |  Subsequent (34)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Tendency (110)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Tolerable (2)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  Universal (198)  |  Verification (32)  |  View (496)  |  Work (1402)

[The object of education is] to train the mind to ascertain the sequence of a particular conclusion from certain premises, to detect a fallacy, to correct undue generalisation, to prevent the growth of mistakes in reasoning. Everything in these must depend on the spirit and the manner in which the instruction itself is conveyed and honoured. If you teach scientific knowledge without honouring scientific knowledge as it is applied, you do more harm than good. I do think that the study of natural science is so glorious a school for the mind, that with the laws impressed on all these things by the Creator, and the wonderful unity and stability of matter, and the forces of matter, there cannot be a better school for the education of the mind.
Giving Evidence (18 Nov 1862) to the Public Schools Commission. As quoted in John L. Lewis, 125 Years: The Physical Society & The Institute of Physics (1999), 168-169.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (176)  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Better (493)  |  Certain (557)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Creator (97)  |  Depend (238)  |  Detect (45)  |  Do (1905)  |  Education (423)  |  Everything (489)  |  Fallacy (31)  |  Force (497)  |  Glorious (49)  |  Good (906)  |  Growth (200)  |  Harm (43)  |  Honour (58)  |  Impress (66)  |  Impressed (39)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Mistake (180)  |  More (2558)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Science (133)  |  Object (438)  |  Premise (40)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  School (227)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Stability (28)  |  Study (701)  |  Teach (299)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Train (118)  |  Unity (81)  |  Wonderful (155)

[The parasite that causes malaria] edges through the cells of the stomach wall of the mosquito and forms a cyst which grows and eventually bursts to release hundreds of “sporozoites” into the body cavity of the mosquito … As far as we can tell, the parasite does not harm the mosquito … It has always seemed to me, though, that these growing cysts … must at least give the mosquito something corresponding to a stomach-ache.
In The Prevalence of People (1955, 1962), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (557)  |  Burst (41)  |  Bursting (3)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cavity (9)  |  Cell (146)  |  Edge (51)  |  Eventually (64)  |  Form (976)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growing (99)  |  Growth (200)  |  Harm (43)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Mosquito (16)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Release (31)  |  Something (718)  |  Stomach (40)  |  Stomachache (3)  |  Tell (344)  |  Through (846)  |  Wall (71)

[The surplus of basic knowledge of the atomic nucleus was] largely used up [during the war with the atomic bomb as the dividend.] We must, without further delay restore this surplus in preparation for the important peacetime job for the nucleus - power production. ... Many of the proposed applications of atomic power - even for interplanetary rockets - seem to be within the realm of possibility provided the economic factor is ruled out completely, and the doubtful physical and chemical factors are weighted heavily on the optimistic side. ... The development of economic atomic power is not a simple extrapolation of knowledge gained during the bomb work. It is a new and difficult project to reach a satisfactory answer. Needless to say, it is vital that the atomic policy legislation now being considered by the congress recognizes the essential nature of this peacetime job, and that it not only permits but encourages the cooperative research-engineering effort of industrial, government and university laboratories for the task. ... We must learn how to generate the still higher energy particles of the cosmic rays - up to 1,000,000,000 volts, for they will unlock new domains in the nucleus.
Addressing the American Institute of Electrical Engineering, in New York (24 Jan 1946). In Schenectady Gazette (25 Jan 1946),
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Application (257)  |  Atomic Bomb (115)  |  Atomic Power (9)  |  Basic (144)  |  Being (1276)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Completely (137)  |  Congress (20)  |  Consider (428)  |  Cooperation (38)  |  Cosmic (74)  |  Cosmic Ray (7)  |  Delay (21)  |  Development (441)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Dividend (3)  |  Domain (72)  |  Doubtful (30)  |  Economic (84)  |  Economics (44)  |  Effort (243)  |  Encourage (43)  |  Energy (373)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Essential (210)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Gain (146)  |  Government (116)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Industry (159)  |  Job (86)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Learn (672)  |  Legislation (10)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Nucleus (54)  |  Optimism (17)  |  Particle (200)  |  Peacetime (4)  |  Permit (61)  |  Physical (518)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Power (771)  |  Preparation (60)  |  Production (190)  |  Project (77)  |  Ray (115)  |  Reach (286)  |  Realm (87)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Research (753)  |  Rocket (52)  |  Satisfaction (76)  |  Say (989)  |  Side (236)  |  Simple (426)  |  Still (614)  |  Surplus (2)  |  Task (152)  |  University (130)  |  Unlock (12)  |  Unlocking (2)  |  Vital (89)  |  War (233)  |  Weight (140)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)  |  World War II (9)

[The] complex pattern of the misallocation of credit for scientific work must quite evidently be described as “the Matthew effect,” for, as will be remembered, the Gospel According to St. Matthew puts it this way: For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath. Put in less stately language, the Matthew effect consists of the accruing of greater increments of recognition for particular scientific contributions to scientists of considerable repute and the withholding of such recognition from scientists who have not yet made their mark.
'The Matthew Effect in Science', Science (1968), 159, 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (26)  |  According (236)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contribution (93)  |  Credit (24)  |  Description (89)  |  Effect (414)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Give (208)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hath (2)  |  Increment (2)  |  Language (308)  |  Mark (47)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Recognition (93)  |  Remember (189)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Stately (12)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

[The] second fundamental rule of historical science may be thus simply expressed:—we should not wish to explain every thing. Historical tradition must never be abandoned in the philosophy of history—otherwise we lose all firm ground and footing. But historical tradition, ever so accurately conceived and carefully sifted, doth not always, especially in the early and primitive ages, bring with it a full and demonstrative certainty.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Age (509)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Early (196)  |  Everything (489)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Express (192)  |  Firm (47)  |  Footing (2)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Ground (222)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Lose (165)  |  Never (1089)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Rule (307)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tradition (76)  |  Wish (216)

[The] seminary spirit of minerals hath its proper wombs where it resides, and is like a Prince or Emperour, whose prescripts both Elements and matter must obey; and it is never idle, but always in action, producing and maintaining natural substances, untill they have fulfilled their destiny.
A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters (1669), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Both (496)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Element (322)  |  Idle (34)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mineral (66)  |  Natural (810)  |  Never (1089)  |  Obey (46)  |  Proper (150)  |  Reside (25)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Substance (253)  |  Womb (25)

[To a man expecting a scientific proof of the impossibility of flying saucers] I might have said to him: “Listen, I mean that from my knowledge of the world that I see around me, I think that it is much more likely that the reports of flying saucers are the results of the known irrational characteristics of terrestrial intelligence than of the unknown rational efforts of extra-terrestrial intelligence.” It is just more likely, that is all. It is a good guess. And we always try to guess the most likely explanation, keeping in the back of the mind the fact that if it does not work we must discuss the other possibilities.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965, 2001), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Effort (243)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Extraterrestrial (6)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Flying (74)  |  Flying Saucer (3)  |  Good (906)  |  Guess (67)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Irrational (16)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Listen (81)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mean (810)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Proof (304)  |  Rational (95)  |  Report (42)  |  Result (700)  |  Scientific (955)  |  See (1094)  |  Terrestrial (62)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Try (296)  |  UFO (4)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)

[To identify ancient sites] The primary requirement is a human skeleton or artifacts that are clearly the work of humans. Next, this evidence must lie in situ within undisturbed geological deposits. The artifacts should be directly associated with stratigraphy. Finally, the minimum age of the site must be determined by a direct link with fossils of known age or with material that has been reliably dated.
As quoted in Sharman Apt Russell, When the Land Was Young: Reflections on American Archaeology (2001), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Artifact (5)  |  Associate (25)  |  Date (14)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Determine (152)  |  Direct (228)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Geology (240)  |  Human (1512)  |  Identify (13)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Lie (370)  |  Link (48)  |  Material (366)  |  Next (238)  |  Primary (82)  |  Reliable (13)  |  Requirement (66)  |  Site (19)  |  Skeleton (25)  |  Stratigraphy (7)  |  Undisturbed (4)  |  Work (1402)

[W]e have made a thing, a most terrible weapon, that has altered abruptly and profoundly the nature of the world. We have made a thing that, by all standards of the world we grew up in, is an evil thing. And by doing so, by our participation in making it possible to make these things, we have raised again the question of whether science is good for man, of whether it is good to learn about the world, to try to understand it, to try to control it, to help give to the world of men increased insight, increased power. Because we are scientists, we must say an unalterable yes to these questions; it is our faith and our commitment, seldom made explicit, even more seldom challenged, that knowledge is a good in itself, knowledge and such power as must come with it.
Speech to the American Philosophical Society (Jan 1946). 'Atomic Weapons', printed in Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 90(1), 7-10. In Deb Bennett-Woods, Nanotechnology: Ethics and Society (2008), 23. Identified as a speech to the society in Kai Bird, Martin J. Sherwin, American Prometheus: the Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (2005), 323.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (64)  |  Altered (32)  |  Atomic Bomb (115)  |  Challenge (91)  |  Commitment (28)  |  Control (182)  |  Doing (277)  |  Evil (122)  |  Explicit (3)  |  Faith (209)  |  Good (906)  |  Insight (107)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Participation (15)  |  Possible (560)  |  Power (771)  |  Question (649)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Seldom (68)  |  Terrible (41)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Try (296)  |  Understand (648)  |  Weapon (98)  |  World (1850)

[We must] recognize ourselves for what we are—the priests of a not very popular religion.
In Physics Today, April 1968.
Science quotes on:  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Priest (29)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Religion (369)

[We] can easily distinguish what relates to Mathematics in any question from that which belongs to the other sciences. But as I considered the matter carefully it gradually came to light that all those matters only were referred to Mathematics in which order and measurements are investigated, and that it makes no difference whether it be in numbers, figures, stars, sounds or any other object that the question of measurement arises. I saw consequently that there must be some general science to explain that element as a whole which gives rise to problems about order and measurement, restricted as these are to no special subject matter. This, I perceived was called “Universal Mathematics,” not a far-fetched asignation, but one of long standing which has passed into current use, because in this science is contained everything on account of which the others are called parts of Mathematics.
Rules for the Direction of the Mind (written 1628). As translated by Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane and George Robert Thomson Ross in The Philosophical Works of Descartes (1911, 1931), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Arise (162)  |  Belong (168)  |  Call (781)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Consider (428)  |  Current (122)  |  Difference (355)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Element (322)  |  Everything (489)  |  Explain (334)  |  Figure (162)  |  General (521)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Investigate (106)  |  Light (635)  |  Long (778)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Matter (821)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Number (710)  |  Object (438)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Problem (731)  |  Question (649)  |  Rise (169)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sound (187)  |  Special (188)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Subject (543)  |  Universal (198)  |  Use (771)  |  Whole (756)

[Werhner von Braun] is a human leader whose eyes and thoughts have always been turned toward the stars. It would be foolish to assign rocketry success to one person totally. Components must necessarily be the work of many minds; so must successive stages of development. But because Wernher von Braun joins technical ability, passionate optimism, immense experience and uncanny organizing ability in the elusive power to create a team, he is the greatest human element behind today’s rocketry success
Quoted in 'Reach For The Stars', Time (17 Feb 1958), 71, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Behind (139)  |  Wernher von Braun (29)  |  Component (51)  |  Create (245)  |  Development (441)  |  Element (322)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Experience (494)  |  Eye (440)  |  Foolish (41)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Human (1512)  |  Immense (89)  |  Leader (51)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Optimism (17)  |  Organize (33)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Person (366)  |  Power (771)  |  Rocket (52)  |  Stage (152)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Success (327)  |  Successive (73)  |  Team (17)  |  Technical (53)  |  Thought (995)  |  Today (321)  |  Turn (454)  |  Uncanny (5)  |  Work (1402)

[About describing atomic models in the language of classical physics:] We must be clear that when it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The poet, too, is not nearly so concerned with describing facts as with creating images and establishing mental connections.
As quoted by Werner Heisenberg, as translated by Arnold J. Pomerans, in Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (1971), 41. The words are not verbatim, but as later recollected by Werner Heisenberg describing his early encounter with Bohr in 1920.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Classical (49)  |  Classical Physics (6)  |  Concern (239)  |  Connection (171)  |  Creation (350)  |  Description (89)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Image (97)  |  Language (308)  |  Mental (179)  |  Model (106)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Poet (97)  |  Poetry (150)

[On seeing the marsupials in Australia for the first time and comparing them to placental mammals:] An unbeliever … might exclaim “Surely two distinct Creators must have been at work.”
In Diary (19 Jan 1836). In Richard D. Keynes (ed.), The Beagle Record: Selections from the Original Pictorial Records and Written Accounts of the Voyage of HMS Beagle (1979), 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Australia (11)  |  Creator (97)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Exclaim (15)  |  First (1302)  |  Mammal (41)  |  Marsupial (2)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Unbeliever (3)  |  Work (1402)

[Pechblende] einer eigenthümlichen, selbstständigen metallischen Substanz bestehe. Es fallen folglich auch deren bisherige Benennungen, als: Ресhblende Eisenpecherz, hinweg, welche nun durch einen neuen ausschliessend bezeichnenden Namen zu ersetzen sind. Ich habe dazu den Namen: Uranerz (Uranium) erwählt; zu einigem Andenken, dass die chemische Ausfindung dieses neuen Metallkörpers in die Epoche der astronomischen. Entdeckung des Planeten Uranus gefallen sei.
[Pitchblende] consists of a peculiar, distinct, metallic substance. Therefore its former denominations, pitch-blende, pitch-iron-ore, &c. are no longer applicable, and must be supplied by another more appropriate name.—I have chosen that of uranite, (Uranium), as a kind of memorial, that the chemical discovery of this new metal happened in the period of the astronomical discovery of the new planet Uranus.
In original German edition, Beiträge Zur Chemischen Kenntniss Der Mineralkörper (1797), Vol. 2, 215. English edition, translator not named, Analytical Essays Towards Promoting the Chemical Knowledge of Mineral Substances (1801), 491. The new planet was discovered on 13 Mar 1781 by William Herschel, who originally named it Georgium Sidus (George's Star) to honour King George III.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Choice (114)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Consist (223)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Element (322)  |  Former (138)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Sir William Herschel (14)  |  Iron (99)  |  Kind (564)  |  Memorial (4)  |  Metal (88)  |  More (2558)  |  Name (359)  |  New (1273)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Ore (14)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Period (200)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Pitchblende (2)  |  Planet (402)  |  Substance (253)  |  Uranium (21)  |  Uranus (6)

Alles Gescheite ist schon gedacht worden; man muss nur versuchen, es noch einmal zu denken.
Everything that is worth thinking has already been thought; one must only try to think it again.
As translated in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Everything (489)  |  Man (2252)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Thought (995)  |  Try (296)  |  Worth (172)

Aux mathématiciens, il appartient de chercher le vrai; les philosophes doivent se contenter du probable
The concern of mathematicians is to seek the truth; philosophers must be content with the probable.
In 'Divers Opuscules' collected in Oeuvres de Vico (1835), Vol. 1, 159. Translation by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (239)  |  Content (75)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Probable (24)  |  Seek (218)  |  Truth (1109)

Dilbert: Evolution must be true because it is a logical conclusion of the scientific method.
Dogbert: But science is based on the irrational belief that because we cannot perceive reality all at once, things called “time” and “cause and effect” exist.
Dilbert: That’s what I was taught and that’s what I believe.
Dogbert: Sounds cultish.
Dilbert comic strip (8 Feb 1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Call (781)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cause And Effect (21)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Cult (5)  |  Effect (414)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Irrational (16)  |  Logic (311)  |  Method (531)  |  Perception (97)  |  Reality (274)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  Sound (187)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Time (1911)  |  Truth (1109)

Dilbert: You joined the “Flat Earth Society?”
Dogbert: I believe the earth must be flat. There is no good evidence to support the so-called “round earth theory.”
Dilbert: I think Christopher Columbus would disagree.
Dogbert: How convenient that your best witness is dead.
Dilbert comic strip (9 Oct 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Best (467)  |  Call (781)  |  Christopher Columbus (16)  |  Convenience (54)  |  Death (406)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Flat (34)  |  Flat Earth (3)  |  Good (906)  |  Join (32)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Society (350)  |  Support (151)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Think (1122)  |  Witness (57)

Discovery always carries an honorific connotation. It is the stamp of approval on a finding of lasting value. Many laws and theories have come and gone in the history of science, but they are not spoken of as discoveries. Kepler is said to have discovered the laws of planetary motion named after him, but no the many other 'laws' which he formulated. ... Theories are especially precarious, as this century profoundly testifies. World views can and do often change. Despite these difficulties, it is still true that to count as a discovery a finding must be of at least relatively permanent value, as shown by its inclusion in the generally accepted body of scientific knowledge.
Discovery in the Physical Sciences (1969). In Rodney P. Carlisle, Scientific American Inventions and Discoveries (2004), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Approval (12)  |  Body (557)  |  Century (319)  |  Change (639)  |  Count (107)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Do (1905)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Kepler_Johann (2)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Motion (320)  |  Other (2233)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Planet (402)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Precarious (6)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Still (614)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Value (393)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!
Said by the fictional Red Queen character, in Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1872, 1896), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1905)  |  Fast (49)  |  Keep (104)  |  Least (75)  |  Place (192)  |  Run (158)  |  Running (61)  |  Same (166)  |  See (1094)  |  Twice (20)  |  Want (504)

Hoc age ['do this'] is the great rule, whether you are serious or merry; whether ... learning science or duty from a folio, or floating on the Thames. Intentions must be gathered from acts.
In James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson (1821), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Age (509)  |  Do (1905)  |  Duty (71)  |  Float (31)  |  Gather (76)  |  Great (1610)  |  Intention (46)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learning (291)  |  Merry (3)  |  Rule (307)  |  Serious (98)  |  Thames (6)

Il ne fallait jamais faire des expériences pour confirmer ses idées, mais simplement pour les contrôler.
We must never make experiments to confirm our ideas, but simply to control them.
From Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale (1865), 67-68. Translation from Henry Copley Green, An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1957), 38. Bernard footnoted that he had expressed this idea earlier in Leçons sur les propriétés et les altérations des liquides de l’organisme (1859), Première leçon.
Science quotes on:  |  Confirm (58)  |  Control (182)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Idea (881)  |  Never (1089)

L’oeuvre de Pasteur est admirable; elle montre son génie, mais it faut avoir vécu dans son intimité pour connaître toute la bonté de son coeur.
The work of Pasteur is admirable; it shows his genius, but it must have been experienced intimately to know all the goodness of his heart.
Epigraph in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1900), title page. English by Google translation, tweaked by Webmaster. Pierre Paul Émile Roux had indeed known Pasteur well, as one of his closest collaborators.
Science quotes on:  |  Experience (494)  |  Genius (301)  |  Goodness (26)  |  Heart (243)  |  Know (1538)  |  Louis Pasteur (85)  |  Show (353)  |  Work (1402)

La théorie est l’hypothèse vérifiée, après qu’elle a été soumise au contrôle du raisonnement et de la critique expérimentale. La meilleure théorie est celle qui a été vérifiée par le plus grand nombre de faits. Mais une théorie, pour rester bonne, doit toujours se modifier avec les progrès de la science et demeurer constamment soumise à la vérification et à la critique des faits nouveaux qui apparaissent.
A theory is a verified hypothesis, after it has been submitted to the control of reason and experimental criticism. The soundest theory is one that has been verified by the greatest number of facts. But to remain valid, a theory must be continually altered to keep pace with the progress of science and must be constantly resubmitted to verification and criticism as new facts appear.
Original work in French, Introduction à l'Étude de la Médecine Expérimentale (1865), 385. English translation by Henry Copley Green in An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (64)  |  Altered (32)  |  Continually (17)  |  Control (182)  |  Criticism (85)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  New (1273)  |  Number (710)  |  Pace (18)  |  Plus (43)  |  Progress (492)  |  Progress Of Science (40)  |  Reason (766)  |  Remain (355)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Validity (50)  |  Verification (32)

Les grands ponts étant … des monuments qui peuvent servir à faire connoître la magnificence et le génie d’une nation, on ne sauroit trop s’occuper des moyens d’en perfectionner l’architecture, qui peut d’ailleurs être susceptible de variété, en conservant toujours, dans les formes et la décoration, le caractere de solidité qui lui est propre.
Great bridges being monuments which serve to make known the grandeur and genius of a nation, we cannot pay too much attention to means for perfecting their architecture; this may be varied in treatment, but there must ever be conserved, in form and in decoration, the indispensable character of solidity.
In Description des projets et de la construction des ponts de Neuilli, de Mantes, d'Orléans, de Louis XVI, etc. (1777, New ed. 1788), 630. Translated by D. B. Steinman, as quoted in 'Some Reflections on the architecture of Bridges', Engineering and Contracting (26 Dec 1917), 48, No. 26, 536. Also seen translated as, “A great bridge is a great monument which should serve to make known the splendour and genius of a nation; one should not occupy oneself with efforts to perfect it architecturally, for taste is always susceptible to change, but to conserve always in its form and decoration the character of solidity which is proper.”
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (50)  |  Attention (196)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Character (259)  |  Decoration (2)  |  Form (976)  |  Genius (301)  |  Grandeur (35)  |  Great (1610)  |  Known (453)  |  Magnificence (14)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Monument (45)  |  Nation (208)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfecting (6)  |  Solidity (3)  |  Splendor (20)  |  Taste (93)  |  Treatment (135)

Les mathématique sont un triple. Elles doivent fournir un instrument pour l'étude de la nature. Mais ce n'est pas tout: elles ont un but philosophique et, j'ose le dire, un but esthétique.
Mathematics has a threefold purpose. It must provide an instrument for the study of nature. But this is not all: it has a philosophical purpose, and, I daresay, an aesthetic purpose.
La valeur de la science. In Anton Bovier, Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems (2006), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (48)  |  Dire (6)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Study (701)

Man muss immer generalisieren
One must always generalize.
Quoted, without citation, in Arnold Dresden, An Invitation to Mathematics (1936), 231. Dresden states this is a “principle usually attributed to Jacobi”.
Science quotes on:  |  Generalize (19)  |  Man (2252)

N’oublions pas non plus qu’il ne saurait exister pour la science des vérités acquises.
Nor must we forget that in science there are no final truths.
Original French in Mythologiques, Vol. 1, Le Cru et le Cuit (1964), 15. As translated by John and Doreen Weightman, The Raw and the Cooked (1969, 1990), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Final (121)  |  Forget (125)  |  Plus (43)  |  Truth (1109)

Nicht Kunst und Wissenschaft allein,
Geduld will bei dem Werke sein.

Not Art and Science serve alone; Patience must in the work be shown.
Lines for character Mephistopheles in Faust I. As translated by Bayard Taylor in Lilian Dalbiac, Dictionary of Quotations (German) (1909, 256. Also translated as “Not art and science only, but patience will be required for the work”, in James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 298, No. 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Art (680)  |  Patience (58)  |  Required (108)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

Non enim omnis error stultitia est dicenda
We must not say every mistake is a foolish one.
De Divinatione II., 22, 79. In Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (classical) (3rd Ed., 1906), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (339)  |  Foolish (41)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Say (989)

Of Cooking. This is an art of various forms, the object of which is to give ordinary observations the appearance and character of those of the highest degree of accuracy. One of its numerous processes is to make multitudes of observations, and out of these to select only those which agree, or very nearly agree. If a hundred observations are made, the cook must be very unhappy if he cannot pick out fifteen or twenty which will do for serving up.
Reflections on the Decline of Science in England (1830). In Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao, Statistics and Truth (1997), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Art (680)  |  Character (259)  |  Cooking (12)  |  Degree (277)  |  Do (1905)  |  Form (976)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Hoax (6)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Multitude (50)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Numerous (70)  |  Object (438)  |  Observation (593)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Select (45)  |  Serving (15)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Various (205)  |  Will (2350)

Opfer müssen gebracht werden!
Sacrifices must be made!
Remark made when near death after breaking his spine in an airplane crash in a glider of his design.
Quoted in Warren F. Phillips, Mechanics of Flight (2004), 371.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (43)  |  Death (406)  |  Design (203)  |   Epitaph (19)  |  Sacrifice (58)  |  Spine (9)

Pour accomplir de grandes choses il ne suffit pas d'agir il faut rêver; il ne suffit pas de calculer, il faut croire.
To accomplish great things, we must not only act but also dream, not only plan but also believe.
[Referring to the Suez Canal, initiated by Ferdinand de Lesseps.]
Speech (24 Dec 1896) upon election to the French Academy, in the vacant place of the late Ferdinand de Lesseps, Discours de Réception de M. Anatole France: Séance de l'Académie Française du 24 Décembre 1896 (1897), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (102)  |  Act (278)  |  Belief (615)  |  Canal (18)  |  Dream (222)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Vicomte Ferdinand, de Lesseps (2)  |  Plan (122)  |  Suez Canal (2)  |  Thing (1914)

Pour inventor il faut penser à côté.
To invent you must think aside
In Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao, Statistics and Truth (1997), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Creativity (84)  |  Invent (57)  |  Think (1122)

Pour réussir dans la science, il faut douter; pour réussir dans la vie, il faut être sûr.
To succeed in science, one must doubt; to succeed in life, one must be sure.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 193. Google translation by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Doubt (314)  |  Life (1870)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)  |  Sure (15)

Primo enim paranda est Historia Naturalis et Experimentalis, suffidens et bona; quod fundamentum rei est: neque enim fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat.
For first of all we must prepare a Natural and Experimental History, sufficient and good; and this is the foundation of all; for we are not to imagine or suppose, but to discover, what nature does or may be made to do.
In Novum Organum, Book 2, Aphorism 10. As translated in Francis Bacon and James Spedding with ‎Robert Leslie Ellis (eds.), 'The New Organon', The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the Philosophical Works (1858), Vol. 4, 127. Also seen in epigraphs as a shorter quote, “Non fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat,” which can also be translated as “We have not to imagine or to think out, but to find out what Nature does or produces.”
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (571)  |  Do (1905)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Experimental (193)  |  First (1302)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Good (906)  |  History (716)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Prepare (44)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Suppose (158)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Accurate (88)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (366)  |  Answer (389)  |  Apparatus (70)  |  Attention (196)  |  Beat (42)  |  Bone (101)  |  Bow (15)  |  Close (77)  |  Common (447)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Determination (80)  |  Determine (152)  |  Dial (9)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Draw (140)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Ear (69)  |  Examination (102)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Faint (10)  |  Figure (162)  |  Force (497)  |  Head (87)  |  Hear (144)  |  Hearing (50)  |  Howler (15)  |  Last (425)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Listen (81)  |  Look (584)  |  Looking (191)  |  Mount (43)  |  Mounting (2)  |  Operation (221)  |  Original (61)  |  Particle (200)  |  Perform (123)  |  Performance (51)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Pressing (2)  |  Process (439)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Question (649)  |  Require (229)  |  Room (42)  |  Second (66)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Slow (108)  |  Sound (187)  |  Stand (284)  |  State (505)  |  Still (614)  |  Sure (15)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1911)  |  Trace (109)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Vibration (26)  |  Watch (118)

Question: Explain why, in order to cook food by boiling, at the top of a high mountain, you must employ a different method from that used at the sea level.
Answer: It is easy to cook food at the sea level by boiling it, but once you get above the sea level the only plan is to fry it in its own fat. It is, in fact, impossible to boil water above the sea level by any amount of heat. A different method, therefore, would have to be employed to boil food at the top of a high mountain, but what that method is has not yet been discovered. The future may reveal it to a daring experimentalist.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 178-9, Question 11. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (153)  |  Answer (389)  |  Boil (24)  |  Boiling (3)  |  Cooking (12)  |  Daring (17)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Easy (213)  |  Employ (115)  |  Examination (102)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fat (11)  |  Food (213)  |  Frying (2)  |  Future (467)  |  Heat (180)  |  High (370)  |  Howler (15)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Method (531)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Order (638)  |  Plan (122)  |  Question (649)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Sea (326)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Top (100)  |  Water (503)  |  Why (491)

Qui ergo munitam vult habere navem habet etiam acum jaculo suppositam. Rotabitur enim et circumvolvetur acus, donec cuspis acus respiciat orientem sicque comprehendunt quo tendere debeant nautaw cum Cynosura latet in aeris turbatione; quamvis ad occasum numquam tendat, propter circuli brevitatem.
If then one wishes a ship well provided with all things, then one must have also a needle mounted on a dart. The needle will be oscillated and turn until the point of the needle directs itself to the East* [North], thus making known to sailors the route which they should hold while the Little Bear is concealed from them by the vicissitudes of the atmosphere; for it never disappears under the horizon because of the smallness of the circle it describes.
Latin text from Thomas Wright, 'De Utensilibus', A Volume of Vocabularies, (1857) as cited with translation in Park Benjamin, The Intellectual Rise in Electricity: A History (1895), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (117)  |  Bear (162)  |  Circle (117)  |  Compass (37)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Describe (132)  |  Direct (228)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Horizon (47)  |  Known (453)  |  Little (717)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Making (300)  |  Mount (43)  |  Never (1089)  |  Point (584)  |  Sailor (21)  |  Ship (69)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Turn (454)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Will (2350)

Qui est de nous & qui seul peut nous égarer; à le mettre continuellement à épreuve de l'expérience; à ne conserver que les faits qui ne font que des données de la nature , & qui ne peuvent nous tromper; à ne chercher la vérité que dans l'enchaînement naturel des expériences & des observations
We must trust to nothing but facts: These are presented to us by Nature, and cannot deceive. We ought, in every instance, to submit our reasoning to the test of experiment, and never to search for truth but by the natural road of experiment and observation.
From the original French in Traité élémentaire de chimie (1789, 1793), discours préliminaire, x; and from edition translated into English by Robert Kerr, as Elements of Chemistry (1790), Preface, xviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deception (9)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Observation (593)  |  Present (630)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Search (175)  |  Test (221)  |  Trust (72)  |  Truth (1109)

Thomasina: Every week I plot your equations dot for dot, x’s against y’s in all manner of algebraical relation, and every week they draw themselves as commonplace geometry, as if the world of forms were nothing but arcs and angles. God’s truth, Septimus, if there is an equation for a curve like a bell, there must be an equation for one like a bluebell, and if a bluebell, why not a rose? Do we believe nature is written in numbers?
Septimus: We do.
Thomasina: Then why do your shapes describe only the shapes of manufacture?
Septimus: I do not know.
Thomasina: Armed thus, God could only make a cabinet.
In the play, Acadia (1993), Scene 3, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (117)  |  Angle (25)  |  Arc (14)  |  Arm (82)  |  Armed (2)  |  Belief (615)  |  Bell (35)  |  Cabinet (5)  |  Commonplace (24)  |  Curve (49)  |  Describe (132)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dot (18)  |  Draw (140)  |  Equation (138)  |  Form (976)  |  Geometry (271)  |  God (776)  |  Know (1538)  |  Manufacture (30)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  Plot (11)  |  Relation (166)  |  Rose (36)  |  Shape (77)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Week (73)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1850)  |  Written (6)

Where faith commences, science ends. Both these arts of the human mind must be strictly kept apart from each other. Faith has its origin in the poetic imagination; knowledge, on the other hand, originates in the reasoning intelligence of man. Science has to pluck the blessed fruits from the tree of knowledge, unconcerned whether these conquests trench upon the poetical imaginings of faith or not.
In Ernst Haeckel and E. Ray Lankester (trans.), The History of Creation (1880), Vol. 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Apart (7)  |  Art (680)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Both (496)  |  Conquest (31)  |  End (603)  |  Faith (209)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Origin (250)  |  Originate (39)  |  Other (2233)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Tree (269)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (8)  |  Trench (6)

Wir mussen wissen. Wir werden wissen.
We must know. We will know.
Engraved on his tombstone in Göttingen. Lecture at Konigsberg, 1930. Gesammelte Abhandlungen, Vol. 3, 387, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |   Epitaph (19)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Will (2350)

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen.
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.
In Tractatus logico-philosophicus (1921, 1955), Sec. 7, 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (2252)  |  Silence (62)  |  Speak (240)  |  Speaking (118)

QUEEN: Thou know’st ’tis common—all that lives must die,
Passing through nature to eternity.
HAMLET: Ay, madam, it is common.
Hamlet (1601), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (447)  |  Cycle (42)  |  Death (406)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Hamlet (10)  |  Know (1538)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Pass (241)  |  Passing (76)  |  Small (489)  |  Through (846)

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?
Doctor: Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest.
Macbeth: Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
Doctor: Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
Macbeth: Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Macbeth (1606), V, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (9)  |  Bosom (14)  |  Brain (281)  |  Cleanse (5)  |  Coming (114)  |  Cure (124)  |  Disease (340)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Dog (70)  |  Heart (243)  |  Himself (461)  |  Lord (97)  |  Memory (144)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Minister (10)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Patient (209)  |  Peril (9)  |  Physic (515)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Rest (287)  |  Root (121)  |  Sick (83)  |  Small (489)  |  Sorrow (21)  |  Sweet (40)  |  Trouble (117)  |  Variant (9)  |  Weigh (51)  |  Writing (192)

~~[Orphan]~~ Mathematicians are like lovers. Grant a mathematician the least principle, and he will draw from it a consequence which you must also grant him, and from this consequence another.
As quoted, without citation, in Eric Temple Bell, Men of Mathematics (1937), Vol. 2, xlix. Webmaster has so far been unable to find the primary source. Can you help? Until then, consider it an unverified orphan quote.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (220)  |  Draw (140)  |  Grant (76)  |  Least (75)  |  Lover (11)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Principle (530)  |  Will (2350)

2. The Second Law of Ecology: Everything must go somewhere.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Ecology (81)  |  Everything (489)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Ecology (5)  |  Second (66)

A primâ facie argument in favour of the efficacy of prayer is therefore to be drawn from the very general use of it. The greater part of mankind, during all the historic ages, have been accustomed to pray for temporal advantages. How vain, it may be urged, must be the reasoning that ventures to oppose this mighty consensus of belief! Not so. The argument of universality either proves too much, or else it is suicidal.
'Statistical Inquiries into the Efficacy of Prayer', Fortnightly Review, 1872, 12, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Advantage (144)  |  Age (509)  |  Argument (145)  |  Belief (615)  |  Consensus (8)  |  General (521)  |  Greater (288)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Prayer (30)  |  Prove (261)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Universality (22)  |  Use (771)  |  Vain (86)

A bird is an instrument working according to mathematical law, which instrument it is within the capacity of man to reproduce with all its movements, but not with a corresponding degree of strength, though it is deficient only in the power of maintaining equilibrium. We may therefore say that such an instrument constructed by man is lacking in nothing except the life of the bird, and this life must needs be supplied from that of man.
'Of the Bird's Movement' from Codice Atlantico 161 r.a., in Leonardo da Vinci's Notebooks, trans. E. MacCurdy (1906), Vol. 1, 153.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Airplane (43)  |  Bird (163)  |  Capacity (105)  |  Construct (129)  |  Construction (114)  |  Degree (277)  |  Equilibrium (34)  |  Flight (101)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Movement (162)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Power (771)  |  Say (989)  |  Strength (139)

A cell has a history; its structure is inherited, it grows, divides, and, as in the embryo of higher animals, the products of division differentiate on complex lines. Living cells, moreover, transmit all that is involved in their complex heredity. I am far from maintaining that these fundamental properties may not depend upon organisation at levels above any chemical level; to understand them may even call for different methods of thought; I do not pretend to know. But if there be a hierarchy of levels we must recognise each one, and the physical and chemical level which, I would again say, may be the level of self-maintenance, must always have a place in any ultimate complete description.
'Some Aspects of Biochemistry', The Irish Journal of Medical Science (1932), 79, 346.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Call (781)  |  Cell (146)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Complete (209)  |  Complex (202)  |  Depend (238)  |  Different (595)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Divide (77)  |  Division (67)  |  Do (1905)  |  Embryo (30)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growth (200)  |  Heredity (62)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  History (716)  |  Inherit (35)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1538)  |  Living (492)  |  Maintenance (21)  |  Method (531)  |  Physical (518)  |  Product (166)  |  Say (989)  |  Self (268)  |  Structure (365)  |  Thought (995)  |  Ultimate (152)  |  Understand (648)

A central lesson of science is that to understand complex issues (or even simple ones), we must try to free our minds of dogma and to guarantee the freedom to publish, to contradict, and to experiment. Arguments from authority are unacceptable.
Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millenium (1998), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (145)  |  Authority (99)  |  Central (81)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Contradict (42)  |  Dogma (49)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Free (239)  |  Freedom (145)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Lesson (58)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Problem (731)  |  Publication (102)  |  Simple (426)  |  Try (296)  |  Unacceptable (3)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)

A complete theory of evolution must acknowledge a balance between ‘external’ forces of environment imposing selection for local adaptation and ‘internal’ forces representing constraints of inheritance and development. Vavilov placed too much emphasis on internal constraints and downgraded the power of selection. But Western Darwinians have erred equally in practically ignoring (while acknowledging in theory) the limits placed on selection by structure and development–what Vavilov and the older biologists would have called ‘laws of form.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Adaptation (59)  |  Balance (82)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Call (781)  |  Complete (209)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Darwinian (10)  |  Development (441)  |  Downgrade (2)  |  Emphasis (18)  |  Environment (239)  |  Equally (129)  |  Err (5)  |  Evolution (635)  |  External (62)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Ignore (52)  |  Ignoring (11)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inheritance (35)  |  Internal (69)  |  Law (913)  |  Limit (294)  |  Local (25)  |  Old (499)  |  Place (192)  |  Power (771)  |  Practically (10)  |  Represent (157)  |  Selection (130)  |  Structure (365)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Western (45)

A demonstrative and convincing proof that an acid does consist of pointed parts is, that not only all acid salts do Crystallize into edges, but all Dissolutions of different things, caused by acid liquors, do assume this figure in their Crystallization; these Crystalls consist of points differing both in length and bigness from one another, and this diversity must be attributed to the keener or blunter edges of the different sorts of acids
A Course of Chymistry (1675), trans. W. Harris (1686), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Both (496)  |  Consist (223)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Crystallize (12)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Different (595)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Diversity (75)  |  Do (1905)  |  Edge (51)  |  Figure (162)  |  Point (584)  |  Proof (304)  |  Salt (48)  |  Thing (1914)

A designer must always think about the unfortunate production engineer who will have to manufacture what you have designed; try to understand his problems.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (203)  |  Designer (7)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Manufacture (30)  |  Manufacturing (29)  |  Problem (731)  |  Production (190)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Try (296)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Will (2350)

A discovery must be, by definition, at variance with existing knowledge. During my lifetime, I made two. Both were rejected offhand by the popes of the field. Had I predicted these discoveries in my applications, and had those authorities been my judges, it is evident what their decisions would have been.
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (257)  |  Authority (99)  |  Both (496)  |  Decision (98)  |  Definition (238)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Evident (92)  |  Existence (481)  |  Field (378)  |  Judge (114)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lifetime (40)  |  Pope (10)  |  Predict (86)  |  Prediction (89)  |  Reject (67)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (36)  |  Two (936)  |  Variance (12)

A doctor must work eighteen hours a day and seven days a week. If you cannot console yourself to this, get out of the profession
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (191)  |  Hour (192)  |  Physician (284)  |  Profession (108)  |  Week (73)  |  Work (1402)

A farmer believes what goes down must come up.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Down (455)  |  Farmer (35)  |  Up (5)

A fire eater must eat fire even if he has to kindle it himself.
In Foundation (1951, 2004), Vol. 1, 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Eat (108)  |  Fire (203)  |  Himself (461)  |  Kindle (9)

A fool must now and then be right, by chance
In 'Conversation' (published 1782). In William Cowper and Humphrey Sumner Milford (ed.), The Complete Poetical Works of William Cowper (1905), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (244)  |  Fool (121)  |  Right (473)  |  Truth (1109)

A game is on, at the other end of this infinite distance, and heads or tails will turn up. What will you wager? According to reason you cannot leave either; according to reason you cannot leave either undone... Yes, but wager you must; there is no option, you have embarked on it. So which will you have. Come. Since you must choose, let us see what concerns you least. You have two things to lose: truth and good, and two things to stake: your reason and your will, your knowledge and your happiness. And your nature has two things to shun: error and misery. Your reason does not suffer by your choosing one more than the other, for you must choose. That is one point cleared. But your happiness? Let us weigh gain and loss in calling heads that God is. Reckon these two chances: if you win, you win all; if you lose, you lose naught. Then do not hesitate, wager that He is.
Pensées (1670), Section I, aphorism 223. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal's Pensées (1950), 117-119.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Chance (244)  |  Choice (114)  |  Choose (116)  |  Concern (239)  |  Distance (171)  |  Do (1905)  |  Embarkation (2)  |  End (603)  |  Error (339)  |  Gain (146)  |  Game (104)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Head (87)  |  Hesitate (24)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lose (165)  |  Loss (117)  |  Misery (31)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Naught (10)  |  Option (10)  |  Other (2233)  |  Point (584)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  See (1094)  |  Shun (4)  |  Stake (20)  |  Suffering (68)  |  Tail (21)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Turn (454)  |  Two (936)  |  Wager (3)  |  Weigh (51)  |  Will (2350)  |  Win (53)

A good ornithologist should be able to distinguish birds by their air as well as by their colors and shape; on the ground as well as on the wing, and in the bush as well as in the hand. For, though it must not be said that every species of birds has a manner peculiar to itself, yet there is somewhat, in most genera at least, that at first sight discriminates them and enables a judicious observer to pronounce upon them with some certainty.
Letter (7 Aug 1778) to Daines Barrington, collected in The Natural History of Selborne (1829), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Bird (163)  |  Bush (11)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Color (155)  |  Discriminate (4)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Enable (122)  |  First (1302)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Genus (27)  |  Good (906)  |  Ground (222)  |  Hand (149)  |  Judicious (3)  |  Least (75)  |  Manner (62)  |  Most (1728)  |  Observer (48)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Pronounce (11)  |  Shape (77)  |  Sight (135)  |  Species (435)  |  Wing (79)

A good preface must be at once the square root and the square of its book.
Critical Fragment 8 in Freidrich Schlegel and Peter Firchow (trans.), Friedrich Schlegel's Lucinde and the Fragments (1971), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (413)  |  Good (906)  |  Preface (9)  |  Root (121)  |  Square (73)  |  Square Root (12)

A good teacher must know the rules; a good pupil, the exceptions.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Exception (74)  |  Good (906)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Rule (307)  |  Teacher (154)

A great department of thought must have its own inner life, however transcendent may be the importance of its relations to the outside. No department of science, least of all one requiring so high a degree of mental concentration as Mathematics, can be developed entirely, or even mainly, with a view to applications outside its own range. The increased complexity and specialisation of all branches of knowledge makes it true in the present, however it may have been in former times, that important advances in such a department as Mathematics can be expected only from men who are interested in the subject for its own sake, and who, whilst keeping an open mind for suggestions from outside, allow their thought to range freely in those lines of advance which are indicated by the present state of their subject, untrammelled by any preoccupation as to applications to other departments of science. Even with a view to applications, if Mathematics is to be adequately equipped for the purpose of coping with the intricate problems which will be presented to it in the future by Physics, Chemistry and other branches of physical science, many of these problems probably of a character which we cannot at present forecast, it is essential that Mathematics should be allowed to develop freely on its own lines.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (50)  |  Advance (298)  |  Allow (51)  |  Application (257)  |  Branch (155)  |  Character (259)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cope (9)  |  Degree (277)  |  Department (93)  |  Develop (278)  |  Entirely (36)  |  Equip (6)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Essential (210)  |  Expect (203)  |  Forecast (15)  |  Former (138)  |  Freely (13)  |  Future (467)  |  Great (1610)  |  High (370)  |  Importance (299)  |  Important (229)  |  Increase (225)  |  Indicate (62)  |  Inner (72)  |  Interest (416)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Least (75)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mainly (10)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mental (179)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Open (277)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical Science (104)  |  Physics (564)  |  Preoccupation (7)  |  Present (630)  |  Probably (50)  |  Problem (731)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Range (104)  |  Relation (166)  |  Require (229)  |  Sake (61)  |  Specialize (4)  |  State (505)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (543)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Transcendent (3)  |  True (239)  |  View (496)  |  Will (2350)

A great surgeon performs operations for stone by a single method; later he makes a statistical summary of deaths and recoveries, and he concludes from these statistics that the mortality law for this operation is two out of five. Well, I say that this ratio means literally nothing scientifically and gives us no certainty in performing the next operation; for we do not know whether the next case will be among the recoveries or the deaths. What really should be done, instead of gathering facts empirically, is to study them more accurately, each in its special determinism. We must study cases of death with great care and try to discover in them the cause of mortal accidents so as to master the cause and avoid the accidents.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 137-138. (Note that Bernard overlooks how the statistical method can be useful: a surgeon announcing a mortality rate of 40% invites comparison. A surgeon with worse outcomes should adopt this method. If a surgeon has a better results, that method should be adopted.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (92)  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Care (203)  |  Cause (561)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Death (406)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Discover (571)  |  Do (1905)  |  Empirical (58)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gather (76)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Great (1610)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Literally (30)  |  Master (182)  |  Mean (810)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Means (587)  |  Method (531)  |  More (2558)  |  Mortal (55)  |  Mortality (16)  |  Next (238)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Perform (123)  |  Performing (3)  |  Ratio (41)  |  Recovery (24)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  Single (365)  |  Special (188)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Stone (168)  |  Study (701)  |  Summary (11)  |  Surgeon (64)  |  Try (296)  |  Two (936)  |  Will (2350)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (75)  |  Achievement (187)  |  Affection (44)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Being (1276)  |  Call (781)  |  Circle (117)  |  Compassion (12)  |  Completely (137)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Creature (242)  |  Delusion (26)  |  Desire (212)  |  Embrace (47)  |  Experience (494)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Free (239)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Inner (72)  |  Kind (564)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nobody (103)  |  Optical (11)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Part (235)  |  Person (366)  |  Personal (75)  |  Prison (13)  |  Rest (287)  |  Restrict (13)  |  Security (51)  |  Separate (151)  |  Something (718)  |  Space (523)  |  Strive (53)  |  Task (152)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)  |  Widen (10)

A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (65)  |  Depend (238)  |  Exert (40)  |  Give In (3)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Inner (72)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Measure (241)  |  Myself (211)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outer (13)  |  Receive (117)  |  Remind (16)  |  Still (614)  |  Time (1911)

A hundred years ago … an engineer, Herbert Spencer, was willing to expound every aspect of life, with an effect on his admiring readers which has not worn off today.
Things do not happen quite in this way nowadays. This, we are told, is an age of specialists. The pursuit of knowledge has become a profession. The time when a man could master several sciences is past. He must now, they say, put all his efforts into one subject. And presumably, he must get all his ideas from this one subject. The world, to be sure, needs men who will follow such a rule with enthusiasm. It needs the greatest numbers of the ablest technicians. But apart from them it also needs men who will converse and think and even work in more than one science and know how to combine or connect them. Such men, I believe, are still to be found today. They are still as glad to exchange ideas as they have been in the past. But we cannot say that our way of life is well-fitted to help them. Why is this?
In 'The Unification of Biology', New Scientist (11 Jan 1962), 13, No. 269, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Able (2)  |  Age (509)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Become (821)  |  Combine (58)  |  Connect (126)  |  Do (1905)  |  Effect (414)  |  Effort (243)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Enthusiasm (59)  |  Exchange (38)  |  Follow (389)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Happen (282)  |  Help (116)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Idea (881)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Master (182)  |  More (2558)  |  Need (320)  |  Number (710)  |  Past (355)  |  Profession (108)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Rule (307)  |  Say (989)  |  Several (33)  |  Specialist (33)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Still (614)  |  Subject (543)  |  Technician (9)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Way (1214)  |  Way Of Life (15)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2350)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

A just society must strive with all its might to right wrongs even if righting wrongs is a highly perilous undertaking. But if it is to survive, a just society must be strong and resolute enough to deal swiftly and relentlessly with those who would mistake its good will for weakness.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (192)  |  Enough (341)  |  Good (906)  |  Highly (16)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Relentlessly (2)  |  Resolute (2)  |  Right (473)  |  Society (350)  |  Strive (53)  |  Strong (182)  |  Survive (87)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Undertake (35)  |  Undertaking (17)  |  Weakness (50)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wrong (246)

A large part of the training of the engineer, civil and military, as far as preparatory studies are concerned; of the builder of every fabric of wood or stone or metal designed to stand upon the earth, or bridge the stream, or resist or float upon the wave; of the surveyor who lays out a building lot in a city, or runs a boundary line between powerful governments across a continent; of the geographer, navigator, hydrographer, and astronomer,—must be derived from the mathematics.
In 'Academical Education', Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions (1870), Vol. 3, 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Boundary (55)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Build (211)  |  Builder (16)  |  Building (158)  |  City (87)  |  Civil (26)  |  Civil Engineer (4)  |  Concern (239)  |  Continent (79)  |  Derive (70)  |  Design (203)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Education (423)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Float (31)  |  Geographer (7)  |  Government (116)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Large (398)  |  Line (100)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Metal (88)  |  Military (45)  |  Military Engineer (2)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Preparatory (3)  |  Resist (15)  |  Run (158)  |  Stand (284)  |  Stone (168)  |  Stream (83)  |  Study (701)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Training (92)  |  Wave (112)  |  Wood (97)

A little science is something that they must have. I should like my nephews to know what air is, and water; why we breathe, and why wood burns; the nutritive elements essential to plant life, and the constituents of the soil. And it is no vague and imperfect knowledge from hearsay I would have them gain of these fundamental truths, on which depend agriculture and the industrial arts and our health itself; I would have them know these things thoroughly from their own observation and experience. Books here are insufficient, and can serve merely as aids to scientific experiment.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (78)  |  Aid (101)  |  Air (366)  |  Art (680)  |  Book (413)  |  Breathe (49)  |  Burn (99)  |  Constituent (47)  |  Depend (238)  |  Element (322)  |  Essential (210)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Gain (146)  |  Health (210)  |  Hearsay (5)  |  Imperfect (46)  |  Industrial (15)  |  Insufficient (10)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Merely (315)  |  Nephew (2)  |  Observation (593)  |  Plant (320)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Serve (64)  |  Soil (98)  |  Something (718)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Vague (50)  |  Water (503)  |  Why (491)  |  Wood (97)

A living organism must be studied from two distinct aspects. One of these is the causal-analytic aspect which is so fruitfully applicable to ontogeny. The other is the historical descriptive aspect which is unravelling lines of phylogeny with ever-increasing precision. Each of these aspects may make suggestions concerning the possible significance of events seen under the other, but does not explain or translate them into simpler terms.
'Embryology and Evolution', in G. R. de Beer (ed.), Evolution: Essays on Aspects of Evolutionary Biology presented to Professor E. S. Goodrich on his Seventieth Birthday (1938), 76-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Descriptive (18)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Embryology (18)  |  Event (222)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Explain (334)  |  Fruitful (61)  |  Historical (70)  |  Living (492)  |  Ontogeny (10)  |  Organism (231)  |  Other (2233)  |  Phylogeny (10)  |  Possible (560)  |  Precision (72)  |  Significance (114)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Translate (21)  |  Two (936)  |  Unraveling (3)

A man does not attain the status of Galileo merely because he is persecuted; he must also be right.
In essay 'Velikovsky in Collision', Natural History (Mar 1975), collected in Ever Since Darwin: Reflections in Natural History (1977, 1992), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (126)  |  Attainment (48)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Galileo Galilei (134)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mere (86)  |  Merely (315)  |  Persecution (14)  |  Right (473)  |  Status (35)

A man does what he must—in spite of personal consequences, in spite of obstacles and dangers and pressures—and that is the basis of all human morality.
In Profiles in Courage (1956), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (180)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Danger (127)  |  Human (1512)  |  Man (2252)  |  Morality (55)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Personal (75)  |  Pressure (69)  |  Spite (55)

A man is flying in a hot air balloon and realizes he is lost. He reduces height, spots a man down below and asks,“Excuse me, can you help me? I promised to return the balloon to its owner, but I don’t know where I am.”
The man below says: “You are in a hot air balloon, hovering approximately 350 feet above mean sea level and 30 feet above this field. You are between 40 and 42 degrees north latitude, and between 58 and 60 degrees west longitude.”
“You must be an engineer,” says the balloonist.
“I am,” replies the man.“How did you know?”
“Well,” says the balloonist, “everything you have told me is technically correct, but I have no idea what to make of your information, and the fact is I am still lost.”
The man below says, “You must be a manager.”
“I am,” replies the balloonist,“but how did you know?”
“Well,” says the engineer,“you don’t know where you are, or where you are going. You have made a promise which you have no idea how to keep, and you expect me to solve your problem.The fact is you are in the exact same position you were in before we met, but now it is somehow my fault.”
Anonymous
In Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp and Deborah Fripp, Speaking of Science (2000), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Ask (420)  |  Balloon (16)  |  Correct (95)  |  Degree (277)  |  Down (455)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Everything (489)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Expect (203)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fault (58)  |  Field (378)  |  Fly (153)  |  Flying (74)  |  Help (116)  |  Hot (63)  |  Hover (8)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Idea (881)  |  Information (173)  |  Joke (90)  |  Know (1538)  |  Latitude (6)  |  Longitude (8)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2252)  |  Manager (6)  |  Mean (810)  |  Problem (731)  |  Promise (72)  |  Realize (157)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Return (133)  |  Say (989)  |  Sea (326)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Solve (145)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Still (614)

A man must cling to the belief that the incomprehensible is comprehensible; otherwise he would not try to fathom it.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Cling (6)  |  Comprehensible (3)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Incomprehensible (31)  |  Man (2252)  |  Try (296)

A mathematician may say anything he pleases, but a physicist must be at least partially sane.
Attributed. Cited in R. B. Lindsay, 'On the Relation of Mathematics and Physics', The Scientific Monthly, Dec 1944, 59, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Partially (8)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Please (68)  |  Say (989)  |  Truth (1109)

A mathematician who can only generalise is like a monkey who can only climb UP a tree. ... And a mathematician who can only specialise is like a monkey who can only climb DOWN a tree. In fact neither the up monkey nor the down monkey is a viable creature. A real monkey must find food and escape his enemies and so must be able to incessantly climb up and down. A real mathematician must be able to generalise and specialise. ... There is, I think, a moral for the teacher. A teacher of traditional mathematics is in danger of becoming a down monkey, and a teacher of modern mathematics an up monkey. The down teacher dishing out one routine problem after another may never get off the ground, never attain any general idea. and the up teacher dishing out one definition after the other may never climb down from his verbiage, may never get down to solid ground, to something of tangible interest for his pupils.
From 'A Story With A Moral', Mathematical Gazette (Jun 1973), 57, No. 400, 86-87
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (126)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Climb (39)  |  Creature (242)  |  Danger (127)  |  Definition (238)  |  Down (455)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Escape (85)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Find (1014)  |  Food (213)  |  General (521)  |  Generalization (61)  |  Ground (222)  |  Idea (881)  |  Incessant (9)  |  Interest (416)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Moral (203)  |  Never (1089)  |  Other (2233)  |  Problem (731)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Real (159)  |  Routine (26)  |  Solid (119)  |  Something (718)  |  Specialization (24)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Think (1122)  |  Tree (269)  |  Up (5)  |  Verbiage (3)

A mere inference or theory must give way to a truth revealed; but a scientific truth must be maintained, however contradictory it may appear to the most cherished doctrines of religion.
More Worlds Than One: The Creed of the Philosopher and the Hope of the Christian (1856), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Cherish (25)  |  Inference (45)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Most (1728)  |  Religion (369)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Revealed (59)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Way (1214)

A Miracle is a Violation of the Laws of Nature; and as a firm and unalterable Experience has established these Laws, the Proof against a Miracle, from the very Nature of the Fact, is as entire as any Argument from Experience can possibly be imagined. Why is it more than probable, that all Men must die; that Lead cannot, of itself, remain suspended in the Air; that Fire consumes Wood, and is extinguished by Water; unless it be, that these Events are found agreeable to the Laws of Nature, and there is required a Violation of these Laws, or in other Words, a Miracle to prevent them? Nothing is esteem'd a Miracle, if it ever happen in the common Course of Nature... There must, therefore, be a uniform Experience against every miraculous Event, otherwise the Event would not merit that Appellation. And as a uniform Experience amounts to a Proof, there is here a direct and full Proof, from the Nature of the Fact, against the Existence of any Miracle; nor can such a Proof be destroy'd, or the Miracle render'd credible, but by an opposite Proof, which is superior.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreeable (20)  |  Air (366)  |  Amount (153)  |  Argument (145)  |  Common (447)  |  Course (413)  |  Death (406)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Direct (228)  |  Event (222)  |  Existence (481)  |  Experience (494)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fire (203)  |  Firm (47)  |  Happen (282)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Law (913)  |  Lead (391)  |  Merit (51)  |  Miracle (85)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Probable (24)  |  Proof (304)  |  Remain (355)  |  Render (96)  |  Required (108)  |  Superior (88)  |  Violation (7)  |  Water (503)  |  Why (491)  |  Wood (97)  |  Word (650)

A moment’s consideration of this case shows what a really great advance in the theory and practise of breeding has been obtained through the discovery of Mendel’s law. What a puzzle this case would have presented to the biologist ten years ago! Agouti crossed with chocolate gives in the second filial generation (not in the first) four varieties, viz., agouti, chocolate, black and cinnamon. We could only have shaken our heads and looked wise (or skeptical).
Then we had no explanation to offer for such occurrences other than the “instability of color characters under domestication,” the “effects of inbreeding,” “maternal impressions.” Serious consideration would have been given to the proximity of cages containing both black and cinnamon-agouti mice.
Now we have a simple, rational explanation, which anyone can put to the test. We are able to predict the production of new varieties, and to produce them.
We must not, of course, in our exuberance, conclude that the powers of the hybridizer know no limits. The result under consideration consists, after all, only in the making of new combinations of unit characters, but it is much to know that these units exist and that all conceivable combinations of them are ordinarily capable of production. This valuable knowledge we owe to the discoverer and to the rediscoverers of Mendel’s law.
'New Colour Variety of the Guinea Pig', Science, 1908, 28, 250-252.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (298)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Both (496)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Cage (12)  |  Capable (174)  |  Character (259)  |  Chocolate (5)  |  Color (155)  |  Combination (150)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Consist (223)  |  Course (413)  |  Discoverer (43)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Effect (414)  |  Exist (458)  |  Explanation (246)  |  First (1302)  |  Generation (256)  |  Great (1610)  |  Heredity (62)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Impression (118)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Limit (294)  |  Look (584)  |  Making (300)  |  Gregor Mendel (22)  |  Moment (260)  |  Mouse (33)  |  New (1273)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Offer (142)  |  Other (2233)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (771)  |  Predict (86)  |  Present (630)  |  Production (190)  |  Puzzle (46)  |  Rational (95)  |  Result (700)  |  Serious (98)  |  Show (353)  |  Simple (426)  |  Skeptical (21)  |  Test (221)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Through (846)  |  Wise (143)  |  Year (963)

A person by study must try to disengage the subject from useless matter, and to seize on points capable of improvement. ... When subjects are viewed through the mists of prejudice, useful truths may escape.
In An Essay on Aërial Navigation, With Some Observations on Ships (1844), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (44)  |  Capable (174)  |  Disengage (3)  |  Escape (85)  |  Improvement (117)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mist (17)  |  Person (366)  |  Point (584)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Seize (18)  |  Study (701)  |  Subject (543)  |  Through (846)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Try (296)  |  Trying (144)  |  Useful (260)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  View (496)

A person must have a certain amount of intelligent ignorance to get anywhere.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (153)  |  Certain (557)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Person (366)

A pessimist is a person who is always right but doesn’t get any enjoyment out of it, while an optimist, is one who imagines that the future is uncertain. It is a duty to be an optimist, because if you imagine that the future is uncertain, then you must do something about it.
In The Pursuit of Simplicity (1980, 1981), 149, footnote 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1905)  |  Duty (71)  |  Enjoyment (37)  |  Future (467)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Optimist (8)  |  Person (366)  |  Pessimist (7)  |  Right (473)  |  Something (718)  |  Uncertain (45)

A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more than even the whole man—he must view the man in his world.
Attributed by Rene Dubos, Man Adapting (1965, 1980), Chap. 12, 342. Dubos introduces the quote with “is reported to have taught” and no other citation.
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (428)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Disease (340)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Obligation (26)  |  Organ (118)  |  Physician (284)  |  View (496)  |  Whole (756)  |  World (1850)

A physician’s subject of study is necessarily the patient, and his first field for observation is the hospital. But if clinical observation teaches him to know the form and course of diseases, it cannot suffice to make him understand their nature; to this end he must penetrate into the body to find which of the internal parts are injured in their functions. That is why dissection of cadavers and microscopic study of diseases were soon added to clinical observation. But to-day these various methods no longer suffice; we must push investigation further and, in analyzing the elementary phenomena of organic bodies, must compare normal with abnormal states. We showed elsewhere how incapable is anatomy alone to take account of vital phenenoma, and we saw that we must add study of all physico-chemical conditions which contribute necessary elements to normal or pathological manifestations of life. This simple suggestion already makes us feel that the laboratory of a physiologist-physician must be the most complicated of all laboratories, because he has to experiment with phenomena of life which are the most complex of all natural phenomena.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Alone (324)  |  Already (226)  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Body (557)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Clinical (18)  |  Compare (76)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complicated (117)  |  Condition (362)  |  Course (413)  |  Diagnosis (65)  |  Disease (340)  |  Dissection (35)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Element (322)  |  Elementary (98)  |  End (603)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Feel (371)  |  Field (378)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Function (235)  |  Hospital (45)  |  Incapable (41)  |  Internal (69)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Know (1538)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Life (1870)  |  Manifestation (61)  |  Method (531)  |  Microscopic (27)  |  Most (1728)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Observation (593)  |  Organic (161)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Patient (209)  |  Penetrate (68)  |  Physician (284)  |  Physiologist (31)  |  Push (66)  |  Saw (160)  |  Show (353)  |  Simple (426)  |  Soon (187)  |  State (505)  |  Study (701)  |  Subject (543)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Understand (648)  |  Various (205)  |  Vital (89)  |  Why (491)

A principle of induction would be a statement with the help of which we could put inductive inferences into a logically acceptable form. In the eyes of the upholders of inductive logic, a principle of induction is of supreme importance for scientific method: “... this principle”, says Reichenbach, “determines the truth of scientific theories. To eliminate it from science would mean nothing less than to deprive science of the power to decide the truth or falsity of its theories. Without it, clearly, science would no longer have the right to distinguish its theories from the fanciful and arbitrary creations of the poet’s mind.” Now this principle of induction cannot be a purely logical truth like a tautology or an analytic statement. Indeed, if there were such a thing as a purely logical principle of induction, there would be no problem of induction; for in this case, all inductive inferences would have to be regarded as purely logical or tautological transformations, just like inferences in inductive logic. Thus the principle of induction must be a synthetic statement; that is, a statement whose negation is not self-contradictory but logically possible. So the question arises why such a principle should be accepted at all, and how we can justify its acceptance on rational grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Acceptable (14)  |  Acceptance (56)  |  Analytic (11)  |  Arbitrary (27)  |  Arise (162)  |  Case (102)  |  Clearly (45)  |  Creation (350)  |  Decide (50)  |  Deprive (14)  |  Determine (152)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Eliminate (25)  |  Eye (440)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Form (976)  |  Ground (222)  |  Help (116)  |  Importance (299)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Induction (81)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Inference (45)  |  Justify (26)  |  Less (105)  |  Logic (311)  |  Logical (57)  |  Long (778)  |  Mean (810)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Negation (2)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Poet (97)  |  Possible (560)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Problem (731)  |  Purely (111)  |  Question (649)  |  Rational (95)  |  Regard (312)  |  Right (473)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Self (268)  |  Statement (148)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Synthetic (27)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Why (491)

A schism has taken place among the chemists. A particular set of them in France have undertaken to remodel all the terms of the science, and to give every substance a new name, the composition, and especially the termination of which, shall define the relation in which it stands to other substances of the same family, But the science seems too much in its infancy as yet, for this reformation; because in fact, the reformation of this year must be reformed again the next year, and so on, changing the names of substances as often as new experiments develop properties in them undiscovered before. The new nomenclature has, accordingly, been already proved to need numerous and important reformations. ... It is espoused by the minority here, and by the very few, indeed, of the foreign chemists. It is particularly rejected in England.
Letter to Dr. Willard (Paris, 1788). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 135. From H.A. Washington, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1853-54). Vol 3, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Chemist (169)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Composition (86)  |  Compound (117)  |  Develop (278)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Family (101)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (41)  |  Minority (24)  |  Name (359)  |  New (1273)  |  Next (238)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Numerous (70)  |  Other (2233)  |  Reform (22)  |  Reformation (6)  |  Reformed (4)  |  Reject (67)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Set (400)  |  Stand (284)  |  Substance (253)  |  Term (357)  |  Termination (4)  |  Terms (184)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Year (963)

A science cannot be played with. If an hypothesis is advanced that obviously brings into direct sequence of cause and effect all the phenomena of human history, we must accept it, and if we accept it, we must teach it.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Advance (298)  |  Bring (95)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cause And Effect (21)  |  Direct (228)  |  Effect (414)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Play (116)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Teach (299)

A science cannot be played with. If an hypothesis is advanced that obviously brings into direct sequence of cause and effect all the phenomena of human history, we must accept it, and if we accept it, we must teach it.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cause And Effect (21)  |  Direct (228)  |  Effect (414)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Teach (299)

A scientist is in a sense a learned small boy. There is something of the scientist in every small boy. Others must outgrow it. Scientists can stay that way all their lives.
Nobel banquet speech (10 Dec 1967). In Ragnar Granit (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1967 (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Boy (100)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (291)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sense (785)  |  Small (489)  |  Something (718)  |  Stay (26)  |  Way (1214)

A scientist strives to understand the work of Nature. But with our insufficient talents as scientists, we do not hit upon the truth all at once. We must content ourselves with tracking it down, enveloped in considerable darkness, which leads us to make new mistakes and errors. By diligent examination, we may at length little by little peel off the thickest layers, but we seldom get the core quite free, so that finally we have to be satisfied with a little incomplete knowledge.
Lecture to the Royal Swedish Academy of Science, 23 May 1764. Quoted in J. A. Schufle 'Torbern Bergman, Earth Scientist', Chymia, 1967, 12, 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Considerable (75)  |  Core (20)  |  Darkness (72)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Enquiry (89)  |  Error (339)  |  Examination (102)  |  Free (239)  |  Incomplete (31)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Layer (41)  |  Lead (391)  |  Little (717)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Seldom (68)  |  Talent (99)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understand (648)  |  Work (1402)

A scientist who would know the laws of nature must sit passively before nature. He may not dictate to nature its laws, nor may he impose his own intelligence upon nature; rather, the more passive he is before nature, the more nature will reveal its secrets.
In The World's First Love (1952, 2010), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Dictate (11)  |  Impose (22)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Nature (80)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Passive (8)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Secret (216)  |  Will (2350)

A single kind of red cell is supposed to have an enormous number of different substances on it, and in the same way there are substances in the serum to react with many different animal cells. In addition, the substances which match each kind of cell are different in each kind of serum. The number of hypothetical different substances postulated makes this conception so uneconomical that the question must be asked whether it is the only one possible. ... We ourselves hold that another, simpler, explanation is possible.
Landsteiner and Adriano Sturli, 'Hamagglutinine normaler Sera', Wiener klinische Wochenschrift (1902), 15, 38-40. Trans. Pauline M. H. Mazumdar.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (70)  |  Animal (651)  |  Animal Cell (2)  |  Ask (420)  |  Blood (144)  |  Conception (160)  |  Different (595)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Kind (564)  |  Match (30)  |  Number (710)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Possible (560)  |  Question (649)  |  Red Cell (2)  |  Serum (11)  |  Single (365)  |  Substance (253)  |  Way (1214)

A wonder then it must needs be,—that there should be any Man found so stupid and forsaken of reason as to persuade himself, that this most beautiful and adorned world was or could be produced by the fortuitous concourse of atoms.
John Ray
The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation (1691), 21-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Adornment (4)  |  Atom (381)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Himself (461)  |  Man (2252)  |  Most (1728)  |  Persuasion (9)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reason (766)  |  Stupid (38)  |  Stupidity (40)  |  Wonder (251)  |  World (1850)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (97)  |  Ashamed (3)  |  Assert (69)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Baking (2)  |  Begin (275)  |  Behind (139)  |  Bird (163)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Business (156)  |  Company (63)  |  Cry (30)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  Dare (55)  |  Death (406)  |  Defend (32)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  England (43)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (11)  |  Genius (301)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (49)  |  Life (1870)  |  Money (178)  |  Music (133)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Open (277)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (5)  |  Pie (4)  |  Right (473)  |  Run (158)  |  Say (989)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sing (29)  |  Singing (19)  |  Something (718)  |  Song (41)  |  Stand (284)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (8)  |  Stop (89)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themself (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

A writer must be as objective as a chemist: he must abandon the subjective line; he must know that dung-heaps play a very reasonable part in a landscape, and that the evil passions are as inherent in life as good ones.
Letter to M. V. Kiselev (14 Jan 1887). In L. S. Friedland (ed.), Anton Chekhov: Letters on the Short Story (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Chemist (169)  |  Dung (10)  |  Evil (122)  |  Good (906)  |  Inherent (43)  |  Know (1538)  |  Landscape (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Objective (96)  |  Passion (121)  |  Subjective (20)  |  Writer (90)

About thirty years ago there was much talk that geologists ought only to observe and not theorise; and I well remember some one saying that at this rate a man might as well go into a gravel-pit and count the pebbles and describe the colours. How odd it is that anyone should not see that all observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service!
Letter to Henry Fawcett (18 Sep 1861). In Charles Darwin, Francis Darwin, Albert Charles Seward, More Letters of Charles Darwin (1903), Vol. 1, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Color (155)  |  Count (107)  |  Describe (132)  |  Description (89)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Man (2252)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observe (179)  |  Pebble (27)  |  Pit (20)  |  Remember (189)  |  See (1094)  |  Service (110)  |  Theory (1015)  |  View (496)  |  Year (963)

Above, far above the prejudices and passions of men soar the laws of nature. Eternal and immutable, they are the expression of the creative power they represent what is, what must be, what otherwise could not be. Man can come to understand them: he is incapable of changing them.
From Cours d’Economie Politique (1896-97), as given in Archives Internationales d’Histoire des Sciences (1993), Issues 131-133, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (639)  |  Creative (144)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Expression (181)  |  Far (158)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Incapable (41)  |  Law (913)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Otherwise (26)  |  Passion (121)  |  Power (771)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Represent (157)  |  Soar (23)  |  Understand (648)

Abstract as it is, science is but an outgrowth of life. That is what the teacher must continually keep in mind. … Let him explain … science is not a dead system—the excretion of a monstrous pedantism—but really one of the most vigorous and exuberant phases of human life.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 195-196.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Continually (17)  |  Dead (65)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Explain (334)  |  Exuberant (2)  |  Human (1512)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Most (1728)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Phase (37)  |  System (545)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Vigorous (21)

According to the conclusion of Dr. Hutton, and of many other geologists, our continents are of definite antiquity, they have been peopled we know not how, and mankind are wholly unacquainted with their origin. According to my conclusions drawn from the same source, that of facts, our continents are of such small antiquity, that the memory of the revolution which gave them birth must still be preserved among men; and thus we are led to seek in the book of Genesis the record of the history of the human race from its origin. Can any object of importance superior to this be found throughout the circle of natural science?
An Elementary Treatise on Geology (1809), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Antiquity (34)  |  Birth (154)  |  Book (413)  |  Circle (117)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Continent (79)  |  Definite (114)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Geology (240)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Race (104)  |  James Hutton (22)  |  Importance (299)  |  Know (1538)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Memory (144)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Science (133)  |  Object (438)  |  Origin (250)  |  Other (2233)  |  Race (278)  |  Record (161)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Seek (218)  |  Small (489)  |  Still (614)  |  Superior (88)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Wholly (88)

According to this view of the matter, there is nothing casual in the formation of Metamorphic Rocks. All strata, once buried deep enough, (and due TIME allowed!!!) must assume that state,—none can escape. All records of former worlds must ultimately perish.
Letter to Mr Murchison, In explanation of the views expressed in his previous letter to Mr Lyell, 15 Nov 1836. Quoted in the Appendix to Charles Babbage, The Ninth Bridgewater Treatise: A Fragment (1838), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Deep (241)  |  Due (143)  |  Enough (341)  |  Escape (85)  |  Formation (100)  |  Former (138)  |  Geology (240)  |  Matter (821)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Perish (56)  |  Record (161)  |  Rock (176)  |  State (505)  |  Strata (37)  |  Time (1911)  |  Ultimately (56)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

Act as if you are going to live for ever and cast your plans way ahead. You must feel responsible without time limitations, and the consideration of whether you may or may not be around to see the results should never enter your thoughts.
In Theodore Rockwell, The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made A Difference (2002), 342.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Ahead (21)  |  Cast (69)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Death (406)  |  Enter (145)  |  Ever (4)  |  Feel (371)  |  Life (1870)  |  Limitation (52)  |  Live (650)  |  Never (1089)  |  Plan (122)  |  Responsibility (71)  |  Result (700)  |  See (1094)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Way (1214)

Active experimentation must force the apparent facts of nature into forms different to those in which they familiarly present themselves; and thus make them tell the truth about themselves, as torture may compel an unwilling witness to reveal what he has been concealing.
In Reconstruction in Philosophy (1920), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (80)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Compel (31)  |  Conceal (19)  |  Different (595)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (47)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Present (630)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Tell (344)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Torture (30)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Unwilling (9)  |  Witness (57)

Adventure isn’t hanging on a rope off the side of a mountain. Adventure is an attitude that we must apply to the day to day obstacles of life - facing new challenges, seizing new opportunities, testing our resources against the unknown and in the process, discovering our own unique potential.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (69)  |  Against (332)  |  Apply (170)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Challenge (91)  |  Discover (571)  |  Face (214)  |  Hang (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mountain (202)  |  New (1273)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Potential (75)  |  Process (439)  |  Resource (74)  |  Rope (9)  |  Seize (18)  |  Side (236)  |  Test (221)  |  Unique (72)  |  Unknown (195)

After all, we scientific workers … like women, are the victims of fashion: at one time we wear dissociated ions, at another electrons; and we are always loth to don rational clothing; some fixed belief we must have manufactured for us: we are high or low church, of this or that degree of nonconformity, according to the school in which we are brought up—but the agnostic is always rare of us and of late years the critic has been taboo.
'The Thirst of Salted Water or the Ions Overboard', Science Progress (1909), 3, 643.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Agnostic (10)  |  Belief (615)  |  Church (64)  |  Degree (277)  |  Electron (96)  |  High (370)  |  Ion (21)  |  Late (119)  |  Low (86)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Rare (94)  |  Rational (95)  |  School (227)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Taboo (5)  |  Time (1911)  |  Victim (37)  |  Year (963)

After seeking in vain for the construction of a perpetual motion machine, the relations were investigated which must subsist between the forces of nature if such a machine is to be impossible; and this inverted question led to the discovery of the law of the conservation of energy, which, again, explained the impossibility of perpetual motion in the sense originally intended.
Opening of Lecture (1900), 'Mathematische Probleme' (Mathematical Problems), to the International Congress of Mathematicians, Paris. From the original German reprinted in David Hilbert: Gesammelte Abhandlungen (Collected Treatises, 1970), Vol. 3. For full citation, see the quote that begins, “This conviction of the solvability…”, on the David Hilbert Quotes page on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (187)  |  Conservation Of Energy (30)  |  Construction (114)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Energy (373)  |  Explain (334)  |  Force (497)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  In Vain (12)  |  Intent (9)  |  Inverted (2)  |  Investigate (106)  |  Law (913)  |  Lead (391)  |  Machine (271)  |  Motion (320)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Original (61)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Question (649)  |  Relation (166)  |  Seek (218)  |  Sense (785)  |  Vain (86)

After what has been premised, I think we may lay down the following Conclusions. First, It is plain Philosophers amuse themselves in vain, when they inquire for any natural efficient Cause, distinct from a Mind or Spirit. Secondly, Considering the whole Creation is the Workmanship of a wise and good Agent, it should seem to become Philosophers, to employ their Thoughts (contrary to what some hold) about the final Causes of Things: And I must confess, I see no reason, why pointing out the various Ends, to which natural Things are adapted and for which they were originally with unspeakable Wisdom contrived, should not be thought one good way of accounting for them, and altogether worthy a Philosopher.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [first published 1710], (1734), 126-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (70)  |  Agent (73)  |  Become (821)  |  Cause (561)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Confess (42)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Creation (350)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Down (455)  |  Employ (115)  |  End (603)  |  Final (121)  |  First (1302)  |  Good (906)  |  Inquire (26)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Natural (810)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Reason (766)  |  See (1094)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Vain (86)  |  Various (205)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Why (491)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Wise (143)  |  Workmanship (7)

Again and again in reading even his [William Thomson] most abstract writings one is struck by the tenacity with which physical ideas control in him the mathematical form in which he expressed them. An instance of this is afforded by … an example of a mathematical result that is, in his own words, “not instantly obvious from the analytical form of my solution, but which we immediately see must be the case by thinking of the physical meaning of the result.”
As given in Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 1136. The ellipsis gives the reference to the quoted footnote, to a passage in his Mathematical and Physical Papers, Vol. 1, 457. [Note: William Thomson, later became Lord Kelvin. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Afford (19)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Control (182)  |  Express (192)  |  Form (976)  |  Idea (881)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Instantly (20)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (74)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Most (1728)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Physical (518)  |  Reading (136)  |  Result (700)  |  See (1094)  |  Solution (282)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Understand (648)  |  Word (650)  |  Writing (192)

All cell biologists are condemned to suffer an incurable secret sorrow: the size of the objects of their passion. … But those of us enamored of the cell must resign ourselves to the perverse, lonely fascination of a human being for things invisible to the naked human eye.
Opening sentence from The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977, 1978), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Cell (146)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fascination (35)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Invisible (66)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Naked Eye (12)  |  Object (438)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Passion (121)  |  Secret (216)  |  Size (62)  |  Sorrow (21)  |  Suffer (43)  |  Thing (1914)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  Act (278)  |  Action (342)  |  Agitation (10)  |  Alike (60)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (651)  |  Atom (381)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1276)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Body (557)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (781)  |  Change (639)  |  Common (447)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (148)  |  Cosmic (74)  |  Drama (24)  |  Earth (1076)  |  End (603)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Expand (56)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (60)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Growing (99)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Material (366)  |  Microscopic (27)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Notice (81)  |  Number (710)  |  Open (277)  |  Orbit (85)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (402)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (177)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (355)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Rise (169)  |  Say (989)  |  Scale (122)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1094)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (523)  |  Speed (66)  |  Spiral (19)  |  Stage (152)  |  Sun (407)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Universe (900)  |  Velocity (51)  |  View (496)  |  Walk (138)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

All discussion of the ultimate nature of things must necessarily be barren unless we have some extraneous standards against which to compare them.
In The Mysterious Universe (1930), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Barren (33)  |  Compare (76)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Extraneous (6)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nature Of Things (30)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Standard (64)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Ultimate (152)

All good intellects have repeated, since Bacon’s time, that there can be no real knowledge but that which is based on observed facts. This is incontestable, in our present advanced stage; but, if we look back to the primitive stage of human knowledge, we shall see that it must have been otherwise then. If it is true that every theory must be based upon observed facts, it is equally true that facts cannot be observed without the guidance of some theory. Without such guidance, our facts would be desultory and fruitless; we could not retain them: for the most part we could not even perceive them.
The Positive Philosophy, trans. Harriet Martineau (1853), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Equally (129)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fruitless (9)  |  Good (906)  |  Guidance (30)  |  Human (1512)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Look (584)  |  Most (1728)  |  Observed (149)  |  Present (630)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Retain (57)  |  See (1094)  |  Stage (152)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Time (1911)

All interpretations made by a scientist are hypotheses, and all hypotheses are tentative. They must forever be tested and they must be revised if found to be unsatisfactory. Hence, a change of mind in a scientist, and particularly in a great scientist, is not only not a sign of weakness but rather evidence for continuing attention to the respective problem and an ability to test the hypothesis again and again.
The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution and Inheritance (1982), 831.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Attention (196)  |  Change (639)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Forever (111)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Problem (731)  |  Repetition (29)  |  Revise (6)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sign (63)  |  Tentative (18)  |  Test (221)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Unsatisfactory (4)  |  Weakness (50)

All men hate the wretched; how, then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou are bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us.
Frankenstein (1818, 1823), Vol. 1, 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilation (15)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bound (120)  |  Creator (97)  |  Creature (242)  |  Hate (68)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Living (492)  |  Spurn (2)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tie (42)  |  Wretched (8)

All of us who are concerned for peace and triumph of reason and justice must be keenly aware how small an influence reason and honest good will exert upon events in the political field.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aware (36)  |  Concern (239)  |  Event (222)  |  Exert (40)  |  Field (378)  |  Good (906)  |  Honest (53)  |  Influence (231)  |  Justice (40)  |  Peace (116)  |  Political (124)  |  Reason (766)  |  Small (489)  |  Triumph (76)  |  Will (2350)

All our knowledge has been built communally; there would be no astrophysics, there would be no history, there would not even be language, if man were a solitary animal. What follows? It follows that we must be able to rely on other people; we must be able to trust their word. That is, it follows that there is a principle, which binds society together because without it the individual would be helpless to tell the truth from the false. This principle is truthfulness.
In Lecture at M.I.T. (19 Mar 1953), collected in 'The Sense of Human Dignity', Science and Human Values (1956, 1990), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Bind (26)  |  Build (211)  |  Communal (7)  |  False (105)  |  Follow (389)  |  Helpless (14)  |  History (716)  |  Individual (420)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Language (308)  |  Man (2252)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Person (366)  |  Principle (530)  |  Rely (12)  |  Society (350)  |  Solitary (16)  |  Tell (344)  |  Together (392)  |  Trust (72)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Word (650)

All scientists must focus closely on limited targets. Whether or not one’s findings on a limited subject will have wide applicability depends to some extent on chance, but biologists of superior ability repeatedly focus on questions the answers to which either have wide ramifications or lead to new areas of investigation. One procedure that can be effective is to attempt both reduction and synthesis; that is, direct a question at a phenomenon on one integrative level, identify its mechanism at a simpler level, then extrapolate its consequences to a more complex level of integration.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 230-231,
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Answer (389)  |  Applicability (7)  |  Area (33)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Both (496)  |  Chance (244)  |  Closely (12)  |  Complex (202)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Depend (238)  |  Direct (228)  |  Effective (68)  |  Extent (142)  |  Extrapolate (3)  |  Findings (6)  |  Focus (36)  |  Identify (13)  |  Integration (21)  |  Integrative (2)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Lead (391)  |  Level (69)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  More (2558)  |  New (1273)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Procedure (48)  |  Question (649)  |  Ramification (8)  |  Reduction (52)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Simple (426)  |  Subject (543)  |  Superior (88)  |  Synthesis (58)  |  Target (13)  |  Wide (97)  |  Will (2350)

All that can be said upon the number and nature of elements is, in my opinion, confined to discussions entirely of a metaphysical nature. The subject only furnishes us with indefinite problems, which may be solved in a thousand different ways, not one of which, in all probability, is consistent with nature. I shall therefore only add upon this subject, that if, by the term elements, we mean to express those simple and indivisible atoms of which matter is composed, it is extremely probable we know nothing at all about them; but, if we apply the term elements, or principles of bodies, to express our idea of the last point which analysis is capable of reaching, we must admit, as elements, all the substances into which we are capable, by any means, to reduce bodies by decomposition.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, Preface, xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Apply (170)  |  Atom (381)  |  Capable (174)  |  Composition (86)  |  Consistent (50)  |  Decomposition (19)  |  Different (595)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Element (322)  |  Express (192)  |  Idea (881)  |  Indefinite (21)  |  Indivisible (22)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Last (425)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (53)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Point (584)  |  Principle (530)  |  Probability (135)  |  Problem (731)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Reduction (52)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solution (282)  |  Subject (543)  |  Substance (253)  |  Term (357)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Way (1214)

All that we can hope from these inspirations, which are the fruits of unconscious work, is to obtain points of departure for such calculations. As for the calculations themselves, they must be made in the second period of conscious work which follows the inspiration, and in which the results of the inspiration are verified and the consequences deduced.
Science and Method (1914, 2003), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (134)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Deduction (90)  |  Departure (9)  |  Follow (389)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Hope (321)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Period (200)  |  Point (584)  |  Result (700)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Unconscious (24)  |  Verification (32)  |  Work (1402)

All the different classes of beings which taken together make up the universe are, in the ideas of God who knows distinctly their essential gradations, only so many ordinates of a single curve so closely united that it would be impossible to place others between any two of them, since that would imply disorder and imperfection. Thus men are linked with the animals, these with the plants and these with the fossils which in turn merge with those bodies which our senses and our imagination represent to us as absolutely inanimate. And, since the law of continuity requires that when the essential attributes of one being approximate those of another all the properties of the one must likewise gradually approximate those of the other, it is necessary that all the orders of natural beings form but a single chain, in which the various classes, like so many rings, are so closely linked one to another that it is impossible for the senses or the imagination to determine precisely the point at which one ends and the next begins?all the species which, so to say, lie near the borderlands being equivocal, at endowed with characters which might equally well be assigned to either of the neighboring species. Thus there is nothing monstrous in the existence zoophytes, or plant-animals, as Budaeus calls them; on the contrary, it is wholly in keeping with the order of nature that they should exist. And so great is the force of the principle of continuity, to my thinking, that not only should I not be surprised to hear that such beings had been discovered?creatures which in some of their properties, such as nutrition or reproduction, might pass equally well for animals or for plants, and which thus overturn the current laws based upon the supposition of a perfect and absolute separation of the different orders of coexistent beings which fill the universe;?not only, I say, should I not be surprised to hear that they had been discovered, but, in fact, I am convinced that there must be such creatures, and that natural history will perhaps some day become acquainted with them, when it has further studied that infinity of living things whose small size conceals them for ordinary observation and which are hidden in the bowels of the earth and the depth of the sea.
Lettre Prétendue de M. De Leibnitz, à M. Hermann dont M. Koenig a Cité le Fragment (1753), cxi-cxii, trans. in A. O. Lovejoy, Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (1936), 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Animal (651)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attribute (65)  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Being (1276)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Bowel (17)  |  Call (781)  |  Character (259)  |  Continuity (39)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Creature (242)  |  Current (122)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depth (97)  |  Determine (152)  |  Different (595)  |  Discover (571)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Earth (1076)  |  End (603)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Equally (129)  |  Essential (210)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Fossil (143)  |  God (776)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hear (144)  |  History (716)  |  Idea (881)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Imperfection (32)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Lie (370)  |  Living (492)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural History (77)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Next (238)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nutrition (25)  |  Observation (593)  |  Order (638)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Plant (320)  |  Point (584)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Principle (530)  |  Represent (157)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  Require (229)  |  Say (989)  |  Sea (326)  |  Sense (785)  |  Separation (60)  |  Single (365)  |  Small (489)  |  Species (435)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Together (392)  |  Turn (454)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Various (205)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2350)

All these delusions of Divination have their root and foundation from Astrology. For whether the lineaments of the body, countenance, or hand be inspected, whether dream or vision be seen, whether marking of entrails or mad inspiration be consulted, there must be a Celestial Figure first erected, by the means of whole indications, together with the conjectures of Signs and Similitudes, they endeavour to find out the truth of what is desired.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrology (46)  |  Body (557)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Conjecture (51)  |  Countenance (9)  |  Delusion (26)  |  Dream (222)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Entrails (4)  |  Figure (162)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Indication (33)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Mad (54)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Root (121)  |  Together (392)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Vision (127)  |  Whole (756)

All true science must aim at objective truth, and that means that the human observer must never allow himself to get emotionally mixed up with his subject-matter. His concern is to understand the universe, not to improve it. Detachment is obligatory.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (175)  |  Concern (239)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Emotion (106)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Improve (64)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mix (24)  |  Never (1089)  |  Objective (96)  |  Obligatory (3)  |  Observer (48)  |  Subject (543)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  True (239)  |  True Science (25)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understand (648)  |  Universe (900)

Already the steam-engine works our mines, impels our ships, excavates our ports and our rivers, forges iron, fashions wood, grinds grain, spins and weaves our cloths, transports the heaviest burdens, etc. It appears that it must some day serve as a universal motor, and be substituted for animal power, waterfalls, and air currents.
'Réflexions sur la puissance motrice du feu' (1824) translated by R.H. Thurston in Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire, and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power (1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Already (226)  |  Animal (651)  |  Burden (30)  |  Cloth (6)  |  Current (122)  |  Energy (373)  |  Engine (99)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Fashioning (2)  |  Forge (10)  |  Grain (50)  |  Grind (11)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Iron (99)  |  Mine (78)  |  Motor (23)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (771)  |  River (140)  |  Serving (15)  |  Ship (69)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Steam (81)  |  Steam Engine (47)  |  Substitution (16)  |  Transport (31)  |  Universal (198)  |  Waterfall (5)  |  Weave (21)  |  Weaving (6)  |  Wood (97)  |  Work (1402)

Although I must say that research problems I worked on were frequently the result of serendipity and often grew out of my interest in some species or some environment which I found to be particularly appealing—marine birds and tropical islands for example.
Bartholomew, April 1993, unpublished remarks when receiving the Miller Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (46)  |  Bird (163)  |  Environment (239)  |  Example (98)  |  Find (1014)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Grow (247)  |  Interest (416)  |  Island (49)  |  Marine (9)  |  Often (109)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Problem (731)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  Say (989)  |  Serendipity (17)  |  Species (435)  |  Tropical (9)  |  Work (1402)

Although species may be discrete, they have no immutable essence. Variation is the raw material of evolutionary change. It represents the fundamental reality of nature, not an accident about a created norm. Variation is primary; essences are illusory. Species must be defined as ranges of irreducible variation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (92)  |  Change (639)  |  Create (245)  |  Define (53)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Essence (85)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Illusory (2)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Material (366)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Norm (5)  |  Primary (82)  |  Range (104)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (274)  |  Represent (157)  |  Species (435)  |  Variation (93)

America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them. And every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (143)  |  American (56)  |  Background (44)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bind (26)  |  Birth (154)  |  Blood (144)  |  Bound (120)  |  Child (333)  |  Citizen (52)  |  Country (269)  |  Embrace (47)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Interest (416)  |  Less (105)  |  Lift (57)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  More (2558)  |  Move (223)  |  Never (1089)  |  Principle (530)  |  Soil (98)  |  Teach (299)  |  United (15)

Amidst the vicissitudes of the earth’s surface, species cannot be immortal, but must perish, one after another, like the individuals which compose them. There is no possibility of escaping from this conclusion.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 2, 202.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Extinction (80)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Individual (420)  |  Perish (56)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Species (435)  |  Surface (223)  |  Vicissitude (6)

Among all highly civilized peoples the golden age of art has always been closely coincident with the golden age of the pure sciences, particularly with mathematics, the most ancient among them.
This coincidence must not be looked upon as accidental, but as natural, due to an inner necessity. Just as art can thrive only when the artist, relieved of the anxieties of existence, can listen to the inspirations of his spirit and follow in their lead, so mathematics, the most ideal of the sciences, will yield its choicest blossoms only when life’s dismal phantom dissolves and fades away, when the striving after naked truth alone predominates, conditions which prevail only in nations while in the prime of their development.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 191-192. From the original German, “Bei allen Kulturvölkern ist die Blüthezeit der Kunst auch immer zeitlich eng verbunden mit einer Blüthezeit der reinen Wissenschaften, insbesondere der ältesten unter ihnen, der Mathematik.
Dieses Zusammentreffen dürfte auch nicht ein zufälliges, sondern ein natürliches, ein Ergebniss innerer Notwendigkeit sein. Wie die Kunst nur gedeihen kann, wenn der Künstler, unbekümmert um die Bedrängnisse des Daseins, den Eingebungen seines Geistes lauschen und ihnen folgen kann, so kann die idealste Wissenschaft, die Mathematik, erst dann ihre schönsten Blüthen treiben, wenn des Erdenlebens schweres Traumbild sinkt und sinkt und sinkt, wenn das Streben nach der nackten Wahrheit allein bestimmend ist, was nur bei Nationen in der Vollkraft ihrer Entwickelung vorkommt.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (31)  |  Age (509)  |  Alone (324)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Art (680)  |  Artist (97)  |  Blossom (22)  |  Civilized (20)  |  Coincidence (20)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Condition (362)  |  Development (441)  |  Dissolve (22)  |  Due (143)  |  Existence (481)  |  Fade (12)  |  Follow (389)  |  Golden (47)  |  Golden Age (11)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Inner (72)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Lead (391)  |  Life (1870)  |  Listen (81)  |  Look (584)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nation (208)  |  Natural (810)  |  Necessity (197)  |  People (1031)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (47)  |  Prime (11)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Science (30)  |  Relieve (6)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Strive (53)  |  Thrive (22)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Will (2350)  |  Yield (86)

Among all the occurrences possible in the universe the a priori probability of any particular one of them verges upon zero. Yet the universe exists; particular events must take place in it, the probability of which (before the event) was infinitesimal. At the present time we have no legitimate grounds for either asserting or denying that life got off to but a single start on earth, and that, as a consequence, before it appeared its chances of occurring were next to nil. ... Destiny is written concurrently with the event, not prior to it.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Appear (122)  |  Assert (69)  |  Chance (244)  |  Concurrent (2)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Deny (71)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Event (222)  |  Exist (458)  |  Ground (222)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Legitimate (26)  |  Life (1870)  |  Next (238)  |  Occur (151)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Particular (80)  |  Possible (560)  |  Present (630)  |  Prior (6)  |  Probability (135)  |  Single (365)  |  Start (237)  |  Time (1911)  |  Universe (900)  |  Verge (10)  |  Write (250)  |  Zero (38)

Among your pupils, sooner or later, there must be one. who has a genius for geometry. He will be Sylvester’s special pupil—the one pupil who will derive from his master, knowledge and enthusiasm—and that one pupil will give more reputation to your institution than the ten thousand, who will complain of the obscurity of Sylvester, and for whom you will provide another class of teachers.
Letter (18 Sep 1875) recommending the appointment of J.J. Sylvester to Daniel C. Gilman. In Daniel C. Gilman Papers, Ms. 1, Special Collections Division, Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins University. As quoted in Karen Hunger Parshall, 'America’s First School of Mathematical Research: James Joseph Sylvester at The Johns Hopkins University 1876—1883', Archive for History of Exact Sciences (1988), 38, No. 2, 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Class (168)  |  Complain (10)  |  Derive (70)  |  Enthusiasm (59)  |  Genius (301)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Institution (73)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Master (182)  |  More (2558)  |  Obscurity (28)  |  Provide (79)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Sooner Or Later (7)  |  Special (188)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Will (2350)

An astronomer must be the wisest of men; his mind must be duly disciplined in youth; especially is mathematical study necessary; both an acquaintance with the doctrine of number, and also with that other branch of mathematics, which, closely connected as it is with the science of the heavens, we very absurdly call geometry, the measurement of the earth.
Plato
From the 'Epilogue to the Laws' (Epinomis), 988-990. As quoted in William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences from the Earliest to the Present Time (1837), Vol. 1, 161. (Although referenced to Plato’s Laws, the Epinomis is regarded as a later addition, not by Plato himself.)
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  Acquaintance (38)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Both (496)  |  Branch (155)  |  Call (781)  |  Connect (126)  |  Discipline (85)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Study (701)  |  Wise (143)  |  Youth (109)

An atom must be at least as complex as a grand piano.
As quoted by Oliver Lodge in Atoms and Rays (1924, 1931), 78. Lodge refers to this as a saying of W. K. Clifford who was “my brilliant teacher of more than half a century ago.”
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Piano (12)

An author has always great difficulty in avoiding unnecessary and tedious detail on the one hand; while, on the other, he must notice such a number of facts as may convince a student, that he is not wandering in a wilderness of crude hypotheses or unsupported assumptions.
In A Geological Manual (1832), Preface, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (96)  |  Author (175)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Convince (43)  |  Crude (32)  |  Detail (150)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Notice (81)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Student (317)  |  Tedious (15)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Unsupported (3)  |  Wander (44)  |  Wilderness (57)

An expert problem solver must be endowed with two incompatible qualities, a restless imagination and a patient pertinacity.
From In Mathematical Circles (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Endow (17)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Expert (67)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Incompatible (4)  |  Patient (209)  |  Persistence (25)  |  Problem (731)  |  Quality (139)  |  Restless (13)  |  Solve (145)  |  Two (936)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Higgledy-Piggledy', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Better (493)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (16)  |  First (1302)  |  Get Rid (4)  |  Idea (881)  |  Incoherency (2)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Introduced (3)  |  Little (717)  |  New (1273)  |  Old (499)  |  Patience (58)  |  Rid (14)  |  See (1094)  |  Shy (5)  |  Wear (20)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Better (493)  |  Condemn (44)  |  First (1302)  |  Idea (881)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Little (717)  |  New (1273)  |  Old (499)  |  Patience (58)  |  See (1094)

An inducement must be offered to those who are engaged in the industrial exploitation of natural sources of power, as waterfalls, by guaranteeing greater returns on the capital invested than they can secure by local development of the property.
In 'The Problem of Increasing Human Energy', Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine (Jun 1900), 210. Collected in My Inventions: And Other Writings (2016), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Capital (16)  |  Development (441)  |  Engage (41)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Furthermore (2)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greater (288)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Inducement (3)  |  Industrial (15)  |  Invest (20)  |  Local (25)  |  Natural (810)  |  Offer (142)  |  Power (771)  |  Prop (6)  |  Return (133)  |  Secure (23)  |  Source (101)  |  Waterfall (5)

An old foundation is worthy of all respect, but it must not take from us the right to build afresh wherever we will.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 188.
Science quotes on:  |  Afresh (4)  |  Build (211)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Old (499)  |  Respect (212)  |  Right (473)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2350)  |  Worth (172)

Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail. Bacteriology is but one little harbor.
In 'Advancement of Surgery', Journal of the American Medical Association (25 Feb 1893), 20, No. 8, 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Great (1610)  |  Harbor (8)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Little (717)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Physician (284)  |  Sail (37)  |  True (239)

Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, son of Hegesiboulos, held that the first principles of things were the homoeomeries. For it seemed to him quite impossible that anything should come into being from the non-existent or be dissolved into it. Anyhow we take in nourishment which is simple and homogeneous, such as bread or water, and by this are nourished hair, veins, arteries, flesh, sinews, bones and all the other parts of the body. Which being so, we must agree that everything that exists is in the nourishment we take in, and that everything derives its growth from things that exist. There must be in that nourishment some parts that are productive of blood, some of sinews, some of bones, and so on-parts which reason alone can apprehend. For there is no need to refer the fact that bread and water produce all these things to sense-perception; rather, there are in bread and water parts which only reason can apprehend.
Aetius 1.3.5. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 375.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Anaxagoras (11)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blood (144)  |  Body (557)  |  Bone (101)  |  Bread (42)  |  Derive (70)  |  Everything (489)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  First (1302)  |  Growth (200)  |  Homogeneous (17)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perception (97)  |  Principle (530)  |  Productive (37)  |  Reason (766)  |  Sense (785)  |  Simple (426)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Vein (27)  |  Water (503)

And do you know what “the world” is to me? Shall I show it to you in my mirror? This world: a monster of energy, without beginning, without end; a firm, iron magnitude of force that does not grow bigger or smaller, that does not expend itself but only transforms itself; as a whole, of unalterable size, a household without expenses or losses, but likewise without increase or income; enclosed by “nothingness”' as by a boundary; not by something blurry or wasted, not something endlessly extended, but set in a definite space as a definite force, and not a space that might be “empty” here or there, but rather as force throughout, as a play of forces and waves of forces, at the same time one and many, increasing here and at the same time decreasing there; a sea of forces flowing and rushing together, eternally changing, eternally flooding back, with tremendous years of recurrence, with an ebb and a flood of its forms; out of the simplest forms striving toward the most complex, out of the stillest, most rigid, coldest forms toward the hottest, most turbulent, most self-contradictory, and then again returning home to the simple out of this abundance, out of the play of contradictions back to the joy of concord, still affirming itself in this uniformity of its courses and its years, blessing itself as that which must return eternally, as a becoming that knows no satiety, no disgust, no weariness: this, my Dionysian world of the eternally self-creating, the eternally self-destroying, this mystery world of the twofold voluptuous delight, my “beyond good and evil,” without goal, unless the joy of the circle itself is a goal; without will, unless a ring feels good will toward itself-do you want a name for this world? A solution for all its riddles? A light for you, too, you best-concealed, strongest, most intrepid, most midnightly men?—This world is the will to power—and nothing besides! And you yourselves are also this will to power—and nothing besides!
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 4, no. 1067. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 549-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (26)  |  Back (395)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Best (467)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Blessing (26)  |  Boundary (55)  |  Circle (117)  |  Complex (202)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Contradiction (69)  |  Course (413)  |  Definite (114)  |  Delight (111)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Do (1905)  |  Empty (82)  |  End (603)  |  Energy (373)  |  Evil (122)  |  Extend (129)  |  Feel (371)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flood (52)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Goal (155)  |  Good (906)  |  Grow (247)  |  Home (184)  |  Income (18)  |  Increase (225)  |  Iron (99)  |  Joy (117)  |  Know (1538)  |  Light (635)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Mirror (43)  |  Monster (33)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Name (359)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Power (771)  |  Return (133)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Sea (326)  |  Self (268)  |  Set (400)  |  Show (353)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solution (282)  |  Something (718)  |  Space (523)  |  Still (614)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Together (392)  |  Transform (74)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Tremendous (29)  |  Uniformity (38)  |  Voluptuous (3)  |  Want (504)  |  Wave (112)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

And invention must still go on for it is necessary that we should completely control our circumstances. It is not sufficient that there should [only] be organization capable of providing food and shelter for all and organization to effect its proper distribution.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 54, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (44)  |  Capable (174)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Completely (137)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Control (182)  |  Distribution (51)  |  Effect (414)  |  Food (213)  |  Invention (400)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Organization (120)  |  Proper (150)  |  Provision (17)  |  Shelter (23)  |  Still (614)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (133)

And many kinds of creatures must have died,
Unable to plant out new sprouts of life.
For whatever you see that lives and breathes and thrives
Has been, from the very beginning, guarded, saved
By it's trickery for its swiftness or brute strength.
And many have been entrusted to our care,
Commended by their usefulness to us.
For instance, strength supports a savage lion;
Foxes rely on their cunning; deer their flight.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 852-60, 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (312)  |  Breathe (49)  |  Brute (30)  |  Care (203)  |  Commend (7)  |  Creature (242)  |  Cunning (17)  |  Death (406)  |  Deer (11)  |  Flight (101)  |  Fox (9)  |  Kind (564)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lion (23)  |  Live (650)  |  New (1273)  |  Plant (320)  |  See (1094)  |  Strength (139)  |  Support (151)  |  Thrive (22)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Whatever (234)

And nature must obey necessity.
Julius Caesar (1599), IV, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Obedience (20)  |  Obey (46)

And part of the soil is called to wash away
In storms and streams shave close and gnaw the rocks.
Besides, whatever the earth feeds and grows
Is restored to earth. And since she surely is
The womb of all things and their common grave,
Earth must dwindle, you see and take on growth again.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 255-60, 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (781)  |  Common (447)  |  Dwindle (6)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Erosion (20)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growth (200)  |  Rock (176)  |  See (1094)  |  Soil (98)  |  Storm (56)  |  Storms (18)  |  Stream (83)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Wash (23)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Womb (25)

And somewhere there are engineers
Helping others fly faster than sound.
But, where are the engineers
Helping those who must live on the ground?
Anonymous
Oxfam poster, as quoted on various websites.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineer (136)  |  Faster (50)  |  Flight (101)  |  Fly (153)  |  Ground (222)  |  Help (116)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Other (2233)  |  Sound (187)  |  Supersonic (4)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  Accept (198)  |  Belief (615)  |  Corner (59)  |  Defense (26)  |  Difference (355)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Disrespect (3)  |  Drive (61)  |  Eliminate (25)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excellence (40)  |  Excellent (29)  |  Failure (176)  |  Former (138)  |  Full (68)  |  Help (116)  |  House (143)  |  Imply (20)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inadequate (20)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Local (25)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (366)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (106)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Range (104)  |  Rationale (8)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (274)  |  Reason (766)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rich (66)  |  Richness (15)  |  Sake (61)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (350)  |  Spot (19)  |  Stem (31)  |  Struggle (111)  |  System (545)  |  Teach (299)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Tide (37)  |  Tough (22)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Unconsciously (9)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Uniform (20)  |  Variation (93)  |  Variety (138)  |  Vary (27)

And, to prevent mistakes, I must advertize you, that I now mean by elements, as those chymists that speak plainest do by their principles, certain primitive or simple, or perfectly unmingled bodies; which not being made of any other bodies, or of one another, are the ingredients of which all those called perfectly mixt bodies are immediately compounded, and into which they are ultimately resolved: now whether there be any such body to be constantly met with in all, and each, of those that are said to be elemented bodies, is the thing I now question.
The Sceptical Chemist (2nd ed., 1661), Appendix, 354. As given in Henry M. Leicester and Herbert S. Klickstein, A Source Book in Chemistry 1400-1900 (1952), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Body (557)  |  Call (781)  |  Certain (557)  |  Compound (117)  |  Definition (238)  |  Do (1905)  |  Element (322)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Mean (810)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Other (2233)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Principle (530)  |  Question (649)  |  Simple (426)  |  Speak (240)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Ultimately (56)

André Weil suggested that there is a logarithmic law at work: first-rate people attract other first-rate people, but second-rate people tend to hire third-raters, and third-rate people hire fifth-raters. If a dean or a president is genuinely interested in building and maintaining a high-quality university (and some of them are), then he must not grant complete self-determination to a second-rate department; he must, instead, use his administrative powers to intervene and set things right. That’s one of the proper functions of deans and presidents, and pity the poor university in which a large proportion of both the faculty and the administration are second-raters; it is doomed to diverge to minus infinity.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: an Automathography (1985), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Administration (15)  |  Attract (25)  |  Both (496)  |  Build (211)  |  Building (158)  |  Complete (209)  |  Dean (2)  |  Department (93)  |  Determination (80)  |  Diverge (3)  |  Doom (34)  |  Faculty (76)  |  First (1302)  |  First-Rate (2)  |  Function (235)  |  Grant (76)  |  High (370)  |  High-Quality (2)  |  Hire (7)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Interest (416)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Large (398)  |  Law (913)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Minus (7)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Poor (139)  |  Power (771)  |  President (36)  |  Proper (150)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Quality (139)  |  Right (473)  |  Second-Rate (4)  |  Self (268)  |  Set (400)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1914)  |  University (130)  |  Use (771)  |  André Weil (3)  |  Work (1402)

Anthropology has reached that point of development where the careful investigation of facts shakes our firm belief in the far-reaching theories that have been built up. The complexity of each phenomenon dawns on our minds, and makes us desirous of proceeding more cautiously. Heretofore we have seen the features common to all human thought. Now we begin to see their differences. We recognize that these are no less important than their similarities, and the value of detailed studies becomes apparent. Our aim has not changed, but our method must change. We are still searching for the laws that govern the growth of human culture, of human thought; but we recognize the fact that before we seek for what is common to all culture, we must analyze each culture by careful and exact methods, as the geologist analyzes the succession and order of deposits, as the biologist examines the forms of living matter. We see that the growth of human culture manifests itself in the growth of each special culture. Thus we have come to understand that before we can build up the theory of the growth of all human culture, we must know the growth of cultures that we find here and there among the most primitive tribes of the Arctic, of the deserts of Australia, and of the impenetrable forests of South America; and the progress of the civilization of antiquity and of our own times. We must, so far as we can, reconstruct the actual history of mankind, before we can hope to discover the laws underlying that history.
The Jesup North Pacific Expedition: Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History (1898), Vol. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Aim (175)  |  America (143)  |  Anthropology (61)  |  Antiquity (34)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Australia (11)  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Belief (615)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Build (211)  |  Change (639)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Common (447)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Culture (157)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desert (59)  |  Desirous (2)  |  Detail (150)  |  Development (441)  |  Difference (355)  |  Discover (571)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (1014)  |  Firm (47)  |  Forest (161)  |  Form (976)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Govern (66)  |  Growth (200)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Living (492)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Order (638)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Point (584)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Proceeding (38)  |  Progress (492)  |  Reach (286)  |  Recognize (136)  |  See (1094)  |  Seek (218)  |  Shake (43)  |  South (39)  |  South America (6)  |  Special (188)  |  Still (614)  |  Succession (80)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tribe (26)  |  Underlying (33)  |  Understand (648)  |  Value (393)

Antiessentialist thinking forces us to view the world differently. We must accept shadings and continua as fundamental. We lose criteria for judgment by comparison to some ideal: short people, retarded people, people of other beliefs, colors, and religions are people of full status.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Belief (615)  |  Color (155)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Continua (3)  |  Criterion (28)  |  Differently (4)  |  Force (497)  |  Full (68)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Lose (165)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Religion (369)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Short (200)  |  Status (35)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

Anton Chekhov wrote that ‘one must not put a loaded rifle on stage if no one is thinking of firing it.’ Good drama requires spare and purposive action, sensible linking of potential causes with realized effects. Life is much messier; nothing happens most of the time. Millions of Americans (many hotheaded) own rifles (many loaded), but the great majority, thank God, do not go off most of the time. We spend most of real life waiting for Godot, not charging once more unto the breach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  American (56)  |  Breach (2)  |  Cause (561)  |  Charge (63)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drama (24)  |  Effect (414)  |  Fire (203)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happen (282)  |  Life (1870)  |  Link (48)  |  Linking (8)  |  Load (12)  |  Majority (68)  |  Messy (6)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Potential (75)  |  Real Life (8)  |  Realize (157)  |  Require (229)  |  Rifle (3)  |  Sensible (28)  |  Spare (9)  |  Spend (97)  |  Stage (152)  |  Thank (48)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Time (1911)  |  Unto (8)  |  Wait (66)  |  Waiting (42)  |  Write (250)

Any country that wants to make full use of all its potential scientists and technologists … must not expect to get the women quite so simply as it gets the men. It seems to me that marriage and motherhood are at least as socially important as military service. Government regulations are framed to ensure (in the United Kingdom) that a man returning to work from military service is not penalized by his absence. Is it utopian, then, to suggest that any country that really wants a woman to return to a scientific career when her children no longer need her physical presence should make special arrangements to encourage her to do so?
In Impact of Science on Society (1970), 20 58. Commenting how for men who went to war, their jobs were held for them pending their return.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (21)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Career (86)  |  Children (201)  |  Country (269)  |  Do (1905)  |  Encourage (43)  |  Encouragement (27)  |  Ensure (27)  |  Expect (203)  |  Expectation (67)  |  Framing (2)  |  Government (116)  |  Importance (299)  |  Kingdom (80)  |  Man (2252)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Men (20)  |  Military (45)  |  Motherhood (2)  |  Physical (518)  |  Potential (75)  |  Presence (63)  |  Regulation (25)  |  Regulations (3)  |  Return (133)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Service (110)  |  Society (350)  |  Special (188)  |  Technologist (7)  |  United Kingdom (2)  |  Use (771)  |  Utopian (3)  |  Want (504)  |  Woman (160)  |  Women (9)  |  Work (1402)

Any man who is intelligent must, on considering that health is of the utmost value to human beings, have the personal understanding necessary to help himself in diseases, and be able to understand and to judge what physicians say and what they administer to his body, being versed in each of these matters to a degree reasonable for a layman.
Affections, in Hippocrates, trans. P. Potter (1988), Vol. 5, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Body (557)  |  Degree (277)  |  Disease (340)  |  Health (210)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Judge (114)  |  Layman (21)  |  Man (2252)  |  Matter (821)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Physician (284)  |  Say (989)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Value (393)

Any opinion as to the form in which the energy of gravitation exists in space is of great importance, and whoever can make his opinion probable will have, made an enormous stride in physical speculation. The apparent universality of gravitation, and the equality of its effects on matter of all kinds are most remarkable facts, hitherto without exception; but they are purely experimental facts, liable to be corrected by a single observed exception. We cannot conceive of matter with negative inertia or mass; but we see no way of accounting for the proportionality of gravitation to mass by any legitimate method of demonstration. If we can see the tails of comets fly off in the direction opposed to the sun with an accelerated velocity, and if we believe these tails to be matter and not optical illusions or mere tracks of vibrating disturbance, then we must admit a force in that direction, and we may establish that it is caused by the sun if it always depends upon his position and distance.
Letter to William Huggins (13 Oct 1868). In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 451-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (85)  |  Comet (65)  |  Conceive (100)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Depend (238)  |  Direction (185)  |  Distance (171)  |  Disturbance (34)  |  Effect (414)  |  Energy (373)  |  Equality (34)  |  Exception (74)  |  Exist (458)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (153)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Gravitation (72)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Great (1610)  |  Illusion (68)  |  Importance (299)  |  Inertia (17)  |  Kind (564)  |  Legitimate (26)  |  Mass (160)  |  Matter (821)  |  Method (531)  |  Most (1728)  |  Negative (66)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Optical (11)  |  Physical (518)  |  Position (83)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  Purely (111)  |  See (1094)  |  Single (365)  |  Space (523)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Stride (15)  |  Sun (407)  |  Track (42)  |  Universality (22)  |  Velocity (51)  |  Vibration (26)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2350)

Any priest or shaman must be presumed guilty until proved innocent.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Guilty (8)  |  Innocent (13)  |  Presume (9)  |  Priest (29)  |  Prove (261)

Any scientist of any age who wants to make important discoveries must study important problems. Dull or piffling problems yield dull or piffling answers. It is not not enough that a problem should be “interesting.” … The problem must be such that it matters what the answer is—whether to science generally or to mankind.
From 'What Shall I Do Research On?', Advice to a Young Scientist (1979), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Answer (389)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Dull (58)  |  Enough (341)  |  Importance (299)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Problem (731)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Study (701)  |  Want (504)  |  Yield (86)

Any successful international negotiation for reducing emissions must be based on four principles: the precautionary principle, the principle of sustainable development, the polluter-pays principle and the principle of equity. The strength of 'contraction and convergence' is that it satisfies all these principles.
In The Independent (10 Aug 2003).
Science quotes on:  |  Contraction (18)  |  Convergence (4)  |  Development (441)  |  Equity (4)  |  Global Warming (29)  |  International (40)  |  Negotiation (3)  |  Principle (530)  |  Strength (139)  |  Successful (134)  |  Sustainable (14)

Any work of science, no matter what its point of departure, cannot become fully convincing until it crosses the boundary between the theoretical and the experimental: Experimentation must give way to argument, and argument must have recourse to experimentation.
The New Scientific Spirit (1934), trans. A. Goldhammer (1984), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (145)  |  Become (821)  |  Boundary (55)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Matter (821)  |  Point (584)  |  Proof (304)  |  Way (1214)  |  Work (1402)

Anybody who has been seriously engaged in scientific work of any kind realizes that over the entrance to the gates of the temple of science are written the words: Ye must have faith. It is a quality which the scientist cannot dispense with.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Entrance (16)  |  Faith (209)  |  Gate (33)  |  Kind (564)  |  Quality (139)  |  Realize (157)  |  Research (753)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Temple (45)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Word (650)  |  Work (1402)  |  Writing (192)

Anybody who really wants to abolish war must resolutely declare himself in favor of his own country’s committing a portion of its sovereignty in favor of international institutions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (13)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Commit (43)  |  Country (269)  |  Declare (48)  |  Favor (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Institution (73)  |  International (40)  |  Portion (86)  |  Really (77)  |  Resolutely (3)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Want (504)  |  War (233)

Anyone who has examined into the history of the theories of earth evolution must have been astounded to observe the manner in which the unique and the difficultly explainable has been made to take the place of the common and the natural in deriving the framework of these theories.
Earth Evolution and Facial Expression (1921), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Astound (9)  |  Common (447)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Framework (33)  |  Geology (240)  |  History (716)  |  Natural (810)  |  Observe (179)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Unique (72)

Anyone who thinks we can continue to have world wars but make them nice polite affairs by outlawing this weapon or that should meditate upon the outlawing of the cross-bow by Papal authority. Setting up the machinery for international law and order must surely precede disarmament. The Wild West did not abandon its shooting irons till after sheriffs and courts were established.
Speech, American Library Assiciation Conference (3 Jul 1947), as quoted by Lawrence E. Davies in 'Army's Atomic Bid Viewed in Making', New York Times (4 Jul 1947), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Affair (29)  |  Atomic Bomb (115)  |  Authority (99)  |  Bow (15)  |  Continue (179)  |  Court (35)  |  Crossbow (2)  |  Disarmament (6)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Gun (10)  |  International (40)  |  Iron (99)  |  Law (913)  |  Law And Order (5)  |  Machinery (59)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Nice (15)  |  Order (638)  |  Polite (9)  |  Pope (10)  |  Precede (23)  |  Setting (44)  |  Surely (101)  |  Think (1122)  |  War (233)  |  Weapon (98)  |  Wild (96)  |  Wild West (2)  |  World (1850)

Anyone who writes about science must know about science, which cuts down competition considerably.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Competition (45)  |  Cut (116)  |  Down (455)  |  Know (1538)  |  Science And Journalism (3)  |  Write (250)

Apparently the anti-evolutionist expects to see a monkey or an ass transformed into a man, though he must be familiar enough with the reverse process.
As quoted by E. Newton Harvey, in 'Edwin Grant Conklin: A Biographical Memoir', Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences(1958), Vol. 31, 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Anti-evolutionist (2)  |  Ass (5)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Expect (203)  |  Man (2252)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Process (439)  |  Reverse (33)  |  See (1094)  |  Transform (74)

Archimedes, who combined a genius for mathematics with a physical insight, must rank with Newton, who lived nearly two thousand years later, as one of the founders of mathematical physics. … The day (when having discovered his famous principle of hydrostatics he ran through the streets shouting Eureka! Eureka!) ought to be celebrated as the birthday of mathematical physics; the science came of age when Newton sat in his orchard.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Archimedes (63)  |  Birthday (9)  |  Celebrate (21)  |  Discover (571)  |  Eureka (13)  |  Famous (12)  |  Founder (26)  |  Genius (301)  |  Insight (107)  |  Later (18)  |  Lived (3)  |  Mathematical Physics (12)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Orchard (4)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physics (564)  |  Principle (530)  |  Rank (69)  |  Run (158)  |  Shout (25)  |  Sit (51)  |  Street (25)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Two (936)  |  Year (963)

Architecture is of all the arts the one nearest to a science, for every architectural design is at its inception dominated by scientific considerations. The inexorable laws of gravitation and of statics must be obeyed by even the most imaginative artist in building.
Anonymous
In 'The Message of Greek Architecture', The Chautauquan (Apr 1906), 43, 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (50)  |  Art (680)  |  Artist (97)  |  Building (158)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Design (203)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Gravitation (72)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Imaginative (9)  |  Inception (3)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Gravitation (23)  |  Most (1728)  |  Obey (46)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Statics (6)

Arithmetic must be discovered in just the same sense in which Columbus discovered the West Indies, and we no more create numbers than he created the Indians.
The Principles of Mathematics (1903), 451.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (144)  |  Christopher Columbus (16)  |  Create (245)  |  Creation (350)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Indian (32)  |  More (2558)  |  Number (710)  |  Sense (785)

Arts and sciences in one and the same century have arrived at great perfection; and no wonder, since every age has a kind of universal genius, which inclines those that live in it to some particular studies; the work then, being pushed on by many hands, must go forward.
In Samuel Austin Allibone, Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay (1880), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Art (680)  |  Being (1276)  |  Century (319)  |  Forward (104)  |  Genius (301)  |  Great (1610)  |  Kind (564)  |  Live (650)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Progress (492)  |  Push (66)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Study (701)  |  Universal (198)  |  Wonder (251)  |  Work (1402)

As a man who has devoted his whole life to the most clear headed science, to the study of matter, I can tell you as a result of my research about atoms this much: There is no matter as such. All matter originates and exists only by virtue of a force which brings the particle of an atom to vibration and holds this most minute solar system of the atom together. … We must assume behind this force the existence of a conscious and intelligent mind. This mind is the matrix of all matter.
Lecture, 'Das Wesen der Materie' [The Essence/Nature/Character of Matter], Florence, Italy (1944). Archiv zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Abt. Va, Rep. 11 Planck, Nr. 1797. Original German and this English translation, as in Gregg Braden, The Spontaneous Healing of Belief: Shattering the Paradigm of False Limits (2009), 334-35. Note: a number of books showing this quote cite it as from Planck’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1918), which the Webmaster has checked, and does not see this quote therein. The original German excerpt, and a slightly more complete translation is also on this web page, beginning: “As a physicist who devoted ….”
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Behind (139)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Force (497)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Minute (129)  |  Most (1728)  |  Originate (39)  |  Origination (7)  |  Particle (200)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  Sage (25)  |  Solar System (81)  |  Study (701)  |  System (545)  |  Tell (344)  |  Together (392)  |  Vibration (26)  |  Virtue (117)  |  Whole (756)

As a nation, we are too young to have true mythic heroes, and we must press real human beings into service. Honest Abe Lincoln the legend is quite a different character from Abraham Lincoln the man. And so should they be. And so should both be treasured, as long as they are distinguished. In a complex and confusing world, the perfect clarity of sports provides a focus for legitimate, utterly unambiguous support or disdain. The Dodgers are evil, the Yankees good. They really are, and have been for as long as anyone in my family can remember.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (38)  |  Being (1276)  |  Both (496)  |  Character (259)  |  Clarity (49)  |  Complex (202)  |  Confuse (22)  |  Different (595)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Evil (122)  |  Family (101)  |  Focus (36)  |  Good (906)  |  Hero (45)  |  Honest (53)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Legend (18)  |  Legitimate (26)  |  Abraham Lincoln (13)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nation (208)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Press (21)  |  Provide (79)  |  Real (159)  |  Really (77)  |  Remember (189)  |  Service (110)  |  Sport (23)  |  Support (151)  |  Treasure (59)  |  True (239)  |  Unambiguous (6)  |  Utterly (15)  |  World (1850)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Young (253)

As a scientist and geneticist I started to feel that science would probably soon reach the point where its interference into the life processes would be counterproductive if a properly designed governing policy was not implemented. A heavily overcrowded planet, ninety-five percent urbanized with nuclear energy as the main source of energy and with all aspects of life highly computerized, is not too pleasant a place for human life. The life of any individual soon will be predictable from birth to death. Medicine, able to cure almost everything, will make the load of accumulated defects too heavy in the next two or three centuries. The artificial prolongation of life, which looked like a very bright idea when I started research in aging about twenty-five years ago, has now lost its attractiveness for me. This is because I now know that the aging process is so multiform and complex that the real technology and chemistry of its prevention by artificial interference must be too complex and expensive. It would be the privilege of a few, not the method for the majority. I also was deeply concerned about the fact that most research is now either directly or indirectly related to military projects and objectives for power.
Quoted in 'Zhores A(leksandrovich) Medvedev', Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2002.
Science quotes on:  |  Aging (9)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Birth (154)  |  Bright (81)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Complex (202)  |  Concern (239)  |  Cure (124)  |  Death (406)  |  Defect (31)  |  Design (203)  |  Energy (373)  |  Everything (489)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Feel (371)  |  Future (467)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (105)  |  Governing (20)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Human (1512)  |  Idea (881)  |  Implement (13)  |  Individual (420)  |  Interference (22)  |  Know (1538)  |  Life (1870)  |  Look (584)  |  Majority (68)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Method (531)  |  Military (45)  |  Most (1728)  |  Next (238)  |  Nuclear (110)  |  Nuclear Energy (18)  |  Objective (96)  |  Planet (402)  |  Point (584)  |  Power (771)  |  Prevention (37)  |  Privilege (41)  |  Process (439)  |  Project (77)  |  Reach (286)  |  Research (753)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Soon (187)  |  Start (237)  |  Technology (281)  |  Two (936)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

As a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.
From The Art of Living, Day by Day 91972), 77. Frequently misattributed to Henry David Thoreau.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (241)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Kind (564)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Mental (179)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Path (159)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Physical (518)  |  Single (365)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Walk (138)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wish (216)

As chemists, we must rename [our] scheme and insert the symbols Ba, La, Ce in place of Ra, Ac, Th. As nuclear chemists closely associated with physics, we cannot yet convince ourselves to make this leap, which contradicts all previous experience in nuclear physics.
Co-author with Fritz Strassmann, German chemist (1902-80)
Otto Hahn
'(Über den nachweis und das Verhalten der bei der Bestrahlung des Urans mittels Neutronen entstehenden Erdalkallmetalle', Die Naturwissenschaften, 1939, 27, 11-15. Trans. J. Heilbron and Robert W. Seidel, Lawrence and his Laboratory: A History of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (1989), Vol. 1, 436-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (175)  |  Chemist (169)  |  Contradict (42)  |  Convince (43)  |  Experience (494)  |  German (37)  |  Leap (57)  |  Nuclear (110)  |  Nuclear Physics (6)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Scheme (62)  |  Symbol (100)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (21)  |  Answer (389)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Attend (67)  |  Authority (99)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Body (557)  |  Carry (130)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Common (447)  |  Communication (101)  |  Compass (37)  |  Complete (209)  |  Conductor (17)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Dispute (36)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Effect (414)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (92)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Exquisite (27)  |  Extend (129)  |  Field (378)  |  Fire (203)  |  First (1302)  |  France (29)  |  Benjamin Franklin (95)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Judge (114)  |  Key (56)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (398)  |  Lightning (49)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Method (531)  |  Moment (260)  |  Month (91)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Past (355)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Point (584)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (630)  |  Proper (150)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Rain (70)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Silk (14)  |  Spark (32)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (284)  |  Storm (56)  |  String (22)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thread (36)  |  Thunder (21)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Verification (32)  |  View (496)  |  Waiting (42)  |  Walk (138)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)

As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.
In The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin edited by Sir Francis Darwin (1887).
Science quotes on:  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Future (467)  |  Himself (461)  |  Judge (114)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Vague (50)

As for your doctrines I am prepared to go to the Stake if requisite ... I trust you will not allow yourself to be in any way disgusted or annoyed by the considerable abuse & misrepresentation which unless I greatly mistake is in store for you... And as to the curs which will bark and yelp - you must recollect that some of your friends at any rate are endowed with an amount of combativeness which (though you have often & justly rebuked it) may stand you in good stead - I am sharpening up my claws and beak in readiness.
Letter (23 Nov 1859) to Charles Darwin a few days after the publication of Origin of Species. In Charles Darwin, Frederick Burkhardt, Sydney Smith, The Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1858-1859 (1992), Vol. 19, 390-391.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (25)  |  Amount (153)  |  Bark (19)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Criticism (85)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Friend (180)  |  Good (906)  |  Misrepresentation (5)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Publication (102)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Stand (284)  |  Store (49)  |  Trust (72)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)

As he sat alone in a garden, he [Isaac Newton in 1666, age 24] fell into a speculation on the power of gravity; that as this power is not found sensibly diminished at the remotest distance from the centre of the earth to which we can rise, neither at the tops of the loftiest buildings, nor even on the summits of the highest mountains, it appeared to him reasonable to conclude that this power must extend much further than was usually thought: why not as high as the moon? said he to himself; and if so, her motion must be influenced by it; perhaps she is retained in her orbit thereby.
View of Newton's Philosophy (1728), preface. In William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences (1847), Vol. 2, 166. Pemberton's narrative is based on firsthand conversations with Newton himself.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Alone (324)  |  Building (158)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Distance (171)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Extend (129)  |  Garden (64)  |  Gravity (140)  |  High (370)  |  Himself (461)  |  Moon (252)  |  Motion (320)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Orbit (85)  |  Power (771)  |  Retain (57)  |  Rise (169)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Summit (27)  |  Thought (995)  |  Top (100)  |  Usually (176)  |  Why (491)

As I have already mentioned, wherever cells are formed, this tough fluid precedes the first solid structures that indicate the presence of future cells. Moreover, we must assume that this substance furnishes the material for the formation of the nucleus and of the primitive sac, not only because these structures are closely apposed to it, but also because,they react to iodine in the same way. We must assume also that the organization of this substance is the process that inaugurates the formation of new cells. It therefore seems justifiable for me to propose a name that refers to its physiological function: I propose the word protoplasma.
H. Mohl, Botanisch Zeitung (1846), 4, col. 73, trans. Henry Harris, The Birth of the Cell (1999), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Cell (146)  |  First (1302)  |  Fluid (54)  |  Form (976)  |  Formation (100)  |  Function (235)  |  Future (467)  |  Indicate (62)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Material (366)  |  Mention (84)  |  Name (359)  |  New (1273)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Nucleus (54)  |  Organization (120)  |  Physiological (64)  |  Presence (63)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Process (439)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Solid (119)  |  Structure (365)  |  Substance (253)  |  Tough (22)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Word (650)

As I stood behind the coffin of my little son the other day, with my mind bent on anything but disputation, the officiating minister read, as part of his duty, the words, 'If the dead rise not again, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.' I cannot tell you how inexpressibly they shocked me. Paul had neither wife nor child, or he must have known that his alternative involved a blasphemy against all that well best and noblest in human nature. I could have laughed with scorn. What! Because I am face to face with irreparable loss, because I have given back to the source from whence it came, the cause of a great happiness, still retaining through all my life the blessings which have sprung and will spring from that cause, I am to renounce my manhood, and, howling, grovel in bestiality? Why, the very apes know better, and if you shoot their young, the poor brutes grieve their grief out and do not immediately seek distraction in a gorge.
Letter to Charles Kingsley (23 Sep 1860). In L. Huxley, The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1903), Vol. 1, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Ape (54)  |  Back (395)  |  Behind (139)  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Blasphemy (8)  |  Blessing (26)  |  Blessings (17)  |  Brute (30)  |  Cause (561)  |  Child (333)  |  Coffin (7)  |  Death (406)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drink (56)  |  Eat (108)  |  Face (214)  |  Great (1610)  |  Grief (20)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Nature (71)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Laugh (50)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Loss (117)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Poor (139)  |  Read (308)  |  Renounce (6)  |  Rise (169)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Seek (218)  |  Shock (38)  |  Son (25)  |  Spring (140)  |  Still (614)  |  Tell (344)  |  Through (846)  |  Why (491)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)  |  Young (253)

As mineralogy constitutes a part of chemistry, it is clear that this arrangement [of minerals] must derive its principles from chemistry. The most perfect mode of arrangement would certainly be to allow bodies to follow each other according to the order of their electro-chemical properties, from the most electro-negative, oxygen, to the most electro-positive, potassium; and to place every compound body according to its most electro-positive ingredient.
An Attempt to Establish a Pure Scientific System of Mineralogy (1814), trans. J. Black, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Body (557)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Classification (102)  |  Compound (117)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Derive (70)  |  Electrochemistry (5)  |  Follow (389)  |  Ingredient (16)  |  Mineral (66)  |  Mineralogy (24)  |  Most (1728)  |  Negative (66)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Oxygen (77)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Positive (98)  |  Potassium (12)  |  Principle (530)

As regards railways, it is certain that nothing is so profitable, because nothing is so cheaply transported, as passenger traffic. Goods traffic, of whatsoever description, must be more or less costly. Every article conveyed by railway requires handling and conveyance beyond the limit of the railway stations; but passengers take care of themselves, and find their own way.
From 'Railway System and its Results' (Jan 1856) read to the Institution of Civil Engineers, reprinted in Samuel Smiles, Life of George Stephenson (1857), 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (316)  |  Care (203)  |  Certain (557)  |  Cheap (13)  |  Convey (17)  |  Conveyance (2)  |  Find (1014)  |  Good (906)  |  Goods (9)  |  Handling (7)  |  Limit (294)  |  More (2558)  |  More Or Less (71)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Profit (56)  |  Profitable (29)  |  Railroad (36)  |  Railway (19)  |  Regard (312)  |  Require (229)  |  Station (30)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Transport (31)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whatsoever (41)

As science is more and more subject to grave misuse as well as to use for human benefit it has also become the scientist's responsibility to become aware of the social relations and applications of his subject, and to exert his influence in such a direction as will result in the best applications of the findings in his own and related fields. Thus he must help in educating the public, in the broad sense, and this means first educating himself, not only in science but in regard to the great issues confronting mankind today.
Message to University Students Studying Science', Kagaku Asahi 11, no. 6 (1951), 28-29. Quoted in Elof Axel Carlson, Genes, Radiation, and Society: The Life and Work of H. J. Muller (1981), 371.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (257)  |  Become (821)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Best (467)  |  Direction (185)  |  Education (423)  |  Exert (40)  |  Field (378)  |  First (1302)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1610)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Influence (231)  |  Issue (46)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Misuse (12)  |  More (2558)  |  Regard (312)  |  Relation (166)  |  Responsibility (71)  |  Result (700)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sense (785)  |  Social (261)  |  Society (350)  |  Subject (543)  |  Today (321)  |  Use (771)  |  Will (2350)

As scientific men we have all, no doubt, felt that our fellow men have become more and more satisfying as fish have taken up their work which has been put often to base uses, which must lead to disaster. But what sin is to the moralist and crime to the jurist so to the scientific man is ignorance. On our plane, knowledge and ignorance are the immemorial adversaries. Scientific men can hardly escape the charge of ignorance with regard to the precise effect of the impact of modern science upon the mode of living of the people and upon their civilisation. For them, such a charge is worse than that of crime.
From Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1922), Nobel Prize in Chemistry, collected in Carl Gustaf Santesson (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1921-1922 (1923).
Science quotes on:  |  Adversary (7)  |  Base (120)  |  Become (821)  |  Charge (63)  |  Civilisation (23)  |  Crime (39)  |  Disaster (58)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Effect (414)  |  Escape (85)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fish (130)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Immemorial (3)  |  Impact (45)  |  Jurist (6)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lead (391)  |  Living (492)  |  Man (2252)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Mode (43)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Science (55)  |  Moralist (2)  |  More (2558)  |  People (1031)  |  Precise (71)  |  Regard (312)  |  Satisfying (5)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Sin (45)  |  Use (771)  |  Work (1402)

As soon as he ceased to be mad he became merely stupid. There are maladies we must not seek to cure because they alone protect us from others that are more serious.
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Cure (124)  |  Disease (340)  |  Mad (54)  |  Malady (8)  |  Merely (315)  |  More (2558)  |  Other (2233)  |  Protect (65)  |  Seek (218)  |  Serious (98)  |  Soon (187)  |  Stupid (38)

As soon as the circumstances of an experiment are well known, we stop gathering statistics. … The effect will occur always without exception, because the cause of the phenomena is accurately defined. Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined,Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined, can we compile statistics. … we must learn therefore that we compile statistics only when we cannot possibly help it; for in my opinion, statistics can never yield scientific truth.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-137.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Cause (561)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compilation (3)  |  Condition (362)  |  Effect (414)  |  Exception (74)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Gather (76)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Include (93)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learning (291)  |  Never (1089)  |  Occur (151)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Soon (187)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Undefined (3)  |  Will (2350)  |  Yield (86)

As soon as we touch the complex processes that go on in a living thing, be it plant or animal, we are at once forced to use the methods of this science [chemistry]. No longer will the microscope, the kymograph, the scalpel avail for the complete solution of the problem. For the further analysis of these phenomena which are in flux and flow, the investigator must associate himself with those who have labored in fields where molecules and atoms, rather than multicellular tissues or even unicellular organisms, are the units of study.
'Experimental and Chemical Studies of the Blood with an Appeal for More Extended Chemical Training for the Biological and Medical Investigator', Science (6 Aug 1915), 42, 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Animal (651)  |  Associate (25)  |  Atom (381)  |  Biochemistry (50)  |  Biology (232)  |  Cell (146)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Complete (209)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Field (378)  |  Flow (89)  |  Flux (21)  |  Himself (461)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Method (531)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Multicellular (4)  |  Organism (231)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Plant (320)  |  Problem (731)  |  Process (439)  |  Scalpel (4)  |  Solution (282)  |  Soon (187)  |  Study (701)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tissue (51)  |  Touch (146)  |  Use (771)  |  Will (2350)

As the issues are greater than men ever sought to realize before, the recriminations will be fiercer and pride more desperately hurt. It may help to recall that many recognized before the bomb ever feel that the time had already come when we must learn to live in One World.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Bomb (20)  |  Feel (371)  |  Fierce (8)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greater (288)  |  Help (116)  |  Hurt (14)  |  Issue (46)  |  Learn (672)  |  Live (650)  |  More (2558)  |  Pride (84)  |  Realize (157)  |  Recall (11)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Seek (218)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

As we discern a fine line between crank and genius, so also (and unfortunately) we must acknowledge an equally graded trajectory from crank to demagogue. When people learn no tools of judgment and merely follow their hopes, the seeds of political manipulation are sown.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Crank (18)  |  Discern (35)  |  Equally (129)  |  Fine (37)  |  Follow (389)  |  Genius (301)  |  Grade (12)  |  Hope (321)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Learn (672)  |  Line (100)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Merely (315)  |  People (1031)  |  Political (124)  |  Seed (97)  |  Sow (11)  |  Tool (129)  |  Trajectory (5)  |  Unfortunately (40)

As we look out into the Universe and identify the many accidents of physics and astronomy that have worked together to our benefit, it almost seems as if the Universe must in some sense have known that we were coming.
In The Anthropic Cosmological Principle by John D. Barrow and Frank J. Tipler (1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (92)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Coming (114)  |  Known (453)  |  Look (584)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Sense (785)  |  Together (392)  |  Universe (900)  |  Work (1402)

As we push ever more deeply into the universe, probing its secrets, discovering its way, we must also constantly try to learn to cooperate across the frontiers that really divide earth’s surface.
In 'The President’s News Conference at the LBJ Ranch' (29 Aug 1965). Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson: 1965 (1966), 945.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Discover (571)  |  Divide (77)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Frontier (41)  |  Learn (672)  |  More (2558)  |  Probe (12)  |  Push (66)  |  Really (77)  |  Secret (216)  |  Surface (223)  |  Try (296)  |  Universe (900)  |  Way (1214)

As we survey all the evidence, the thought insistently arises that some supernatural agency—or, rather, Agency—must be involved. Is it possible that suddenly, without intending to, we have stumbled upon scientific proof of the existence of a Supreme Being? Was it God who stepped in and so providentially crafted the cosmos for our benefit?
In The Symbiotic Universe: Life and Mind in the Cosmos (1988), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (14)  |  Arise (162)  |  Being (1276)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Cosmos (64)  |  Craft (11)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Existence (481)  |  God (776)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Involve (93)  |  Involved (90)  |  Possible (560)  |  Proof (304)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Supernatural (26)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Supreme Being (8)  |  Survey (36)  |  Thought (995)

As, no matter what cunning system of checks we devise, we must in the end trust some one whom we do not check, but to whom we give unreserved confidence, so there is a point at which the understanding and mental processes must be taken as understood without further question or definition in words. And I should say that this point should be fixed pretty early in the discussion.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220-221.
Science quotes on:  |  Check (26)  |  Confidence (75)  |  Cunning (17)  |  Definition (238)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Do (1905)  |  Early (196)  |  End (603)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mental (179)  |  Point (584)  |  Process (439)  |  Question (649)  |  Say (989)  |  System (545)  |  Trust (72)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Understood (155)  |  Unreserved (2)  |  Word (650)

At bottom each “exact” science is, and must be speculative, and its chief tool of research, too rarely used with both courage and judgement, is the regulated imagination.
In Igneous Rocks and their Origin (1914), Introduction, xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (496)  |  Chief (99)  |  Courage (82)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Research (753)  |  Tool (129)

At present we must confine ourselves to saying that soul is the source of these phenomena and is characterized by them, viz. by the powers of self-nutrition, sensation, thinking, and movement.
Aristotle
On the Soul, 413b, II-3. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 1, 658.
Science quotes on:  |  Human Body (34)  |  Movement (162)  |  Nutrition (25)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Power (771)  |  Present (630)  |  Self (268)  |  Sensation (60)  |  Soul (235)  |  Thinking (425)

At the outset do not be worried about this big question—Truth. It is a very simple matter if each one of you starts with the desire to get as much as possible. No human being is constituted to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; and even the best of men must be content with fragments, with partial glimpses, never the full fruition. In this unsatisfied quest the attitude of mind, the desire, the thirst—a thirst that from the soul must arise!—the fervent longing, are the be-all and the end-all.
'The Student Life' (1905). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (162)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Being (1276)  |  Best (467)  |  Constitution (78)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Desire (212)  |  Do (1905)  |  End (603)  |  Fervent (6)  |  Fragment (58)  |  Fruition (2)  |  Glimpse (16)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Know (1538)  |  Longing (19)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Outset (7)  |  Possible (560)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (649)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Soul (235)  |  Start (237)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Whole (756)

At this stage you must admit that whatever is seen to be sentient is nevertheless composed of atoms that are insentient. The phenomena open to our observation so not contradict this conclusion or conflict with it. Rather they lead us by the hand and compel us to believe that the animate is born, as I maintain, of the insentient.
In On the Nature of the Universe, translated by R. E. Latham (1951, 1994), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Animate (8)  |  Atom (381)  |  Belief (615)  |  Birth (154)  |  Compel (31)  |  Compelling (11)  |  Composition (86)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Conflict (77)  |  Contradict (42)  |  Lead (391)  |  Leading (17)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Observation (593)  |  Open (277)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Sentient (8)  |  Stage (152)  |  Whatever (234)

Because basic learning takes place so early—as…the classic musical South Pacific reminds us, “You've got to be taught before it’s too late, before you are six or seven or eight; you’ve got to be carefully taught,”—we must strengthen our pre-school program, especially Headstart, Kindergarten and Day Care.
In address, to the Economic Club of Detroit (14 Jan 1990), 'Where Do We Go From Here?' on the massiechairs.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (144)  |  Care (203)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Classic (13)  |  Early (196)  |  Kindergarten (5)  |  Late (119)  |  Learning (291)  |  Musical (10)  |  Reminder (13)  |  School (227)  |  South (39)  |  Strengthen (25)  |  Teach (299)

Because of the way it came into existence, the solar system has only one-way traffic—like Piccadilly Circus. … If we want to make a model to scale, we must take a very tiny object, such as a pea, to represent the sun. On the same scale the nine planets will be small seeds, grains of sand and specks of dust. Even so, Piccadilly Circus is only just big enough to contain the orbit of Pluto. … The whole of Piccadilly Circus was needed to represent the space of the solar system, but a child can carry the whole substance of the model in its hand. All the rest is empty space.
In The Stars in Their Courses (1931, 1954), 49-50 & 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (130)  |  Child (333)  |  Dust (68)  |  Empty (82)  |  Enough (341)  |  Existence (481)  |  Grain (50)  |  Hand (149)  |  Model (106)  |  Object (438)  |  Orbit (85)  |  Pea (4)  |  Planet (402)  |  Pluto (6)  |  Represent (157)  |  Rest (287)  |  Sand (63)  |  Scale (122)  |  Seed (97)  |  Small (489)  |  Solar System (81)  |  Space (523)  |  Speck (25)  |  Substance (253)  |  Sun (407)  |  System (545)  |  Tiny (74)  |  Traffic (10)  |  Want (504)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)

Because science flourishes, must poesy decline? The complaint serves but to betray the weakness of the class who urge it. True, in an age like the present,—considerably more scientific than poetical,—science substitutes for the smaller poetry of fiction, the great poetry of truth.
Lecture Second, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Betray (8)  |  Class (168)  |  Decline (28)  |  Fiction (23)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Great (1610)  |  More (2558)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Present (630)  |  Science And Poetry (17)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Substitute (47)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Urge (17)  |  Weakness (50)

Before a complex of sensations becomes a recollection placeable in time, it has ceased to be actual. We must lose our awareness of its infinite complexity, or it is still actual ... It is only after a memory has lost all life that it can be classed in time, just as only dissected flowers find their way into the herbarium of a botanist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Awareness (42)  |  Become (821)  |  Botanist (25)  |  Cease (81)  |  Class (168)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Dissection (35)  |  Find (1014)  |  Flower (112)  |  Herbarium (2)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lose (165)  |  Memory (144)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Sensation (60)  |  Still (614)  |  Time (1911)  |  Way (1214)

Before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned—the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted—nature's answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of the theorist, who finds himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics. Of course, this does not mean that the experimenter does not also engage in theoretical deliberations. The foremost classical example of a major achievement produced by such a division of labor is the creation of spectrum analysis by the joint efforts of Robert Bunsen, the experimenter, and Gustav Kirchoff, the theorist. Since then, spectrum analysis has been continually developing and bearing ever richer fruit.
'The Meaning and Limits of Exact Science', Science (30 Sep 1949), 110, No. 2857, 325. Advance reprinting of chapter from book Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Abstract Mathematics (9)  |  Achievement (187)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Answer (389)  |  Bearing (10)  |  Being (1276)  |  Robert Bunsen (8)  |  Classical (49)  |  Collaboration (16)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Course (413)  |  Creation (350)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Dependence (46)  |  Development (441)  |  Division (67)  |  Effort (243)  |  Engage (41)  |  Example (98)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Find (1014)  |  Formulation (37)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Himself (461)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Joint (31)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Labor (200)  |  Major (88)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mean (810)  |  Measurement (178)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Perform (123)  |  Performance (51)  |  Plan (122)  |  Produced (187)  |  Properly (21)  |  Question (649)  |  Result (700)  |  Richness (15)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectrum (35)  |  Task (152)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Tool (129)  |  Two (936)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Understood (155)  |  Use (771)

Before you generalize, formalize, and axiomatize there must be mathematical substance.
In Eberhard Zeidler, Applied Functional Analysis: main principles and their applications (1995), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (65)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Substance (253)

Biological determinism is, in its essence, a theory of limits. It takes the current status of groups as a measure of where they should and must be ... We inhabit a world of human differences and predilections, but the extrapolation of these facts to theories of rigid limits is ideology.
The Mismeasure of Man (1981), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (232)  |  Current (122)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Difference (355)  |  Essence (85)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Human (1512)  |  Ideology (15)  |  Limit (294)  |  Measure (241)  |  Predilection (4)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Status (35)  |  Theory (1015)  |  World (1850)

Biologists must constantly keep in mind that what they see was not designed, but rather evolved.
What Mad Pursuit (1990), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (70)  |  Design (203)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Mind (1377)  |  See (1094)

Biology occupies a position among the sciences both marginal and central. Marginal because, the living world, constituting only a tiny and very “special” part of the universe, it does not seem likely that the study of living beings will ever uncover general laws applicable outside the biosphere. But if the ultimate aim of the whole of science is indeed, as I believe, to clarify man's relationship to the universe, then biology must be accorded a central position, since of all the disciplines it is the one that endeavours to go most directly to the heart of the problems that must be resolved before that of “human nature” can even be framed in other than metaphysical terms.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (175)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Being (1276)  |  Biology (232)  |  Biosphere (14)  |  Both (496)  |  Central (81)  |  Clarify (3)  |  Discipline (85)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  General (521)  |  Heart (243)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Nature (71)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Man (2252)  |  Marginal (3)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (53)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outside (141)  |  Problem (731)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Special (188)  |  Study (701)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Tiny (74)  |  Ultimate (152)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

Body and soul cannot be separated for purposes of treatment, for they are one and indivisible. Sick minds must be healed as well as sick bodies.
Surgery, Gynaecology and Obstetrics (1931), 52, 488.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (557)  |  Body And Soul (4)  |  Indivisible (22)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Sick (83)  |  Soul (235)  |  Treatment (135)

Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books.
In 'A Proposal for Amending the Laws of England' (1616). Collected in The Works, with Several Additional Pieces Never Before Printed (1740), Vol. 4, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (413)  |  Follow (389)

Both died, ignored by most; they neither sought nor found public favour, for high roads never lead there. Laurent and Gerhardt never left such roads, were never tempted to peruse those easy successes which, for strongly marked characters, offer neither allure nor gain. Their passion was for the search for truth; and, preferring their independence to their advancement, their convictions to their interests, they placed their love for science above that of their worldly goods; indeed above that for life itself, for death was the reward for their pains. Rare example of abnegation, sublime poverty that deserves the name nobility, glorious death that France must not forget!
'Éloge de Laurent et Gerhardt', Moniteur Scientifique (1862), 4, 473-83, trans. Alan J. Rocke.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (63)  |  Allure (4)  |  Both (496)  |  Character (259)  |  Conviction (100)  |  Death (406)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Easy (213)  |  Fame (51)  |  Forget (125)  |  Gain (146)  |  Charles Gerhardt (3)  |  Glorious (49)  |  Good (906)  |  High (370)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Independence (37)  |  Interest (416)  |  Auguste Laurent (5)  |  Lead (391)  |  Life (1870)  |  Love (328)  |  Marked (55)  |  Most (1728)  |  Name (359)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nobility (5)  |  Offer (142)  |  Pain (144)  |  Passion (121)  |  Poverty (40)  |  Rare (94)  |  Reward (72)  |  Search (175)  |  Sublime (50)  |  Success (327)  |  Truth (1109)

Both religion and science must preserve their autonomy and their distinctiveness. Religion is not founded on science nor is science an extension of religion. Each should possess its own principles, its pattern of procedures, its diversities of interpretation and its own conclusions.
In Letter (1 Jun 1988) to Father George V. Coyne, Director of the Vatican Observatory. On vatican.va website.
Science quotes on:  |  Autonomy (6)  |  Both (496)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Diversity (75)  |  Extension (60)  |  Founded (22)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Possess (157)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Principle (530)  |  Procedure (48)  |  Religion (369)  |  Science And Religion (337)

Bowing to the reality of harried lives, Rudwick recognizes that not everyone will read every word of the meaty second section; he even explicitly gives us permission to skip if we get ‘bogged down in the narrative.’ Readers absolutely must not do such a thing; it should be illegal. The publisher should lock up the last 60 pages, and deny access to anyone who doesn’t pass a multiple-choice exam inserted into the book between parts two and three.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (41)  |  Access (21)  |  Anyone (38)  |  Bog (5)  |  Book (413)  |  Bow (15)  |  Choice (114)  |  Deny (71)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Everyone (35)  |  Exam (5)  |  Explicitly (2)  |  Give (208)  |  Illegal (2)  |  Insert (4)  |  Last (425)  |  Live (650)  |  Lock (14)  |  Multiple (19)  |  Narrative (9)  |  Page (35)  |  Part (235)  |  Pass (241)  |  Permission (7)  |  Publisher (3)  |  Read (308)  |  Reader (42)  |  Reality (274)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Second (66)  |  Section (11)  |  Skip (4)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Two (936)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)

Elbert (Green) Hubbard quote: Business, to be successful, must be based on science, for demand and supply are matters
Business, to be successful, must be based on science, for demand and supply are matters of mathematics, not guesswork.
The Book of Business (1913), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (156)  |  Demand (131)  |  Guesswork (4)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Matter (821)  |  Success (327)  |  Successful (134)  |  Supply (100)  |  Supply And Demand (4)

But at the same time, there must never be the least hesitation in giving up a position the moment it is shown to be untenable. It is not going too far to say that the greatness of a scientific investigator does not rest on the fact of his having never made a mistake, but rather on his readiness to admit that he has done so, whenever the contrary evidence is cogent enough.
Principles of General Physiology (1915), x.xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Cogent (6)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Moment (260)  |  Never (1089)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Rest (287)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Time (1911)  |  Untenable (5)  |  Whenever (81)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (13)  |  Answer (389)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Art (680)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Consider (428)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Country (269)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (44)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Example (98)  |  Face (214)  |  Figure (162)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (776)  |  Gratitude (14)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (149)  |  Heap (15)  |  Hill (23)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Isle (6)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Object (438)  |  Objection (34)  |  Order (638)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (630)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Protuberance (3)  |  Rise (169)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rock (176)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (44)  |  Shape (77)  |  Sight (135)  |  Termination (4)  |  Valley (37)  |  Variety (138)

But how is one to determine what is pleasing to God? ... Whatever is unpleasant to man is pleasant to God. The test is the natural instinct of man. If there arises within one’s dark recesses a hot desire to do this or that, then it is the paramount duty of a Christian to avoid doing this or that. And if, on the contrary, one cherishes an abhorrence of the business, then one must tackle it forthwith, all the time shouting ‘Hallelujah!’ A simple enough religion, surely–simple, satisfying and idiotic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Arise (162)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Business (156)  |  Cherish (25)  |  Christian (44)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Dark (145)  |  Desire (212)  |  Determine (152)  |  Do (1905)  |  Doing (277)  |  Duty (71)  |  Enough (341)  |  Forthwith (2)  |  God (776)  |  Hot (63)  |  Instinct (91)  |  Man (2252)  |  Natural (810)  |  Paramount (11)  |  Pleasant (22)  |  Please (68)  |  Recess (8)  |  Religion (369)  |  Satisfy (29)  |  Shout (25)  |  Simple (426)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tackle (6)  |  Test (221)  |  Time (1911)  |  Unpleasant (15)  |  Whatever (234)

But I must confess I am jealous of the term atom; for though it is very easy to talk of atoms, it is very difficult to form a clear idea of their nature, especially when compounded bodies are under consideration.
'On the Absolute Quantity of Electricity Associated with the Particles or Atoms of Matter,' (31 Dec 1833), published in Philosophical Transactions (Jan 1834) as part of Series VII. Collected in Experimental Researches in Electricity: Reprinted from the Philosophical Transactions of 1831-1838 (1839), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Compound (117)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Easy (213)  |  Form (976)  |  Idea (881)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Term (357)

But I shall certainly admit a system as empirical or scientific only if it is capable of being tested by experience. These considerations suggest that not the verifiability but the falsifiability of a system is to be taken as a criterion of demarcation. In other words: I shall not require of a scientific system that it shall be capable of being singled out, once and for all, in a positive sense; but I shall require that its logical form shall be such that it can be singled out, by means of empirical tests, in a negative sense: it must be possible for an empirical scientific system to be refuted by experience. (1959)
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Capable (174)  |