Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Doing

Doing Quotes (280 quotes)


“Advance, ye mates! Cross your lances full before me. Well done! Let me touch the axis.” So saying, with extended arm, he grasped the three level, radiating lances at their crossed centre; while so doing, suddenly and nervously twitched them; meanwhile, glancing intently from Starbuck to Stubb; from Stubb to Flask. It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life. The three mates quailed before his strong, sustained, and mystic aspect. Stubb and Flask looked sideways from him; the honest eye of Starbuck fell downright.
“In vain!&rsdquo; cried Ahab; “but, maybe, 'tis well. For did ye three but once take the full-forced shock, then mine own electric thing, that had perhaps expired from out me. Perchance, too, it would have dropped ye dead. ...”
[Commentary by Henry Schlesinger: Electricity—mysterious and powerful as it seemed at the time—served as a perfect metaphor for Captain Ahab's primal obsession and madness, which he transmits through the crew as if through an electrical circuit in Moby-Dick.]
Extract from Herman Melville, Moby-Dick and comment by Henry Schlesinger in The Battery: How Portable Power Sparked a Technological Revolution (2010), 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Advance (280)  |  Arm (81)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Captain (14)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Death (388)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Honest (50)  |  Interior (32)  |  Leyden Jar (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Madness (33)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Quail (2)  |  Shock (37)  |  Strong (174)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Vain (83)  |  Volition (3)

... If I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.
The Scientific Basis of Morals (1884), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Danger (115)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Sink (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wrong (234)

...the scientific cast of mind examines the world critically, as if many alternative worlds might exist, as if other things might be here which are not. Then we are forced to ask why what we see is present and not something else. Why are the Sun and moon and the planets spheres? Why not pyramids, or cubes, or dodecahedra? Why not irregular, jumbly shapes? Why so symmetrical, worlds? If you spend any time spinning hypotheses, checking to see whether they make sense, whether they conform to what else we know. Thinking of tests you can pose to substantiate or deflate hypotheses, you will find yourself doing science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cast (66)  |  Check (24)  |  Conform (13)  |  Critical (66)  |  Cube (13)  |  Deflate (2)  |  Examine (78)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Irregular (6)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moon (237)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pose (9)  |  Present (619)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shape (72)  |  Something (719)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Sun (385)  |  Symmetrical (2)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Omnes scientiae sunt connexae et fovent auxiliis sicut partes ejusdem totius, quarum quaelibet opus suum peragit non propter se sed pro aliis.
All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work, not for itself alone, but for the other parts; as the eye guides the body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place.
Opus Tertium [1266- 1268], chapter 4, Latin text quoted in J. B. Bury, The Idea of Progress (1920), 355 (footnote to page 25). In J. S. Brewer (ed.), Fr. Rogeri Bacon Opera ... inedita (1859), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Body (537)  |  Connect (125)  |  Eye (419)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Lead (384)  |  Material (353)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (177)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Que faisons-nous ici-bas? Nous préparons les floraisons de demain. Nous sommes tous du fumier d'humanité future.
What are we doing on earth? We are preparing the blossoms of tomorrow. We are all the manure of future humanity.
Aphorism dated 28 Nov 1903, in Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 194. Google translation by Webmaster. You may choose to use “blooms” instead of “blossoms” depending on your context.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flower (106)  |  Future (429)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manure (8)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Tomorrow (60)

Ron Hutcheson, a Knight-Ridder reporter: [Mr. President, what are your] personal views [about the theory of] intelligent design?
President George W. Bush: [Laughing. You're] doing a fine job of dragging me back to the past [days as governor of Texas]. ... Then, I said that, first of all, that decision should be made to local school districts, but I felt like both sides ought to be properly taught...”
Hutcheson: Both sides ought to be properly taught?
President: Yes ... so people can understand what the debate is about.
Hutcheson: So the answer accepts the validity of “intelligent design” as an alternative to evolution?
President: I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought, and I'm not suggesting—you're asking me whether or not people ought to be exposed to different ideas, and the answer is yes.
Hutcheson: So we've got to give these groups—...
President: [interrupting] Very interesting question, Hutch. [Laughter from other reporters]
From conversation with reporters at the White House (1 Aug 2005), as quoted by Matthew Cooper in 'Fanning the Controversy Over “Intelligent Design”', Time (3 Aug 2005). The Time writer stated, “The president has gone farther in questioning the widely-taught theories of evolution and natural selection than any president since Ronald Reagan, who advocated teaching creationism in public schools alongside evolution.” Just a few months later, in the nation's first case on that point, on 20 Dec 2005, “a federal judge [John E. Jones] ruled it was unconstitutional for a Pennsylvania school district to present intelligent design as an alternative in high school biology courses, because it is a religious viewpoint,” as reported by Laurie Goodstein in 'Judge Rejects Teaching Intelligent Design', New York Times (21 Dec 2005). Goodstein also wrote “Judge Jones, a Republican appointed by President Bush, concluded that intelligent design was not science,” and that “the evidence in the trial proved that intelligent design was 'creationism relabeled.' The Supreme Court has already ruled that creationism ... cannot be taught as science in a public school.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Answer (366)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Both (493)  |  Debate (38)  |  Decision (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  District (9)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Governor (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Local (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  President (31)  |  Question (621)  |  School (219)  |  Side (233)  |  Teach (277)  |  Texas (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Validity (47)  |  View (488)

There is no such thing as a Scientific Mind. Scientists are people of very dissimilar temperaments doing different things in very different ways. Among scientists are collectors, classifiers, and compulsive tidiers-up; many are detectives by temperament and many are explorers; some are artists and others artisans. There are poet-scientists and philosopher-scientists and even a few mystics.
The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967). Reprinted in Pluto’s Republic (1982), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Artisan (9)  |  Artist (90)  |  Collector (9)  |  Compulsive (3)  |  Detective (10)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Poet (83)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

[On President Bush's plan to get to Mars in 10 years] Stupid. Robots would do a better job and be much cheaper because you don't have to bring them back.
Interview with Deborah Solomon, 'The Science of Second-Guessing', in New York Times Magazine (12 Dec 2004), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Better (486)  |  Bringing (10)  |  George W. Bush (19)  |  Cheapness (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Job (82)  |  Mars (44)  |  Plan (117)  |  President (31)  |  Robot (13)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Year (933)

A biologist, if he wishes to know how many toes a cat has, does not "frame the hypothesis that the number of feline digital extremities is 4, or 5, or 6," he simply looks at a cat and counts. A social scientist prefers the more long-winded expression every time, because it gives an entirely spurious impression of scientificness to what he is doing.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cat (47)  |  Count (105)  |  Digital (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Spurious (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toe (7)  |  Wind (128)

A disease which new and obscure to you, Doctor, will be known only after death; and even then not without an autopsy will you examine it with exacting pains. But rare are those among the extremely busy clinicians who are willing or capable of doing this correctly.
In Atrocis, nee Descipti Prius, Morbi Historia as translated in Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (1944), 43, 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Autopsy (3)  |  Busy (28)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clinician (2)  |  Correct (86)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Exacting (4)  |  Examine (78)  |  Known (454)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Pain (136)  |  Rare (89)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

A historical fact is rather like the flamingo that Alice in Wonderland tried to use as a croquet mallet. As soon as she got its neck nicely straightened out and was ready to hit the ball, it would turn and look at her with a puzzled expression, and any biographer knows that what is called a “fact” has a way of doing the same.
From 'Getting at the Truth', The Saturday Review (19 Sep 1953), 36, No. 38, 11. Excerpted in Meta Riley Emberger and Marian Ross Hall, Scientific Writing (1955), 399.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice In Wonderland (6)  |  Ball (62)  |  Biographer (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Croquet (2)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flamingo (2)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Neck (15)  |  Puzzled (2)  |  Soon (186)  |  Straight (73)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

A key concept is that security is an enabler, not a disabler. … Security … enables you to keep your job, security enables you to move into new markets, security enables you to have confidence in what you’re doing.
As quoted in magazine article, an interview by John McCormick, 'Computer Security as a Business Enabler', Baseline (7 Jul 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Enable (119)  |  Job (82)  |  Key (50)  |  Market (20)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Security (47)

A life spent in making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.
In 'Preface on Doctors', The Doctor's Dilemma (1909, 1911), lxxxv.
Science quotes on:  |  Honorable (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Useful (250)

A lot of people ask, “Do you think humans are parasites?” It’s an interesting idea and one worth thinking about. People casually refer to humanity as a virus spreading across the earth. In fact, we do look like some strange kind of bio-film spreading across the landscape. A good metaphor? If the biosphere is our host, we do use it up for our own benefit. We do manipulate it. We alter the flows and fluxes of elements like carbon and nitrogen to benefit ourselves—often at the expense of the biosphere as a whole. If you look at how coral reefs or tropical forests are faring these days, you’ll notice that our host is not doing that well right now. Parasites are very sophisticated; parasites are highly evolved; parasites are very successful, as reflected in their diversity. Humans are not very good parasites. Successful parasites do a very good job of balancing—using up their hosts and keeping them alive. It’s all a question of tuning the adaptation to your particular host. In our case, we have only one host, so we have to be particularly careful.
Talk at Columbia University, 'The Power of Parasites'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Ask (411)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forest (150)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Kind (557)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nitrogen Cycle (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Parasite (33)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Right (452)  |  Strange (157)  |  Successful (123)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)

A man can do his best only by confidently seeking (and perpetually missing) an unattainable perfection.
In Forbes (1946), 57, 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Best (459)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Man (2251)  |  Missing (21)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Perpetuity (9)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Unattainable (6)

A man who sets out to justify his existence and his activities has to distinguish two different questions. The first is whether the work which he does is worth doing; and the second is why he does it (whatever its value may be).
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Justification (48)  |  Man (2251)  |  Question (621)  |  Set (394)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

A parable: A man was examining the construction of a cathedral. He asked a stone mason what he was doing chipping the stones, and the mason replied, “I am making stones.” He asked a stone carver what he was doing. “I am carving a gargoyle.” And so it went, each person said in detail what they were doing. Finally he came to an old woman who was sweeping the ground. She said. “I am helping build a cathedral.”
...Most of the time each person is immersed in the details of one special part of the whole and does not think of how what they are doing relates to the larger picture.
[For example, in education, a teacher might say in the next class he was going to “explain Young's modulus and how to measure it,” rather than, “I am going to educate the students and prepare them for their future careers.”]
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Career (75)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Class (164)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Future (429)  |  Gargoyle (3)  |  Ground (217)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mason (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Parable (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Picture (143)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Relation (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Special (184)  |  Stone (162)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Woman (151)  |  Young (227)

A species consists of a group of populations which replace each other geographically or ecologically and of which the neighboring ones integrate or hybridise wherever they are in contact or which are potentially capable of doing so (with one or more of the populations) in those cases where contact is prevented by geographical or ecological barriers.
'Speciation Phenomena in Birds', The American Naturalist (1940), 74, 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Barrier (32)  |  Capable (168)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contact (65)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Geography (36)  |  Integrate (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Population (110)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Species (401)  |  Wherever (51)

Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.
Lou Holtz
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Capable (168)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Motivation (27)

Agriculture is something like farming; only farming is doing it.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Farming (8)  |  Something (719)

All the modern higher mathematics is based on a calculus of operations, on laws of thought. All mathematics, from the first, was so in reality; but the evolvers of the modern higher calculus have known that it is so. Therefore elementary teachers who, at the present day, persist in thinking about algebra and arithmetic as dealing with laws of number, and about geometry as dealing with laws of surface and solid content, are doing the best that in them lies to put their pupils on the wrong track for reaching in the future any true understanding of the higher algebras. Algebras deal not with laws of number, but with such laws of the human thinking machinery as have been discovered in the course of investigations on numbers. Plane geometry deals with such laws of thought as were discovered by men intent on finding out how to measure surface; and solid geometry with such additional laws of thought as were discovered when men began to extend geometry into three dimensions.
In Lectures on the Logic of Arithmetic (1903), Preface, 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Present (619)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reality (261)  |  Solid (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wrong (234)

Alvarez seemed to care less about the way the picture in the puzzle would look, when everything fit together, than about the fun of looking for pieces that fit. He loved nothing more than doing something that everybody else thought impossible. His designs were clever, and usually exploited some little-known principle that everyone else had forgotten.
As quoted in Walter Sullivan, 'Luis W. Alvarez, Nobel Physicist Who Explored Atom, Dies at 77: Obituary', New York Times (2 Sep 1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Luis W. Alvarez (24)  |  Care (186)  |  Clever (38)  |  Design (195)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Fun (38)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Known (454)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Picture (143)  |  Piece (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Usually (176)  |  Way (1217)

And yet in a funny way our lack of success led to our breakthrough; because, since we could not get a cell line off the shelf doing what we wanted, we were forced to construct it. And the original experiment ... developed into a method for the production of hybridomas ... [which] was of more importance than our original purpose.
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 256-257.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Cell (138)  |  Construct (124)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Force (487)  |  Funny (11)  |  Hybridoma (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lack (119)  |  Lead (384)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Original (58)  |  Production (183)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Success (302)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

Anything worth doing is worth doing to excess.
[In reference to concentration and hard work.]
Quoted in New York Times (2 Mar 1991), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Concentration (29)  |  Excess (22)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

Anything worth doing is worth doing twice, the first time quick and dirty and the second time the best way you can.
As quoted in Steven Chu and Charles H. Townes, 'Arthur Schawlow', Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (2003), Vol. 83, 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Dirty (17)  |  First (1283)  |  Quick (13)  |  Research (664)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worth (169)

Around here, however, we don't look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors, and doing new things, because we're curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.
In Juz Griffiths, Disneyland Paris - The Family Guide (2007), opening page.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Forward (102)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  New (1216)  |  Path (144)  |  Progress (465)  |  Thing (1915)

Art is the beautiful way of doing things. Science is the effective way of doing things. Business is the economic way of doing things.
Selected writings of Elbert Hubbard (1928), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Business (149)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Effective (59)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

Basic research at universities comes in two varieties: research that requires big bucks and research that requires small bucks. Big bucks research is much like government research and in fact usually is government research but done for the government under contract. Like other government research, big bucks academic research is done to understand the nature and structure of the universe or to understand life, which really means that it is either for blowing up the world or extending life, whichever comes first. Again, that's the government's motivation. The universities' motivation for conducting big bucks research is to bring money in to support professors and graduate students and to wax the floors of ivy-covered buildings. While we think they are busy teaching and learning, these folks are mainly doing big bucks basic research for a living, all the while priding themselves on their terrific summer vacations and lack of a dress code.
Smalls bucks research is the sort of thing that requires paper and pencil, and maybe a blackboard, and is aimed primarily at increasing knowledge in areas of study that don't usually attract big bucks - that is, areas that don't extend life or end it, or both. History, political science, and romance languages are typically small bucks areas of basic research. The real purpose of small bucks research to the universities is to provide a means of deciding, by the quality of their small bucks research, which professors in these areas should get tenure.
Accidental Empires (1992), 78.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Code (31)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Government (110)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  History (673)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Money (170)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Political (121)  |  Political Science (2)  |  Professor (128)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Summer (54)  |  Support (147)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  University (121)  |  Usually (176)  |  Wax (13)  |  World (1774)

Basic research is what I am doing when I don't know what I am doing.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)

Before the printing press, the young learned by listening, watching, doing.
In 'Classroom Without Walls', Explorations (May 1957), No. 7. Collected in Edmund Carpenter and Marshall McLuhan (eds.), Explorations in Communication, an Anthology (1960), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Watch (109)  |  Young (227)

Business men are to be pitied who do not recognize the fact that the largest side of their secular business is benevolence. ... No man ever manages a legitimate business in this life without doing indirectly far more for other men than he is trying to do for himself.
Defining what makes a business legitimate. In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Business (149)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Himself (461)  |  Largest (39)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manage (23)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pity (14)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Secular (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Trying (144)

But how is one to determine what is pleasing to God? ... Whatever is unpleasant to man is pleasant to God. The test is the natural instinct of man. If there arises within one’s dark recesses a hot desire to do this or that, then it is the paramount duty of a Christian to avoid doing this or that. And if, on the contrary, one cherishes an abhorrence of the business, then one must tackle it forthwith, all the time shouting ‘Hallelujah!’ A simple enough religion, surely–simple, satisfying and idiotic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Business (149)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Christian (43)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Dark (140)  |  Desire (204)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  Enough (340)  |  Forthwith (2)  |  God (757)  |  Hot (60)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Please (65)  |  Recess (8)  |  Religion (361)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Shout (25)  |  Simple (406)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tackle (6)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Whatever (234)

But neither thirty years, nor thirty centuries, affect the clearness, or the charm, of Geometrical truths. Such a theorem as “the square of the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the sides” is as dazzlingly beautiful now as it was in the day when Pythagoras first discovered it, and celebrated its advent, it is said, by sacrificing a hecatomb of oxen—a method of doing honour to Science that has always seemed to me slightly exaggerated and uncalled-for. One can imagine oneself, even in these degenerate days, marking the epoch of some brilliant scientific discovery by inviting a convivial friend or two, to join one in a beefsteak and a bottle of wine. But a hecatomb of oxen! It would produce a quite inconvenient supply of beef.
Written without pseudonym as Charles L. Dodgson, in Introduction to A New Theory of Parallels (1888, 1890), xvi. Note: a hecatomb is a great public sacrifice, originally of a hundred oxen.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beef (4)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Charm (51)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Epoch (45)  |  First (1283)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hypotenuse (4)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Method (505)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Oxen (8)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Side (233)  |  Square (70)  |  Steak (3)  |  Sum (102)  |  Supply (93)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Wine (38)  |  Year (933)

By increasing the size of the keyhole, today's playwrights are in danger of doing away with the door.
In Christian Science Monitor (14 Nov 62).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Danger (115)  |  Door (93)  |  Increasing (4)  |  Keyhole (5)  |  Playwright (2)  |  Today (314)

Common sense is the knack of seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Knack (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Common sense is the knack of seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done.
Anonymous
Appears in Tryon Edwards (ed.), A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations (1891), 77, attributed, without citation, to Calvin Ellis Stowe. However, Webmaster, as yet, has not been able to find any primary source in a work by Stowe. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Daniel Bernoulli used to tell two little adventures, which he said had given him more pleasure than all the other honours he had received. Travelling with a learned stranger, who, being pleased with his conversation, asked his name; “I am Daniel Bernoulli,” answered he with great modesty; “and I,” said the stranger (who thought he meant to laugh at him) “am Isaac Newton.” Another time, having to dine with the celebrated Koenig, the mathematician, who boasted, with some degree of self-complacency, of a difficult problem he had solved with much trouble, Bernoulli went on doing the honours of his table, and when they went to drink coffee he presented Koenig with a solution of the problem more elegant than his own.
In A Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 1, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Daniel Bernoulli (5)  |  Boast (22)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dine (5)  |  Drink (53)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Great (1574)  |  Honour (56)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modesty (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleased (3)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Self (267)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)

Doing an experiment is not more important than writing.
Concept attributed to Boring, but stated without quotation marks, by D.O. Hebb and Dalbir Bindra, in 'Scientific Writing and the General Problem of Communication', The American Psychologist (Oct 1952), 7, 569-673. Excerpted and cited in Ritchie R. Ward, Practical Technical Writing (1968), 32. If you know a verbatim primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (695)  |  Importance (286)  |  More (2559)  |  Writing (189)

Doing nothing is better than being busy doing nothing.
Lao Tzu
Tao Te Ching. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 183
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Busy (28)  |  Nothing (966)

During the time that [Karl] Landsteiner gave me an education in the field of imununology, I discovered that he and I were thinking about the serologic problem in very different ways. He would ask, What do these experiments force us to believe about the nature of the world? I would ask, What is the most. simple and general picture of the world that we can formulate that is not ruled by these experiments? I realized that medical and biological investigators were not attacking their problems the same way that theoretical physicists do, the way I had been in the habit of doing.
‘Molecular Disease’, Pfizer Spectrum (1958), 6:9, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Formulation (36)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Karl Landsteiner (8)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realization (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Electricity is doing for the distribution of energy what the railroads have done for the distribution of materials.
As quoted in 'C.P. Steinmetz Dies In Sudden Relapse', New York Times (27 Oct 1923), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Distribution (50)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Energy (344)  |  Material (353)  |  Railroad (32)

ENGINEER, in the military art, an able expert man, who, by a perfect knowledge in mathematics, delineates upon paper, or marks upon the ground, all sorts of forts, and other works proper for offence and defence. He should understand the art of fortification, so as to be able, not only to discover the defects of a place, but to find a remedy proper for them; as also how to make an attack upon, as well as to defend, the place. Engineers are extremely necessary for these purposes: wherefore it is requisite that, besides being ingenious, they should be brave in proportion. When at a siege the engineers have narrowly surveyed the place, they are to make their report to the general, by acquainting him which part they judge the weakest, and where approaches may be made with most success. Their business is also to delineate the lines of circumvallation and contravallation, taking all the advantages of the ground; to mark out the trenches, places of arms, batteries, and lodgments, taking care that none of their works be flanked or discovered from the place. After making a faithful report to the general of what is a-doing, the engineers are to demand a sufficient number of workmen and utensils, and whatever else is necessary.
In Encyclopaedia Britannica or a Dictionary of Arts and Sciences (1771), Vol. 2, 497.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brave (12)  |  Business (149)  |  Care (186)  |  Defect (31)  |  Defence (14)  |  Delineate (2)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discover (553)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Expert (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Fort (2)  |  Fortification (6)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Judge (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Offence (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Success (302)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Survey (33)  |  Trench (6)  |  Understand (606)  |  Utensil (2)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

Even fairly good students, when they have obtained the solution of the problem and written down neatly the argument, shut their books and look for something else. Doing so, they miss an important and instructive phase of the work. ... A good teacher should understand and impress on his students the view that no problem whatever is completely exhausted.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Book (392)  |  Completely (135)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Down (456)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Look (582)  |  Miss (51)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Phase (36)  |  Problem (676)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

Even the humblest creature has to know how to react to the difference between food and toxin if it's to survive. ... Life and some level of intelligent behavior—discerning and doing what's best for one's survival—appear to go hand in hand.
In Life Everywhere: the Maverick Science of Astrobiology (2002), 140.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Best (459)  |  Creature (233)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Food (199)  |  Hand In Hand (4)  |  Humblest (4)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Toxin (8)

Every honest researcher I know admits he’s just a professional amateur. He’s doing whatever he’s doing for the first time. That makes him an amateur. He has sense enough to know that he’s going to have a lot of trouble, so that makes him a professional.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admit (45)  |  Amateur (19)  |  Enough (340)  |  First (1283)  |  First Time (10)  |  Honest (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Professional (70)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Whatever (234)

Everyone doing his best is not the answer. It is necessary that people know what to do.
In Quality, Productivity, and Competitive Position (1982), ii. A similar quote often attributed to Deming, but without citation, is “It is not enough to do your best; you must know what to do, and then do your best.”
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Know (1518)  |  Necessary (363)  |  People (1005)

Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
From Address (7 Sep 1903), at the State Fair, Syracuse, N.Y., collected in Addresses and Presidential Messages of Theodore Roosevelt, 1902-1904 (1907), Vol. 1, 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Chance (239)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Offer (141)  |  Prize (13)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)  |  Worth (169)

First get a clear notion of what you desire to accomplish and then in all probability you will succeed in doing it.
As quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 48-49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Desire (204)  |  First (1283)  |  Notion (113)  |  Probability (130)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Will (2355)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Character (243)  |  Chief (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Desk (13)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Fund (18)  |  Institution (69)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Professional (70)  |  Project (73)  |  Raise (35)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sky (161)  |  Spend (95)  |  State (491)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)

For more than ten years, my theory was in limbo. Then, finally, in the late 1980s, physicists at Princeton said, “There’s nothing wrong with this theory. It’s the only one that works, and we have to open out minds to hyperspace.” We weren’t destined to discover this theory for another 100 years because it’s so bizarre, so different from everything we’d been doing. We didn’t use the normal sequence of discoveries to get to it.
Describing reaction to his superstring theory of hyperspace which mathematically relates the universe’s basic forces.
Quoted in Nina L. Diamond, Voices of Truth (2000), 326.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basic (138)  |  Destined (42)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Everything (476)  |  Force (487)  |  Hyperspace (3)  |  Late (118)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Sequence (68)  |  String Theory (10)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

From him [Wilard Bennett] I learned how different a working laboratory is from a student laboratory. The answers are not known!
[While an undergraduate, doing experimental measurements in the laboratory of his professor, at Ohio State University.]
From autobiography on Nobel Prize website.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Professor (128)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)

Genetics as a whole is the great over-hyped science, and geneticists know that even if they don't say it. All that genetics really is is anatomy plus an enormous research group grant. It's what anatomists did in the fifteenth century-looking at the heart and seeing how it worked. Now, we are doing the same with DNA
Quoted by Sean O'Hagan, in 'End of sperm report', The Observer (14 Sep 2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  15th Century (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Century (310)  |  DNA (77)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Grant (73)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  Heart (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Looking (189)  |  Now (5)  |  Plus (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Working (20)

Having always observed that most of them who constantly took in the weekly Bills of Mortality made little other use of them than to look at the foot how the burials increased or decreased, and among the Casualties what had happened, rare and extraordinary, in the week current; so as they might take the same as a Text to talk upon in the next company, and withal in the Plague-time, how the Sickness increased or decreased, that the Rich might judg of the necessity of their removal, and Trades-men might conjecture what doings they were likely to have in their respective dealings.
From Natural and Political Observations Mentioned in a Following Index and Made upon Bills of Mortality (1662), Preface. Reproduced in Cornelius Walford, The Insurance Cyclopaedia (1871), Vol. 1, 286. Italicizations from another source.
Science quotes on:  |  Burial (7)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Company (59)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Current (118)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Increase (210)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plague (41)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Talk (100)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Week (70)

His [Henry Cavendish’s] Theory of the Universe seems to have been, that it consisted solely of a multitude of objects which could be weighed, numbered, and measured; and the vocation to which he considered himself called was, to weigh, number and measure as many of those objects as his allotted three-score years and ten would permit. This conviction biased all his doings, alike his great scientific enterprises, and the petty details of his daily life.
In George Wilson, The Life of the Honourable Henry Cavendish: Including the Abstracts of his Important Scientific Papers (1851), 186.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Bias (20)  |  Call (769)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consist (223)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Detail (146)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Permit (58)  |  Petty (9)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vocation (6)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Year (933)

His [Thomas Edison] method was inefficient in the extreme, for an immense ground had to be covered to get anything at all unless blind chance intervened and, at first, I was almost a sorry witness of his doings, knowing that just a little theory and calculation would have saved him 90 per cent of the labor. But he had a veritable contempt for book learning and mathematical knowledge, trusting himself entirely to his inventor's instinct and practical American sense. In view of this, the truly prodigious amount of his actual accomplishments is little short of a miracle.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25. In 1884, Tesla had moved to America to assist Edison in the designing of motors and generators.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  American (46)  |  Amount (151)  |  Blind (95)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Chance (239)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inefficient (3)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Saving (20)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truly (116)  |  Trust (66)  |  View (488)  |  Witness (54)

How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. An artist is emotional, they think, and uses only his intuition; he sees all at once and has no need of reason. A scientist is cold, they think, and uses only his reason; he argues carefully step by step, and needs no imagination. That is all wrong. The true artist is quite rational as well as imaginative and knows what he is doing; if he does not, his art suffers. The true scientist is quite imaginative as well as rational, and sometimes leaps to solutions where reason can follow only slowly; if he does not, his science suffers.
'Prometheus.' The Roving Mind (1983), Chap 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cold (112)  |  Different (577)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Follow (378)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leap (53)  |  People (1005)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speak (232)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Wrong (234)

I am sorry that the distinguished leader of the Republican Party in the House states that he is not versed in botany and publicly admits that he does not know anything of these terms or what it is all about; but, Mr. Chairman, it is indeed a sad day for the people of this country when we must close the doors of the laboratories doing research work for the people of the United States.
Speaking (28 Dec 1932) as a member of the 72nd Congress, early in the Great Depression, in opposition to an attempt to eliminate a small amount from the agricultural appropriation bill. As quoted in 'Mayor-Elect La Guardia on Research', Science (1933), New Series, 78, No. 2031, 511.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Botany (57)  |  Close (69)  |  Congress (19)  |  Country (251)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Door (93)  |  House (140)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leader (43)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Research (664)  |  Sorry (30)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  United States (31)  |  Work (1351)

I became expert at dissecting crayfish. At one point I had a crayfish claw mounted on an apparatus in such a way that I could operate the individual nerves. I could get the several-jointed claw to reach down and pick up a pencil and wave it around. I am not sure that what I was doing had much scientific value, although I did learn which nerve fiber had to be excited to inhibit the effects of another fiber so that the claw would open. And it did get me interested in robotic instrumentation, something that I have now returned to. I am trying to build better micromanipulators for surgery and the like.
In Jeremy Bernstein, 'A.I.', The New Yorker (14 Dec 1981).
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Better (486)  |  Build (204)  |  Claw (8)  |  Dissect (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Excite (15)  |  Expert (65)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inhibit (4)  |  Instrumentation (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Mount (42)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Open (274)  |  Operate (17)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Pick Up (4)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Robot (13)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Trying (144)  |  Value (365)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)

I believe in Spinoza’s God, Who reveals Himself in the lawful harmony of the world, not in a God Who concerns Himself with the fate and the doings of mankind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Concern (228)  |  Doings (2)  |  Fate (72)  |  God (757)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Himself (461)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Spinozas (2)  |  World (1774)

I came to realize that exaggerated concern about what others are doing can be foolish. It can paralyze effort, and stifle a good idea. One finds that in the history of science almost every problem has been worked out by someone else. This should not discourage anyone from pursuing his own path.
From Theodore von Karman and Lee Edson (ed.), The Wind and Beyond: Theodore von Karman, Pioneer in Aviation and Pathfinder in Science (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Path (144)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stifle (5)  |  Work (1351)

I cannot judge my work while I am doing it. I have to do as painters do, stand back and view it from a distance, but not too great a distance. How great? Guess.
Quoted without citation in W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms (1966), 291. Webmaster has tried without success to locate a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guess (61)  |  Judge (108)  |  Painter (29)  |  Stand (274)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.
In 'The Science Of Deduction', A Study In Scarlet (1887, 1904), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Attic (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Brain (270)  |  Choose (112)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Elastic (2)  |  Empty (80)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fool (116)  |  Forget (115)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Useful (250)  |  Useless (33)  |  Wall (67)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

I don't really care how time is reckoned so long as there is some agreement about it, but I object to being told that I am saving daylight when my reason tells me that I am doing nothing of the kind. I even object to the implication that I am wasting something valuable if I stay in bed after the sun has risen. As an admirer of moonlight I resent the bossy insistence of those who want to reduce my time for enjoying it. At the back of the Daylight Saving scheme I detect the bony, blue-fingered hand of Puritanism, eager to push people into bed earlier, and get them up earlier, to make them healthy, wealthy and wise in spite of themselves.
In The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (9)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Back (390)  |  Bed (23)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blue (56)  |  Care (186)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (16)  |  Eager (15)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Finger (44)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Kind (557)  |  Long (790)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  People (1005)  |  Push (62)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Resent (4)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Something (719)  |  Spite (55)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Want (497)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wise (131)

I don’t believe in evolution, like people believe in God … Science and technology are not advanced by people who believe, but by people who don’t know but are doing their best to find out.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Technology (257)

I don’t believe medical discoveries are doing much to advance human life. As fast as we create ways to extend it we are inventing ways to shorten it.
What They Said (1970), 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Create (235)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Extend (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Way (1217)

I feel a desperation to make people see what we are doing to the environment, what a mess we are making of our world. At this point, the more people I reach, the more I accomplish. … I miss Gombe and my wonderful years in the forest But if I were to go back to that, I wouldn’t feel I was doing what I should be doing.
Answering the question, “Why have you transferred your energies from animal research to activism?” From interview by Tamar Lewin, 'Wildlife to Tireless Crusader, See Jane Run', New York Times (20 Nov 2000), F35.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Back (390)  |  Desperation (6)  |  Environment (216)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forest (150)  |  Gombe (2)  |  Making (300)  |  Mess (13)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missing (21)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  See (1081)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

I forget whether you take in the Times; for the chance of your not doing so, I send the enclosed rich letter. It is, I am sure, by Fitz-Roy. … It is a pity he did not add his theory of the extinction of Mastodon, etc., from the door of the Ark being made too small.
Letter (5 Dec 1859) to Charles Lyell. In Francis Darwin and Albert Charles Seward (eds.), More Letters of Charles Darwin: A Record of his Work in a Series of Hitherto Unpublished Letters (103), Vol. 1, 129. The referenced letters in the Times were on 1 Dec and 5 Dec 1859, signed under the pseudonym “Senex”, on the topic of “Works of Art in the Drift.”
Science quotes on:  |  Ark (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Door (93)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Robert Fitzroy (4)  |  Forget (115)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mastodon (4)  |  Quip (80)  |  Small (477)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

I had gone on a walk on a fine Sabbath afternoon. I had entered the Green [of Glasgow] by the gate at the foot of Charlotte Street—had passed the old washing-house. I was thinking upon the engine at the time, and had gone as far as the herd's house, when the idea came into my mind that as steam was an elastic body it would rush into a vacuum, and if a communication were made between the cylinder and an exhausted vessel it would rush into it, and might be there condensed without cooling the cylinder. I then saw that I must get rid of the condensed steam and injection water if I used a jet, as in Newcomen's engine. Two ways of doing this occurred to me. First, the water might be run off by a descending pipe, if an outlet could be got at the depth of 35 or 36 feet, and any air might be extracted by a small pump. The second was to make the pump large enough to extract both water and air. ... I had not walked further than the Golf-house when the whole thing was arranged in my mind.
[In Robert Hart's words, a recollection of the description of Watt's moment of inspiration, in May 1765, for improving Thomas Newcomen's steam engine.]
In Robert Hart, 'Reminiscences of James Watt' (read 2 Nov 1857), Transactions of the Glasgow Archaeological Society (1859), Vol. 1, 1. Note that these are not the verbatim words of James Watt, but are only a recollection of them by Robert Hart, who is quoting as best he can from memory of a conversation he and his brother had with James Watt that took place over 43 years previously. In his Reminiscences, Hart explains, “I have accordingly thrown together the following brief narrative:— As these meetings took place forty-three years since, many observations that were made at the time may have escaped me at present; yet, when the same subjects are touched on, I have as distinct recollection of his treatment of them as if it were yesterday.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Communication (94)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Depth (94)  |  Elastic (2)  |  Engine (98)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Extract (40)  |  First (1283)  |  Gate (32)  |  Green (63)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Injection (9)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Invention (369)  |  Large (394)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Thomas Newcomen (2)  |  Old (481)  |  Pass (238)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Small (477)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

I had this experience at the age of eight. My parents gave me a microscope. I don’t recall why, but no matter. I then found my own little world, completely wild and unconstrained, no plastic, no teacher, no books, no anything predictable. At first I did not know the names of the water-drop denizens or what they were doing. But neither did the pioneer microscopists. Like them, I graduated to looking at butterfly scales and other miscellaneous objects. I never thought of what I was doing in such a way, but it was pure science. As true as could be of any child so engaged, I was kin to Leeuwenhoek, who said that his work “was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more that most other men.”
In The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth (2010), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Book (392)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completely (135)  |  Craving (5)  |  Drop (76)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Kin (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Praise (26)  |  Predictability (7)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reside (25)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unconstrained (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I have always found small mammals enough like ourselves to feel that I could understand what their lives would be like, and yet different enough to make it a sort of adventure and exploration to see what they were doing.
Echoes of Bats and Men (1959), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likeness (18)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

I have from my childhood, in conformity with the precepts of a mother void of all imaginary fear, been in the constant habit of taking toads in my hand, and applying them to my nose and face as it may happen. My motive for doing this very frequently is to inculcate the opinion I have held, since I was told by my mother, that the toad is actually a harmless animal; and to whose manner of life man is certainly under some obligation as its food is chiefly those insects which devour his crops and annoy him in various ways.
Letter to an unknown correspondent, quoted by Bowdler Sharpe, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1900), Vol. 1, 69. In Averil M. Lysaght, Joseph Banks in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1766: his Diary, Manuscripts, and Collections (1971), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Biography (240)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Constant (144)  |  Crop (25)  |  Devour (29)  |  Face (212)  |  Fear (197)  |  Food (199)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happen (274)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nose (11)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Precept (10)  |  Toad (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Void (31)  |  Way (1217)

I hope you enjoy the absence of pupils … the total oblivion of them for definite intervals is a necessary condition for doing them justice at the proper time.
Letter to Lewis Campbell (21 Apr 1862). In P.M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1990), Vol. 1, 712.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  Definite (110)  |  Hope (299)  |  Interval (13)  |  Justice (39)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Proper (144)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)

I mean, if 10 years from now, when you are doing something quick and dirty, you suddenly visualize that I am looking over your shoulders and say to yourself ‘Dijkstra would not have liked this’, well, that would be enough immortality for me.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dirty (17)  |  Enough (340)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mean (809)  |  Quick (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Something (719)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Visualize (8)  |  Year (933)

I never did anything worth doing entirely by accident and none of my inventions came about totally by accident. They came about by hard work.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Invention (369)  |  Never (1087)  |  Totally (5)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

I often say that research is a way of finding out what you are going to do when you can't keep on doing what you are doing now.
'Industrial Prospecting', an address to the Founder Societies of Engineers (20 May 1935). In National Research Council, Reprint and Circular Series of the National Research Council (1933), No. 107, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Way (1217)

I read them. Not to grade them. No, I read them to see how I am doing. Where am I failing? What don’t they understand? Why do they give wrong answers? Why do they have some point of view that I don’t think is right? Where am I failing? Where do I need to build up.
In The Essential Deming.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Build (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fail (185)  |  Grade (11)  |  Monitor (7)  |  Need (290)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Read (287)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  View (488)  |  Why (491)  |  Wrong (234)

I spend a great deal of the hours that I’m awake within myself. You never want to stop doing it, especially when it’s a pleasure. It’s vital to my existence and I couldn’t live if I wasn’t an inventor.
Quoted in Timothy L. O’Brien, 'Not Invented here: Are U.S. Innovators Losing Their Competitive Edge?', New York Times (13 Nov 2005), B6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awake (19)  |  Deal (188)  |  Existence (456)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Live (628)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Spend (95)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Vital (85)  |  Want (497)

I suppose I should be run after for a professorship if I had studied at Giessen, as it seems to be a settled point that no young man can be expected to know anything of chemistry unless he has studied with Liebig; while the truth is, that any one who goes there and does not afterwards correct the bad habits acquired there, in some other laboratory, is almost unfitted for doing things in Chemistry. No doubt Liebig is a remarkable man, who has done much for organic Chemistry, not to speak of his having quarreled with all the Chemists in Europe...
Letter to his brother, William Dwight Whitney (25 Apr 1846). In Edwin Tenney Brewster and Josiah Dwight Whitney, Life and Letters of Josiah Dwight Whitney (1909), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Expect (200)  |  Habit (168)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Man (2251)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Run (174)  |  Settled (34)  |  Speak (232)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Young (227)

I thought existing zoo programmes were really not doing animals justice. They all looked like oddities, like bizarre stage things, when, really, in their own environment, they are wonderful answers to very complex questions.
Explaining his motivation for his earliest groundbreaking Zoo Quest nature TV series featuring on location filming. From interview with Alice Roberts, 'Attenborough: My Life on Earth', The Biologist (Aug 2015), 62, No. 4, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Complex (188)  |  Environment (216)  |  Justice (39)  |  Look (582)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Program (52)  |  Question (621)  |  Stage (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Zoo (8)

I trust and believe that the time spent in this voyage … will produce its full worth in Natural History; and it appears to me the doing what little we can to increase the general stock of knowledge is as respectable an object of life, as one can in any likelihood pursue.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1888), 245.
Science quotes on:  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Increase (210)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Object (422)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Spent (85)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trust (66)  |  Voyage Of The Beagle (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)

I was just so interested in what I was doing I could hardly wait to get up in the morning and get at it. One of my friends, a geneticist, said I was a child, because only children can't wait to get up in the morning to get at what they want to do.
Quoted in Evelyn Fox Keller, A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock (1984), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Career (75)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Interest (386)  |  Morning (94)  |  Research (664)  |  Want (497)

I was unable to devote myself to the learning of this al-jabr [algebra] and the continued concentration upon it, because of obstacles in the vagaries of Time which hindered me; for we have been deprived of all the people of knowledge save for a group, small in number, with many troubles, whose concern in life is to snatch the opportunity, when Time is asleep, to devote themselves meanwhile to the investigation and perfection of a science; for the majority of people who imitate philosophers confuse the true with the false, and they do nothing but deceive and pretend knowledge, and they do not use what they know of the sciences except for base and material purposes; and if they see a certain person seeking for the right and preferring the truth, doing his best to refute the false and untrue and leaving aside hypocrisy and deceit, they make a fool of him and mock him.
A. P. Youschkevitch and B. A. Rosenfeld, 'Al-Khayyami', in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol. 7, 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Best (459)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deceit (7)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fool (116)  |  Hinder (12)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Use (766)

I wasn’t aware of Chargaff’s rules when he said them, but the effect on me was quite electric because I realized immediately that if you had this sort of scheme that John Griffith was proposing, of adenine being paired with thymine, and guanine being paired with cytosine, then you should get Chargaff’s rules.
I was very excited, but I didn’t actually tell Chargaff because it was something I was doing with John Griffith. There was a sort of musical comedy effect where I forgot what the bases were and I had to go to the library to check, and I went back to John Griffith to find out which places he said. Low and behold, it turned out that John Griffith’s ideas fitted in with Chargaff’s rules!
This was very exciting, and we thought “ah ha!” and we realized—I mean what anyone who is familiar with the history of science ought to realize—that when you have one-to-one ratios, it means things go to together. And how on Earth no one pointed out this simple fact in those years, I don’t know.
From Transcript of documentary by VSM Productions, The DNA Story (1973). As excerpted on web page 'Chargaff’s Rules', Linus Pauling and the Race for DNA on website scarc.library.oregonstate.edu
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adenine (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Comedy (4)  |  Cytosine (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Guanine (4)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Library (48)  |  Low (80)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Pair (9)  |  Point (580)  |  Propose (23)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thymine (5)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Year (933)

I worked for many years in almost total obscurity doing what I thought was interesting.
In interview with Associated Press, as quoted in Sean Trembath, 'Chemist Henry Taube Was Saskatchewan's First Nobel Laureate', Saskatoon StarPhoenix (5 Jan 2017)
Science quotes on:  |  Interesting (153)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I wrote a fair amount of poetry in college. It was really, really bad. I mean, bad. And that’s how I found out—by doing it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amount (151)  |  Bad (180)  |  College (66)  |  Fair (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Mean (809)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Really (78)  |  Write (230)

I'm not a wizard or a Frankenstein tampering with Nature. We are not creating life. We have merely done what many people try to do in all kinds of medicine—to help nature. We found nature could not put an egg and sperm together, so we did it. We do not see anything immoral in doing that in the interests of the mother. I cannot see anything immoral in trying to help the patient’s problem.
As quoted by thr Associated Press after the birth of Louise Brown, the first baby born by in vitro fertilization. Reprinted in, for example,'First test-tube baby born in England', Toledo Blade (27 Jul 1978), 1. As reported, the first sentence was given in its own quote marks, followed by “Dr. Steptoe said,” so the quote may not have been delivered as a single statement.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Frankenstein (3)  |  Help (105)  |  Immoral (5)  |  Immorality (7)  |  In Vitro (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Sperm (7)  |  Tamper (6)  |  Tampering (3)  |  Together (387)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Wizard (4)

If a mathematician wishes to disparage the work of one of his colleagues, say, A, the most effective method he finds for doing this is to ask where the results can be applied. The hard pressed man, with his back against the wall, finally unearths the researches of another mathematician B as the locus of the application of his own results. If next B is plagued with a similar question, he will refer to another mathematician C. After a few steps of this kind we find ourselves referred back to the researches of A, and in this way the chain closes.
From final remarks in 'The Semantic Conception of Truth and the Foundations of Semantics' (1944), collected in Leonard Linsky (ed.), Semantics and the Philosophy of Language: A Collection of Readings (1952), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Chain (50)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Disparage (5)  |  Effective (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Hard (243)  |  Kind (557)  |  Locus (5)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Step (231)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

If a research project is not worth doing at all, it is not worth doing properly.
Anonymous
Saying.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Project (73)  |  Research (664)  |  Worth (169)

If I were working in astrophysics I would find it quite hard to explain to people what I was doing. Natural history is a pretty easy thing to explain. It does have its complexities, but nowhere do you speak about things that are outside people’s experience. You might speak about a species that is outside their experience, but nothing as remote as astrophysics.
From interview with Michael Bond, 'It’s a Wonderful Life', New Scientist (14 Dec 2002), 176, No. 2373, 48.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easy (204)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Hard (243)  |  History (673)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Remote (83)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Thing (1915)

If Louis Pasteur were to come out of his grave because he heard that the cure for cancer still had not been found, NIH would tell him, “Of course we'll give you assistance. Now write up exactly what you will be doing during the three years of your grant.” Pasteur would say, “Thank you very much,” and would go back to his grave. Why? Because research means going into the unknown. If you know what you are going to do in science, then you are stupid! This is like telling Michelangelo or Renoir that he must tell you in advance how many reds and how many blues he will buy, and exactly how he will put those colors together.
Interview for Saturday Evening Post (Jan/Feb 1981), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Blue (56)  |  Buonarroti_Michelangelo (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Color (137)  |  Course (409)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Giving (11)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paint (22)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Red (35)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Together (387)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)  |  Years (5)

If our intention had been merely to bring back a handful of soil and rocks from the lunar gravel pit and then forget the whole thing, we would certainly be history's biggest fools. But that is not our intention now—it never will be. What we are seeking in tomorrow's [Apollo 11] trip is indeed that key to our future on earth. We are expanding the mind of man. We are extending this God-given brain and these God-given hands to their outermost limits and in so doing all mankind will benefit. All mankind will reap the harvest…. What we will have attained when Neil Armstrong steps down upon the moon is a completely new step in the evolution of man.
Banquet speech on the eve of the Apollo 11 launch, Royal Oaks Country Club, Titusville (15 Jul 1969). In "Of a Fire on the Moon", Life (29 Aug 1969), 67, No. 9, 34.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Neil Armstrong (16)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Back (390)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Fool (116)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Handful (13)  |  Harvest (27)  |  History (673)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intention (46)  |  Key (50)  |  Limit (280)  |  Lunar (9)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moon (237)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Pit (19)  |  Reap (17)  |  Reaping (4)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Soil (86)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Trip (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

If the earth’s population continues to double every 50 years (as it is now doing) then by 2550 A.D. it will have increased 3,000-fold. … by 2800 A.D., it would reach 630,000 billion! Our planet would have standing room only, for there would be only two-and-a-half square feet per person on the entire land surface, including Greenland and Antarctica. In fact, if the human species could be imagined as continuing to multiply further at the same rate, by 4200 A.D. the total mass of human tissue would be equal to the mass of the earth.
In The Intelligent Man's Guide to Science: The Biological Sciences (1960), 117. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 237.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Billion (95)  |  Continue (165)  |  Double (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Greenland (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Increase (210)  |  Land (115)  |  Mass (157)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Person (363)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Total (94)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

If there is a wrong way to do something, then someone will do it.
[Subsequently became known as Murphy's Law: “If anything can go wrong, it will.”]
As quoted in Robert L. Forward, 'Murphy Lives!', Science (Jan-Feb 1983), 83, 78. Short form in J.A. Simpson (ed), The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (1982).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Murphy’s Law (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Technology (257)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

If there’s more than one way to do a job and one of those ways will end in disaster, then somebody will do it that way.
[Early statement of what became known as Murphy's Law.]
As quoted in People (31 Jan 1983), 82. Also in Nick T. Spark, A History of Murphy's Law (2006), 47. Nick T. Spark - Humor - 2006
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Job (82)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Murphy’s Law (4)  |  Somebody (8)  |  Statement (142)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

If we can get kids talking about conservation and doing it, they can have a great influence on their parents by lecturing them and pointing the finger.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Finger (44)  |  Great (1574)  |  Influence (222)  |  Kid (15)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Parent (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)

If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)

If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn’t be called research, would it?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)

If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn’t be research.
Anonymous
Seen in various publications attributed—but without citation—to Albert Einstein. Also seen attributed to J.C. Stamos. Webmaster is doubtful, and is placing it under Anonymous. But, if you know the primary print source, perhaps in different wording, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Quip (80)  |  Research (664)

If we lived on a planet where nothing ever changed, there would be little to do. There would be nothing to figure out. There would be no impetus for science. And if we lived in an unpredictable world, where things changed in random or very complex ways, we would not be able to figure things out. But we live in an in-between universe, where things change, but according to patterns, rules, or as we call them, laws of nature. If I throw a stick up in the air, it always falls down. If the sun sets in the west, it always rises again the next morning in the east. And so it becomes possible to figure things out. We can do science, and with it we can improve our lives.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Fall (230)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possible (552)  |  Random (41)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Stick (24)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throw (43)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  Way (1217)  |  West (17)  |  World (1774)

If what we are doing is not seen by some people as science fiction, it’s probably not transformative enough.
Explaining his enthusiasm for a laboratory experiment to grow a meat patty from cells in the lab, for which he contributed more than $330,000. In Alan Boyle, 'Google’s Sergey Brin explains why he paid $330,000 for lab burger', nbcnews.com website, (5 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Enough (340)  |  People (1005)  |  Probably (49)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Transformation (69)

If you are young, then I say: Learn something about statistics as soon as you can. Don’t dismiss it through ignorance or because it calls for thought. … If you are older and already crowned with the laurels of success, see to it that those under your wing who look to you for advice are encouraged to look into this subject. In this way you will show that your arteries are not yet hardened, and you will be able to reap the benefits without doing overmuch work yourself. Whoever you are, if your work calls for the interpretation of data, you may be able to do without statistics, but you won’t do as well.
In Facts from Figures (1951), 463.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Already (222)  |  Artery (10)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Call (769)  |  Crown (38)  |  Data (156)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Hardened (2)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Laurel (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Older (7)  |  Reap (17)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

If you cannot—in the long run—tell everyone what you have been doing, your doing has been worthless.
Concluding remark of the first of four public lectures for the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies at University College, Dublin (Feb 1950), 'The Spiritual Bearing of Science on Life', collected in Science and Humanism: Physics in Our Time (1951). Reprinted in 'Nature and the Greeks' and 'Science and Humanism' (1996), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Long (790)  |  Run (174)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Worthless (21)

If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you’re doing.
Widely quoted, without citation. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Describe (128)  |  Know (1518)  |  Process (423)

If you do something, it’s worth doing well; except to bureaucrats. to them, if you do something, it’s worth doing cheaply.
Aphorism as given by the fictional character Dezhnev Senior, in Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 170.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Do (1908)  |  Something (719)  |  Worth (169)

If you don’t wake up at three in the morning and want to do something, you’re wasting your time.
As quoted in J. Kim Vandiver and Pagan Kennedy, 'Harold Eugene Edgerton', Biographical Memoirs (National Academy of Sciences, 2005), Vol. 86, 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Morning (94)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Waking (17)  |  Want (497)  |  Waste (101)

If you dream of something worth doing and then simply go to work on it and don't think anything of personalities, or emotional conflicts, or of money, or of family distractions; if you think of, detail by detail, what you have to do next, it is a wonderful dream even though the end is a long way off, for there are about five thousand steps to be taken before we realize it; and [when you] start taking the first ten, and ... twenty after that, it is amazing how quickly you get through through the four thousand [nine hundred] and ninety. The last ten steps you never seem to work out. But you keep on coming nearer to giving the world something.
Victor K. McElheny, Insisting on the Impossible (1999), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Detail (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  End (590)  |  Family (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Money (170)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Realize (147)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Step (231)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

If you have a lot of loose papers to carry, or sticks of kindling-wood, you will do it more easily if they are tied together in a single bundle. That is what the scientist is always doing, tying up fugitive facts into compact and portable packages.
In Chats on Science (1924), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Bundle (7)  |  Carry (127)  |  Compact (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fugitive (3)  |  Loose (14)  |  Lot (151)  |  More (2559)  |  Package (6)  |  Paper (182)  |  Portable (3)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Stick (24)  |  Together (387)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)

In all spheres of science, art, skill, and handicraft it is never doubted that, in order to master them, a considerable amount of trouble must be spent in learning and in being trained. As regards philosophy, on the contrary, there seems still an assumption prevalent that, though every one with eyes and fingers is not on that account in a position to make shoes if he only has leather and a last, yet everybody understands how to philosophize straight away, and pass judgment on philosophy, simply because he possesses the criterion for doing so in his natural reason.
From Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) as translated by J.B. Baillie in 'Preface', The Phenomenology of Mind (1910), Vol. 1, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Art (657)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Being (1278)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Eye (419)  |  Finger (44)  |  Handicraft (3)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Leather (4)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Possess (156)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spent (85)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Straight (73)  |  Train (114)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)

In an era in which the domain of intellect and politics were almost exclusively male, Theon [her father] was an unusually liberated person who taught an unusually gifted daughter [Hypatia] and encouraged her to achieve things that, as far as we know, no woman before her did or perhaps even dreamed of doing.
From 'Hypatia', in Louise S. Grinstein (ed.), Women of Mathematics, (1987), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Domain (69)  |  Dream (208)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Era (51)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Father (110)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Liberated (2)  |  Male (26)  |  Person (363)  |  Politics (112)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theon (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Woman (151)

In ancient days two aviators procured to themselves wings. Daedalus flew safely through the middle air and was duly honored on his landing. Icarus soared upwards to the sun till the wax melted which bound his wings and his flight ended in fiasco. In weighing their achievements, there is something to be said for Icarus. The classical authorities tell us that he was only “doing a stunt,” but I prefer to think of him as the man who brought to light a serious constructional defect in the flying machines of his day.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Classical (45)  |  Defect (31)  |  End (590)  |  Fiasco (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Honor (54)  |  Icarus (2)  |  Light (607)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melt (16)  |  Serious (91)  |  Soar (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wax (13)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wing (75)

In my own field, x-ray crystallography, we used to work out the structure of minerals by various dodges which we never bothered to write down, we just used them. Then Linus Pauling came along to the laboratory, saw what we were doing and wrote out what we now call Pauling's Rules. We had all been using Pauling's Rules for about three or four years before Pauling told us what the rules were.
In The Extension of Man (1972), 116.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Field (364)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Never (1087)  |  Linus Pauling (60)  |  Ray (114)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  Structure (344)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)  |  Year (933)

In science men have discovered an activity of the very highest value in which they are no longer, as in art, dependent for progress upon the appearance of continually greater genius, for in science the successors stand upon the shoulders of their predecessors; where one man of supreme genius has invented a method, a thousand lesser men can apply it. … In art nothing worth doing can be done without genius; in science even a very moderate capacity can contribute to a supreme achievement.
Essay, 'The Place Of Science In A Liberal Education.' In Mysticism and Logic: and Other Essays (1919), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Activity (210)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Art (657)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Discover (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Greater (288)  |  Invention (369)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Stand (274)  |  Successor (14)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Value (365)  |  Worth (169)

In terms of doing things I take a fairly scientific approach to why things happen and how they happen. I don't know if there's a god or not, but I think religious principles are quite valid.
PBS interview with David Frost (Nov 1995). In Lisa Rogak (ed.) The Impatient Optimist - Bill Gates in his Words (2012), 107.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  God (757)  |  Happen (274)  |  Know (1518)  |  Principle (507)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)

In the 1860s, Pasteur not only applied his germ theory to create “Pasteurization,” rescuing France’s wine and vinegar industries, but also found both the cause and cure of silkworm disease, saving growers millions of dollars. When Napoleon asked the scientist why he had not legitimately profited by his findings, Pasteur replied: “In France scientists would consider they lowered themselves by doing so.”
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 190.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ask (411)  |  Boneparte_Napoleon (2)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dollar (22)  |  France (27)  |  Germ (53)  |  Germ Theory (2)  |  Industry (137)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Lower (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Profit (52)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Why (491)  |  Wine (38)

In the modern interpretation of Mendelism, facts are being transformed into factors at a rapid rate. If one factor will not explain the facts, then two are involved; if two prove insufficient, three will sometimes work out. The superior jugglery sometimes necessary to account for the results may blind us, if taken too naively, to the common-place that the results are often so excellently 'explained' because the explanation was invented to explain them. We work backwards from the facts to the factors, and then, presto! explain the facts by the very factors that we invented to account for them. I am not unappreciative of the distinct advantages that this method has in handling the facts. I realize how valuable it has been to us to be able to marshal our results under a few simple assumptions, yet I cannot but fear that we are rapidly developing a sort of Mendelian ritual by which to explain the extraordinary facts of alternative inheritance. So long as we do not lose sight of the purely arbitrary and formal nature of our formulae, little harm will be done; and it is only fair to state that those who are doing the actual work of progress along Mendelian lines are aware of the hypothetical nature of the factor-assumption.
'What are 'Factors' in Mendelian Explanations?', American Breeders Association (1909), 5, 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Common (436)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Involved (90)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Superior (81)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In these strenuous times, we are likely to become morbid and look constantly on the dark side of life, and spend entirely too much time considering and brooding over what we can't do, rather than what we can do, and instead of growing morose and despondent over opportunities either real or imaginary that are shut from us, let us rejoice at the many unexplored fields in which there is unlimited fame and fortune to the successful explorer and upon which there is no color line; simply the survival of the fittest.
In article urging African-Americans to engage in plant breeding to develop improved species.'A New Industry for Colored Men and Women', Colored American (Jan 1908, 14, 33. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dark (140)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Fame (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Growing (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Morbid (3)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Spend (95)  |  Strenuous (5)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unlimited (22)

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Expect (200)  |  Insanity (8)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Thing (1915)

Into whatsoever houses I enter, I will enter to help the sick, and I will abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm, especially from abusing the bodies of man or woman, bond or free. And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession, as well as outside my profession in my intercourse with men, if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets.
Oath, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 1, 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Abstain (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Bond (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Enter (141)  |  Free (232)  |  Hear (139)  |  Holy (34)  |  House (140)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physician (273)  |  Profession (99)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Sick (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Wrong (234)

Investigators are commonly said to be engaged in a search for the truth. I think they themselves would usually state their aims less pretentiously. What the experimenter is really trying to do is to learn whether facts can be established which will be recognized as facts by others and which will support some theory that in imagination he has projected. But he must be ingenuously honest. He must face facts as they arise in the course of experimental procedure, whether they are favourable to his idea or not. In doing this he must be ready to surrender his theory at any time if the facts are adverse to it.
The Way of an Investigator: A Scientist's Experiences in Medical Research (1945), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Arise (158)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Learn (629)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Project (73)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Search (162)  |  State (491)  |  Support (147)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers: you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age.
Perhaps one of the reasons for this silence is that you have to know how to read music. For instance, the scientific article may say, “The radioactive phosphorus content of the cerebrum of the rat decreases to one-half in a period of two weeks.” Now what does that mean?
It means that phosphorus that is in the brain of a rat—and also in mine, and yours—is not the same phosphorus as it was two weeks ago. It means the atoms that are in the brain are being replaced: the ones that were there before have gone away.
So what is this mind of ours: what are these atoms with consciousness? Last week’s potatoes! They now can remember what was going on in my mind a year ago—a mind which has long ago been replaced. To note that the thing I call my individuality is only a pattern or dance, that is what it means when one discovers how long it takes for the atoms of the brain to be replaced by other atoms. The atoms come into my brain, dance a dance, and then go out—there are always new atoms, but always doing the same dance, remembering what the dance was yesterday.
'What do You Care What Other People Think?' Further Adventures of a Curious Character (1988), 244.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Cerebrum (10)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Dance (32)  |  Discover (553)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Music (129)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Period (198)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poem (96)  |  Present (619)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Rat (37)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Silence (56)  |  Song (37)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unsung (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)  |  Yesterday (36)

Is what you are doing fun? Of course, physics is also fun—indeed it is an enjoyable way of life. One reason physics is fun is that each element of progress transforms an area of ignorance into knowledge, but it also creates, as a by-product, an amount of new and additional ignorance in excess of that which was reduced to understanding. Thus, the volume of delicious ignorance we produce is ever-expanding, like our exponentially exploding universe.
In 'Physics and the APS in 1979', Physics Today (Apr 1980), 33, No. 4, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  By-Product (7)  |  Course (409)  |  Create (235)  |  Element (310)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Excess (22)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fun (38)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  New (1216)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Product (160)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Transform (73)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)

It appears, nevertheless, that all such simple solutions of the problem of vertebrate ancestry are without warrant. They arise from a very common tendency of the mind, against which the naturalist has to guard himself,—a tendency which finds expression in the very widespread notion that the existing anthropoid apes, and more especially the gorilla, must be looked upon as the ancestors of mankind, if once the doctrine of the descent of man from ape-like forefathers is admitted. A little reflexion suffices to show that any given living form, such as the gorilla, cannot possibly be the ancestral form from which man was derived, since ex-hypothesi that ancestral form underwent modification and development, and in so doing, ceased to exist.
'Vertebrata', entry in Encyclopaedia Britannica, 9th edition (1899), Vol. 24, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arise (158)  |  Common (436)  |  Descent (27)  |  Descent Of Man (6)  |  Development (422)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Notion (113)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Warrant (8)  |  Widespread (22)

It has been said that computing machines can only carry out the processes that they are instructed to do. This is certainly true in the sense that if they do something other than what they were instructed then they have just made some mistake. It is also true that the intention in constructing these machines in the first instance is to treat them as slaves, giving them only jobs which have been thought out in detail, jobs such that the user of the machine fully understands what in principle is going on all the time. Up till the present machines have only been used in this way. But is it necessary that they should always be used in such a manner? Let us suppose we have set up a machine with certain initial instruction tables, so constructed that these tables might on occasion, if good reason arose, modify those tables. One can imagine that after the machine had been operating for some time, the instructions would have altered out of all recognition, but nevertheless still be such that one would have to admit that the machine was still doing very worthwhile calculations. Possibly it might still be getting results of the type desired when the machine was first set up, but in a much more efficient manner. In such a case one would have to admit that the progress of the machine had not been foreseen when its original instructions were put in. It would be like a pupil who had learnt much from his master, but had added much more by his own work. When this happens I feel that one is obliged to regard the machine as showing intelligence.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 122-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construct (124)  |  Detail (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intention (46)  |  Job (82)  |  Machine (257)  |  Master (178)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthwhile (18)

It is a sign of our power, and our criminal folly, that we can pollute the vast ocean and are doing so.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Criminal (19)  |  Folly (43)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Power (746)  |  Sign (58)  |  Vast (177)

It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works—that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light, that transparent air reflects light, that in so doing it discriminates among the waves, and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it.
Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space (1994), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blue (56)  |  Color (137)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Figure (160)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Passion (114)  |  Reason (744)  |  Red (35)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Research (664)  |  Romance (15)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Understand (606)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wavelength (8)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  White Light (5)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It may be said “In research, if you know what you are doing, then you shouldn't be doing it.” In a sense, if the answer turns out to be exactly what you expected, then you have learned nothing new, although you may have had your confidence increased somewhat.
In Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1973), 704.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Increase (210)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Research (664)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sense (770)  |  Turn (447)

It would be well if engineering were less generally thought of, and even defined, as the art of constructing. In a certain important sense it is rather the art of not constructing; or, to define it rudely but not inaptly, it is the art of doing that well with one dollar, which any bungler can do with two after a fashion.
From The Economic Theory of the Location of Railways (1887, 1914), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Bungler (2)  |  Certain (550)  |  Construction (112)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)

It’s no trick to get the right answer when you have all the data. The real creative trick is to get the right answer when you have only half of the data in hand and half of it is wrong and you don't know which half is wrong. When you get the right answer under these circumstances, you are doing something creative.
In autobiography, Following the Trail of Light: A Scientific Odyssey (1992), 134.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Creative (137)  |  Data (156)  |  Half (56)  |  Know (1518)  |  Right (452)  |  Something (719)  |  Trick (35)  |  Wrong (234)

I’m doing my part, building plants at a record rate, having historic conservation levels. The only people not doing their part is the federal government that is siding with the energy companies against the interests of the people of California.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  California (9)  |  Company (59)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Energy (344)  |  Federal (6)  |  Government (110)  |  Historic (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Level (67)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Plant (294)  |  Rate (29)  |  Record (154)  |  Side (233)

I’ve met a lot of people in important positions, and he [Wernher von Braun] was one that I never had any reluctance to give him whatever kind of credit they deserve. He owned his spot, he knew what he was doing, and he was very impressive when you met with him. He understood the problems. He could come back and straighten things out. He moved with sureness whenever he came up with a decision. Of all the people, as I think back on it now, all of the top management that I met at NASA, many of them are very, very good. But Wernher, relative to the position he had and what he had to do, I think was the best of the bunch.
From interview with Ron Stone (24 May 1999) for NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Wernher von Braun (29)  |  Credit (20)  |  Decision (91)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lot (151)  |  Management (21)  |  Manager (6)  |  NASA (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Spot (17)  |  Sureness (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Top (96)  |  Understood (156)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whenever (81)

Leadership is doing what is right when no one is watching.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Leadership (9)  |  Right (452)  |  Watch (109)

Leo Szilard’s Ten Commandments:
1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men, so that you may know what you are doing.
2. Let your acts be directed towards a worthy goal, but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not means to an end.
3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world; lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out of sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of the creation.
4. Do not destroy what you cannot create.
5. Touch no dish, except that you are hungry.
6. Do not covet what you cannot have.
7. Do not lie without need.
8. Honor children. Listen reverently to their words and speak to them with infinite love.
9. Do your work for six years; but in the seventh, go into solitude or among strangers, so that the memory of your friends does not hinder you from being what you have become.
10. Lead your life with a gentle hand and be ready to leave whenever you are called.
Circulated by Mrs. Szilard in July 1964, in a letter to their friends (translated by Dr. Jacob Bronowski). As printed in Robert J. Levine, Ethics and Regulation of Clinical Research (1988), 431.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Call (769)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Connection (162)  |  Covet (2)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Example (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hinder (12)  |  Honor (54)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Lose (159)  |  Love (309)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Model (102)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Reach (281)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solitude (18)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Let me suggest to you a simple test one can apply to scientific activities to determine whether or not they can constitute the practice of physics. Is what you are doing beautiful? Many beautiful things are created without the use of physical knowledge, but I know of no really worthwhile physics that isn’t beautiful. Indeed, one of the most distressing symptoms of scientific illiteracy is the impression so often given to school children that science is a mechanistic activity subject to algorithmic description.
In 'Physics and the APS in 1979', Physics Today (Apr 1980), 33, No. 4, 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Children (200)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Determine (144)  |  Illiteracy (7)  |  Impression (114)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practice (204)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Worthwhile (18)

Let Nature do your bottling and your pickling and preserving. For all Nature is doing her best each moment to make us well. She exists for no other end. Do not resist her. With the least inclination to be well, we should not be sick. Men have discovered—or think they have discovered—the salutariness of a few wild things only, and not of all nature. Why, “nature” is but another name for health, and the seasons are but different states of health. Some men think that they are not well in spring, or summer, or autumn, or winter; it is only because they are not well in them.
(23 Aug 1853). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: V: March 5-November 30, 1853 (1906), 395.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Autumn (9)  |  Best (459)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Health (193)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Moment (253)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pickle (3)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Resist (15)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spring (133)  |  State (491)  |  Summer (54)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Winter (44)

Life is inseparable from water. For all terrestrial animals, including birds, the inescapable need for maintaining an adequate state of hydration in a hostile, desiccating environment is a central persistent constraint which exerts a sustained selective pressure on every aspect of the life cycle. It has been said, with some justification, that the struggle for existence is a struggle for free energy for doing physiological work. It can be said with equal justification for terrestrial organisms that the struggle for existence is a struggle to maintain an aqueous internal environment in which energy transformations for doing work can take place.
In 'The water economy of seed-eating birds that survive without drinking', Proceedings of the International Ornithological Congress (1972), 15, 237-238.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aqueous (8)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bird (149)  |  Central (80)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Energy (344)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exert (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Free (232)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Include (90)  |  Inescapable (7)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Internal (66)  |  Justification (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Need (290)  |  Organism (220)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Place (177)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Say (984)  |  Selective (19)  |  State (491)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Water (481)  |  Work (1351)

Life is too short to do the things you don’t love doing.
As quoted on imdb.com biography page for Bruce Dickinson. Webmaster has not yet found a primary source for this quote. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Short (197)  |  Thing (1915)

Like Molière’s M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole’s The Mathematical Analysis of Logic.
Co-authored with James R. Newman in Gödel's Proof (1986, 2005), 30.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Aware (31)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  George Boole (10)  |  Craft (10)  |  Evident (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Life (1795)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prose (11)  |  Publication (101)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recent (77)  |  Renaissance (14)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Underlying (30)

Lubin's Law: If another scientist thought your research was more important than his, he would drop what he is doing and do what you are doing.
Anonymous
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thought (953)

Mankind is drawn to the heavens for the same reason we were once drawn into unknown lands and across the open sea. We choose to explore space because doing so improves our lives, and lifts our national spirit. So let us continue the journey.
Conclusion of speech, NASA Headquarters (14 Jan 2004). In Office of the Federal Register (U.S.) Staff (eds.), Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, George W. Bush (2007), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Continue (165)  |  Drawn (2)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Improve (58)  |  Journey (42)  |  Land (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Open (274)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sea (308)  |  Space (500)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Unknown (182)

Mars is the next frontier, what the Wild West was, what America was 500 years ago. It’s time to strike out anew. Mars is where the action is for the next thousand years. The characteristic of human nature, and perhaps our simian branch of the family, is curiosity and exploration. When we stop doing that, we won’t be humans anymore. I’ve seen far more in my lifetime than I ever dreamed. Many of our problems on Earth can only be solved by space technology. The next step is in space. It’s inevitable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  America (127)  |  Anew (18)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Branch (150)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Family (94)  |  Far (154)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mars (44)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Simian (2)  |  Solve (130)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Stop (80)  |  Strike (68)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wild West (2)  |  Year (933)

Mathematics is being lazy. Mathematics is letting the principles do the work for you so that you do not have to do the work for yourself
In Marion Walter and Tom O'Brien, 'Memories of George Polya', Mathematics Teaching (Sep 1986), 116, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Do (1908)  |  Laziness (8)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Principle (507)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yourself (7)

Mathematics … above all other subjects, makes the student lust after knowledge, fills him, as it were, with a longing to fathom the cause of things and to employ his own powers independently; it collects his mental forces and concentrates them on a single point and thus awakens the spirit of individual inquiry, self-confidence and the joy of doing; it fascinates because of the view-points which it offers and creates certainty and assurance, owing to the universal validity of its methods. Thus, both what he receives and what he himself contributes toward the proper conception and solution of a problem, combine to mature the student and to make him skillful, to lead him away from the surface of things and to exercise him in the perception of their essence. A student thus prepared thirsts after knowledge and is ready for the university and its sciences. Thus it appears, that higher mathematics is the best guide to philosophy and to the philosophic conception of the world (considered as a self-contained whole) and of one’s own being.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 40. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 49.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Collect (16)  |  Combine (57)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Create (235)  |  Employ (113)  |  Essence (82)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Fill (61)  |  Force (487)  |  Guide (97)  |  Himself (461)  |  Independently (24)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Lust (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mature (16)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophic (5)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proper (144)  |  Ready (39)  |  Receive (114)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Confidence (9)  |  Self-Contained (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Universal (189)  |  University (121)  |  Validity (47)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Mathematics, a creation of the mind, so accurately fits the outside world. … [There is a] fantastic amount of uniformity in the universe. The formulas of physics are compressed descriptions of nature's weird repetitions. The accuracy of those formulas, coupled with nature’s tireless ability to keep doing everything the same way, gives them their incredible power.
In book review, 'Adventures Of a Mathematician: The Man Who Invented the H-Bomb', New York Times (9 May 1976), 201. The book is a biography of Stanislaw Ulam, and this is Gardner’s description of one of Ulam’s reflections on nature and mathematics.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Amount (151)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Creation (327)  |  Description (84)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Fit (134)  |  Formula (98)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Power (746)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Same (157)  |  Tireless (5)  |  Stanislaw M. Ulam (7)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weird (3)  |  World (1774)

Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new,
That which they have done but earnest of the things which they shall do.
Stanza in poem 'Locksley Hall' (1842) in The Complete Works of Alfred Tennyson (1880), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Brother (43)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earnest (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  Reaping (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Worker (31)

Mere infants of the universe, with no feel for infinity, no sense of place in time and space, we human beings have yet to comprehend the enormity of what we are doing: In a geological second, we are unraveling complexities it took eternity to create.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Create (235)  |  Enormity (4)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Feel (367)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Infant (26)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Place (177)  |  Second (62)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unravel (14)

More and more of out colleagues fail to understand our work because of the high specialization of research problems. We must not be discouraged if the products of our labor are not read or even known to exist. The joy of research must be found in doing since every other harvest is uncertain.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Colleague (50)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Harvest (27)  |  High (362)  |  Joy (107)  |  Known (454)  |  Labor (107)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Product (160)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

Most people regard scientists as explorers … Imagine a handful of people shipwrecked on a strange island and setting out to explore it. One of them cuts a solitary path through the jungle, going on and on until he is exhausted or lost or both. He eventually returns to his companions, and they listen to him with goggling eyes as he describes what he saw; what he fell into, and what bit him. After a rest he demands more supplies and sets off again to explore the unknown. Many of his companions will be doing the same, each choosing his own direction and pursuing his pioneering path.
In The Development of Design (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Companion (19)  |  Cut (114)  |  Demand (123)  |  Describe (128)  |  Direction (175)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Eye (419)  |  Handful (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Island (46)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Lost (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Path (144)  |  People (1005)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strange (157)  |  Through (849)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

Mother: He’s been depressed. All of a sudden, he can’t do anything.
Doctor: Why are you depressed, Alvy?
Mother: Tell Dr. Flicker. It’s something he read.
Doctor: Something he read, huh?
Alvy: The universe is expanding.
Doctor: The universe is expanding?
Alvy: Well, the universe is everything, and if it’s expanding, someday it will break apart and that would be the end of everything!
Mother: What is that your business? He stopped doing his homework.
Alvy: What’s the point?
With co-author Marshall Brickman, Annie Hall (1973).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Break (99)  |  Business (149)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Mother (114)  |  Point (580)  |  Read (287)  |  Someday (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Tell (340)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Church (56)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Natural powers, principally those of steam and falling water, are subsidized and taken into human employment Spinning-machines, power-looms, and all the mechanical devices, acting, among other operatives, in the factories and work-shops, are but so many laborers. They are usually denominated labor-saving machines, but it would be more just to call them labor-doing machines. They are made to be active agents; to have motion, and to produce effect; and though without intelligence, they are guided by laws of science, which are exact and perfect, and they produce results, therefore, in general, more accurate than the human hand is capable of producing.
Speech in Senate (12 Mar 1838). In The Writings and Speeches of Daniel Webster (1903), Vol. 8, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Active (76)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Device (70)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employment (32)  |  Exact (68)  |  Factory (20)  |  Falling (6)  |  General (511)  |  Hand (143)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labor-Saving (3)  |  Laborer (7)  |  Law (894)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Operative (10)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Power (746)  |  Power Loom (2)  |  Principal (63)  |  Production (183)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Spinning Machine (2)  |  Steam (80)  |  Usually (176)  |  Water (481)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workshop (14)

Nature never makes excellent things, for mean or no uses: and it is hardly to be conceived, that our infinitely wise Creator, should make so admirable a Faculty, as the power of Thinking, that Faculty which comes nearest the Excellency of his own incomprehensible Being, to be so idlely and uselesly employ’d, at least 1/4 part of its time here, as to think constantly, without remembering any of those Thoughts, without doing any good to it self or others, or being anyway useful to any other part of Creation.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 1, Section 15, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Employ (113)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Good (889)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Self (267)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wise (131)

Nearly every subject has a shadow, or imitation. It would, I suppose, be quite possible to teach a deaf and dumb child to play the piano. When it played a wrong note, it would see the frown of its teacher, and try again. But it would obviously have no idea of what it was doing, or why anyone should devote hours to such an extraordinary exercise. It would have learnt an imitation of music. and it would fear the piano exactly as most students fear what is supposed to be mathematics.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Deaf (4)  |  Devote (35)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fear (197)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Note (34)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Piano (12)  |  Play (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Try (283)  |  Why (491)  |  Wrong (234)

Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Let (61)  |  Moral (195)  |  Never (1087)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Right (452)  |  Sense (770)

No scientist or student of science, need ever read an original work of the past. As a general rule, he does not think of doing so. Rutherford was one of the greatest experimental physicists, but no nuclear scientist today would study his researches of fifty years ago. Their substance has all been infused into the common agreement, the textbooks, the contemporary papers, the living present.
Attempting to distinguish between science and the humanities in which original works like Shakespeare's must be studied verbatim. 'The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case', (1970), reprinted in Public Affairs (1971), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Common (436)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Living (491)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Original (58)  |  Paper (182)  |  Past (337)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Nobody … took me seriously. They wondered why in the world I wanted to be a chemist when no women were doing that. The world was not waiting for me.
Quoted in interview by Mary Ellen Avery (1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (156)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Women Scientists (13)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

Nothing I then learned [in high school] had any bearing at all on the big and real questions. Who am I? What am I doing here? What is the world? What is my relationship to it?
This View of Life: the World of an Evolutionist (1964), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Relationship (104)  |  School (219)  |  World (1774)

Now I feel as if I should succeed in doing something in mathematics, although I cannot see why it is so very important… The knowledge doesn’t make life any sweeter or happier, does it?
In Letter (29 May 1898), at age almost 18, to Mrs. Lawrence Hutton, excerpted in The Story of My Life: With her Letters (1887-1901) (1903, 1921), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Feel (367)  |  Happy (105)  |  Important (209)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Why (491)

One can argue that mathematics is a human activity deeply rooted in reality, and permanently returning to reality. From counting on one’s fingers to moon-landing to Google, we are doing mathematics in order to understand, create, and handle things, … Mathematicians are thus more or less responsible actors of human history, like Archimedes helping to defend Syracuse (and to save a local tyrant), Alan Turing cryptanalyzing Marshal Rommel’s intercepted military dispatches to Berlin, or John von Neumann suggesting high altitude detonation as an efficient tactic of bombing.
In 'Mathematical Knowledge: Internal, Social and Cultural Aspects', Mathematics As Metaphor: Selected Essays (2007), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Altitude (4)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Counting (26)  |  Create (235)  |  Defend (30)  |  Detonation (2)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Finger (44)  |  Google (4)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intercept (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Military (40)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moon Landing (8)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Order (632)  |  Reality (261)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Alan M. Turing (8)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  Understand (606)

One has to do something new in order to see something new.
Aphorism from Notebook J (1789).
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)

One must learn by doing the thing; though you think you know it, you have no certainty until you try.
Sophocles
In play, 'Trachiniae', collected in George Young (trans.), The Dramas of Sophocles: Rendered in English Verse: Dramatic and Lyric (1916), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Must (1526)  |  Practice (204)  |  Self-Taught (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)

One of my guiding principles is don’t do anything that other people are doing. Always do something a little different if you can. The concept is that if you do it a little differently there is a greater potential for reward than if you the same thing that other people are doing. I think that this kind of goal for one’s work, having obviously the maximum risk, would have the maximum reward no matter what the field may be.
In transcript of a video history interview with Seymour Cray by David K. Allison at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, (9 May 1995), 29.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Concept (221)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Field (364)  |  Goal (145)  |  Greater (288)  |  Guide (97)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Potential (69)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reward (68)  |  Risk (61)  |  Same (157)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Work (1351)

One of my surgical giant friends had in his operating room a sign “If the operation is difficult, you aren’t doing it right.” What he meant was, you have to plan every operation You cannot ever be casual You have to realize that any operation is a potential fatality.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |  Casual (7)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Error (321)  |  Fatality (3)  |  Friend (168)  |  Giant (67)  |  Operation (213)  |  Plan (117)  |  Potential (69)  |  Realize (147)  |  Right (452)  |  Sign (58)  |  Surgeon (63)

One of the endearing things about mathematicians is the extent to which they will go to avoid doing any real work.
As quoted, without citation, in Howard W. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, (1988), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Extent (139)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Real (149)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

One of the greatest experimental scientists of the time who was really doing something, William Harvey, said that what Bacon said science was, was the science that a lord-chancellor would do. He [Bacon] spoke of making observations, but omitted the vital factor of judgment about what to observe and what to pay attention to.
From address (1966) at the 14th Annual Convention of the National Science Teachers Association, New York City, printed in 'What is science?', The Physics Teacher (1969), 7, No. 6, 321.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Chancellor (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Factor (46)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Lord (93)  |  Making (300)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)

One of the major goals when studying specific genetic diseases is to find the primary gene product, which in turn leads to a better understanding of the biochemical basis of the disorder. The bottom line often reads, 'This may lead to effective prenatal diagnosis and eventual eradication of the disease.' But we now have the ironic situation of being able to jump right to the bottom line without reading the rest of the page, that is, without needing to identify the primary gene product or the basic biochemical mechanism of the disease. The technical capability of doing this is now available. Since the degree of departure from our previous approaches and the potential of this procedure are so great, one will not be guilty of hyperbole in calling it the 'New Genetics'.
'Prenatal Diagnosis and the New Genetics', The American Journal of Human Genetics, 1980, 32:3, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Capability (41)  |  Degree (276)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Effective (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Jump (29)  |  Lead (384)  |  Major (84)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  New (1216)  |  Potential (69)  |  Primary (80)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Product (160)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Situation (113)  |  Specific (95)  |  Studying (70)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

One should first discourage people from doing mathematics; there is no need for too many mathematicians. But, if after that, they still insist on doing mathematics, then one should indeed encourage them, and help them.
Reply to question, “How could we encourage young people to take up mathematics, especially in the schools?” C.T. Chong and Y.K. Leong, 'An Interview With Jean-Pierre Serre', Singapore Mathematical Society Mathematical Medley (1985), 13, No. 1, 11-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Discourage (13)  |  Encourage (40)  |  First (1283)  |  Help (105)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insist (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Need (290)  |  People (1005)  |  Still (613)  |  Teaching (188)

Perhaps I can best describe my experience of doing mathematics in terms of a journey through a dark unexplored mansion. You enter the first room of the mansion and it’s completely dark. You stumble around bumping into the furniture, but gradually you learn where each piece of furniture is. Finally, after six months or so, you find the light switch, you turn it on, and suddenly it’s all illuminated. You can see exactly where you were. Then you move into the next room and spend another six months in the dark. So each of these breakthroughs, while sometimes they’re momentary, sometimes over a period of a day or two, they are the culmination of—and couldn’t exist without—the many months of stumbling around in the dark that proceed them.
Quoted in interview for website for PBS TV Nova program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Completely (135)  |  Culmination (4)  |  Dark (140)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Journey (42)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Mansion (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Month (88)  |  Move (216)  |  Next (236)  |  Period (198)  |  Proceed (129)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)

Personally I think there is no doubt that sub-atomic energy is available all around us, and that one day man will release and control its almost infinite power. We cannot prevent him from doing so and can only hope that he will not use it exclusively in blowing up his next door neighbour. (1936)
Concluding remark in Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Atomic Theory', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Around (7)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Available (78)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Control (167)  |  Door (93)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Hope (299)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Man (2251)  |  Neighbour (5)  |  Next (236)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Release (27)  |  Subatomic (10)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

Put glibly:
In science if you know what you are doing you should not be doing it.
In engineering if you do not know what you are doing you should not be doing it.
Of course, you seldom, if ever, see either pure state.
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Seldom (65)  |  State (491)

Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Looking (189)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Quality (135)  |  Right (452)

Religion has been compelled by science to give up one after another of its dogmas—of those assumed cognitions which it could not substantiate. In the mean time, Science substituted for the personalities to which Religion ascribed phenomena certain metaphysical entities; and in doing this it trespassed on the province of religion; since it classed among the things which it comprehended certain forms of the incomprehensible.
In First Principles (1864), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Cognition (7)  |  Compel (30)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Entity (35)  |  Form (959)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Personality (62)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Province (35)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespass (5)

Research is the art of seeing what everyone else has seen, and doing what no-one else has done.
Anonymous
In Barbara A. Nadel (ed.), Building Security (2004), 18.1. Compare quote by Albert Szent-Gyorgyi: “Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.”
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Do (1908)  |  Research (664)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)

Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)

Science can be interpreted effectively only for those who have more than the usual intelligence and innate curiosity. These will work hard if given the chance and if they find they acquire something by so doing.
(1940). Epigraph, without citation, in I. Bernard Cohen, Science, Servant of Man: A Layman's Primer for the Age of Science (1948), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Chance (239)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Effective (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Hard (243)  |  Innate (14)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Interpret (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

Science has taught us to think the unthinkable. Because when nature is the guide—rather than a priori prejudices, hopes, fears or desires—we are forced out of our comfort zone. One by one, pillars of classical logic have fallen by the wayside as science progressed in the 20th century, from Einstein's realization that measurements of space and time were not absolute but observer-dependent, to quantum mechanics, which not only put fundamental limits on what we can empirically know but also demonstrated that elementary particles and the atoms they form are doing a million seemingly impossible things at once.
In op-ed, 'A Universe Without Purpose', Los Angeles Times (1 Apr 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  20th Century (36)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Atom (355)  |  Century (310)  |  Classical (45)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Desire (204)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elementary Particle (2)  |  Falling (6)  |  Fear (197)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hope (299)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observer (43)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Realization (43)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Wayside (4)

Science is like sex: sometimes something useful comes out, but that is not the reason we are doing it.
Anonymous
This, and variations, appear in various places attributed (highly likely incorrectly) to Richard Feynman, but without any primary source citation. For example, see John Lloyd and John Mitchinson, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People? : Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 274. It is also very suspicious that no example, readily found on the internet, is dated earlier than 2000, yet such a salacious remark surely would have seen the light of day long before that! Also seen worded beginning with: "Physics is….” If you know any instance of this quote published before 2000, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Physics (533)  |  Quip (80)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Something (719)  |  Sometime (4)  |  Useful (250)

Science is like society and trade, in resting at bottom upon a basis of faith. There are some things here, too, that we can not prove, otherwise there would be nothing we can prove. Science is busy with the hither-end of things, not the thither-end. It is a mistake to contrast religion and science in this respect, and to think of religion as taking everything for granted, and science as doing only clean work, and having all the loose ends gathered up and tucked in. We never reach the roots of things in science more than in religion.
From 'Walking by Faith', The Pattern in the Mount: And Other Sermons (1885), 49. The sentence “Science is busy with the hither-end of things, not the thither-end” is quoted alone in collections such as James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 382:35.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Clean (50)  |  Contrast (44)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Faith (203)  |  Gather (72)  |  Grant (73)  |  Granted (5)  |  Loose (14)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Respect (207)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Society (326)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trade (31)  |  Tuck (3)  |  Work (1351)

Science is what scientists do, not what nonscientists think they do or ought to be doing.
Wetenschap is wat wetenschappers doen.
Flanagan's motto as magazine editor for selecting content to put in Scientific American. Because he heard, and liked the sound of this slogan in Dutch, he put that version on a banner in his office. As quoted in obituary by Marc Santora, 'Dennis Flanagan, 85, Editor of Scientific American, for 37 Years', New york Times (17 Jan 2005), B6.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Think (1086)

Scientific observation has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences upon the environment. The task of the teacher becomes that of preparing a series of motives of cultural activity, spread over a specially prepared environment, and then refraining from obtrusive interference. Human teachers can only help the great work that is being done, as servants help the master. Doing so, they will be witnesses to the unfolding of the human soul and to the rising of a New Man who will not be a victim of events, but will have the clarity of vision to direct and shape the future of human society.
In Education For a New World (1946), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Activity (210)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Direct (225)  |  Education (378)  |  Environment (216)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interference (21)  |  Listening (25)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Motive (59)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Process (423)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Servant (39)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spread (83)  |  Task (147)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Victim (35)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

Scientists are people of very dissimilar temperaments doing different things in very different ways. Among scientists are collectors, classifiers and compulsive tidiers-up; many are detectives by temperament and many are explorers; some are artists and others artisans. There are poets–scientists and philosopher–scientists and even a few mystics. ... and most people who are in fact scientists could easily have been something else instead.
'Hypothesis and Imagination', The Art of the Soluble (1967), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Detective (10)  |  Different (577)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

Scientists dream about doing great things. Engineers do them.
In Space: A Novel (1982), 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Great (1574)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thing (1915)

So much goes into doing a transplant operation. All the way from preparing the patient, to procuring the donor. It's like being an astronaut. The astronaut gets all the credit, he gets the trip to the moon, but he had nothing to do with the creation of the rocket, or navigating the ship. He's the privileged one who gets to drive to the moon. I feel that way in some of these more difficult operations, like the heart transplant.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Creation (327)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heart Transplant (6)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Patient (199)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Ship (62)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Way (1217)

Society exists through a process of transmission quite as much as biological life. This transmission occurs by means of communication of habits of doing, thinking, and feeling from the older to the younger.
Democracy and Education: an Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Biological (137)  |  Communication (94)  |  Education (378)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Habit (168)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Occur (150)  |  Process (423)  |  Society (326)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Younger (21)

Something unknown is doing we don’t know what—that is what our theory amounts to.
Expressing the quantum theory description of an electron has no familiar conception of a real form. In The Nature Of The Physical World (1928), 291.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Something (719)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unknown (182)

Sooner or later in every talk, [David] Brower describes the creation of the world. He invites his listeners to consider the six days of Genesis as a figure of speech for what has in fact been 4 billion years. On this scale, one day equals something like six hundred and sixty-six million years, and thus, all day Monday and until Tuesday noon, creation was busy getting the world going. Life began Tuesday noon, and the beautiful organic wholeness of it developed over the next four days. At 4 p.m. Saturday, the big reptiles came on. At three minutes before midnight on the last day, man appeared. At one-fourth of a second before midnight Christ arrived. At one-fortieth of a second before midnight, the Industrial Revolution began. We are surrounded with people who think that what we have been doing for that one-fortieth of a second can go on indefinitely. They are considered normal, but they are stark. raving mad.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Begin (260)  |  Big (48)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brower (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Christ (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  David (6)  |  Describe (128)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Figure (160)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Invite (9)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listener (7)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monday (3)  |  Next (236)  |  Noon (14)  |  Normal (28)  |  Organic (158)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Scale (121)  |  Second (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Sooner (6)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stark (3)  |  Surround (30)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tuesday (3)  |  Wholeness (9)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Sound … cannot travel across what we call a vacuum. … Light and our eyes that see it deal with the doings of the whole universe; sound belongs to the world only. I may talk of the universe of light, but I can only talk of the world of sound.
In The World of Sound (1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Deal (188)  |  Eye (419)  |  Light (607)  |  See (1081)  |  Sound (183)  |  Travel (114)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Success comes by doing the common, every-day things of life uncommonly well.
As quoted in Edward J. Wheeler (ed.), 'The Demeanor of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Under Fire,' Current Opinion (Jul 1914), 57, No. 1, 21. This quote was one out of a collation in the article, “from his many talks to the Bible Class he formerly conducted and from various interviews.”
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Life (1795)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)

Suppose we take a quantity of heat and change it into work. In doing so, we haven’t destroyed the heat, we have only transferred it to another place or perhaps changed it into another energy form.
From 'In the Game of Energy and Thermodynamics You Can’t Even Break Even', Smithsonian (Aug 1970), 1, No. 5, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Energy (344)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Work (1351)

That alone is worthy to be called Natural History, which investigates and records the condition of living things, of things in a state of nature; if animals, of living animals:— which tells of their 'sayings and doings,' their varied notes and utterances, songs and cries; their actions, in ease and under the pressure of circumstances; their affections and passions, towards their young, towards each other, towards other animals, towards man: their various arts and devices, to protect their progeny, to procure food, to escape from their enemies, to defend themselves from attacks; their ingenious resources for concealment; their stratagems to overcome their victims; their modes of bringing forth, of feeding, and of training, their offspring; the relations of their structure to their wants and habits; the countries in which they dwell; their connexion with the intimate world around them, mountain or plain, forest or field, barren heath or bushy dell, open savanna or wild hidden glen, river, lake, or sea:— this would be indeed zoology, i.e. the science of living creatures.
A Naturalist's Sojourn in Jamaica (1851), vi-vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Affection (43)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Barren (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concealment (10)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Device (70)  |  Escape (80)  |  Field (364)  |  Food (199)  |  Forest (150)  |  Habit (168)  |  History (673)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Protect (58)  |  Record (154)  |  River (119)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Song (37)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Training (80)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Various (200)  |  Victim (35)  |  Want (497)  |  Wild (87)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)  |  Zoology (36)

That’s the nature of research—you don’t know what in hell you’re doing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Hell (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Research (664)

The alchemists of past centuries tried hard to make the elixir of life: ... Those efforts were in vain; it is not in our power to obtain the experiences and the views of the future by prolonging our lives forward in this direction. However, it is well possible in a certain sense to prolong our lives backwards by acquiring the experiences of those who existed before us and by learning to know their views as well as if we were their contemporaries. The means for doing this is also an elixir of life.
Foreword to Die Entwicklung der Chemie in der neueren Zeit (1873), trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forward (102)  |  Future (429)  |  Hard (243)  |  History (673)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Sense (770)  |  Vain (83)  |  View (488)

The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality.
Attributed, perhaps apocryphal. As given in Felix E. Browder, Norbert Wiener (1966), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Case (99)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contain (68)  |  Containing (4)  |  Find (998)  |  Finding (30)  |  Generality (45)  |  Germ (53)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Special (184)

The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality.
Stated without quotation marks, as “attributed apocryphally perhaps”, in M. Kac, 'Wiener and Integration in Function Spaces', Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Jan 1966), 72, No. 1, Part 2, 65.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Consist (223)  |  Generality (45)  |  Germ (53)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Special (184)

The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality.
Attributed (apocryphally perhaps). As cited in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (1966), 72, 65.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Consist (223)  |  Generality (45)  |  Germ (53)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Special (184)

The best person to decide what research shall be done is the man who is doing the research. The next best is the head of the department. After that you leave the field of best persons and meet increasingly worse groups. The first of these is the research director, who is probably wrong more than half the time. Then comes a committee which is wrong most of the time. Finally there is a committee of company vice-presidents, which is wrong all the time.
1935, in Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 1961.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Company (59)  |  Department (92)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Person (363)  |  President (31)  |  Research (664)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vice (40)  |  Wrong (234)

The big political doings of our time are so disheartening that in our generation one feels quite alone. It is as if people had lost the passion for justice and dignity and no longer treasure what better generations have won by extraordinary sacrifices.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Better (486)  |  Big (48)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Doings (2)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Feel (367)  |  Generation (242)  |  Justice (39)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Win (52)

The design of a book is the pattern of reality controlled and shaped by the mind of the writer. This is completely understood about poetry or fiction, but it is too seldom realized about books of fact. And yet the impulse which drives a man to poetry will send a man into the tide pools and force him to report what he finds there. Why is an expedition to Tibet undertaken, or a sea bottom dredged? Why do men, sitting at the microscope, examine the calcareous plates of a sea cucumber and give the new species a name, and write about it possessively? It would be good to know the impulse truly, not to be confused by the “services to science” platitudes or the other little mazes into which we entice our minds so that they will not know what we are doing.
In John Steinbeck and Edward Flanders Ricketts, Introduction to Sea of Cortez: a Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research (1941), opening paragraph. John Steinbeck had an interest in marine science before he met Ricketts. This book is an account of their trip in the Gulf of California, once called the Sea of Cortez, and recording the marine life to be found there.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Completely (135)  |  Cucumber (4)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiction (22)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Good (889)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Maze (10)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Platitude (2)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pool (15)  |  Reality (261)  |  Report (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Species (401)  |  Tibet (4)  |  Tide (34)  |  Truly (116)  |  Understood (156)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

The development doctrines are doing much harm on both sides of the Atlantic, especially among intelligent mechanics, and a class of young men engaged in the subordinate departments of trade and the law. And the harm thus considerable in amount must be necessarily more than considerable in degree. For it invariably happens, that when persons in these walks become materialists, they become turbulent subjects and bad men.
The Foot-prints of the Creator: Or, The Asterolepis of Stromness (1850, 1859), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Bad (180)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Class (164)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Degree (276)  |  Department (92)  |  Development (422)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Happen (274)  |  Harm (39)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Law (894)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Person (363)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Trade (31)  |  Turbulent (4)  |  Walk (124)  |  Young (227)

The events of the past few years have led to a critical examination of the function of science in society. It used to be believed that the results of scientific investigation would lead to continuous progressive improvements in conditions of life; but first the War and then the economic crisis have shown that science can be used as easily for destructive and wasteful purposes, and voices have been raised demanding the cessation of scientific research as the only means of preserving a tolerable civilization. Scientists themselves, faced with these criticisms, have been forced to consider, effectively for the first time, how the work they are doing is connected around them. This book is an attempt to analyse this connection; to investigate how far scientists, individually and collectively, are responsible for this state of affairs, and to suggest what possible steps could be taken which would lead to a fruitful and not to a destructive utilization of science.
The Social Function of Science (1939), xlii.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Book (392)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Economic (81)  |  Event (216)  |  Examination (98)  |  First (1283)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Function (228)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Utilization (15)  |  War (225)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The faculties developed by doing research are those most needed in diagnosis.
From Transactions of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology (1966) 70, 17. Used as epigraph in Clifford Frank Hawkins and Marco Sorgi Research: How to Plan, Speak and Write About It (1985), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Develop (268)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Most (1731)  |  Research (664)

The gentleman [Mr. Taber] from New York says [agricultural research] is all foolish. Yes; it was foolish when Burbank was experimenting with wild cactus. It was foolish when the Wright boys went down to Kitty Hawk and had a contraption there that they were going to fly like birds. It was foolish when Robert Fulton tried to put a boiler into a sail boat and steam it up the Hudson. It was foolish when one of my ancestors thought the world was round and discovered this country so that the gentleman from New York could become a Congressman. (Laughter.) ... Do not seek to stop progress; do not seek to put the hand of politics on these scientific men who are doing a great work. As the gentleman from Texas points out, it is not the discharge of these particular employees that is at stake, it is all the work of investigation, of research, of experimentation that has been going on for years that will be stopped and lost.
Speaking (28 Dec 1932) as a member of the 72nd Congress, early in the Great Depression, in opposition to an attempt to eliminate a small amount from the agricultural appropriation bill. As quoted in 'Mayor-Elect La Guardia on Research', Science (1933), New Series, 78, No. 2031, 511.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boat (16)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Contraption (2)  |  Country (251)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Employee (3)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Foolishness (10)  |  Robert Fulton (7)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kitty Hawk (4)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Loss (110)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Point (580)  |  Politics (112)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sail (36)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Seek (213)  |  Steam (80)  |  Stop (80)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Orville Wright (8)  |  Wilbur Wright (11)  |  Year (933)

The great use of life is to spend it doing something that will outlast it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Something (719)  |  Spend (95)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.
Attributed. The wording as above may be a popularized derivative from this quote: “The greatest enjoyment possible to man was that which this philosophy promises its votaries—the pleasure of being always right, and always reasoning—without ever being bound to look at anything.” In The English Constitution (1867), 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Cannot (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Life (1795)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Say (984)

The history of aëronautic adventure affords a curious illustration of the same [dip of the horizon] principle. The late Mr. Sadler, the celebrated aeronaut, ascended on one occasion in a balloon from Dublin, and was wafted across the Irish Channel, when, on his approach to the Welsh coast, the balloon descended nearly to the surface of the sea. By this time the sun was set, and the shades of evening began to close in. He threw out nearly all his ballast, and suddenly sprang upwards to a great height, and by so doing brought his horizon to dip below the sun, producing the whole phenomenon of a western sunrise. Subsequently descending in Wales, he of course witnessed a second sunset on the same evening.
This describes how a rapidly ascending balloonist can see more of a setting sun, from the top down, as the viewer gradually rises more and thus sees further, beyond the curvature of the earth. The sun gradually appears as if at sunrise. It is the reverse of the view of a ship sailing toward the horizon which disappears from its hull up to the tip of the mast. In Outlines of Astronomy (1849), 20. A similar description appeared earlier, in Astronomy (1833), 36, which also footnoted Herschel's comment that he had this anecdote from Dr. Lardner, who was present at the ascent
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent (27)  |  Dip (3)  |  Dublin (3)  |  Evening (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Height (32)  |  History (673)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Ireland (8)  |  Late (118)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Principle (507)  |  Sea (308)  |  Set (394)  |  Shade (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)  |  Upward (43)  |  Western (45)  |  Whole (738)  |  Witness (54)

The Industrial Revolution as a whole was not designed. It took shape gradually as industrialists and engineers figured out how to make things. The result is that we put billions of pounds of toxic materials in the air, water and soil every year and generate gigantic amounts of waste. If our goal is to destroy the world—to produce global warming and toxicity and endocrine disruption—we're doing great.
In interview article, 'Designing For The Future', Newsweek (15 May 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Amount (151)  |  Billion (95)  |  Design (195)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Disruption (3)  |  Endocrine (2)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Environment (216)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Global (35)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Material (353)  |  Result (677)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Soil (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toxicity (2)  |  Toxin (8)  |  Warming (23)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The instruction of children should aim gradually to combine knowing and doing [Wissen und Konnen]. Among all sciences mathematics seems to be the only one of a kind to satisfy this aim most completely.
In Werke, Bd. 9 (1888), 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Combine (57)  |  Completely (135)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

The late Alan Gregg pointed out that human population growth within the ecosystem was closely analogous to the growth of malignant tumor cells within an organism: that man was acting like a cancer on the biosphere. The multiplication of human numbers certainly seems wild and uncontrolled… Four million a month—the equivalent of the population of Chicago… We seem to be doing all right at the moment; but if you could ask cancer cells, I suspect they would think they were doing fine. But when the organism dies, so do they; and for our own, selfish, practical, utilitarian reasons, I think we should be careful about how we influence the rest of the ecosystem.
From Horace M. Albright Conservation Lectureship Berkeley, California (23 Apr 1962), 'The Human Environment', collected in Conservators of Hope: the Horace M. Albright Conservation Lectures (1988), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Alan Gregg (4)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Late (118)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Number (699)  |  Organism (220)  |  Point (580)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wild (87)

The little beggars are doing just what I don’t want them to.
Referring to his garden plants.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Botany (57)  |  Little (707)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plant (294)  |  Want (497)

The man or corporation who has not determined at the outset to do good to others while doing good to himself will fail in the end.
As quoted in Edward J. Wheeler (ed.), 'The Demeanor of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Under Fire,' Current Opinion (Jul 1914), 57, No. 1, 21. This quote was one out of a collation in the article, “from his many talks to the Bible Class he formerly conducted and from various interviews.”
Science quotes on:  |  Corporation (6)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outset (7)  |  Will (2355)

The more I think of it, I find this conclusion more impressed upon me—that the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way.
Modern Painters: pt. 4. Of Many Things (1850), 268. books.google.com John Ruskin - 1850
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Impression (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Plain (33)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The most remarkable thing was his [Clifford’s] great strength as compared with his weight, as shown in some exercises. At one time he could pull up on the bar with either hand, which is well known to be one of the greatest feats of strength. His nerve at dangerous heights was extraordinary. I am appalled now to think that he climbed up and sat on the cross bars of the weathercock on a church tower, and when by way of doing something worse I went up and hung by my toes to the bars he did the same.
Anonymous
Quoted from a letter by one of Clifford’s friends to F. Pollock, in Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1901), Vol. 1, Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appalled (2)  |  Badly (32)  |  Bar (8)  |  Church (56)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Climb (35)  |  Compare (69)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Feat (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hang (45)  |  Height (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Pull (43)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Show (346)  |  Sit (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Strength (126)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toe (7)  |  Tower (42)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)

The Ocean Health Index is like a thermometer of ocean health, which will allow us to determine how the patient is doing. The Index will be a measure of whether our policies are working, or whether we need new solutions.
As quoted in press release (14 Aug 2012), 'Ocean Health Index Provides First-Ever Global Benchmark of 171 Coastal Regions', on web page of Conservation International, conservation.org.
Science quotes on:  |  Determine (144)  |  Health (193)  |  Measure (232)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Patient (199)  |  Policy (24)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Thermometer (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The operating management, providing as it does for the care of near thirty thousand miles of railway, is far more important than that for construction in which there is comparatively little doing.
In Railway Property: A Treatise on the Construction and Management of Railways (1866), iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Construction (112)  |  Importance (286)  |  Little (707)  |  Management (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Operation (213)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Thousand (331)

The principal goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done—men who are creative, inventive, and discovers. The second goal of education is to form minds which can be critical, can verify, and not accept everything they are offered.
From remarks at a conference on cognitive development, Cornell University (1964). In Philip Hampson Taylor, New Directions in Curriculum Studies (1979), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Capable (168)  |  Create (235)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critical (66)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Everything (476)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Goal (145)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principal (63)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Verify (23)

The process that I want to call scientific is a process that involves the continual apprehension of meaning, the constant appraisal of significance accompanied by a running act of checking to be sure that I am doing what I want to do, and of judging correctness or incorrectness. This checking and judging and accepting, that together constitute understanding, are done by me and can be done for me by no one else. They are as private as my toothache, and without them science is dead.
Reflections of a Physicist (1950), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Accepting (22)  |  Act (272)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continual (43)  |  Do (1908)  |  Involve (90)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Process (423)  |  Running (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Significance (113)  |  Together (387)  |  Toothache (3)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Experience (467)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frame (26)  |  Growing (98)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Observe (168)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prove (250)  |  Ready (39)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Think (1086)  |  Topic (21)  |  Work (1351)

The psychiatric interviewer is supposed to be doing three things: considering what the patient could mean by what he says; considering how he himself can best phrase what he wishes to communicate to the patient; and, at the same time, observing the general pattern of the events being communicated. In addition to that, to make notes which will be of more than evocative value, or come anywhere near being a verbatim record of what is said, in my opinion is beyond the capacity of most human beings.
From The Psychiatric Interview (1954, 1970), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Considering (6)  |  Event (216)  |  General (511)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Record (154)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Verbatim (4)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

The routine produces. But each day, nevertheless, when you try to get started you have to transmogrify, transpose yourself; you have to go through some kind of change from being a normal human being, into becoming some kind of slave.
I simply don’t want to break through that membrane. I’d do anything to avoid it. You have to get there and you don’t want to go there because there’s so much pressure and so much strain and you just want to stay on the outside and be yourself. And so the day is a constant struggle to get going.
And if somebody says to me, You’re a prolific writer—it seems so odd. It’s like the difference between geological time and human time. On a certain scale, it does look like I do a lot. But that’s my day, all day long, sitting there wondering when I’m going to be able to get started. And the routine of doing this six days a week puts a little drop in a bucket each day, and that’s the key. Because if you put a drop in a bucket every day, after three hundred and sixty-five days, the bucket’s going to have some water in it.
https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/5997/john-mcphee-the-art-of-nonfiction-no-3-john-mcphee
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Break (99)  |  Bucket (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Constant (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Key (50)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Normal (28)  |  Odd (13)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Routine (25)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simply (53)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Slave (37)  |  Somebody (8)  |  Start (221)  |  Stay (25)  |  Strain (11)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transpose (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)  |  Week (70)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Writer (86)

The sciences have sworn among themselves an inviolable partnership; it is almost impossible to separate them, for they would rather suffer than be torn apart; and if anyone persists in doing so, he gets for his trouble only imperfect and confused fragments. Yet they do not arrive all together, but they hold each other by the hand so that they follow one another in a natural order which it is dangerous to change, because they refuse to enter in any other way where they are called. ...
Les Préludes de l'Harmonie Universelle (1634), 135-139. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apart (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Danger (115)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inviolable (2)  |  Natural (796)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Partnership (4)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Tear (42)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Torn (17)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Way (1217)

The Sierra Club is a very good and a very powerful force for conservation and, as a matter of fact, has grown faster since I left than it was growing while I was there! It must be doing something right.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Leave (130)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Right (452)  |  Sierra Club (2)  |  Something (719)

The Theory of Groups is a branch of mathematics in which one does something to something and then compares the result with the result obtained from doing the same thing to something else, or something else to the same thing.
In J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 3, 1534.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (150)  |  Compare (69)  |  Group (78)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Result (677)  |  Something (719)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)

Their minds sang with the ecstatic knowledge that either what they were doing was completely and utterly and totally impossible or that physics had a lot of catching up to do.
So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1985). Quoted in Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations (2005), 322.
Science quotes on:  |  Completely (135)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecstatic (3)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Theory (970)

There are in this world optimists who feel that any symbol that starts off with an integral sign must necessarily denote something that will have every property that they should like an integral to possess. This of course is quite annoying to us rigorous mathematicians; what is even more annoying is that by doing so they often come up with the right answer.
In 'Integrals Devised for Special Purposes', Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (1963), 69, 611.
Science quotes on:  |  Annoy (3)  |  Answer (366)  |  Course (409)  |  Denote (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  Integral (26)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Often (106)  |  Optimist (8)  |  Possess (156)  |  Property (168)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Sign (58)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

There are young people who constantly come to tell me: you, too, are making Op Art. I haven’t the slightest idea what that is, Op Art. I’ve been doing this work for thirty years now.
As quoted, without citation, on the mcescher.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Idea (843)  |  Making (300)  |  People (1005)  |  Tell (340)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

There is beauty in space, and it is orderly. There is no weather, and there is regularity. It is predictable…. Everything in space obeys the laws of physics. If you know these laws, and obey them, space will treat you kindly. And don't tell me that man doesn't belong out there. Man belongs wherever he wants to go—and he’ll do plenty well when he gets there.
Quoted in 'Reach For The Stars', Time (17 Feb 1958), 71, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Obey (40)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Space (500)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Want (497)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

There is only one law of Nature—the second law of thermodynamics—which recognises a distinction between past and future more profound than the difference of plus and minus. It stands aloof from all the rest. … It opens up a new province of knowledge, namely, the study of organisation; and it is in connection with organisation that a direction of time-flow and a distinction between doing and undoing appears for the first time.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), 67-68.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Connection (162)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distinction (72)  |  First (1283)  |  Flow (83)  |  Future (429)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Organization (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Plus (43)  |  Profound (104)  |  Province (35)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Stand (274)  |  Study (653)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Undoing (2)

This is a classical example of the process which we call, with Tinbergen, a redirected activity. It is characterized by the fact that an activity is released by one object but discharged at another, because the first one, while presenting stimuli specifically eliciting the response, simultaneously emits others which inhibit its discharge. A human example is furnished by the man who is very angry with someone and hits the table instead of the other man's jaw, because inhibition prevents him from doing so, although his pent-up anger, like the pressure within a volcano, demands outlet.
On Aggression, trans. M. Latzke (1966), 145.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Anger (20)  |  Call (769)  |  Classical (45)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Emit (15)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Man (2251)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Process (423)  |  Response (53)  |  Table (104)

This political movement has patently demonstrated that it will not defend the integrity of science in any case in which science runs afoul of its core political constituencies. In so doing, it has ceded any right to govern a technologically advanced and sophisticated nation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Case (99)  |  Cede (2)  |  Constituency (2)  |  Core (18)  |  Defend (30)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Govern (64)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nation (193)  |  Patently (4)  |  Political (121)  |  Right (452)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Technologically (2)  |  Will (2355)

Throughout all of human history, we have taken, taken, taken, from the natural world. All creatures, however large or small, do this as a way of making a living. Humans, though, have gone way beyond what elephants have done to the planet or what birds or what any fish in the sea is capable of doing.
In interview with Pierce Nahigyan, 'Dr. Sylvia Earle: “We’re Literally Destroying The Systems That Keep Us Alive”', Huffington Post (6 Jan 2016).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bird (149)  |  Capable (168)  |  Creature (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Fish (120)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Large (394)  |  Living (491)  |  Making (300)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

True wisdom is to know what is best worth knowing, and to do what is best worth doing.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  True (212)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Worth (169)

Until that afternoon, my thoughts on planetary atmospheres had been wholly concerned with atmospheric analysis as a method of life detection and nothing more. Now that I knew the composition of the Martian atmosphere was so different from that of our own, my mind filled with wonderings about the nature of the Earth. If the air is burning, what sustains it at a constant composition? I also wondered about the supply of fuel and the removal of the products of combustion. It came to me suddenly, just like a flash of enlightenment, that to persist and keep stable, something must be regulating the atmosphere and so keeping it at its constant composition. Moreover, if most of the gases came from living organisms, then life at the surface must be doing the regulation.
Homage to Gaia: The Life of an Independent Scholar (2000), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Burning (48)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concern (228)  |  Constant (144)  |  Detection (16)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Flash (49)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Gaia (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mars (44)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organism (220)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Product (160)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Something (719)  |  Stable (30)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supply (93)  |  Surface (209)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wonder (236)

We are a plague on the Earth. It’s coming home to roost over the next 50 years or so. It’s not just climate change; it’s sheer space, places to grow food for this enormous horde. Either we limit our population growth or the natural world will do it for us, and the natural world is doing it for us right now.
As quoted and cited from Radio Times in Louise Gray, 'David Attenborough - Humans are Plague on Earth', The Telegraph (22 Jan 2013).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Coming (114)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Food (199)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Home (170)  |  Limit (280)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Next (236)  |  Overpopulation (5)  |  Plague (41)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Right (452)  |  Roost (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

We are the children of a technological age. We have found streamlined ways of doing much of our routine work. Printing is no longer the only way of reproducing books. Reading them, however, has not changed...
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Long (790)  |  Print (17)  |  Printing (22)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Routine (25)  |  Technological (61)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

We don’t teach our students enough of the intellectual content of experiments—their novelty and their capacity for opening new fields… . My own view is that you take these things personally. You do an experiment because your own philosophy makes you want to know the result. It’s too hard, and life is too short, to spend your time doing something because someone else has said it’s important. You must feel the thing yourself—feel that it will change your outlook and your way of life.
In Bernstein, 'Profiles: Physicists: I', The New Yorker (13 Oct 1975), 108.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Change (593)  |  Content (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Hard (243)  |  Important (209)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Result (677)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Spend (95)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Will (2355)

We have reason not to be afraid of the machine, for there is always constructive change, the enemy of machines, making them change to fit new conditions.
We suffer not from overproduction but from undercirculation. You have heard of technocracy. I wish I had those fellows for my competitors. I'd like to take the automobile it is said they predicted could be made now that would last fifty years. Even if never used, this automobile would not be worth anything except to a junkman in ten years, because of the changes in men's tastes and ideas. This desire for change is an inherent quality in human nature, so that the present generation must not try to crystallize the needs of the future ones.
We have been measuring too much in terms of the dollar. What we should do is think in terms of useful materials—things that will be of value to us in our daily life.
In 'Quotation Marks: Against Technocracy', New York Times (1 Han 1933), E4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Afraid (21)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Change (593)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Competitor (4)  |  Condition (356)  |  Construction (112)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Crystallization (2)  |  Crystallize (12)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Fit (134)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Junk (6)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Material (353)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Need (290)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reason (744)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Taste (90)  |  Technocracy (2)  |  Ten (3)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

We profess to teach the principles and practice of medicine, or, in other words, the science and art of medicine. Science is knowledge reduced to principles; art is knowledge reduced to practice. The knowing and doing, however, are distinct. ... Your knowledge, therefore, is useless unless you cultivate the art of healing. Unfortunately, the scientific man very often has the least amount of art, and he is totally unsuccessful in practice; and, on the other hand, there may be much art based on an infinitesimal amount of knowledge, and yet it is sufficient to make its cultivator eminent.
From H.G. Sutton, Abstract of Lecture delivered at Guy's Hospital by Samuel Wilks, 'Introductory to Part of a Course on the Theory and Practice of Medicine', The Lancet (24 Mar 1866), 1, 308
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Art (657)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Healing (25)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profess (20)  |  Profession (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Success (302)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teach (277)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Word (619)

We talk about our high standard of living in this country. What we have is a high standard of work. Usually the peaks of civilization have been periods when a large proportion of the population had time to live. I don’t think we’re doing this today. I think the people who could live are still spending their time and supplementary resources on making a living.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Country (251)  |  High (362)  |  Large (394)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Make A Living (2)  |  Making (300)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Period (198)  |  Population (110)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Resource (63)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spending (24)  |  Standard Of Living (4)  |  Still (613)  |  Supplementary (4)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Usual (6)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)

We think we understand the regular reflection of light and X rays - and we should understand the reflections of electrons as well if electrons were only waves instead of particles ... It is rather as if one were to see a rabbit climbing a tree, and were to say ‘Well, that is rather a strange thing for a rabbit to be doing, but after all there is really nothing to get excited about. Cats climb trees - so that if the rabbit were only a cat, we would understand its behavior perfectly.’ Of course, the explanation might be that what we took to be a rabbit was not a rabbit at all but was actually a cat. Is it possible that we are mistaken all this time in supposing they are particles, and that actually they are waves?
Franklin Institute Journal Vol. 205, 597. Cited in New Scientist (14 Apr 1977), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Cat (47)  |  Course (409)  |  Election (7)  |  Electron (93)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Light (607)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particle (194)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rabbit (8)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Regular (46)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wave (107)

We want to explore. We’re curious people. Look back over history, people have put their lives at stake to go out and explore... We believe in what we’re doing. Now it’s time to go.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Belief (578)  |  Curious (91)  |  Exploration (134)  |  History (673)  |  Live (628)  |  Look (582)  |  Look Back (5)  |  People (1005)  |  Stake (19)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)

We worked and worked, didn’t get anywhere. That’s how you know you’re doing research.
As found on a MIT website, without citation. Webmaster has not yet been able to determine a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)  |  Work (1351)

We’re suffocating ourselves by cutting things down. And the awful thing is that the knowledge is there. Fifty years ago when we exterminated things, we did it without realising. Now there’s plenty of evidence of what it is we’re doing, and yet we keep on doing it.
In Rowan Hooper, 'One Minute With… David Attenborough', New Scientist (2 Feb 2013), 217, No. 2902, 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awful (8)  |  Cut Down (2)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Down (456)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exterminate (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Plenty (5)  |  Realize (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Year (933)

What are they doing, examining last month's costs with a microscope when they should be surveying the horizon with a telescope?
[Acerbic comment about directors of Brunner Mond, where he worked.]
As quoted by Peter Allen in obituary, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1976), 22, 116.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cost (86)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Last (426)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Money (170)  |  Month (88)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Research (664)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Work (1351)

What I may attempt is to dispel the feeling that in using the eye of the body or the eye of the soul, and incorporating what is thereby revealed in our conception of reality, we are doing something irrational and disobeying the leading of truth which as scientists we are pledged to serve.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Body (537)  |  Conception (154)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Truth (1057)

What is mathematics? What is it for? What are mathematicians doing nowadays? Wasn't it all finished long ago? How many new numbers can you invent anyway? Is today’s mathematics just a matter of huge calculations, with the mathematician as a kind of zookeeper, making sure the precious computers are fed and watered? If it’s not, what is it other than the incomprehensible outpourings of superpowered brainboxes with their heads in the clouds and their feet dangling from the lofty balconies of their ivory towers?
Mathematics is all of these, and none. Mostly, it’s just different. It’s not what you expect it to be, you turn your back for a moment and it's changed. It's certainly not just a fixed body of knowledge, its growth is not confined to inventing new numbers, and its hidden tendrils pervade every aspect of modern life.
Opening paragraphs of 'Preface', From Here to Infinity (1996), vii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Back (390)  |  Balcony (2)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Computer (127)  |  Confine (26)  |  Dangle (2)  |  Different (577)  |  Expect (200)  |  Finish (59)  |  Finished (4)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Foot (60)  |  Growth (187)  |  Head (81)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Huge (25)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Invent (51)  |  Ivory Tower (5)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Life (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Nowadays (6)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Precious (41)  |  Today (314)  |  Tower (42)  |  Turn (447)  |  Water (481)  |  Zookeeper (2)

What of the future of this adventure? What will happen ultimately? We are going along guessing the laws; how many laws are we going to have to guess? I do not know. Some of my colleagues say that this fundamental aspect of our science will go on; but I think there will certainly not be perpetual novelty, say for a thousand years. This thing cannot keep on going so that we are always going to discover more and more new laws … It is like the discovery of America—you only discover it once. The age in which we live is the age in which we are discovering the fundamental laws of nature, and that day will never come again. Of course in the future there will be other interests … but there will not be the same things that we are doing now … There will be a degeneration of ideas, just like the degeneration that great explorers feel is occurring when tourists begin moving in on a territory.
In The Character of Physical Law (1965, 1994), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Age (499)  |  America (127)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Begin (260)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Course (409)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guess (61)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Territory (24)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tourist (6)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.
From Forest Primeval: The Natural History of an Ancient Forest (2001), 230. Seen in various sources erroneously attributed to Mahatma Gandhi.
Science quotes on:  |  Forest (150)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Reflection (90)  |  World (1774)

What [man landing on the moon] is doing up there is indulging his obsession with the impossible. The impossible infuriates and tantalizes him. Show him an impossible job and he will reduce it to a possibility so trite that eventually it bores him.
'Why on Earth Are We There? Because It's Impossible', New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Apollo 11 (6)  |  Bore (3)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Infuriate (2)  |  Job (82)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Show (346)  |  Trite (4)  |  Will (2355)

Whatever we are to do when we have learnt, these we learn by doing; as by building, men become builders.
Aristotle
From Ethics, book 2, 1103a32-33. As translated in A New Translation of the Nichomachean Ethics (1819), 32, as “printed for R. Pearson.” Often seen quoted briefly as, “What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing.” There are a number of other translations. “We learn an art or craft by doing the things that we shall have to do when we have learnt it: for instance, men become builders by building houses, harpers by playing on the harp,” is given by Harris Rackham, The Nicomachean Ethics (1962), 73. Also “In the case of the arts, that which we have to be taught to do, that we learn to do by doing it. We become masons, for instance, by building; and harpers by playing upon the harp,” in Robert Williams (trans.), The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle (1869), 32. Notice the idea that "have to be taught" is in contrast with things that we do by nature.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Build (204)  |  Builder (12)  |  Building (156)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Learn (629)  |  Whatever (234)

When Da Vinci wanted an effect, he willed, he planned the means to make it happen: that was the purpose of his machines. But the machines of Newton … are means not for doing but for observing. He saw an effect, and he looked for its cause.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (87)  |  Effect (393)  |  Happen (274)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plan (117)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

When someone builds a bridge, he uses engineers who have been certified as knowing what they are doing. Yet when someone builds you a software program, he has no similar certification, even though your safety may be just as dependent upon that software working as it is upon the bridge supporting your weight.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (47)  |  Build (204)  |  Certification (2)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Program (52)  |  Safety (54)  |  Software (13)  |  Support (147)  |  Use (766)  |  Weight (134)

When you do not know what you are doing and what you are doing is the best - that is inspiration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Know (1518)

When you get up here in space and you go into the weightlessness environment, your body is not sure what really just happened to it. So your stomach, intestines, and that stuff kind of shuts down for a few hours to figure out what is going on and during that timeframe your body is not doing much with your food. After your body figures out that it can handle the new environment, everything cranks back up and your food, stomach and intestines and all start working like normal.
Replying to a Mifflin Middle School students’ question during a school forum held using a downlink with the Discovery Space Shuttle mission (31 Oct 1998). On NASA web page 'STS-95 Educational Downlink'. Mike Tomolillo, Philip Slater asked, “Commander Brown, how does space affect the digestive system?”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Crank (18)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Down (456)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everything (476)  |  Figure (160)  |  Food (199)  |  Handle (28)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hour (186)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Kind (557)  |  New (1216)  |  Normal (28)  |  Shut (41)  |  Space (500)  |  Start (221)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Weightlessness (2)

Whenever there is a hard job to be done I assign it to a lazy man; he is sure to find an easy way of doing it.
Science quotes on:  |  Easy (204)  |  Find (998)  |  Hard (243)  |  Job (82)  |  Man (2251)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1351)

Where should I start? Start from the statement of the problem. ... What can I do? Visualize the problem as a whole as clearly and as vividly as you can. ... What can I gain by doing so? You should understand the problem, familiarize yourself with it, impress its purpose on your mind.
How to Solve It: a New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Clearly (41)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Gain (145)  |  Impress (64)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Start (221)  |  Statement (142)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Visualize (8)  |  Vividly (11)  |  Whole (738)

Whereas in The Two Towers you have different races, nations, cultures coming together and examining their conscience and unifying against a very real and terrifying enemy. What the United States has been doing for the past year is bombing innocent civilians without having come anywhere close to catching Osama bin Laden or any presumed enemy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Catch (31)  |  Civilian (2)  |  Close (69)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Examine (78)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Load (11)  |  Nation (193)  |  Past (337)  |  Presume (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Real (149)  |  State (491)  |  Terrify (11)  |  Together (387)  |  Tower (42)  |  Two (937)  |  Unify (6)  |  United States (23)  |  Year (933)

While reading in a textbook of chemistry, … I came across the statement, “nitric acid acts upon copper.” I was getting tired of reading such absurd stuff and I determined to see what this meant. Copper was more or less familiar to me, for copper cents were then in use. I had seen a bottle marked “nitric acid” on a table in the doctor’s office where I was then “doing time.” I did not know its peculiarities, but I was getting on and likely to learn. The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words “act upon” meant … I put one of them [cent] on the table, opened the bottle marked “nitric acid”; poured some of the liquid on the copper; and prepared to make an observation. But what was this wonderful thing which I beheld? The cent was already changed, and it was no small change either. A greenish blue liquid foamed and fumed over the cent and over the table. The air in the neighborhood of the performance became colored dark red. A great colored cloud arose. This was disagreeable and suffocating—how should I stop this? I tried to get rid of the objectionable mess by picking it up and throwing it out of the window, which I had meanwhile opened. I learned another fact—nitric acid not only acts upon copper but it acts upon fingers. The pain led to another unpremeditated experiment. I drew my fingers across my trousers and another fact was discovered. Nitric acid acts upon trousers. Taking everything into consideration, that was the most impressive experiment, and, relatively, probably the most costly experiment I have ever performed.
In F.H. Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Acid (83)  |  Act (272)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cent (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disagreeable (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finger (44)  |  Foam (3)  |  Fume (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Marked (55)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mess (13)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Office (71)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suffocation (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Use (766)  |  Window (58)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Word (619)

Why administrators are respected and school-teachers are not: An administrator is paid a lot for doing very little, while a teacher is paid very little for doing a lot.
In 'Money Et Cetera', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto) (1989), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (11)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Pay (43)  |  Respect (207)  |  School (219)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Why (491)

Why, only last term we sent a man who had never been in a laboratory in his life as a senior Science Master to one of our leading public schools. He came [to our agency] wanting to do private coaching in music. He’s doing very well, I believe.
In Decline and Fall (1928), 1962 edn., 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agency (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Leading (17)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Music (129)  |  Never (1087)  |  Private (23)  |  Public School (3)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Senior (6)  |  Term (349)  |  Wanting (2)  |  Why (491)

Wisdom is knowing what to do next, skill is knowing how to do it, and virtue is doing it.
In 'American University Tendencies' (23 Mar 1903), Address at the Charter Day exercise to University of California, stenographic report in University Chronicle (1903), 6, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Next (236)  |  Skill (109)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wisdom (221)

Without the suitable conditions life could not exist. But both life and its conditions set forth the operations of inscrutable Power. We know not its origin; we know not its end. And the presumption, if not the degradation, rests with those who place upon the throne of the universe a magnified image of themselves, and make its doings a mere colossal imitation of their own.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degradation (17)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  God (757)  |  Image (96)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Inscrutability (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Origin (239)  |  Place (177)  |  Power (746)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Rest (280)  |  Set (394)  |  Suitability (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Throne (7)  |  Universe (857)  |  Without (13)

You have all heard of that celebrated painter who would never allow any one to mix his colors for him. He always insisted on doing that himself, and at last one of his students, whose curiosity had been aroused, said: “Professor, what do you mix your colors with?” “With brains, sir,” said the professor. Now, that is what we have to do with our observations.
From Address (22 May 1914) to the graduating class of the Friends’ School, Washington, D.C. Printed in 'Discovery and Invention', The National Geographic Magazine (1914), 25, 650.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Color (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Himself (461)  |  Last (426)  |  Mix (19)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Painter (29)  |  Professor (128)  |  Student (300)

You have heard of the new chemical nomenclature endeavored to be introduced by Lavoisier, Fourcroy, &c. Other chemists of this country, of equal note, reject it, and prove in my opinion that it is premature, insufficient and false. These latter are joined by the British chemists; and upon the whole, I think the new nomenclature will be rejected, after doing more harm than good. There are some good publications in it, which must be translated into the ordinary chemical language before they will be useful.
Letter to Dr. Currie (Paris, 1788). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 135. From H.A. Washington, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1853-54). Vol 2, 544.
Science quotes on:  |  British (41)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Country (251)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  False (100)  |  Comte de Antoine Francois Fourcroy (5)  |  Good (889)  |  Harm (39)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Language (293)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prove (250)  |  Publication (101)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Think (1086)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

You know something I could really do without? The Space Shuttle. … It’s irresponsible. The last thing we should be doing is sending our grotesquely distorted DNA out into space.
Brain Droppings (1998), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Distort (22)  |  Distortion (13)  |  DNA (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Grotesque (6)  |  Irresponsibility (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Thing (3)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Thing (1915)

You, in this country [the USA], are subjected to the British insularity in weights and measures; you use the foot, inch and yard. I am obliged to use that system, but must apologize to you for doing so, because it is so inconvenient, and I hope Americans will do everything in their power to introduce the French metrical system. ... I look upon our English system as a wickedly, brain-destroying system of bondage under which we suffer. The reason why we continue to use it, is the imaginary difficulty of making a change, and nothing else; but I do not think in America that any such difficulty should stand in the way of adopting so splendidly useful a reform.
Journal of the Franklin Institute, Nov 1884, 118, 321-341
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Brain (270)  |  British (41)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Country (251)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Hope (299)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Metric System (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Power (746)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reform (22)  |  Stand (274)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Rosalind Franklin quote: In my view, all that is necessary for faith is the belief that by doing our best we shall come nearer
Your theories are those which you and many other people find easiest and pleasantest to believe, but, so far as I can see, they have no foundation other than they lead to a pleasant view of life … I agree that faith is essential to success in life … but I do not accept your definition of faith, i.e. belief in life after death. In my view, all that is necessary for faith is the belief that by doing our best we shall come nearer to success and that success in our aims (the improvement of the lot of mankind, present and future) is worth attaining … I maintain that faith in this world is perfectly possible without faith in another world.
Letter to her father, Ellis Franklin (undated, summer 1940? while she was an undergraduate at Cambridge). Excerpted in Brenda Maddox, The Dark Lady of DNA (2002), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Death (388)  |  Definition (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Future (429)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lot (151)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

[About the great synthesis of atomic physics in the 1920s:] It was a heroic time. It was not the doing of any one man; it involved the collaboration of scores of scientists from many different lands. But from the first to last the deeply creative, subtle and critical spirit of Niels Bohr guided, restrained, deepened and finally transmuted the enterprise.
Quoted in Bill Becker, 'Pioneer of the Atom', New York Times Sunday Magazine (20 Oct 1957), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critical (66)  |  Deep (233)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Involved (90)  |  Land (115)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transmutation (22)

[At DuPont,] I was very fortunate that I worked under men who were very much interested in making discoveries and inventions. They were very much interested in what they were doing, and they left me alone. And I was able to experiment on my own, and I found this very stimulating. It appealed to the creative person in me.
From transcript for video interview (2007, published Aug 2012), 'Stephanie Kwolek: Curiosity and the Discovery of Kevlar', in the series Women in Chemistry, on Chemical Heritage Foundation website.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Making (300)  |  Person (363)  |  Research (664)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Work (1351)

[Fritz Haber's] greatness lies in his scientific ideas and in the depth of his searching. The thought, the plan, and the process are more important to him than the completion. The creative process gives him more pleasure than the yield, the finished piece. Success is immaterial. “Doing it was wonderful.” His work is nearly always uneconomical, with the wastefulness of the rich.
In Richard Willstätter, Arthur Stoll (ed. of the original German) and Lilli S. Hornig (trans.), From My Life: The Memoirs of Richard Willstätter (1958), 268.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Completion (22)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Depth (94)  |  Finish (59)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Fritz Haber (4)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immaterial (6)  |  Importance (286)  |  Lie (364)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Plan (117)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Process (423)  |  Rich (62)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Success (302)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wastefulness (2)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

[In my early youth, walking with my father,] “See that bird?” he says. “It’s a Spencer’s warbler.” (I knew he didn’t know the real name.) “Well, in Italian, it’s a Chutto Lapittida. In Portuguese, it’s a Bom da Peida. In Chinese, it’s a Chung-long-tah, and in Japanese, it’s a Katano Tekeda. You can know the name of that bird in all the languages of the world, but when you’re finished, you’ll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird. You’ll only know about humans in different places, and what they call the bird. So let’s look at the bird and see what it’s doing—that’s what counts.” (I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.)
In 'The Making of a Scientist', What Do You Care What Other People Think?": Further Adventures of a Curious Character (2001), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Count (105)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Early (185)  |  Father (110)  |  Finish (59)  |  Human (1468)  |  Italian (12)  |  Japanese (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Warbler (2)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

[It] is not the nature of things for any one man to make a sudden, violent discovery; science goes step by step and every man depends on the work of his predecessors. When you hear of a sudden unexpected discovery—a bolt from the blue—you can always be sure that it has grown up by the influence of one man or another, and it is the mutual influence which makes the enormous possibility of scientific advance. Scientists are not dependent on the ideas of a single man, but on the combined wisdom of thousands of men, all thinking of the same problem and each doing his little bit to add to the great structure of knowledge which is gradually being erected.
Concluding remark in Lecture ii (1936) on 'Forty Years of Physics', revised and prepared for publication by J.A. Ratcliffe, collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.), Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 73-74. Note that the words as prepared for publication may not be verbatim as spoken in the original lecture by the then late Lord Rutherford.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bit (22)  |  Blue (56)  |  Bolt (9)  |  Bolt From The Blue (2)  |  Combined (3)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Erected (2)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hear (139)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Make (25)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Violent (17)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Work (1351)

[N]o scientist likes to be criticized. … But you don’t reply to critics: “Wait a minute, wait a minute; this is a really good idea. I’m very fond of it. It’s done you no harm. Please don’t attack it.” That's not the way it goes. The hard but just rule is that if the ideas don't work, you must throw them away. Don't waste any neurons on what doesn’t work. Devote those neurons to new ideas that better explain the data. Valid criticism is doing you a favor.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attack (84)  |  Better (486)  |  Critic (20)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Data (156)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Favor (63)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Harm (39)  |  Idea (843)  |  Minute (125)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neuron (9)  |  New (1216)  |  Please (65)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Validity (47)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

[Overfishing—] it’s not just that we’re taking too many out, it’s how we’re doing it. We are wiping out their nurseries, … [because some huge boats] … bottom trawl … [with] nets that 50 years ago you’d have to lift when you came to coral reefs or rocks or nooks and crannies. Now they’re so sophisticated and so heavy, the equipment, and the boat’s so powerful they can just drag right over the coral reefs and the rocks and the nooks and crannies, and turn them into a gravel pit. … The trouble is those are the nurseries. That’s where the little fish hide and get bigger and get big enough for us to eat.
From transcript of PBS TV interview by Tavis Smiley (28 Mar 2011).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Boat (16)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Cranny (2)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drag (4)  |  Eat (104)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Fish (120)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Hide (69)  |  Huge (25)  |  Lift (55)  |  Little (707)  |  Net (11)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Pit (19)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Trawling (6)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wipe Out (3)  |  Year (933)

[The heart is] really a fascinating organ. It's about the only organ in the body that you can really witness its function. Doing things. And so on. Some of the other organs you can witness, like the intestines, will have this sort of peristaltic motion. But nothing that can compare with the activity of the human heart.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Body (537)  |  Compare (69)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Function (228)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witness (54)

[Tom Bombadil is] an exemplar, a particular embodying of pure (real) natural science: the spirit that desires knowledge of other things