Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Intelligent

Intelligent Quotes (35 quotes)

[About Pierre de Fermat] It cannot be denied that he has had many exceptional ideas, and that he is a highly intelligent man. For my part, however, I have always been taught to take a broad overview of things, in order to be able to deduce from them general rules, which might be applicable elsewhere.
Quoted, without source, in The Grolier Library of Science Biographies (1996), Vol. 3, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Broad (18)  |  Elsewhere (7)  |  Exceptional (6)  |  Pierre de Fermat (8)  |  General (92)  |  Idea (440)  |  Rule (135)

A hypothesis may be simply defined as a guess. A scientific hypothesis is an intelligent guess.
In Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  Guess (36)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Simple (111)

A universe without law would be a universe without order, without the possibility of science, and the manifestations of an intelligent governor and creator.
Presidential address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (22 Aug 1850),The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 8, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Creator (40)  |  Governor (7)  |  Law (418)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Order (167)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Universe (563)

All material Things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid Particles … variously associated with the first Creation by the Counsel of an intelligent Agent. For it became him who created them to set them in order: and if he did so, it is unphilosophical to seek for any other Origin of the World, or to pretend that it might arise out of a Chaos by the mere Laws of Nature.
From Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 377-378.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Arise (32)  |  Associated (2)  |  Big Bang (38)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Composed (3)  |  Counsel (5)  |  Creation (211)  |  Hard (70)  |  Law (418)  |  Material (124)  |  Mere (41)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin (77)  |  Origin Of Earth (8)  |  Origin Of The Universe (13)  |  Particle (90)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Seek (57)  |  Solid (34)  |  World (667)

And from true lordship it follows that the true God is living, intelligent, and powerful; from the other perfections, that he is supreme, or supremely perfect. He is eternal and infinite, omnipotent and omniscient; that is, he endures from eternity to eternity; and he is present from infinity to infinity; he rules all things, and he knows all things that happen or can happen.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), General Scholium, 941.
Science quotes on:  |  Endure (12)  |  Eternity (44)  |  God (454)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Omniscient (3)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Supreme (24)

Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage - to move in the opposite direction.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Big (33)  |  Complex (78)  |  Courage (39)  |  Direction (56)  |  Fool (70)  |  Genius (186)  |  Lot (23)  |  Move (58)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Touch (48)  |  Violent (15)

At this very minute, with almost absolute certainty, radio waves sent forth by other intelligent civilizations are falling on the earth. A telescope can be built that, pointed in the right place, and tuned to the right frequency, could discover these waves. Someday, from somewhere out among the stars, will come the answers to many of the oldest, most important, and most exciting questions mankind has asked.
In Intelligent Life in Space (1962), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Discover (115)  |  Earth (487)  |  Exciting (14)  |  Fall (89)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Important (124)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Oldest (6)  |  Question (315)  |  Star (251)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Tune (9)

Faced with a new mutation in an organism, or a fundamental change in its living conditions, the biologist is frequently in no position whatever to predict its future prospects. He has to wait and see. For instance, the hairy mammoth seems to have been an admirable animal, intelligent and well-accoutered. Now that it is extinct, we try to understand why it failed. I doubt that any biologist thinks he could have predicted that failure. Fitness and survival are by nature estimates of past performance.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Animal (309)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Change (291)  |  Condition (119)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Extinct (7)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fitness (7)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Future (229)  |  Hairy (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Mammoth (7)  |  Mutation (25)  |  New (340)  |  Organism (126)  |  Past (109)  |  Performance (27)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Survival (49)  |  Understanding (317)

For those of us who make only a brief study of chemistry, the benefits to be expected are of an indirect nature. Increased capacity for enjoyment, a livelier interest in the world in which we live, a more intelligent attitude toward the great questions of the day—these are the by-products of a well-balanced education, including chemistry in its proper relation to other studies.
In 'Introduction', General Chemistry: An Elementary Survey Emphasizing Industrial Applications of Fundamental Principles (1923), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (47)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Brief (14)  |  Byproduct (3)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Education (280)  |  Enjoyment (27)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Increase (107)  |  Indirect (8)  |  Interest (170)  |  Life (917)  |  Livelier (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Question (315)  |  Relation (96)  |  Study (331)  |  Well-Balanced (3)  |  World (667)

Freeman’s gift? It’s cosmic. He is able to see more interconnections between more things than almost anybody. He sees the interrelationships, whether it’s in some microscopic physical process or in a big complicated machine like Orion. He has been, from the time he was in his teens, capable of understanding essentially anything that he’s interested in. He’s the most intelligent person I know.
As quoted in Kenneth Brower, 'The Danger of Cosmic Genius', The Atlantic (Dec 2010). Webmaster note: The Orion Project was a study of the possibility of nuclear powered propulsion of spacecraft.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (26)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Connection (86)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Freeman Dyson (43)  |  Gift (47)  |  Interested (4)  |  Know (321)  |  Machine (133)  |  Microscopic (10)  |  Person (114)  |  Physical (94)  |  Process (201)  |  Relationship (59)  |  See (197)  |  Teen (2)  |  Understand (189)

I believe ... that we can still have a genre of scientific books suitable for and accessible alike to professionals and interested laypeople. The concepts of science, in all their richness and ambiguity, can be presented without any compromise, without any simplification counting as distortion, in language accessible to all intelligent people ... I hope that this book can be read with profit both in seminars for graduate students and–if the movie stinks and you forgot your sleeping pills–on the businessman’s special to Tokyo.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (11)  |  Alike (10)  |  Ambiguity (9)  |  Belief (400)  |  Book (181)  |  Both (52)  |  Compromise (4)  |  Concept (102)  |  Count (34)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Forget (40)  |  Genre (3)  |  Hope (129)  |  Interest (170)  |  Language (155)  |  Laypeople (2)  |  Movie (8)  |  People (269)  |  Pill (5)  |  Present (103)  |  Professional (27)  |  Profit (28)  |  Read (83)  |  Richness (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Seminar (3)  |  Simplification (12)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Special (51)  |  Stink (5)  |  Suitable (6)  |  Tokyo (2)

I believe that the science of chemistry alone almost proves the existence of an intelligent creator.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Belief (400)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Creator (40)  |  Existence (254)  |  Prove (60)  |  Science (1699)

If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Read (83)  |  Want (120)

If, then, there must be something eternal, let us see what sort of Being it must be. And to that it is very obvious to Reason, that it must necessarily be a cogitative Being. For it is as impossible to conceive that ever bare incogitative Matter should produce a thinking intelligent Being, as that nothing should of itself produce Matter...
In Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690, 1801), Book 4, Chap. 10, Sec. 10, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (5)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Matter (270)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Produce (63)  |  Reason (330)  |  Thinking (222)

In essence, science is a perpetual search for an intelligent and integrated comprehension of the world we live in.
In Matthew M. Radmanesh, Cracking the Code of Our Physical Universe (2006), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Essence (42)  |  Integration (12)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Live (186)  |  Perpetual (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Search (85)  |  World (667)

In the light of knowledge attained, the happy achievement seems almost a matter of course, and any intelligent student can grasp it without too much trouble. But the years of anxious searching in the dark, with their intense longing, their alternations of confidence and exhaustion, and the final emergence into the light—only those who have experienced it can understand that.
Quoted in Banesh Hoffmann and Helen Dukas, Albert Einstein: Creator and Rebel (1972), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Alternation (5)  |  Anxious (2)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Dark (49)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Experience (268)  |  Final (33)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Intense (11)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Light (246)  |  Long (95)  |  Search (85)  |  Student (131)  |  Understand (189)  |  Year (214)

It doesn’t take a scientist to realize that a chimpanzee or a dog is an intelligent animal. Instead, it takes a bigoted human to suggest that it’s not.
In The Omni Interviews (1984), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Dog (39)  |  Human (445)  |  Instead (12)

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most responsive to change.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Species (181)  |  Strong (47)  |  Survive (28)

I’m not an atheist and I don’t think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It doe s not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn’t know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Atheist (13)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Book (181)  |  Call (68)  |  Child (189)  |  Different (110)  |  Dimly (4)  |  Enter (20)  |  Fill (35)  |  God (454)  |  Huge (15)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Know (321)  |  Language (155)  |  Library (37)  |  Little (126)  |  Myself (22)  |  Mysterious (21)  |  Order (167)  |  Position (54)  |  Seem (89)  |  Someone (13)  |  Suspect (12)  |  Think (205)  |  Toward (29)  |  Write (87)

Out of all possible universes, the only one which can exist, in the sense that it can be known, is simply the one which satisfies the narrow conditions necessary for the development of intelligent life.
From In the Centre of Immensities: Creation (1979), as cited in Bill Swainson, The Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 579.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (119)  |  Development (228)  |  Exist (89)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Possible (100)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Sense (240)  |  Simple (111)  |  Universe (563)

Philosophers no longer write for the intelligent, only for their fellow professionals. The few thousand academic philosophers in the world do not stint themselves: they maintain more than seventy learned journals. But in the handful that cover more than one subdivision of philosophy, any given philosopher can hardly follow more than one or two articles in each issue. This hermetic condition is attributed to “technical problems” in the subject. Since William James, Russell, and Whitehead, philosophy, like history, has been confiscated by scholarship and locked away from the contamination of general use.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (12)  |  Article (15)  |  Attribute (22)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contamination (4)  |  Cover (23)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Follow (66)  |  General (92)  |  Give (117)  |  Handful (6)  |  Hardly (12)  |  Hermetic (2)  |  History (302)  |  Issue (37)  |  William James (42)  |  Journal (13)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lock (9)  |  Long (95)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Problem (362)  |  Professional (27)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Subdivision (2)  |  Subject (129)  |  Technical (26)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Whitehead (2)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)

Science by itself produces a very badly deformed man who becomes rounded out into a useful creative being only with great difficulty and large expenditure of time. … It is a much smaller matter to both teach and learn pure science than it is to intelligently apply this science to the solution of problems as they arise in daily life.
As quoted in Gary W. Matkin, Technology Transfer and the University (1990), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (38)  |  Arise (32)  |  Bad (78)  |  Become (100)  |  Creative (41)  |  Daily (19)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Expenditure (4)  |  Great (300)  |  Large (82)  |  Learn (160)  |  Life (917)  |  Matter (270)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Pure (62)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Round (15)  |  Science (1699)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Solution (168)  |  Teach (102)  |  Time (439)  |  Useful (66)

Science gives us the grounds of premises from which religious truths are to be inferred; but it does not set about inferring them, much less does it reach the inference;Mthat is not its province. It brings before us phenomena, and it leaves us, if we will, to call them works of design, wisdom, or benevolence; and further still, if we will, to proceed to confess an Intelligent Creator. We have to take its facts, and to give them a meaning, and to draw our own conclusions from them. First comes Knowledge, then a view, then reasoning, then belief. This is why Science has so little of a religious tendency; deductions have no power of persuasion. The heart is commonly reached, not through the reason, but through the imagination, by means of direct impressions, by the testimony of facts and events, by history, by description. Persons influence us, voices melt us, looks subdue us, deeds inflame us. Many a man will live and die upon a dogma; no man will be a martyr for a conclusion.
Tamworth Reading Room (1841).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Benevolence (5)  |  Bring (53)  |  Call (68)  |  Commonly (7)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Confess (9)  |  Creator (40)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deed (17)  |  Description (72)  |  Design (92)  |  Die (46)  |  Direct (44)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Draw (25)  |  Event (97)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  First (174)  |  Give (117)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  History (302)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impression (51)  |  Infer (10)  |  Inference (26)  |  Influence (110)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Leave (63)  |  Less (54)  |  Little (126)  |  Live (186)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Melt (15)  |  Person (114)  |  Persuasion (3)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Power (273)  |  Premise (14)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Province (11)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reason (330)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Subdue (5)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Truth (750)  |  View (115)  |  Voice (41)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Work (457)

So then Gravity may put ye Planets into Motion, but without ye divine Power it could never put them into such a Circulating Motion as they have about ye Sun; & therefore, for this, as well as other Reasons, I am compelled to ascribe ye Frame of this Systeme to an intelligent agent.
Letter to Richard Bently (17 Jan 1693). 189.R.4.47, f. 5A, Trinity College Library, Cambridge.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Divine (42)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Motion (127)  |  Planet (199)  |  Power (273)  |  Reason (330)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Sun (211)

The final results [of his work on the theory of relativity] appear almost simple; any intelligent undergraduate can understand them without much trouble. But the years of searching in the dark for a truth that one feels, but cannot express; the intense effort and the alternations of confidence and misgiving, until one breaks through to clarity and understanding, are only known to him who has himself experienced them.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternation (5)  |  Appear (55)  |  Break (33)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Dark (49)  |  Effort (94)  |  Experience (268)  |  Express (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Final (33)  |  Intense (11)  |  Know (321)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Search (85)  |  Simple (111)  |  Theory Of Relativity (12)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Truth (750)  |  Undergraduate (8)  |  Understand (189)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)

The first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  First (174)  |  Part (146)  |  Rule (135)  |  Save (46)  |  Tinker (5)

The most important effect of the suffrage is psychological. The permanent consciousness of power for effective action, the knowledge that their own thoughts have an equal chance with those of any other person … this is what has always rendered the men of a free state so energetic, so acutely intelligent, so powerful.
In “Common Sense” Applied to Woman Suffrage (1894), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Chance (122)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Effect (133)  |  Effective (20)  |  Energetic (5)  |  Equal (53)  |  Important (124)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Power (273)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Psychological (10)  |  Suffrage (4)  |  Thought (374)

The only distinct meaning of the word “natural” is stated, fixed, or settled; since what is natural as much requires and presupposes an intelligent agent to render it so, i.e. to effect it continually or at stated times, as what is supernatural or miraculous does to effect it for once.
In The Analogy of Revealed Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature (1791), 43. Charles Darwin placed this quote on the title page of his On the Origin of Species.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Miraculous (7)  |  Natural (128)  |  Presuppose (3)  |  Render (17)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Settled (3)  |  Stated (2)  |  Supernatural (19)  |  Word (221)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Cure (88)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Dog (39)  |  Good (228)  |  Harm (31)  |  Honesty (16)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Inaccurate (3)  |  Insatiable (4)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Observation (418)  |  Pathologist (4)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Praise (17)  |  Profit (28)  |  Prototype (5)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (46)  |  Scoundrel (6)  |  Secret (98)  |  Slave (21)  |  Society (188)  |  Soul (139)  |  Thirst (9)  |  Unjust (5)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Value (180)

This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful Being.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 39
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Comet (43)  |  Counsel (5)  |  Dominion (6)  |  Planet (199)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Sun (211)  |  System (141)

To save every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.
Round River
Science quotes on:  |  Cog (3)  |  Conservation (139)  |  First (174)  |  Precaution (4)  |  Save (46)  |  Tinker (5)  |  Wheel (13)

We all agree now - by “we” I mean intelligent people under sixty - that a work of art is like a rose. A rose is not beautiful because it is like something else. Neither is a work of art. Roses and works of art are beautiful in themselves.
In Since Cezanne (1922), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (19)  |  Art (205)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Mean (63)  |  People (269)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Work (457)

What can be more important than the science of life to any intelligent being who has the good fortune to be alive?
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Biology (150)  |  Fortune (23)  |  Important (124)  |  Life (917)  |  Science (1699)

With highly civilised nations continued progress depends in a subordinate degree on natural selection; for such nations do not supplant and exterminate one another as do savage tribes. Nevertheless the more intelligent members within the same community will succeed better in the long run than the inferior, and leave a more numerous progeny, and this is a form of natural selection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Civilised (3)  |  Community (65)  |  Continue (38)  |  Degree (48)  |  Depend (56)  |  Exterminate (7)  |  Form (210)  |  Highly (8)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Leave (63)  |  Long (95)  |  Member (27)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Progeny (6)  |  Progress (317)  |  Run (33)  |  Same (92)  |  Savage (23)  |  Subordinate (6)  |  Succeed (11)  |  Supplant (2)  |  Tribe (10)

[At my secondary school] if you were very bright, you did classics; if you were pretty thick, you did woodwork; and if you were neither of those poles, you did science. The number of kids in my school who did science because they were excited by the notion of science was pretty small. You were allocated to those things, you weren’t asked. This was in the late 1930s/early 1940s … Science was seen as something more remote and less to do with everyday life.
From interview with Brian Cox and Robert Ince, in 'A Life Measured in Heartbeats', New Statesman (21 Dec 2012), 141, No. 5138, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Allocated (2)  |  Excited (6)  |  Remote (27)  |  School (87)  |  Science (1699)  |  Student (131)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.