Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Person

Person Quotes (153 quotes)

'Normal' science, in Kuhn's sense, exists. It is the activity of the non-revolutionary, or more precisely, the not-too-critical professional: of the science student who accepts the ruling dogma of the day... in my view the 'normal' scientist, as Kuhn describes him, is a person one ought to be sorry for... He has been taught in a dogmatic spirit: he is a victim of indoctrination... I can only say that I see a very great danger in it and in the possibility of its becoming normal... a danger to science and, indeed, to our civilization. And this shows why I regard Kuhn's emphasis on the existence of this kind of science as so important.
'Normal Science and its Dangers', in I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave (eds.), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge (1970), 52-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Civilization (174)  |  Criticism (60)  |  Danger (78)  |  Description (84)  |  Dogmatism (10)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Existence (296)  |  Importance (216)  |  Indoctrination (2)  |  Kind (138)  |  Thomas S. Kuhn (22)  |  Normal (27)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Professional (37)  |  Revolutionary (16)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sorry (16)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Victim (13)

[When questioned on his longevity] First of all, I selected my ancestors very wisely. ... They were long-lived, healthy people. Then, as a chemist, I know how to eat, how to exercise, keep my blood circulating. ... I don't worry. I don't get angry at people. I don't worry about things I can't help. I do what I can to make the world a better place to live, but I don't complain if things aren't right. As a scientist I take the world as I find it.
[About celebrating his 77th birthday by swimming a half mile in 22 minutes] I used swim fins and webbed gloves because a man of intelligence should apply his power efficiently, not just churn the water.
As quoted in obituary by Wallace Turner, 'Joel Hildebrand, 101', New York Times (3 May 1983), D27.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (40)  |  Anger (16)  |  Application (166)  |  Better (190)  |  Blood (104)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Churn (3)  |  Circulation (18)  |  Complaint (10)  |  Eating (21)  |  Efficiency (30)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Fin (3)  |  Glove (4)  |  Health (153)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Life (1124)  |  Long-Lived (2)  |  Longevity (6)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Power (358)  |  Selection (32)  |  Swimming (5)  |  Water (292)  |  Web (15)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  World (892)  |  Worry (33)

A celebrity is a person who is known for his well-knownness.
In The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America (1961), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Celebrity (8)  |  Know (547)

A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.
Anonymous
Widely found on the web as an Einstein quote, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help? It is probably yet another example of a “wise” quote to which Einstein’s name has been falsely attributed. For authentic quotes see Albert Einstein Quotes on Problem.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (52)  |  Clever (18)  |  Problem (490)  |  Solve (76)  |  Wise (60)

A good work of visual art carries a person who is capable of appreciating it out of life into ecstasy.
In Art (1913), 29-30
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (29)  |  Art (284)  |  Capable (49)  |  Carry (59)  |  Ecstasy (8)  |  Good (345)  |  Life (1124)  |  Visual (15)  |  Work (626)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Achievement (150)  |  Affection (18)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Call (127)  |  Circle (55)  |  Compassion (9)  |  Completely (32)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Creature (154)  |  Delusion (22)  |  Desire (140)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Experience (338)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Free (90)  |  Human Being (73)  |  Inner (39)  |  Kind (138)  |  Liberation (10)  |  Limit (123)  |  Live (269)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Optical (3)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Part (220)  |  Personal (66)  |  Prison (9)  |  Rest (92)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Security (33)  |  Separate (69)  |  Strive (43)  |  Task (83)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time And Space (31)  |  Universe (683)  |  Whole (189)  |  Widen (4)

A neurotic person can be most simply described as someone who, while he was growing up, learned ways of behaving that are self-defeating in his society.
In Margaret Mead and Rhoda Bubendey Métraux (ed.), Margaret Mead, Some Personal Views (1979), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (17)  |  Defeat (18)  |  Describe (56)  |  Growing (15)  |  Learn (281)  |  Neurotic (5)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Self (47)  |  Simple (172)  |  Society (227)

A perfectly normal person is rare in our civilization.
Quoted in obituary, Time magazine (15 Dec 1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (174)  |  Normal (27)  |  Rare (47)

A person by study must try to disengage the subject from useless matter, and to seize on points capable of improvement. ... When subjects are viewed through the mists of prejudice, useful truths may escape.
In An Essay on Aërial Navigation, With Some Observations on Ships (1844), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (37)  |  Disengage (3)  |  Escape (46)  |  Improvement (73)  |  Matter (340)  |  Mist (9)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Seize (14)  |  Study (461)  |  Subject (235)  |  Truth (914)  |  Trying (19)  |  Usefulness (77)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  View (171)

A person filled with gumption doesn’t sit about stewing about things. He’s at the front of the train of his own awareness, watching to see what’s up the track and meeting it when it comes. That’s gumption. If you’re going to repair a motorcycle, an adequate supply of gumption is the first and most important tool. If you haven’t got that you might as well gather up all the other tools and put them away, because they won’t do you any good.
In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974), 272.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (25)  |  Awareness (27)  |  Fill (61)  |  First (313)  |  Front (16)  |  Gather (39)  |  Good (345)  |  Gumption (2)  |  Important (202)  |  Meet (31)  |  Motorcycle (2)  |  Repair (11)  |  See (369)  |  Sit (47)  |  Stew (2)  |  Supply (46)  |  Tool (87)  |  Track (14)  |  Train (45)  |  Watch (64)

A person starts to live when he can live outside himself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Live (269)  |  Outside (48)  |  Start (97)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Appear (115)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Become (172)  |  Best (172)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Capable (49)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cling (6)  |  Completely (32)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Concern (108)  |  Conflict (55)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Content (66)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Count (48)  |  Definition (191)  |  Depth (50)  |  Desire (140)  |  Devout (5)  |  Divine (60)  |  Domain (40)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Effect (165)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Enlightened (7)  |  Exist (147)  |  Extend (41)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Force (249)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Goal (100)  |  Important (202)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Kind (138)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Object (169)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outside (48)  |  Personality (47)  |  Possible (155)  |  Rational (56)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Religion (239)  |  Religious (49)  |  Remain (111)  |  Require (79)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Seem (143)  |  Selfish (3)  |  Sense (315)  |  Significance (71)  |  Spinoza (4)  |  Strengthen (20)  |  Superpersonal (2)  |  Thought (536)  |  Unite (21)  |  Value (240)

A person with strength of character is one who has strong feelings, and strong command over them.
Aphorism in The Philistine (Jan 1905), 20, No. 2, 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Character (115)  |  Command (27)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Strength (79)  |  Strong (72)

A research laboratory jealous of its reputation has to develop less formal, more intimate ways of forming a corporate judgment of the work its people do. The best laboratories in university departments are well known for their searching, mutual questioning.
In Editorial, 'Is Science Really a Pack of Lies', Nature (1983), 303, 1257. As quoted and cited in Bradley P. Fuhrman, Jerry J. Zimmerman, Pediatric Critical Care (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (172)  |  Corporate (3)  |  Department (47)  |  Develop (103)  |  Formal (29)  |  Forming (7)  |  Intimate (14)  |  Jealous (3)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Known (16)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Mutual (27)  |  Question (404)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Research (589)  |  Searching (5)  |  University (80)  |  Way (37)  |  Work (626)

A statistician is one who has learned how to get valid evidence from statistics and how (usually) to avoid being misled by irrelevant facts. It’s too bad that we apply the same name to this kind of person that we use for those who only tabulate. It’s as if we had the same name for barbers and brain surgeons because they both work on the head.
In How to Tell the Liars from the Statisticians (1983), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (52)  |  Barber (5)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Fact (725)  |  Head (80)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Learn (281)  |  Mislead (4)  |  Name (165)  |  Same (155)  |  Statistician (19)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Tabulate (2)  |  Valid (11)  |  Work (626)

A very sincere and serious freshman student came to my office with a question that had clearly been troubling him deeply. He said to me, ‘I am a devout Christian and have never had any reason to doubt evolution, an idea that seems both exciting and well documented. But my roommate, a proselytizing evangelical, has been insisting with enormous vigor that I cannot be both a real Christian and an evolutionist. So tell me, can a person believe both in God and in evolution?’ Again, I gulped hard, did my intellectual duty, a nd reassured him that evolution was both true and entirely compatible with Christian belief –a position that I hold sincerely, but still an odd situation for a Jewish agnostic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (7)  |  Belief (503)  |  Both (81)  |  Christian (21)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Devout (5)  |  Document (7)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Duty (68)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Exciting (17)  |  Freshman (3)  |  God (535)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hold (92)  |  Idea (577)  |  Insist (19)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Jewish (10)  |  Nd (2)  |  Odd (13)  |  Office (22)  |  Position (75)  |  Question (404)  |  Real (148)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reassure (7)  |  Roommate (2)  |  Say (228)  |  Seem (143)  |  Serious (52)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Sincerely (3)  |  Situation (52)  |  Student (201)  |  Tell (110)  |  Trouble (72)  |  True (201)  |  Vigor (7)

A young person who reads a science book is confronted with a number of facts, x = ma … ma - me² … You never see in the scientific books what lies behind the discovery—the struggle and the passion of the person, who made that discovery.
From 'Asking Nature', collected in Lewis Wolpert and Alison Richards (eds.), Passionate Minds: The Inner World of Scientists (1997), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Confront (17)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Fact (725)  |  Number (276)  |  Passion (70)  |  Read (144)  |  Science (2043)  |  See (369)  |  Struggle (77)  |  Young (98)

All our knowledge has been built communally; there would be no astrophysics, there would be no history, there would not even be language, if man were a solitary animal. What follows? It follows that we must be able to rely on other people; we must be able to trust their word. That is, it follows that there is a principle, which binds society together because without it the individual would be helpless to tell the truth from the false. This principle is truthfulness.
In Lecture at M.I.T. (19 Mar 1953), collected in 'The Sense of Human Dignity', Science and Human Values (1956, 1990), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Astrophysics (14)  |  Bind (25)  |  Build (117)  |  Communal (7)  |  False (98)  |  Helpless (7)  |  History (368)  |  Individual (215)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Language (217)  |  Principle (285)  |  Rely (11)  |  Society (227)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Trust (49)  |  Truth (914)

Among people I have met, the few whom I would term “great” all share a kind of unquestioned, fierce dedication; an utter lack of doubt about the value of their activities (or at least an internal impulse that drives through any such angst); and above all, a capacity to work (or at least to be mentally alert for unexpected insights) at every available moment of every day of their lives.
From The Lying Stones of Marrakech: Penultimate Reflections in Natural History (2000), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Alert (6)  |  Angst (2)  |  Available (25)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Drive (55)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Great (524)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Insight (69)  |  Internal (23)  |  Kind (138)  |  Lack (77)  |  Least (74)  |  Life (1124)  |  Mentally (3)  |  Met (2)  |  Moment (106)  |  Share (49)  |  Term (120)  |  Unexpected (36)  |  Unquestioned (6)  |  Utter (7)  |  Value (240)  |  Work (626)

An age is called Dark, not because the light fails to shine, but because people refuse to see.
From Space: A Novel (1983), 709. As cited by David G. Anderson, 'Archaic Mounds and Southeastern Tribal Societies', in Jon L. Gibson, Philip J. Carr (ed.), Signs of Power: The Rise of Cultural Complexity in the Southeast (2004), 297. A footnote by Anderson explains that Michener described the supernova of 1054 A.D. which blazed for 23 days and was recorded around the world, except in western Europe where religious dogma insisted the heavens were immutable. The quote above was Michener’s comment on that “refusal to see.”.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Called (9)  |  Dark (76)  |  Failing (5)  |  Light (345)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Shining (8)

An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.
As quoted by Edward Teller, in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Expert (50)  |  Field (170)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Narrow (48)

An intimate friend and a hated enemy have always been indispensable requirements for my emotional life; I have always been able to create them anew, and not infrequently my childish ideal has been so closely approached that friend and enemy coincided in the same person.
The Interpretation of Dreams (1913), 385. Sigmund Freud - 1913
Science quotes on:  |  Anew (8)  |  Approach (53)  |  Childish (7)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Create (150)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Enemy (63)  |  Friend (85)  |  Hatred (19)  |  Ideal (69)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Infrequently (2)  |  Intimate (14)  |  Life (1124)  |  Requirement (46)

And, in this case, science could learn an important lesson from the literati–who love contingency for the same basic reason that scientists tend to regard the theme with suspicion. Because, in contingency lies the power of each person, to make a difference in an unconstrained world bristling with possibilities, and nudgeable by the smallest of unpredictable inputs into markedly different channels spelling either vast improvement or potential disaster.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (66)  |  Bristle (3)  |  Case (98)  |  Channel (21)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (178)  |  Disaster (40)  |  Important (202)  |  Improvement (73)  |  Input (2)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Lie (115)  |  Love (221)  |  Markedly (2)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Potential (39)  |  Power (358)  |  Reason (454)  |  Regard (93)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Small (161)  |  Spell (9)  |  Suspicion (28)  |  Tend (36)  |  Theme (12)  |  Unconstrained (2)  |  Unpredictable (10)  |  Vast (88)  |  World (892)

Another great and special excellence of mathematics is that it demands earnest voluntary exertion. It is simply impossible for a person to become a good mathematician by the happy accident of having been sent to a good school; this may give him a preparation and a start, but by his own individual efforts alone can he reach an eminent position.
In Conflict of Studies (1873), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (65)  |  Alone (101)  |  Become (172)  |  Demand (74)  |  Earnest (2)  |  Effort (143)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Excellence (33)  |  Exertion (13)  |  Give (200)  |  Good (345)  |  Great (524)  |  Happy (46)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Individual (215)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Position (75)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Reach (119)  |  School (117)  |  Send (22)  |  Simply (52)  |  Special (74)  |  Start (97)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  Voluntary (3)

Being perpetually charmed by his familiar siren, that is, by his geometry, he [Archimedes] neglected to eat and drink and took no care of his person; that he was often carried by force to the baths, and when there he would trace geometrical figures in the ashes of the fire, and with his finger draws lines upon his body when it was anointed with oil, being in a state of great ecstasy and divinely possessed by his science.
Plutarch
As translated in George Finlay Simmons, Calculus Gems: Brief Lives and Memorable Mathematics, (1992), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (53)  |  Ash (19)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (243)  |  Care (95)  |  Carry (59)  |  Charm (26)  |  Divine (60)  |  Draw (55)  |  Drink (36)  |  Eat (52)  |  Ecstasy (8)  |  Familiar (42)  |  Figure (68)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (132)  |  Force (249)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Great (524)  |  Line (89)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Often (106)  |  Oil (39)  |  Perpetual (20)  |  Possess (53)  |  Science (2043)  |  Siren (4)  |  State (136)  |  Trace (51)

But it is precisely mathematics, and the pure science generally, from which the general educated public and independent students have been debarred, and into which they have only rarely attained more than a very meagre insight. The reason of this is twofold. In the first place, the ascendant and consecutive character of mathematical knowledge renders its results absolutely insusceptible of presentation to persons who are unacquainted with what has gone before, and so necessitates on the part of its devotees a thorough and patient exploration of the field from the very beginning, as distinguished from those sciences which may, so to speak, be begun at the end, and which are consequently cultivated with the greatest zeal. The second reason is that, partly through the exigencies of academic instruction, but mainly through the martinet traditions of antiquity and the influence of mediaeval logic-mongers, the great bulk of the elementary text-books of mathematics have unconsciously assumed a very repellant form,—something similar to what is termed in the theory of protective mimicry in biology “the terrifying form.” And it is mainly to this formidableness and touch-me-not character of exterior, concealing withal a harmless body, that the undue neglect of typical mathematical studies is to be attributed.
In Editor’s Preface to Augustus De Morgan and Thomas J. McCormack (ed.), Elementary Illustrations of the Differential and Integral Calculus (1899), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Academic (18)  |  Antiquity (18)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Assume (37)  |  Attain (42)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Begin (106)  |  Biology (168)  |  Body (243)  |  Bulk (11)  |  Character (115)  |  Conceal (17)  |  Consecutive (2)  |  Consequent (4)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Debar (2)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Educated (11)  |  Elementary (45)  |  End (195)  |  Exigency (2)  |  Exploration (122)  |  Exterior (6)  |  Field (170)  |  Form (308)  |  Formidable (7)  |  General (156)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Independent (65)  |  Influence (137)  |  Insight (69)  |  Instruction (72)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Logic (247)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Meager (2)  |  Medieval (9)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Part (220)  |  Patient (125)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Presentation (17)  |  Protective (5)  |  Public (93)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Rarely (20)  |  Reason (454)  |  Render (30)  |  Repellent (4)  |  Result (376)  |  Science (2043)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Terrify (11)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Thorough (17)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Typical (13)  |  Unacquainted (2)  |  Unconscious (18)  |  Undue (4)  |  Zeal (11)

Can any thoughtful person admit for a moment that, in a society so constituted that these overwhelming contrasts of luxury and privation are looked upon as necessities, and are treated by the Legislature as matters with which it has practically nothing do, there is the smallest probability that we can deal successfully with such tremendous social problems as those which involve the marriage tie and the family relation as a means of promoting the physical and moral advancement of the race? What a mockery to still further whiten the sepulchre of society, in which is hidden ‘all manner of corruption,’ with schemes for the moral and physical advancement of the race!
In 'Human Selection', Fortnightly Review (1890),48, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (44)  |  Advancement (40)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Contrast (28)  |  Corruption (10)  |  Deal (49)  |  Family (45)  |  Further (6)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Involve (47)  |  Legislature (4)  |  Luxury (16)  |  Manner (57)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Matter (340)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mockery (2)  |  Moment (106)  |  Moral (123)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Overwhelming (21)  |  Physical (129)  |  Practically (10)  |  Privation (5)  |  Probability (106)  |  Problem (490)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Race (103)  |  Relation (149)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Sepulchre (3)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Social (108)  |  Society (227)  |  Successfully (5)  |  Thoughtful (10)  |  Tie (23)  |  Treated (2)  |  Tremendous (17)

Climate change threatens every corner of our country, every sector of our economy and the health and future of every child. We are already seeing its impacts and we know the poorest and most vulnerable people in the United States and around the world will suffer most of all.
In Hillary Clinton, 'Hillary Clinton: America Must Lead at Paris Climate Talks', Time (29 Nov 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  Child (245)  |  Climate Change (59)  |  Corner (29)  |  Country (144)  |  Economy (54)  |  Future (284)  |  Health (153)  |  Impact (26)  |  Poorest (2)  |  Sector (4)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Suffering (27)  |  Threat (29)  |  United States (31)  |  Vulnerable (5)  |  World (892)

Despite the high long-term probability of extinction, every organism alive today, including every person reading this paper, is a link in an unbroken chain of parent-offspring relationships that extends back unbroken to the beginning of life on earth. Every living organism is a part of an enormously long success story—each of its direct ancestors has been sufficiently well adapted to its physical and biological environments to allow it to mature and reproduce successfully. Viewed thus, adaptation is not a trivial facet of natural history, but a biological attribute so central as to be inseparable from life itself.
In 'Integrative Biology: An Organismic Biologist’s Point of View', Integrative and Comparative Biology (2005), 45, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (27)  |  Adaptation (49)  |  Alive (49)  |  Allow (44)  |  Ancestor (40)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Back (104)  |  Begin (106)  |  Biological (35)  |  Central (33)  |  Chain (50)  |  Despite (7)  |  Direct (82)  |  Enormously (4)  |  Environment (180)  |  Extend (41)  |  Extinction (66)  |  Facet (8)  |  High (152)  |  Include (40)  |  Inseparable (10)  |  Life (1124)  |  Life On Earth (9)  |  Link (41)  |  Live (269)  |  Long (172)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Mature (10)  |  Natural History (49)  |  Organism (150)  |  Paper (82)  |  Part (220)  |  Physical (129)  |  Probability (106)  |  Read (144)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Story (72)  |  Success (248)  |  Successfully (5)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Today (117)  |  Trivial (41)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  View (171)

Don’t worry about people stealing an idea. If it’s original, you will have to ram it down their throats.
As quoted, without citation, in Robert Slater, Portraits in Silicon (1987), 88. In reply to a student expressing concern that his own ideas might be stolen before he had published his own thesis. Also seen as “Don’t worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats,” in Eric A. Weiss, A Computer Science Reader: Selections from ABACUS (1988), 404. (The selections were published in the first three-and-a-half years of ABACUS, a quarterly journal for computing professionals.)
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (577)  |  Original (57)  |  Ram (3)  |  Steal (13)  |  Throat (10)  |  Worry (33)

Each person is an idiom unto himself, an apparent violation of the syntax of the species.
Becoming: Basic Considerations for a Psychology of Personality (1955), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Idiom (4)  |  Species (220)  |  Violation (6)

Education is a private matter between the person and the world of knowledge and experience, and has little to do with school or college.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  College (35)  |  Education (333)  |  Experience (338)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Little (184)  |  Matter (340)  |  Private (21)  |  School (117)  |  World (892)

Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and the convenience of people. In its modern form engineering involves people, money, materials, machines, and energy. It is differentiated from science because it is primarily concerned with how to direct to useful and economical ends the natural phenomena which scientists discover and formulate into acceptable theories. Engineering therefore requires above all the creative imagination to innovate useful applications of natural phenomena. It seeks newer, cheaper, better means of using natural sources of energy and materials.
In McGraw Hill, Science and Technology Encyclopedia
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptable (6)  |  Application (166)  |  Art (284)  |  Better (190)  |  Cheaper (6)  |  Concern (108)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Creative (58)  |  Differentiate (12)  |  Direct (82)  |  Directing (5)  |  Discover (196)  |  Economical (9)  |  End (195)  |  Energy (214)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Form (308)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Great (524)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Innovate (2)  |  Involve (47)  |  Machine (157)  |  Material (154)  |  Means (171)  |  Modern (159)  |  Money (142)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Power (358)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Require (79)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Seek (104)  |  Source (90)  |  Theory (690)  |  Useful (98)

Every uneducated person is a caricature of himself.
Aphorism 63 from Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797-1800). In Friedrich Schlegel, translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms (trans. 1968), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Caricature (6)  |  Uneducated (5)

For a smart material to be able to send out a more complex signal it needs to be nonlinear. If you hit a tuning fork twice as hard it will ring twice as loud but still at the same frequency. That’s a linear response. If you hit a person twice as hard they’re unlikely just to shout twice as loud. That property lets you learn more about the person than the tuning fork. - When Things Start to Think, 1999.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (94)  |  Frequency (14)  |  Hard (99)  |  Hit (20)  |  Learn (281)  |  Let (61)  |  Linear (4)  |  Loud (9)  |  Material (154)  |  Need (283)  |  Nonlinear (3)  |  Property (123)  |  Response (28)  |  Ring (16)  |  Same (155)  |  Send (22)  |  Shout (12)  |  Signal (18)  |  Smart (18)  |  Start (97)  |  Think (341)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Twice (17)  |  Unlikely (13)

For the sake of persons of ... different types, scientific truth should be presented in different forms, and should be regarded as equally scientific, whether it appears in the robust form and the vivid coloring of a physical illustration, or in the tenuity and paleness of a symbolic expression.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (115)  |  Different (178)  |  Equally (25)  |  Expression (104)  |  Form (308)  |  Illustration (28)  |  Physical (129)  |  Present (174)  |  Regard (93)  |  Robust (7)  |  Sake (22)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Scientific Truth (3)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Type (51)  |  Vivid (17)

Freeman’s gift? It’s cosmic. He is able to see more interconnections between more things than almost anybody. He sees the interrelationships, whether it’s in some microscopic physical process or in a big complicated machine like Orion. He has been, from the time he was in his teens, capable of understanding essentially anything that he’s interested in. He’s the most intelligent person I know.
As quoted in Kenneth Brower, 'The Danger of Cosmic Genius', The Atlantic (Dec 2010). Webmaster note: The Orion Project was a study of the possibility of nuclear powered propulsion of spacecraft.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (49)  |  Complicated (61)  |  Connection (107)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Freeman Dyson (53)  |  Gift (61)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Interested (5)  |  Know (547)  |  Machine (157)  |  Microscopic (11)  |  Physical (129)  |  Process (261)  |  Relationship (71)  |  See (369)  |  Teen (2)  |  Understand (326)

Gardner writes about various kinds of cranks with the conscious superiority of the scientist…. He asserts that the scientist, unlike the crank, does his best to remain open-minded, so how can he be so sure that no sane person has ever seen a flying saucer…? … A.J. Ayer once remarked wryly “I wish I was as certain of anything as he seems to be about everything”.
In The Quest For Wilhelm Reich (1981), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (21)  |  Certain (125)  |  Conscious (43)  |  Crank (13)  |  Flying Saucer (2)  |  Martin Gardner (50)  |  Open-Minded (2)  |  Remain (111)  |  Sane (4)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Superiority (12)  |  Various (46)  |  Write (153)

Geometry enlightens the intellect and sets one’s mind right. All of its proofs are very clear and orderly. It is hardly possible for errors to enter into geometrical reasoning, because it is well arranged and orderly. Thus, the mind that constantly applies itself to geometry is not likely to fall into error. In this convenient way, the person who knows geometry acquires intelligence.
In Ibn Khaldûn, Franz Rosenthal (trans.) and N.J. Dawood (ed.), The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History (1967, 1969), Vol. 1, 378.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (38)  |  Apply (76)  |  Arranged (4)  |  Clear (97)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Enlighten (4)  |  Error (275)  |  Fall (119)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Know (547)  |  Mind (743)  |  Orderly (13)  |  Proof (243)  |  Reasoning (95)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (23)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Duty (68)  |  Exaggeration (11)  |  Eye (218)  |  Good (345)  |  Harder (6)  |  Humble (31)  |  Importance (216)  |  Ineffective (4)  |  Professor (54)  |  Ridiculous (13)  |  Right (196)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Work (626)  |  Worth (97)

Hell, if I could explain it to the average person, it wouldn't have been worth the Nobel prize.
After being awarded a Nobel Prize, he was frequently asked to explain what he had done, and would would give this answer. As stated in Lee Dye, 'Nobel Physicist R.P. Feynman of Caltech Dies', Los Angeles Times (16 Feb 1988). About this answer, the articles also states that, “Feynman once said, claiming he was told that by a New York cab driver.”
Science quotes on:  |  Average (41)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Nobel Prize (28)  |  Worth (97)

History without the history of science, to alter slightly an apothegm of Lord Bacon, resembles a statue of Polyphemus without his eye—that very feature being left out which most marks the spirit and life of the person. My own thesis is complementary: science taught ... without a sense of history is robbed of those very qualities that make it worth teaching to the student of the humanities and the social sciences.
'The History of Science and the Teaching of Science', in I. Bernard Cohen and Fletcher G. Watson (eds.), General Education in Science (1952), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (23)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (179)  |  Complementary (8)  |  Feature (43)  |  History (368)  |  History Of Science (58)  |  Humanities (17)  |  Life (1124)  |  Mark (42)  |  Quality (93)  |  Resemble (26)  |  Sense (315)  |  Social Science (31)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Statue (11)  |  Student (201)  |  Teaching (107)  |  Thesis (11)  |  Worth (97)

How can cosmic religious feeling be communicated from one person to another, if it can give rise to no definite notion of a God and no theology? In my view, it is the most important function of art and science to awaken this feeling and keep it alive in those who are receptive to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Art (284)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Communicate (16)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Definite (42)  |  Feel (165)  |  Function (128)  |  Give (200)  |  God (535)  |  Important (202)  |  Keep (100)  |  Notion (57)  |  Receptive (4)  |  Religious (49)  |  Rise (70)  |  Science (2043)  |  Theology (40)  |  View (171)

How have people come to be taken in by The Phenomenon of Man? Just as compulsory primary education created a market catered for by cheap dailies and weeklies, so the spread of secondary and latterly of tertiary education has created a large population of people, often with well-developed literary and scholarly tastes who have been educated far beyond their capacity to undertake analytical thought … [The Phenomenon of Man] is written in an all but totally unintelligible style, and this is construed as prima-facie evidence of profundity.
Medawar’s book review of The Phenomenon of Man by Teilhard de Chardin first appeared as 'Critical Notice' in the journal Mind (1961), 70, No. 277, 105. The book review was reprinted in The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Cheap (11)  |  Compulsory (6)  |  Construed (2)  |  Created (6)  |  Daily (29)  |  Developed (11)  |  Educated (11)  |  Education (333)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Large (130)  |  Literary (12)  |  Market (11)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Population (78)  |  Primary (39)  |  Profundity (6)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Spread (33)  |  Style (22)  |  Taste (48)  |  Tertiary (3)  |  Thought (536)  |  Undertake (20)  |  Unintelligible (9)  |  Written (5)

I agree with Schopenhauer that one of the most powerful motives that attracts people to science and art is the longing to escape from everyday life.
Quoted, without citation in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1959), 85. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (25)  |  Attract (20)  |  Escape (46)  |  Everyday (16)  |  Life (1124)  |  Longing (9)  |  Motive (33)  |  Powerful (66)  |  Arthur Schopenhauer (17)  |  Science And Art (181)

I believe that in every person is a kind of circuit which resonates to intellectual discovery—and the idea is to make that resonance work
Quoted by Dennis Meredith, in 'Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection and Extraterrestrial Life-Wish', Science Digest (Jun 1979), 85, 37. Reproduced in Carl Sagan and Tom Head (editor), Conversations With Sagan (2006), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (503)  |  Circuit (15)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Resonance (2)

I believe that the useful methods of mathematics are easily to be learned by quite young persons, just as languages are easily learned in youth. What a wondrous philosophy and history underlie the use of almost every word in every language—yet the child learns to use the word unconsciously. No doubt when such a word was first invented it was studied over and lectured upon, just as one might lecture now upon the idea of a rate, or the use of Cartesian co-ordinates, and we may depend upon it that children of the future will use the idea of the calculus, and use squared paper as readily as they now cipher. … When Egyptian and Chaldean philosophers spent years in difficult calculations, which would now be thought easy by young children, doubtless they had the same notions of the depth of their knowledge that Sir William Thomson might now have of his. How is it, then, that Thomson gained his immense knowledge in the time taken by a Chaldean philosopher to acquire a simple knowledge of arithmetic? The reason is plain. Thomson, when a child, was taught in a few years more than all that was known three thousand years ago of the properties of numbers. When it is found essential to a boy’s future that machinery should be given to his brain, it is given to him; he is taught to use it, and his bright memory makes the use of it a second nature to him; but it is not till after-life that he makes a close investigation of what there actually is in his brain which has enabled him to do so much. It is taken because the child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brain of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as early, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Acquire (38)  |  Actually (27)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Belief (503)  |  Boy (46)  |  Brain (209)  |  Bright (42)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Child (245)  |  Cipher (2)  |  Close (66)  |  Complicated (61)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Coordinate (4)  |  Depend (87)  |  Depth (50)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Early (61)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (98)  |  Education (333)  |  Egyptian (4)  |  Enable (44)  |  Essential (115)  |  Faith (157)  |  Find (405)  |  First (313)  |  Future (284)  |  Gain (67)  |  Give (200)  |  History (368)  |  Idea (577)  |  Immense (42)  |  Invent (50)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (64)  |  Know (547)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Language (217)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lecture (67)  |  Machinery (32)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Memory (105)  |  Method (230)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notion (57)  |  Number (276)  |  Paper (82)  |  Philosopher (164)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Plain (33)  |  Property (123)  |  Rate (29)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (454)  |  Same (155)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Simple (172)  |  Spend (43)  |  Square (23)  |  Study (461)  |  Teach (179)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Thought (536)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Time (594)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (6)  |  Useful (98)  |  Wondrous (9)  |  Word (299)  |  Year (299)  |  Young (98)  |  Youth (75)

I came by the horror naturally. Surgery is the one branch of medicine that is the most violent. After all, it’s violent to take up a knife and cut open a person’s body and rummage around with your hands. I think I was attracted to the horrific.
As quoted in Randy Hutter Epstein, 'Richard Selzer, Who Fictionalized Medicine’s Absurdity and Gore, Dies at 87', New York Times (15 Jun 2016). Explaining why his first fiction writing was horror stories.
Science quotes on:  |  Attracted (3)  |  Body (243)  |  Branch (102)  |  Cut (39)  |  Hand (141)  |  Horror (9)  |  Knife (10)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Natural (167)  |  Surgery (43)  |  Think (341)  |  Violent (17)

I feel more comfortable with gorillas than people. I can anticipate what a gorilla's going to do, and they're purely motivated.
Preferring the “silence of the forest” to the noise of a cocktail party while participating in a symposium, 'What We Can Learn About Humankind From the Apes' at Sweet Briar College campus. As quoted by Nan Robertson in 'Three Who Have Chosen a Life in the Wild', New York Times (1 May 1981), B36.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (10)  |  Comfort (49)  |  Feel (165)  |  Gorilla (17)  |  Motivation (26)  |  Pure (98)

I grew up in love with science, asking the same questions all children ask as they try to codify the world to find out what makes it work. “Who is the smartest person in the world?” and “Where is the tallest mountain in the world?” turned into questions like, “How big is the universe?” and “What is it that makes us alive?”
In Introduction to Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), xix.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Ask (157)  |  Child (245)  |  Codify (2)  |  Learn (281)  |  Love (221)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Question (404)  |  Science (2043)  |  Smart (18)  |  Tall (9)  |  Try (141)  |  Universe (683)  |  World (892)

I have never yet met a healthy person who worried very much about his health, or a really good person who worried much about his own soul.
In Keeping Cool: And Other Essays (1940), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Good (345)  |  Health (153)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Meet (31)  |  Soul (163)  |  Worry (33)

I must not pass by Dr. Young called Phaenomenon Young at Cambridge. A man of universal erudition, & almost universal accomplishments. Had he limited himself to anyone department of knowledge, he must have been first in that department. But as a mathematician, a scholar, a hieroglyphist, he was eminent; & he knew so much that it is difficult to say what he did not know. He was a most amiable & good-tempered man; too fond, perhaps, of the society of persons of rank for a true philosopher.
J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia (1967), 12, 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (79)  |  Cambridge (15)  |  Department (47)  |  Erudition (6)  |  Fond (12)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Limit (123)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Philosopher (164)  |  Rank (32)  |  Scholar (37)  |  Society (227)  |  Universal (100)  |  Thomas Young (14)

I suppose that the first chemists seemed to be very hard-hearted and unpoetical persons when they scouted the glorious dream of the alchemists that there must be some process for turning base metals into gold. I suppose that the men who first said, in plain, cold assertion, there is no fountain of eternal youth, seemed to be the most cruel and cold-hearted adversaries of human happiness. I know that the economists who say that if we could transmute lead into gold, it would certainly do us no good and might do great harm, are still regarded as unworthy of belief. Do not the money articles of the newspapers yet ring with the doctrine that we are getting rich when we give cotton and wheat for gold rather than when we give cotton and wheat for iron?
'The Forgotten Man' (1883). In The Forgotten Man and Other Essays (1918), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (17)  |  Article (22)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Base Metal (2)  |  Belief (503)  |  Chemist (88)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Cruelty (16)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dream (165)  |  Economist (17)  |  Eternity (49)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Glory (57)  |  Gold (68)  |  Good (345)  |  Happiness (94)  |  Harm (37)  |  Iron (65)  |  Lead (158)  |  Money (142)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Process (261)  |  Richness (14)  |  Ring (16)  |  Scout (3)  |  Supposition (36)  |  Transmutation (17)  |  Unworthy (12)  |  Wheat (10)  |  Youth (75)

I tell young people to reach for the stars. And I can't think of a greater high than you could possibly get than by inventing something.
From audio on MIT video '1999 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award Winner', on 'Innovative Lives: Stephanie Kwolek and Kevlar, The Wonder Fiber' on the Smithsonian website.
Science quotes on:  |  Greater (42)  |  High (152)  |  Invention (318)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Reach (119)  |  Star (336)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Young (98)

I was sitting in a chair in the patent office at Bern when all of a sudden a thought occurred to me: “If a person falls freely he will not feel his own weight.” I was startled. This simple thought made a deep impression on me. It impelled me toward a theory of gravitation.
Lecture in Japan (1922). The quote is footnoted in Michael White, John Gribbin, Einstein: a Life in Science (1995), 128, saying the talk is known as the 'Kyoto address', reported in J. Ishiwara, Einstein Koen-Roku (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Chair (11)  |  Deep (121)  |  Falling (6)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Free (90)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Impelling (2)  |  Impression (69)  |  Occurrence (32)  |  Patent Office (3)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Sitting (5)  |  Startling (5)  |  Sudden (32)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)  |  Thought (536)  |  Weight (75)

I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give any woman the instrument to procure abortion. … I will not cut a person who is suffering with stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of such work.
From 'The Oath', as translated by Francis Adams in The Genuine Works of Hippocrates (1849), Vol. 2, 780.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (157)  |  Counsel (7)  |  Cut (39)  |  Deadly (10)  |  Give (200)  |  Instrument (92)  |  Leave (127)  |  Manner (57)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Procure (5)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Stone (76)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Suggest (32)  |  Surgeon (44)  |  Woman (111)

I'd like the [Cosmos] series to be so visually stimulating that somebody who isn't even interested in the concepts will just watch for the effects. And I'd like people who are prepared to do some thinking to be really stimulated.
Quoted by Dennis Meredith, in 'Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection and Extraterrestrial Life-Wish', Science Digest (Jun 1979), 85, 38. Reproduced in Carl Sagan and Tom Head, Conversations With Sagan (2006), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (143)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Effect (165)  |  Interest (235)  |  Series (50)  |  Stimulation (14)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Visualize (8)

If a person cannot love a plant after he has pruned it, then he has either done a poor job or is devoid of emotion.
In The Pruning-Book: A Monograph of the Pruning and Training of Plants (1898), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Devoid (11)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Job (43)  |  Love (221)  |  Plant (199)  |  Poor (57)  |  Prune (7)

If a person sweeps streets for a living, he should sweep them as Michelangelo painted, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote his plays.
As quoted, without citation, in Patricia J. Raskin, Pathfinding: Seven Principles for Positive Living (2002), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (6)  |  Compose (17)  |  Living (56)  |  Michelangelo (2)  |  Music (95)  |  Paint (21)  |  Play (110)  |  William Shakespeare (101)  |  Street (23)  |  Sweep (13)  |  Write (153)

If you ask a person, “What were you thinking?” you may get an answer that is richer and more revealing of the human condition than any stream of thoughts a novelist could invent. I try to see through people’s faces into their minds and listen through their words into their lives, and what I find there is beyond imagining.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (157)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Face (108)  |  Find (405)  |  Human Condition (4)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Invent (50)  |  Listen (39)  |  Live (269)  |  Mind (743)  |  Novelist (6)  |  People (388)  |  Reveal (50)  |  Rich (61)  |  See (369)  |  Stream (40)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Try (141)  |  Word (299)

In an autocracy, one person has his way; in an aristocracy a few people have their way; in a democracy, no one has his way.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristocracy (4)  |  Democracy (26)  |  People (388)

In an era in which the domain of intellect and politics were almost exclusively male, Theon [her father] was an unusually liberated person who taught an unusually gifted daughter [Hypatia] and encouraged her to achieve things that, as far as we know, no woman before her did or perhaps even dreamed of doing.
From 'Hypatia', in Louise S. Grinstein (ed.), Women of Mathematics, (1987), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Daughter (16)  |  Domain (40)  |  Dream (165)  |  Encourage (24)  |  Era (17)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Father (57)  |  Gifted (6)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Know (547)  |  Liberated (2)  |  Male (26)  |  Politics (95)  |  Teach (179)  |  Theon (2)  |  Unusual (16)  |  Woman (111)

In one person he [Isaac Newton] combined the experimenter, the theorist, the mechanic and, not least, the artist in exposition.
In 'Foreword' to Isaac Newton, Opticks (1952), lix.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (61)  |  Combine (34)  |  Experimenter (20)  |  Exposition (13)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Theorist (27)

Is it not true that for every person the course of life is along the line of least resistance, and that in this the movement of humanity is like the movement of material bodies?
In preface to Scientific Memoirs (1878), xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (243)  |  Course (83)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Least (74)  |  Life (1124)  |  Line (89)  |  Movement (82)  |  Resistance (26)  |  Truth (914)

It gets you nowhere if the other person’s tail is only just in sight for the second half of the conversation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conversation (26)  |  Half (56)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Second (59)  |  Sight (47)  |  Tail (18)

It is a common rule with primitive people not to waken a sleeper, because his soul is away and might not have time to get back.
In The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion: Part II: Taboo and the Perils of the Soul (1890, 1911), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Common (118)  |  Primitive (41)  |  Rule (173)  |  Soul (163)  |  Time (594)  |  Wake (13)

It is certain that as a nation we are all smoking a great deal too much ... Smoking among boys—to whom it cannot possibly do any kind of good, while it may do a vast amount of active harm—is becoming prevalent to a most pernicious extent. ... It would be an excellent thing for the morality of the people could the use of “intoxicants and tobacco” be forbidden to all persons under twenty years of age. (1878)
In London Daily Telegraph (22 Jan 1878). Reprinted in English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League, Monthly letters of the Committee of the English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League 1878, 1879, 1880, (1 Feb 1878), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (25)  |  Age (174)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Certain (125)  |  Deal (49)  |  Excellent (26)  |  Forbidden (8)  |  Good (345)  |  Great (524)  |  Harm (37)  |  Morality (42)  |  Nation (132)  |  People (388)  |  Pernicious (3)  |  Prevalent (4)  |  Smoking (22)  |  Tobacco (16)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Vast (88)  |  Year (299)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Age (174)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (30)  |  Animal (356)  |  Apparently (19)  |  Available (25)  |  Back (104)  |  Best (172)  |  Blind (47)  |  Boundless (13)  |  Branch (102)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Charge (34)  |  Collect (16)  |  Collection (44)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Country (144)  |  Creation (239)  |  Creator (52)  |  Cultivation (27)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Direct (82)  |  Distribution (29)  |  Earth (635)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Extinction (66)  |  Face (108)  |  Form (308)  |  Future (284)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Government (93)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Higher (36)  |  History (368)  |  Immediately (21)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Important (202)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (215)  |  Inquiry (40)  |  Institution (39)  |  Interpretation (69)  |  Invaluable (7)  |  Invariably (9)  |  Known (16)  |  Letter (50)  |  Life (1124)  |  Living (56)  |  Long (172)  |  Look (52)  |  Lost (32)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (154)  |  Modern (159)  |  Museum (24)  |  National (25)  |  Native (15)  |  Natural (167)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Object (169)  |  Obscure (31)  |  Past (150)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Perish (29)  |  Plant (199)  |  Possible (155)  |  Power (358)  |  Preserve (51)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (362)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Record (67)  |  Regard (93)  |  Remain (111)  |  Render (30)  |  Rest (92)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Secure (20)  |  Seeing (47)  |  Sentence (28)  |  Species (220)  |  Step (109)  |  Strange (94)  |  Study (461)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Tropical (8)  |  Unintelligible (9)  |  Unknown (105)  |  Variation (61)  |  Volume (19)  |  Want (175)  |  Wealth (66)

It is not enough to teach man a specialty. Through it he may become a kind of useful machine, but not a harmoniously developed personality. It is essential that the student acquire an understanding of and a lively feeling for values. He must acquire a vivid sense of the beautiful and of the morally good. Otherwise he—with his specialized knowledge—more closely resembles a well-trained dog than a harmoniously developed person.
From interview with Benjamin Fine, 'Einstein Stresses Critical Thinking', New York Times (5 Oct 1952), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (38)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Become (172)  |  Developed (11)  |  Dog (44)  |  Essential (115)  |  Feel (165)  |  Good (345)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Lively (7)  |  Machine (157)  |  Moral (123)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Personality (47)  |  Resemble (26)  |  Sense (315)  |  Specialized (8)  |  Specialty (10)  |  Student (201)  |  Teach (179)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Useful (98)  |  Value (240)  |  Vivid (17)

It’s hard to explain to people what the significance of an invention is, so it’s hard to get funding. The first thing they say is that it can’t be done. Then they say, “You didn't do it right.” Then, when you’ve done it, they finally say, “Well, it was obvious anyway.”
http://www.thetech.org/nmot/detail.cfm?id=95&st=awardDate&qt=1997&kiosk=Off
Science quotes on:  |  Explain (105)  |  Finally (26)  |  First (313)  |  Funding (13)  |  Hard (99)  |  Invention (318)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Right (196)  |  Say (228)  |  Significance (71)

I’m sick of people thinking that efficiency is going to be sufficient. I’m sick of seeing people say, “I’m going to reduce my carbon footprint,” and think that being less bad is being good. … I want healthy, safe things in closed cycles, not just being less bad.
In interview with Kerry A. Dolan, 'William McDonough On Cradle-to-Cradle Design', Forbes (4 Aug 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (99)  |  Carbon Footprint (2)  |  Closed (11)  |  Cycle (27)  |  Efficiency (30)  |  Good (345)  |  Health (153)  |  Less (102)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Safety (43)  |  Sick (27)  |  Sufficient (40)  |  Thinking (231)

Leibniz never married; he had considered it at the age of fifty; but the person he had in mind asked for time to reflect. This gave Leibniz time to reflect, too, and so he never married.
From the original French, “Leibnitz ne s'était point marié ; il y avait pensé à l'âge de cinquante ans; mais la personne qu’il avait en vue voulut avoir le temps de faire ses réflexions. Cela donna à Leibnitz le loisir de faire aussi les siennes, et il ne se maria point.” In 'Éloge de Leibniz' (1768), in Éloges de Fontenelle (1883), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Ask (157)  |  Consider (80)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Marry (8)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Time (594)

Life and business are rather simple after all—to make a success of either, you've got to hang on to the knack of putting yourself into the other person's place.
c. 1891. On Wrigley Company web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (84)  |  Knack (2)  |  Life (1124)  |  Other (27)  |  Place (174)  |  Putting (2)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Success (248)  |  Yourself (6)

Many a person thinks he is hard-boiled when he is only half-baked.
Science quotes on:  |  Bake (2)  |  Boil (15)  |  Half (56)  |  Hard (99)  |  Sociology (43)  |  Think (341)

Many persons have inquired concerning a recent message of mine that “a new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels.”
From interview with Michael Amrine, 'The Real Problem is in the Hearts of Men', New York Times Magazine, (23 Jun 1946), 7. See more of the message from which Einstein quoted himself, see the longer quote that begins, “Our world faces a crisis as yet unperceived…,” on the Albert Einstein Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (108)  |  Essential (115)  |  High (152)  |  Inquire (9)  |  Level (67)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Message (35)  |  Move (94)  |  New (483)  |  Recent (29)  |  Survive (46)  |  Think (341)  |  Type (51)

Most educated people are aware that we're the outcome of nearly 4 billion years of Darwinian selection, but many tend to think that humans are somehow the culmination. Our sun, however, is less than halfway through its lifespan. It will not be humans who watch the sun's demise, 6 billion years from now. Any creatures that then exist will be as different from us as we are from bacteria or amoebae.
Lecture (2006), reprinted as 'Dark Materials'. As cited in J.G. Ballard, 'The Catastrophist', collected in Christopher Hitchens, Arguably: Selected Essays (2011), 353
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Aware (31)  |  Bacteria (34)  |  Billion (62)  |  Creature (154)  |  Culmination (3)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Demise (2)  |  Difference (246)  |  Education (333)  |  Existence (296)  |  Lifespan (6)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Sun (276)  |  Watch (64)  |  Year (299)

My thoughts … are like persons met upon a journey; I think them very agreeable at first but soon find, as a rule, that I am tired of them.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (9)  |  Find (405)  |  Journey (28)  |  Meet (31)  |  Thought (536)  |  Tired (13)

Nearly anyone in this line of work would take a bullet for the last pregnant dodo. But should we not admire the person who, when faced with an overwhelmingly sad reality beyond and personal blame or control, strives valiantly to rescue what ever can be salvaged, rather than retreating to the nearest corner to weep or assign fault?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (17)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Assign (13)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Blame (24)  |  Bullet (4)  |  Control (111)  |  Corner (29)  |  Dodo (5)  |  Face (108)  |  Fault (33)  |  Line (89)  |  Nearly (26)  |  Overwhelmingly (3)  |  Personal (66)  |  Pregnant (4)  |  Reality (188)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Sadness (34)  |  Salvage (2)  |  Strive (43)  |  Valiantly (2)  |  Weep (5)  |  Work (626)

Nevertheless, his [Dostoyevsky’s] personality retained sadistic traits in plenty, which show themselves in his irritability, his love of tormenting, and his intolerance even towards people he loved, and which appear also in the way in which, as an author, he treats his readers. Thus in little things he was a sadist towards others, and in bigger things a sadist towards himself, in fact a masochist—that is to say the mildest, kindliest, most helpful person possible.
In James Strachey (ed.), 'Dostoyevsky and Parricide', The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1953-74), Vol. 21, 178-179. Reprinted in Writings on Art and Literature (1997), 236
Science quotes on:  |  Author (61)  |  Helpful (15)  |  Intolerance (8)  |  Irritability (2)  |  Kind (138)  |  Love (221)  |  Mild (3)  |  Personality (47)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Reader (38)  |  Sadist (2)  |  Torment (14)  |  Trait (22)  |  Treat (34)

No person was ever honored for what he received; honor has been the reward for what he gave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Give (200)  |  Honor (30)  |  Honored (3)  |  Receive (59)  |  Reward (49)

Nobody knows more than a tiny fragment of science well enough to judge its validity and value at first hand. For the rest he has to rely on views accepted at second hand on the authority of a community of people accredited as scientists. But this accrediting depends in its turn on a complex organization. For each member of the community can judge at first hand only a small number of his fellow members, and yet eventually each is accredited by all. What happens is that each recognizes as scientists a number of others by whom he is recognized as such in return, and these relations form chains which transmit these mutual recognitions at second hand through the whole community. This is how each member becomes directly or indirectly accredited by all. The system extends into the past. Its members recognize the same set of persons as their masters and derive from this allegiance a common tradition, of which each carries on a particular strand.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  All (8)  |  Allegiance (4)  |  Authority (65)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Chain (50)  |  Common (118)  |  Community (81)  |  Complexity (90)  |  Dependance (4)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Directly (21)  |  Extension (30)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Happening (32)  |  Indirectly (6)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Master (93)  |  Member (39)  |  Mutual (27)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Organization (84)  |  Particular (75)  |  Past (150)  |  People (388)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Set (97)  |  Strand (5)  |  System (191)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Transmission (25)  |  Validity (31)  |  Value (240)  |  View (171)  |  Whole (189)

Not long ago the head of what should be a strictly scientific department in one of the major universities commented on the odd (and ominous) phenomenon that persons who can claim to be scientists on the basis of the technical training that won them the degree of Ph.D. are now found certifying the authenticity of the painted rag that is called the “Turin Shroud” or adducing “scientific” arguments to support hoaxes about the “paranormal” or an antiquated religiosity. “You can hire a scientist [sic],” he said, “to prove anything.” He did not adduce himself as proof of his generalization, but he did boast of his cleverness in confining his own research to areas in which the results would not perturb the Establishment or any vociferous gang of shyster-led fanatics. If such is indeed the status of science and scholarship in our darkling age, Send not to ask for whom the bell tolls.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Antiquated (3)  |  Area (29)  |  Argument (81)  |  Ask (157)  |  Authenticity (4)  |  Basis (89)  |  Bell (15)  |  Boast (21)  |  Call (127)  |  Certify (2)  |  Claim (70)  |  Cleverness (12)  |  Comment (11)  |  Confine (24)  |  Degree (81)  |  Department (47)  |  Establishment (34)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Find (405)  |  Gang (4)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Head (80)  |  Hire (6)  |  Hoax (5)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Major (32)  |  Odd (13)  |  Ominous (4)  |  Paint (21)  |  Paranormal (3)  |  Perturb (2)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Proof (243)  |  Prove (108)  |  Prove Anything (7)  |  Rag (2)  |  Religiosity (2)  |  Research (589)  |  Result (376)  |  Say (228)  |  Scholarship (14)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Send (22)  |  Shroud (2)  |  Status (20)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Support (77)  |  Technical (40)  |  Toll (3)  |  Training (64)  |  Turin (2)  |  University (80)  |  Win (38)

Now and then women should do for themselves what men have already done—and occasionally what men have not done—thereby establishing themselves as persons, and perhaps encouraging other women toward greater independence of thought and action. Some such consideration was a contributing reason for my wanting to do what I so much wanted to do.
In Amelia Earhart and George Palmer Putnam (ed.), Last Flight (1937), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Encouraging (2)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Independence (34)  |  Reason (454)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Thought (536)  |  Want (175)  |  Women (9)

Obviously we biologists should fit our methods to our materials. An interesting response to this challenge has been employed particularly by persons who have entered biology from the physical sciences or who are distressed by the variability in biology; they focus their research on inbred strains of genetically homogeneous laboratory animals from which, to the maximum extent possible, variability has been eliminated. These biologists have changed the nature of the biological system to fit their methods. Such a bold and forthright solution is admirable, but it is not for me. Before I became a professional biologist, I was a boy naturalist, and I prefer a contrasting approach; to change the method to fit the system. This approach requires that one employ procedures which allow direct scientific utilization of the successful long-term evolutionary experiments which are documented by the fascinating diversity and variability of the species of animals which occupy the earth. This is easy to say and hard to do.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Allow (44)  |  Animal (356)  |  Approach (53)  |  Become (172)  |  Biological (35)  |  Biologist (41)  |  Biology (168)  |  Bold (7)  |  Boy (46)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Change (363)  |  Contrast (28)  |  Direct (82)  |  Distress (6)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Document (7)  |  Earth (635)  |  Easy (98)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Employ (35)  |  Enter (30)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Extent (49)  |  Fascinating (22)  |  Fit (48)  |  Focus (27)  |  Genetically (2)  |  Hard (99)  |  Homogeneous (5)  |  Interest (235)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Material (154)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Method (230)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Physical Science (65)  |  Possible (155)  |  Prefer (24)  |  Procedure (24)  |  Professional (37)  |  Require (79)  |  Research (589)  |  Response (28)  |  Say (228)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Solution (211)  |  Species (220)  |  Strain (11)  |  Successful (39)  |  System (191)  |  Utilization (9)  |  Variability (5)

Oh! But I have better news for you, Madam, if you have any patriotism as citizen of this world and wish its longevity. Mr. Herschel has found out that our globe is a comely middle-aged personage, and has not so many wrinkles as seven stars, who are evidently our seniors. Nay, he has discovered that the Milky Way is not only a mob of stars, but that there is another dairy of them still farther off, whence, I conclude, comets are nothing but pails returning from milking, instead of balloons filled with inflammable air.
Letter to the Countess of Upper Ossory (4 Jul 1785) in W. S. Lewis (ed.), Horace Walpole's Correspondence with the Countess of Upper Ossory (1965), Vol. 33, 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (188)  |  Balloon (14)  |  Citizen (30)  |  Comet (50)  |  Dairy (2)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Find (405)  |  Globe (47)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Longevity (6)  |  Milky Way (24)  |  Mob (7)  |  News (13)  |  Pail (3)  |  Patriotism (6)  |  Senior (3)  |  Star (336)  |  Wish (92)  |  World (892)  |  Wrinkle (4)

Once you go from 10 people to 100, you already don’t know who everyone is. So at that stage you might as well keep growing, to get the advantages of scale.
As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (73)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Grow (98)  |  Keep (100)  |  Know (547)  |  Scale (62)  |  Stage (54)

One precept for the scientist-to-be is already obvious. Do not place yourself in an environment where your advisor is already suffering from scientific obsolescence. If one is so unfortunate as to receive his training under a person who is either technically or intellectually obsolescent, one finds himself to be a loser before he starts. It is difficult to move into a position of leadership if one’s launching platform is a scientific generation whose time is already past.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Advisor (3)  |  Already (28)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Environment (180)  |  Find (405)  |  Generation (137)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Launch (12)  |  Leadership (8)  |  Loser (2)  |  Move (94)  |  Obsolescence (4)  |  Obsolescent (2)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Past (150)  |  Place (174)  |  Platform (3)  |  Position (75)  |  Precept (7)  |  Receive (59)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Start (97)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Technically (5)  |  Time (594)  |  Training (64)  |  Unfortunate (14)

Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master. For this reason mastery demands all of a person.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (283)  |  Demand (74)  |  Devote (34)  |  Master (93)  |  Mastery (27)  |  Reason (454)  |  Soul (163)  |  Strength (79)  |  True (201)  |  Whole (189)

People make the mistake of talking about ‘natural laws’. There are no natural laws. There are only temporary habits of nature.
In Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead, as recorded by Lucien Price (1954), 367. As cited in G. Debrock (ed.), Process Pragmatism: Essays on a Quiet Philosophical Revolution (2003), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Habit (107)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Natural Law (31)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Talking (11)  |  Temporary (16)

People, houses, streets, animals, flowers—everything in Holland looks as if it were washed and ironed each night in order to glisten immaculately and newly starched the next morning.
In The Mirror of Souls, and Other Essays (1966), 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Everything (180)  |  Flower (76)  |  Holland (2)  |  House (43)  |  Immaculate (2)  |  Look (52)  |  Morning (43)  |  New (483)  |  Next (35)  |  Night (117)  |  Order (239)  |  Street (23)  |  Washed (2)

Persons, who have a decided mathematical talent, constitute, as it were, a favored class. They bear the same relation to the rest of mankind that those who are academically trained bear to those who are not.
In Ueber die Anlage zur Mathematik (1900), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Class (83)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Decide (40)  |  Favored (5)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Relation (149)  |  Rest (92)  |  Talent (61)  |  Train (45)

Psychoanalysis is a science conducted by lunatics for lunatics. They are generally concerned with proving that people are irresponsible; and they certainly succeed in proving that some people are.
From Illustrated London News (23 Jun 1928). In Dale Ahlquist (ed.) The Universe According to G.K. Chesterton: A Dictionary of the Mad, Mundane and Metaphysical (2013), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (108)  |  Irresponsible (4)  |  Lunatic (7)  |  Prove (108)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Succeed (26)

Questions of personal priority, however interesting they may be to the persons concerned, sink into insignificance in the prospect of any gain of deeper insight into the secrets of nature.
As quoted in Silvanus Phillips Thompson, The Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 602.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (108)  |  Deeper (4)  |  Gain (67)  |  Insight (69)  |  Insignificance (9)  |  Interesting (48)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Personal (66)  |  Priority (10)  |  Prospect (22)  |  Question (404)  |  Secret (130)  |  Sink (21)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (162)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Already (28)  |  Approach (53)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Available (25)  |  Avenue (6)  |  Badly (15)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Benefit (72)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Branch (102)  |  George Chrystal (7)  |  Close (66)  |  Compass (24)  |  Competent (18)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (67)  |  Country (144)  |  Department (47)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Example (92)  |  Excellent (26)  |  Expose (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Give (200)  |  Great (524)  |  High (152)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (368)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (34)  |  Journal (19)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (115)  |  Literature (79)  |  Lose (93)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Memoir (11)  |  Mention (23)  |  Merely (82)  |  Nature (1211)  |  New (483)  |  Notice (34)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Original (57)  |  Part (220)  |  Peril (9)  |  Possible (155)  |  Practical (129)  |  Present (174)  |  Problem (490)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (33)  |  Question (404)  |  Reach (119)  |  Real (148)  |  Reality (188)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (93)  |  Regret (20)  |  Render (30)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Result (376)  |  Science (2043)  |  Second (59)  |  Short (49)  |  Small (161)  |  State (136)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (201)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Subject (235)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Technical (40)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theory (690)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Useful (98)  |  Value (240)  |  Various (46)  |  Want (175)  |  Whole (189)  |  Write (153)  |  Year (299)

Religion shows a pattern of heredity which I think is similar to genetic heredity. ... There are hundreds of different religious sects, and every religious person is loyal to just one of these. ... The overwhelming majority just happen to choose the one their parents belonged to. Not the sect that has the best evidence in its favour, the best miracles, the best moral code, the best cathedral, the best stained-glass, the best music when it comes to choosing from the smorgasbord of available religions, their potential virtues seem to count for nothing compared to the matter of heredity.
From edited version of a speech, at the Edinburgh International Science Festival (15 Apr 1992), as reprinted from the Independent newspaper in Alec Fisher, The Logic of Real Arguments (2004), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Belonging (12)  |  Best (172)  |  Cathedral (15)  |  Choose (59)  |  Code (14)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Favor (30)  |  Genetic (12)  |  Heredity (53)  |  Loyal (5)  |  Majority (42)  |  Miracle (66)  |  Moral (123)  |  Music (95)  |  Overwhelming (21)  |  Parent (45)  |  Potential (39)  |  Religion (239)  |  Sect (4)  |  Similar (35)  |  Stained Glass (2)  |  Virtue (61)

Science and Religion. These are reconciled in amiable and sensible people but nowhere else.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Elementary Mortality', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Amiable (5)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Sensible (25)

Science gives us the grounds of premises from which religious truths are to be inferred; but it does not set about inferring them, much less does it reach the inference; that is not its province. It brings before us phenomena, and it leaves us, if we will, to call them works of design, wisdom, or benevolence; and further still, if we will, to proceed to confess an Intelligent Creator. We have to take its facts, and to give them a meaning, and to draw our own conclusions from them. First comes Knowledge, then a view, then reasoning, then belief. This is why Science has so little of a religious tendency; deductions have no power of persuasion. The heart is commonly reached, not through the reason, but through the imagination, by means of direct impressions, by the testimony of facts and events, by history, by description. Persons influence us, voices melt us, looks subdue us, deeds inflame us. Many a man will live and die upon a dogma; no man will be a martyr for a conclusion.
Letter collected in Tamworth Reading Room: Letters on an Address Delivered by Sir Robert Peel, Bart., M.P. on the Establishment of a Reading Room at Tamworth (1841), 32. Excerpted in John Henry Newman, An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent (1870), 89 & 94 footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (503)  |  Benevolence (6)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (127)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Confess (15)  |  Creator (52)  |  Deduction (68)  |  Deed (21)  |  Description (84)  |  Design (113)  |  Die (81)  |  Direct (82)  |  Dogma (32)  |  Draw (55)  |  Event (115)  |  Fact (725)  |  Far (154)  |  First (313)  |  Give (200)  |  Ground (90)  |  Heart (139)  |  History (368)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Impression (69)  |  Infer (12)  |  Inference (31)  |  Inflame (2)  |  Influence (137)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Leave (127)  |  Less (102)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (171)  |  Melt (16)  |  Persuasion (3)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Power (358)  |  Premise (25)  |  Proceed (41)  |  Province (14)  |  Reach (119)  |  Reason (454)  |  Religious (49)  |  Science (2043)  |  Set (97)  |  Subdue (6)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Truth (914)  |  View (171)  |  Voice (50)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Work (626)

Scientific research can reduce superstition by encouraging people to think and survey things in terms of cause and effect. Certain it is that a conviction, akin to religious feeling, of the rationality or intelligibility of the world lies behind all scientific work of a higher order.
From 'Scientific Truth' in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause And Effect (11)  |  Certain (125)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Encouraging (2)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Higher (36)  |  Order (239)  |  Rationality (15)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Religious (49)  |  Research (589)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Superstition (56)  |  Survey (20)  |  Think (341)  |  Work (626)  |  World (892)

Should a person do good, let him do it again and again. Let him find pleasure therein, for blissful is the accumulation of good.
Buddha
The Dhammapada. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 236
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (30)  |  Blissful (3)  |  Find (405)  |  Good (345)  |  Let (61)  |  Pleasure (130)

Since an organism is inseparable from its environment, any person who attempts to understand an organism’s distribution must keep constantly in mind that the item being studied is neither a stuffed skin, a pickled specimen, nor a dot on a map. It is not even the live organism held in the hand, caged in a laboratory, or seen in the field. It is a complex interaction between a self-sustaining physicochemical system and the environment. An obvious corollary is that to know the organism it is necessary to know its environment.
From 'The role of physiology in the distribution of terrestrial vertebrates', collected in C.L. Hubbs (ed.), Zoogeography: Publ. 51 (1958), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Cage (8)  |  Complex (94)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Corollary (5)  |  Distribution (29)  |  Dot (11)  |  Environment (180)  |  Field (170)  |  Hand (141)  |  Hold (92)  |  Inseparable (10)  |  Interaction (31)  |  Item (4)  |  Keep (100)  |  Know (547)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Live (269)  |  Map (30)  |  Mind (743)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Organism (150)  |  Pickle (3)  |  See (369)  |  Self-Sustaining (3)  |  Skin (25)  |  Specimen (17)  |  Study (461)  |  Stuff (21)  |  System (191)  |  Understand (326)

Some persons have contended that mathematics ought to be taught by making the illustrations obvious to the senses. Nothing can be more absurd or injurious: it ought to be our never-ceasing effort to make people think, not feel.
Seven Lectures on Shakespeare and Milton (1856) 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (29)  |  Contend (6)  |  Effort (143)  |  Feel (165)  |  Illustration (28)  |  Injurious (4)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Sense (315)  |  Teach (179)  |  Thinking (231)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Admit (44)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Aid (41)  |  Apprehension (15)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Binomial Theorem (3)  |  Call (127)  |  Case (98)  |  Class (83)  |  Common (118)  |  Competent (18)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (239)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (178)  |  Differential Calculus (8)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Easy (98)  |  Effort (143)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (68)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Furnish (40)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Great (524)  |  Group (72)  |  High (152)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Involve (47)  |  Johannes Kepler (90)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Large (130)  |  Law (513)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Line (89)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Notion (57)  |  Object (169)  |  Operation (118)  |  Part (220)  |  Particular (75)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Physical Science (65)  |  Place (174)  |  Point (122)  |  Power (358)  |  Practical (129)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Product (82)  |  Purely (28)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (454)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (79)  |  Result (376)  |  Rise (70)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific Mind (5)  |  Seize (14)  |  Sense (315)  |  Simple (172)  |  Single (119)  |  Situation (52)  |  Solve (76)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (9)  |  Superior (40)  |  Tension (9)  |  Theory (690)  |  Train (45)  |  Triangle (10)  |  Universal (100)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (98)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (189)  |  Wide (27)

The assumption we have made … is that marriages and the union of gametes occur at random. The validity of this assumption may now be examined. “Random mating” obviously does not mean promiscuity; it simply means, as already explained above, that in the choice of mates for marriage there is neither preference for nor aversion to the union of persons similar or dissimilar with respect to a given trait or gene. Not all gentlemen prefer blondes or brunettes. Since so few people know what their blood type is, it is even safer to say that the chances of mates being similar or dissimilar in blood type are determined simply by the incidence of these blood types in a given Mendelian population.
[Co-author with Theodosius Dobzhansky]
In Radiation, Genes and Man (1960), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (58)  |  Aversion (7)  |  Blood (104)  |  Chance (159)  |  Choice (79)  |  Determined (9)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Examined (3)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Gamete (3)  |  Gene (72)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Incidence (2)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Mate (6)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Population (78)  |  Preference (21)  |  Promiscuity (3)  |  Random (25)  |  Respect (86)  |  Safety (43)  |  Similar (35)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Trait (22)  |  Union (20)  |  Validity (31)

The attempted synthesis of paleontology and genetics, an essential part of the present study, may be particularly surprising and possibly hazardous. Not long ago, paleontologists felt that a geneticist was a person who shut himself in a room, pulled down the shades, watched small flies disporting themselves in milk bottles, and thought that he was studying nature. A pursuit so removed from the realities of life, they said, had no significance for the true biologist. On the other hand, the geneticists said that paleontology had no further contributions to make to biology, that its only point had been the completed demonstration of the truth of evolution, and that it was a subject too purely descriptive to merit the name 'science'. The paleontologist, they believed, is like a man who undertakes to study the principles of the internal combustion engine by standing on a street corner and watching the motor cars whiz by.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Biology (168)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cat (36)  |  Completion (17)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Corner (29)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Description (84)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Fly (99)  |  Geneticist (11)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Internal Combustion Engine (2)  |  Merit (32)  |  Name (165)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Room (38)  |  Shade (22)  |  Standing (11)  |  Street (23)  |  Study (461)  |  Subject (235)  |  Synthesis (43)  |  Truth (914)  |  Watch (64)  |  Whiz (2)

The best education will not immunize a person against corruption by power. The best education does not automatically make people compassionate. We know this more clearly than any preceding generation. Our time has seen the best-educated society, situated in the heart of the most civilized part of the world, give birth to the most murderously vengeful government in history.
In Before the Sabbath (1979), 40-41.
Science quotes on:  |  Automatically (5)  |  Best (172)  |  Best-Educated (2)  |  Birth (93)  |  Civilized (17)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Corruption (10)  |  Education (333)  |  Generation (137)  |  Give (200)  |  Government (93)  |  Heart (139)  |  History (368)  |  Know (547)  |  Part (220)  |  People (388)  |  Power (358)  |  Precede (20)  |  See (369)  |  Situate (3)  |  Society (227)  |  Time (594)  |  World (892)

The best person able to appraise promise as a mathematician is a gifted teacher, and not a professional tester.
In speech, 'Education for Creativity in the Sciences', Conference at New York University, Washington Square. As quoted by Gene Currivan in 'I.Q. Tests Called Harmful to Pupil', New York Times (16 Jun 1963), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Appraisal (2)  |  Best (172)  |  Gifted (6)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Professional (37)  |  Promise (38)  |  Teacher (119)

The entire mathematical arsenal that our modern sages command cannot establish facts. Practical people should always keep this in mind when they ask mathematicians for help.
As translated from Literaturnaya Gazeta (5 Dec 1979), 49, 12, in 'Miscellanea', The American Mathematical Monthly (Aug-Sep 1980), 87, No. 7, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Ask (157)  |  Command (27)  |  Entire (46)  |  Establish (55)  |  Fact (725)  |  Help (101)  |  Keep (100)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mind (743)  |  Modern (159)  |  Practical (129)  |  Sage (15)

The first nonabsolute number is the number of people for whom the table is reserved. This will vary during the course of the first three telephone calls to the restaurant, and then bear no apparent relation to the number of people who actually turn up, or to the number of people who subsequently join them after the show/match/party/gig, or to the number of people who leave when they see who else has turned up.
The second nonabsolute number is the given time of arrival, which is now known to be one of the most bizarre of mathematical concepts, a recipriversexcluson, a number whose existence can only be defined as being anything other than itself. In other words, the given time of arrival is the one moment of time at which it is impossible that any member of the party will arrive. Recipriversexclusons now play a vital part in many branches of math, including statistics and accountancy and also form the basic equations used to engineer the Somebody Else’s Problem field.
The third and most mysterious piece of nonabsoluteness of all lies in the relationship between the number of items on the check [bill], the cost of each item, the number of people at the table and what they are each prepared to pay for. (The number of people who have actually brought any money is only a subphenomenon of this field.)
Life, the Universe and Everything (1982, 1995), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Arrival (9)  |  Bill (14)  |  Concept (143)  |  Cost (44)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Equation (93)  |  Existence (296)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Money (142)  |  Number (276)  |  Party (18)  |  Reservation (6)  |  Restaurant (3)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Telephone (23)  |  Time (594)

The following story is true. There was a little boy, and his father said, “Do try to be like other people. Don’t frown.” And he tried and tried, but could not. So his father beat him with a strap; and then he was eaten up by lions. Reader, if young, take warning by his sad life and death. For though it may be an honour to be different from other people, if Carlyle’s dictum about the 30 million be still true, yet other people do not like it. So, if you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. In particular, if you are going to write a book, remember the wooden-headed. So be rigorous; that will cover a multitude of sins. And do not frown.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (23)  |  Better (190)  |  Book (257)  |  Boy (46)  |  Thomas Carlyle (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Death (302)  |  Dictum (5)  |  Different (178)  |  Father (57)  |  Fortune (27)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hiding (6)  |  Honour (25)  |  Life (1124)  |  Lion (17)  |  Money (142)  |  Multitude (20)  |  Reader (38)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Sadness (34)  |  Sin (30)  |  Solemn (10)  |  Story (72)  |  Strap (3)  |  Truth (914)  |  Try (141)  |  Warning (10)  |  Worship (25)  |  Writing (79)  |  Young (98)

The great horde of physicians are always servile imitators, who can neither perceive nor correct the faults of their system, and are always ready to growl at and even to worry the ingenious person that could attempt it. Thus was the system of Galen secured in the possession of the schools of physic.
In Lectures Introductory to the Practice of Physic, Collected in The Works of William Cullen: Containing his Physiology, Nosology, and first lines of the practice of physic (1827), Vol. 1, 386.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (121)  |  Correct (83)  |  Fault (33)  |  Galen (19)  |  Great (524)  |  Growl (3)  |  Horde (2)  |  Imitator (3)  |  Ingenious (25)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Physic (6)  |  Physician (241)  |  Possession (45)  |  Ready (37)  |  School (117)  |  Secure (20)  |  Servile (3)  |  System (191)  |  Worry (33)

The greater intellect one has, the more originality one finds in men. Ordinary persons find no difference between men.
In Pascal’s Pensées (1958), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Difference (246)  |  Find (405)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Man (373)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Originality (18)  |  People (388)

The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.
Attributed. The wording as above may be a popularized derivative from this quote: “The greatest enjoyment possible to man was that which this philosophy promises its votaries—the pleasure of being always right, and always reasoning—without ever being bound to look at anything.” In The English Constitution (1867), 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Cannot (8)  |  Doing (36)  |  Greatest (62)  |  Life (1124)  |  Pleasure (130)

The injurious agent in cigarettes comes principally from the burning paper wrapper. The substance thereby formed is called “acrolein.” It has a violent action on the nerve centers, producing degeneration of the cells of the brain, which is quite rapid among boys. Unlike most narcotics, this degeneration is permanent and uncontrollable. I employ no person who smokes cigarettes.
[From the Laboratory of Thomas A. Edison, Orange, N.J., April 26, 1914.]
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Agent (32)  |  Boy (46)  |  Brain (209)  |  Burning (17)  |  Cell (137)  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Employment (23)  |  Formation (58)  |  Injury (21)  |  Nerve (69)  |  Paper (82)  |  Permanent (28)  |  Rapidity (16)  |  Smoker (3)  |  Substance (85)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Violence (23)

The last person who left the lab will be the one held responsible for everything that goes wrong.
Anonymous
Found in The NIH Catalyst (May-June 2003), 11, No. 3, 8, as part of list 'A Scientist’s Dozen,' cited as “culled and adapted…from a variety of sources” by Howard Young.
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (180)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Wrong (138)

The morning stars sang together.
And a person of delicate ear and nice judgment discussed the singing at length, and showed how and wherein one star differed from another, and which was great and which was not.
And still the morning stars sang together.
'Classification' in Little Stings (1907, 1908), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (203)  |  Classification (85)  |  Delicate (20)  |  Differ (22)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Ear (25)  |  Great (524)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Morning (43)  |  Nice (12)  |  Singing (6)  |  Star (336)  |  Together (77)

The most pathetic person in the world is someone who has sight, but has no vision.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Pathetic (4)  |  Sight (47)  |  Someone (21)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (892)

The observer is not he who merely sees the thing which is before his eyes, but he who sees what parts the thing is composed of. To do this well is a rare talent. One person, from inattention, or attending only in the wrong place, overlooks half of what he sees; another sets down much more than he sees, confounding it with what he imagines, or with what he infers; another takes note of the kind of all the circumstances, but being inexpert in estimating their degree, leaves the quantity of each vague and uncertain; another sees indeed the whole, but makes such an awkward division of it into parts, throwing into one mass things which require to be separated, and separating others which might more conveniently be considered as one, that the result is much the same, sometimes even worse than if no analysis had been attempted at all.
In A System of Logic Ratiocinative and Inductive (1858), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (159)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Attend (9)  |  Awkward (7)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Composed (3)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (80)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Degree (81)  |  Division (33)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Eye (218)  |  Half (56)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Inattention (4)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Infer (12)  |  Kind (138)  |  Mass (78)  |  Merely (82)  |  Note (33)  |  Observation (445)  |  Observer (42)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (220)  |  Place (174)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Rare (47)  |  Require (79)  |  Result (376)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (69)  |  Set Down (2)  |  Talent (61)  |  Uncertain (14)  |  Vague (25)  |  Whole (189)  |  Worse (23)  |  Wrong (138)

The opening of a foreign trade, by making them acquainted with new objects, or tempting them by the easier acquisition of things which they had not previously thought attainable, sometimes works a sort of industrial revolution in a country whose resources were previously undeveloped for want of energy and ambition in the people; inducing those who were satisfied with scanty comforts and little work to work harder for the gratification of their new tastes, and even to save, and accumulate capital, for the still more complete satisfaction of those tastes at a future time.
In Principles of Political Economy, with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy Vol. 1 (1873), Vol. 1, 351.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Acquisition (41)  |  Ambition (34)  |  Attain (42)  |  Capital (15)  |  Comfort (49)  |  Country (144)  |  Easier (10)  |  Energy (214)  |  Future (284)  |  Gratification (17)  |  Hard (99)  |  Induce (12)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  New (483)  |  Resource (61)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Save (56)  |  Scanty (3)  |  Taste (48)  |  Tempt (5)  |  Undeveloped (4)  |  Want (175)

The people has no definite disbelief in the temples of theology. The people has a very fiery and practical disbelief in the temples of physical science.
In Charles Dickens: A Critical Study (1906, 1910), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Definite (42)  |  Disbelief (3)  |  Fiery (5)  |  Physical Science (65)  |  Practical (129)  |  Temple (25)  |  Theology (40)

The persons who have been employed on these problems of applying the properties of matter and the laws of motion to the explanation of the phenomena of the world, and who have brought to them the high and admirable qualities which such an office requires, have justly excited in a very eminent degree the admiration which mankind feels for great intellectual powers. Their names occupy a distinguished place in literary history; and probably there are no scientific reputations of the last century higher, and none more merited, than those earned by great mathematicians who have laboured with such wonderful success in unfolding the mechanism of the heavens; such for instance as D ’Alembert, Clairaut, Euler, Lagrange, Laplace.
In Astronomy and General Physics (1833), Bk. 3, chap. 4, 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (44)  |  Apply (76)  |  Bring (90)  |  Century (130)  |  Alexis Claude Clairaut (2)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (10)  |  Degree (81)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Earn (7)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Employ (35)  |  Leonhard Euler (34)  |  Excited (8)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Feel (165)  |  Great (524)  |  Heaven (151)  |  High (152)  |  History (368)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Justly (6)  |  Labour (45)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (24)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (61)  |  Law Of Motion (13)  |  Literary (12)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Merit (32)  |  Name (165)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Office (22)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Place (174)  |  Power (358)  |  Probably (47)  |  Problem (490)  |  Properties Of Matter (2)  |  Quality (93)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Require (79)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Success (248)  |  Unfold (12)  |  Wonderful (59)  |  World (892)

The philosophy that I have worked under most of my life is that the serious study of natural history is an activity which has far-reaching effects in every aspect of a person's life. It ultimately makes people protective of the environment in a very committed way. It is my opinion that the study of natural history should be the primary avenue for creating environmentalists.
As quoted in William V. Mealy, Peter Friederici and Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Value in American Wildlife Art: Proceedings of the 1992 Forum (1992), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Aspect (57)  |  Avenue (6)  |  Committed (2)  |  Create (150)  |  Effect (165)  |  Environment (180)  |  Environmentalist (5)  |  Far-Reaching (8)  |  Life (1124)  |  Make (25)  |  Natural History (49)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Primary (39)  |  Protective (5)  |  Serious (52)  |  Study (461)  |  Ultimately (15)  |  Work (626)

The radiation of radium was “contagious”—Contagious like a persistent scent or a disease. It was impossible for an object, a plant, an animal or a person to be left near a tube of radium without immediately acquiring a notable “activity” which a sensitive apparatus could detect.
Eve Curie
In Eve Curie, Madame Curie: a Biography by Eve Curie (1937, 2007), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Animal (356)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Contagious (4)  |  Disease (275)  |  Impossibility (52)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Object (169)  |  Persistence (20)  |  Plant (199)  |  Radiation (25)  |  Radioactivity (28)  |  Radium (20)  |  Scent (5)

The saddest moment in a person’s life comes but once.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Life (1124)  |  Moment (106)  |  Sadness (34)

The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, he’s one who asks the right questions.
Translation of the original French, “Le savant n’est pas l’homme qui fournit les vraies réponses; c’est luis qui pose les vraies questions,” in Mythologiques, Vol. 1, Le Cru et le Cuit (1964), 15. As seen in various books, with no credit to a translator, for example, in What a Piece of Work is Man!: Camp's Unfamiliar Quotations (1989), 283. Also translated as “The scientific mind does not so much provide the right answers as ask the right questions.”
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (157)  |  Give (200)  |  Question (404)  |  Right (196)  |  Scientist (519)

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI, to us insiders) has so far only proved that no matter what you beam up—the Pythagorean theorem, pictures of attractive nude people, etc.—the big 800 number in the sky does not return calls.
From essay 'First Person Secular: Blocking the Gates to Heaven', Mother Jones Magazine (Jun 1986), 48. Collected in The Worst Years of our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed (1995), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (8)  |  Beam (10)  |  Call (127)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Nude (3)  |  Number (276)  |  Picture (75)  |  Proof (243)  |  Return (55)  |  Search (104)  |  SETI (3)  |  Sky (124)

The student of mathematics often finds it hard to throw off the uncomfortable feeling that his science, in the person of his pencil, surpasses him in intelligence,—an impression which the great Euler confessed he often could not get rid of. This feeling finds a sort of justification when we reflect that the majority of the ideas we deal with were conceived by others, often centuries ago. In a great measure it is really the intelligence of other people that confronts us in science.
In Popular Scientific Lectures (1910), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (130)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Confess (15)  |  Confront (17)  |  Deal (49)  |  Leonhard Euler (34)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  Get Rid (4)  |  Great (524)  |  Hard (99)  |  Idea (577)  |  Impression (69)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Justification (39)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Measure (102)  |  Often (106)  |  Pencil (17)  |  People (388)  |  Really (78)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sort (49)  |  Student (201)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Surpass (19)  |  Throw (43)  |  Uncomfortable (6)

The tide of evolution carries everything before it, thoughts no less than bodies, and persons no less than nations.
Little Essays (1920, 2008), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (533)  |  Nation (132)

The true wealth of a nation consists not in the stored-up gold but in the intellectual and physical strength of its people.
Quoted in India Today (Apr 2008), 33, No 16, as cited on webpage of Dhirubhai Ambani Institute of Information and Communication Technology.
Science quotes on:  |  Gold (68)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Nation (132)  |  Physical (129)  |  Store (21)  |  Strength (79)  |  True (201)  |  Wealth (66)

To discover and to teach are distinct functions; they are also distinct gifts, and are not commonly found united in the same person.
Discourses on the Scope and Nature of University Education. Addressed to the Catholics of Dublin (1852), Preface, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Commonly (9)  |  Discover (196)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Function (128)  |  Gift (61)  |  Teach (179)  |  United (14)

Try to find pleasure in the speed that you’re not used to. Changing the way you do routine things allows a new person to grow inside of you.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 236
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (44)  |  Change (363)  |  Find (405)  |  Grow (98)  |  Inside (26)  |  New (483)  |  Pleasure (130)  |  Routine (19)  |  Speed (35)  |  Try (141)

Very few people do anything creative after the age of thirty-five. The reason is that very few people do anything creative before the age of thirty-five.
Atrributed, without citation, in Richard V. Eastman, Discovery Workbook: Why Didn't I Think Of That, 6. If you known a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (174)  |  Creativity (70)  |  Reason (454)  |  Thirty-Five (2)

Water is the most precious, limited natural resource we have in this country… But because water belongs to no one—except the people—special interests, including government polluters, use it as their private sewers.
In Nader’s Foreword to David Zwick, Marcy Benstock and Ralph Nader, Water wasteland: Ralph Nader's Study Group Report on Water Pollution (1971), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (144)  |  Government (93)  |  Limited (18)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Precious (31)  |  Private (21)  |  Sewer (4)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Water (292)  |  Water Pollution (11)

We cannot hope to fill the schools with persons of high intelligence, for persons of high intelligence simply refuse to spend their lives teaching such banal things as spelling and arithmetic. Among the teachers male we may safely assume that 95% are of low mentality, el se they would depart for more appetizing pastures. And even among the teachers female the best are inevitably weeded out by marriage, and only the worst (with a few romantic exceptions) survive.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Assume (37)  |  Bad (99)  |  Best (172)  |  Depart (4)  |  Exception (39)  |  Female (24)  |  Fill (61)  |  High (152)  |  Hope (174)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Live (269)  |  Low (24)  |  Male (26)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Refuse (23)  |  Romantic (9)  |  Safely (8)  |  School (117)  |  Simply (52)  |  Spell (9)  |  Spend (43)  |  Survive (46)  |  Teach (179)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Weed (15)

We just want to have great people working for us.
As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 281.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (524)  |  Want (175)  |  Work (626)

We … came up with the notion that not all web pages are created equal. People are, but not web pages.
Guest Lecture, UC Berkeley, 'Search Engines, Technology, and Business' (3 Oct 2005). At 7:43 in the YouTube video.
Science quotes on:  |  Create (150)  |  Equal (77)  |  Notion (57)  |  Web Page (2)

We’re going to see public attitudes [on climate change] switch not in proportion to scientific findings or graphs, but in proportion to the stories they hear, the people they know whose lives have been touched by climate change or some environmental calamity. That’s what really changed public opinion.
From interview with Mark Tercek, 'Q&A With Ramez Naam: Dialogues on the Environment', Huffington Post (1 Jul 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (59)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Climate Change (59)  |  Environment (180)  |  Finding (30)  |  Graph (5)  |  Hear (60)  |  Know (547)  |  Life (1124)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Public (93)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Story (72)  |  Switch (10)  |  Touch (76)

What counts is the person, not the name.
Aphorism as given by the fictional character Dezhnev Senior, in Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Count (48)  |  Name (165)

When a believing person prays, great things happen.
Bible
James 5:13-16. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 177
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (503)  |  Great (524)  |  Happen (82)  |  Pray (16)

When I first ventured into the Gulf of Mexico in the 1950s, the sea appeared to be a blue infinity too large, too wild to be harmed by anything that people could do. I explored powder white beaches, dense marshes, mangrove forests, and miles of sea grass meadows alive with pink sea urchins, tiny shrimps, and seahorses half the size of my little finger. … Then, in mere decades, not millennia, the blue wilderness of my childhood disappeared: biologic change in the space of a lifetime.
From 'My Blue Wilderness', National Geographic Magazine (Oct 2010), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Beach (16)  |  Biological (35)  |  Blue (56)  |  Change (363)  |  Childhood (28)  |  Decade (32)  |  Dense (5)  |  Disappear (29)  |  Exploration (122)  |  Finger (44)  |  Forest (107)  |  Grass (35)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (4)  |  Harm (37)  |  Infinity (72)  |  Large (130)  |  Lifetime (28)  |  Mangrove (3)  |  Marsh (6)  |  Meadow (14)  |  Mile (39)  |  Millennium (3)  |  Pink (4)  |  Powder (4)  |  Sea (187)  |  Shrimp (5)  |  Size (60)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Venture (18)  |  White (56)  |  Wild (48)  |  Wilderness (39)

When I was growing up, I always knew I’d be in the top of my class in math, and that gave me a lot of self-confidence. [But now that students can see beyond their own school, they see that] there are always going to be a million people better than you at times, or someone will always be far better than you. I feel there’s an existential angst among young people. I didn’t have that. They see enormous mountains, where I only saw one little hill to climb.
From address at a conference on Google campus, co-hosted with Common Sense Media and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop 'Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age'. As quoted in Technology blog report by Dan Fost, 'Google co-founder Sergey Brin wants more computers in schools', Los Angeles Times (28 Oct 2009). On latimesblogs.latimes.com website. As quoted, without citation, in Can Akdeniz, Fast MBA (2014), 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Angst (2)  |  Climb (34)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Existential (2)  |  Hill (20)  |  Little (184)  |  Mountain (145)  |  See (369)  |  Young (98)

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion.
As quoted by Richard Dawkins in The God Delusion (2006, 2008), Preface, 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Delusion (22)  |  Insanity (7)  |  Religion (239)  |  Suffering (27)

When we have fully discovered the scientific laws that govern life, we shall realise that one person who has more illusions than the dreamer is the man of action.
In Epigrams of Oscar Wilde (2007), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (184)  |  Discover (196)  |  Dreamer (10)  |  Govern (28)  |  Illusion (43)  |  Life (1124)  |  Natural Law (31)  |  Realize (90)

When you row another person across the river, you get there yourself.
Anonymous
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  River (79)  |  Row (9)

Why should [persons of artistic sensibility] stop to think when they are not very good at thinking?
In Art (1913), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Artistic (15)  |  Good (345)  |  Sensibility (4)  |  Stop (75)  |  Think (341)

Wise [persons] learn by others’ mistakes, fools by their own.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fool (85)  |  Learn (281)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Wise (60)

Working on the final formulation of technological patents was a veritable blessing for me. It enforced many-sided thinking and also provided important stimuli to physical thought. Academia places a young person under a kind of compulsion to produce impressive quantities of scientific publications–a temptation to superficiality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Bless (9)  |  Compulsion (12)  |  Enforce (8)  |  Final (49)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Important (202)  |  Impressive (20)  |  Kind (138)  |  Patent (25)  |  Physical (129)  |  Place (174)  |  Produce (100)  |  Provide (68)  |  Publication (90)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Stimulus (19)  |  Superficiality (4)  |  Technological (18)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Veritable (4)  |  Work (626)  |  Young (98)

Your average scientist is not a good PR person because he wants to get on with his science.
On BBC website, 'Climate change scientists losing “PR war”' (11 Feb 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Average (41)  |  Good (345)  |  Public Relations (5)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Want (175)

[De Morgan relates that some person had made up 800 anagrams on his name, of which he had seen about 650. Commenting on these he says:]
Two of these I have joined in the title-page:
[Ut agendo surgamus arguendo gustamus.]
A few of the others are personal remarks.
Great gun! do us a sum!
is a sneer at my pursuit; but,
Go! great sum! [integral of a to the power u to the power n with respect to u] is more dignified. …
Adsum, nugator, suge!
is addressed to a student who continues talking after the lecture has commenced: …
Graduatus sum! nego
applies to one who declined to subscribe for an M.A. degree.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 82. [The Latin phrases translate as, respectively, “Such action will start arguing with taste”, “Here babbler suck!” and “I graduate! I reject.” —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Address (12)  |  Anagram (9)  |  Apply (76)  |  Argue (23)  |  Babble (2)  |  Commence (5)  |  Comment (11)  |  Continue (63)  |  Decline (17)  |  Degree (81)  |  Augustus De Morgan (44)  |  Dignified (4)  |  Graduate (13)  |  Great (524)  |  Gun (9)  |  Integral (14)  |  Join (25)  |  Lecture (67)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Name (165)  |  Page (27)  |  Personal (66)  |  Power (358)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Relate (19)  |  Remark (26)  |  Say (228)  |  See (369)  |  Sneer (6)  |  Student (201)  |  Subscribe (2)  |  Suck (5)  |  Sum (41)  |  Talk (99)  |  Title (18)

[Ignorance] of the principle of conservation of energy … does not prevent inventors without background from continually putting forward perpetual motion machines… Also, such persons undoubtedly have their exact counterparts in the fields of art, finance, education, and all other departments of human activity… persons who are unwilling to take the time and to make the effort required to find what the known facts are before they become the champions of unsupported opinions—people who take sides first and look up facts afterward when the tendency to distort the facts to conform to the opinions has become well-nigh irresistible.
From Evolution in Science and Religion (1927), 58-59. An excerpt from the book including this quote appears in 'New Truth and Old', Christian Education (Apr 1927), 10, No. 7, 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Art (284)  |  Background (30)  |  Conform (11)  |  Conservation Of Energy (27)  |  Continual (18)  |  Counterpart (5)  |  Department (47)  |  Distort (7)  |  Education (333)  |  Effort (143)  |  Fact (725)  |  Finance (2)  |  Human (548)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Inventor (55)  |  Machine (157)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Perpetual Motion (9)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Principle (285)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Time (594)  |  Unwilling (9)

[On suburbia] We’re bringing up our children in one-class areas. When they grow up and move to a city or go abroad, they’re not accustomed to variety and they get uncertain and insecure. We should bring up our children where they’re exposed to all types of people.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (8)  |  Accustom (9)  |  Child (245)  |  City (47)  |  Class (83)  |  Expose (16)  |  Grow (98)  |  Insecure (4)  |  Move (94)  |  Type (51)  |  Uncertain (14)  |  Variety (69)

~~[Dubious]~~ A plagiarist steals from one person. A true artist steals from everybody.
Seen feral on the web, but never with source citation. Webmaster has not yet found any primary source, and regards the quote as spurious. Compare the believed authentic quote, “When there's anything to steal, I steal,” See the Pablo Picasso Quotes page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (61)  |  Everybody (27)  |  Steal (13)  |  True (201)

~~[unverified]~~ Talent is like electricity. We don’t understand electricity. We use it. You can plug into it and light up a lamp, keep a heart pump going, light a cathedral, or you can electrocute a person with it.
Attribution is uncertain until a primary source is identified. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Cathedral (15)  |  Electricity (135)  |  Heart (139)  |  Lamp (16)  |  Light (345)  |  Plug (3)  |  Pump (6)  |  Talent (61)  |  Understand (326)

“You know that it is quite preposterous of you to chase rainbows,” said the sane person to the poet.
“Yet it would be rather beautiful if I did one day manage to catch one,” mused the poet.
'Dreams' in Little Stings (1907, 1908), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Catch (30)  |  Chase (13)  |  Manage (15)  |  Muse (5)  |  Poet (78)  |  Preposterous (6)  |  Rainbow (10)  |  Sane (4)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.