Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Dignity

Dignity Quotes (18 quotes)

In primis, hominis est propria VERI inquisitio atque investigato. Itaque cum sumus negotiis necessariis, curisque vacui, tum avemus aliquid videre, audire, ac dicere, cognitionemque rerum, aut occultarum aut admirabilium, ad benè beatéque vivendum necessariam ducimus; —ex quo intelligitur, quod VERUM, simplex, sincerumque sit, id esse naturæ hominis aptissimum. Huic veri videndi cupiditati adjuncta est appetitio quædam principatûs, ut nemini parere animus benè a naturâ informatus velit, nisi præcipienti, aut docenti, aut utilitatis causâ justè et legitimè imperanti: ex quo animi magnitudo existit, et humanarum rerum contemtio.
Before all other things, man is distinguished by his pursuit and investigation of TRUTH. And hence, when free from needful business and cares, we delight to see, to hear, and to communicate, and consider a knowledge of many admirable and abstruse things necessary to the good conduct and happiness of our lives: whence it is clear that whatsoever is TRUE, simple, and direct, the same is most congenial to our nature as men. Closely allied with this earnest longing to see and know the truth, is a kind of dignified and princely sentiment which forbids a mind, naturally well constituted, to submit its faculties to any but those who announce it in precept or in doctrine, or to yield obedience to any orders but such as are at once just, lawful, and founded on utility. From this source spring greatness of mind and contempt of worldly advantages and troubles.
In De Officiis, Book 1. Sect. 13. As given in epigraph to John Frederick William Herschel, A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Communication (58)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Congenial (2)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lawful (6)  |  Life (917)  |  Longing (8)  |  Man (345)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Obedience (15)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Utility (23)

Accurate and minute measurement seems to the non-scientific imagination, a less lofty and dignified work than looking for something new. But nearly all the grandest discoveries of science have been but the rewards of accurate measurement and patient long-continued labour in the minute sifting of numerical results.
Presidential inaugural address, to the General Meeting of the British Association, Edinburgh (2 Aug 1871). In Report of the Forty-First Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1872), xci.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Labour (36)  |  Lofty (7)  |  Looking (25)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Minuteness (3)  |  New (340)  |  Non-Scientific (4)  |  Number (179)  |  Patience (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Reward (38)  |  Work (457)

Astronomy is, not without reason, regarded, by mankind, as the sublimest of the natural sciences. Its objects so frequently visible, and therefore familiar, being always remote and inaccessible, do not lose their dignity.
In Elements of Chemistry: In the Order of the Lectures Given in Yale College (1830), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Familiarity (12)  |  Frequently (13)  |  Inaccessible (8)  |  Loss (62)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Object (110)  |  Reason (330)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remote (27)  |  Sublime (18)  |  Visible (20)

But to proceed; as in order and place, so also in matter of her Creation, Woman far excells Man. things receive their value from the matter they are made of, and the excellent skill of their maker: Pots of common clay must not contend with China-dishes, nor pewter utensils vye dignity with those of silver…. Woman was not composed of any inanimate or vile dirt, but of a more refined and purified substance, enlivened and actuated by a Rational Soul, whose operations speak it a beam, or bright ray of Divinity.
In Female Pre-eminence: Or, The Dignity and Excellency of that Sex above the Male, translation (1670).
Science quotes on:  |  China (17)  |  Clay (9)  |  Creation (211)  |  Silver (26)  |  Utensil (2)  |  Woman (94)

I hold every man a debtor to his profession; from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavour themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto. This is performed, in some degree, by the honest and liberal practice of a profession; where men shall carry a respect not to descend into any course that is corrupt and unworthy thereof, and preserve themselves free from the abuses wherewith the same profession is noted to be infected: but much more is this performed, if a man be able to visit and strengthen the roots and foundation of the science itself; thereby not only gracing it in reputation and dignity, but also amplifying it in profession and substance.
Opening sentences of Preface, Maxims of Law (1596), in The Works of Francis Bacon: Law tracts. Maxims of the Law (1803), Vol. 4, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Amplification (3)  |  Corruption (9)  |  Countenance (2)  |  Course (57)  |  Descent (14)  |  Endeavour (24)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Grace (13)  |  Help (68)  |  Honesty (16)  |  Infection (18)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Ornament (12)  |  Performance (27)  |  Practice (67)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Profession (54)  |  Profit (28)  |  Reputation (17)  |  Respect (57)  |  Root (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Substance (73)  |  Unworthy (8)  |  Visit (15)

Judging from our experience upon this planet, such a history, that begins with elementary particles, leads perhaps inevitably toward a strange and moving end: a creature that knows, a science-making animal, that turns back upon the process that generated him and attempts to understand it. Without his like, the universe could be, but not be known, and this is a poor thing. Surely this is a great part of our dignity as men, that we can know, and that through us matter can know itself; that beginning with protons and electrons, out of the womb of time and the vastnesses of space, we can begin to understand; that organized as in us, the hydrogen, the carbon, the nitrogen, the oxygen, those 16-21 elements, the water, the sunlight—all having become us, can begin to understand what they are, and how they came to be.
In 'The Origins of Life', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1964), 52, 609-110.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Carbon (48)  |  Creature (127)  |  Electron (66)  |  Element (129)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Experience (268)  |  Generation (111)  |  History (302)  |  Hydrogen (37)  |  Judge (43)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lead (101)  |  Moving (11)  |  Nitrogen (18)  |  Organized (9)  |  Oxygen (49)  |  Particle (90)  |  Planet (199)  |  Space (154)  |  Strange (61)  |  Sunlight (14)  |  Time (439)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vastness (9)  |  Water (244)  |  Womb (13)

No shreds of dignity encumber
The undistinguished Random Number
He has, so sad a lot is his,
No reason to be what he is.
In Kenneth Ewart Boulding and Richard P. Beilock (Ed.), Illustrating Economics: Beasts, Ballads and Aphorisms (1980, 2009), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Encumber (3)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Number (179)  |  Random (21)  |  Reason (330)  |  Sadness (26)  |  Shred (6)  |  Undistinguished (3)

Science is inseparably interwoven in all that gives power and dignity to a nation.
Anonymous
Cited only as “said by one of the soundest writers upon the study of nature” in 'The Smithsonian Institution', Putnam's Monthly Magazine of American Literature, Science, and Art (Aug 1854), 4, No. 20, 131. Also seen cited as “it has been well observed,” in W.F. Ainsworth, (ed.),'North America', All Round the World: An Illustrated Record of Voyages, Travels, and Adventures in All Parts of the Globe (1866), Vol. 3, 50. Please contact Webmaster if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Interwoven (6)  |  Nation (111)  |  Power (273)  |  Science (1699)

Science is teaching man to know and reverence truth, and to believe that only so far as he knows and loves it can he live worthily on earth, and vindicate the dignity of his spirit.
In Where are We and Whither Tending?: Three Lectures on the Reality and Worth of Human Progress (1886), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Live (186)  |  Love (164)  |  Man (345)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Teach (102)  |  Truth (750)  |  Vindicate (2)  |  Worth (74)

The big political doings of our time are so disheartening that in our generation one feels quite alone. It is as if people had lost the passion for justice and dignity and no longer treasure what better generations have won by extraordinary sacrifices.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Better (131)  |  Big (33)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Doings (2)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Generation (111)  |  Justice (24)  |  Long (95)  |  Lose (53)  |  Passion (54)  |  People (269)  |  Political (31)  |  Sacrifice (24)  |  Time (439)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Win (25)

The fact which interests us most is the life of the naturalist. The purest science is still biographical. Nothing will dignify and elevate science while it is sundered so wholly from the moral life of its devotee.
A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1873), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Devotee (3)  |  Elevation (4)  |  Fact (609)  |  Interest (170)  |  Life (917)  |  Moral (100)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Purest (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Wholly (7)

The first objection to Darwinism is that it is only a guess and was never anything more. It is called a “hypothesis,” but the word “hypothesis,” though euphonioous, dignified and high-sounding, is merely a scientific synonym for the old-fashioned word “guess.” If Darwin had advanced his views as a guess they would not have survived for a year, but they have floated for half a century, buoyed up by the inflated word “hypothesis.” When it is understood that “hypothesis” means “guess,” people will inspect it more carefully before accepting it.
'God and Evolution', New York Times (26 Feb 1922), 84. Rebuttals were printed a few days later from Henry Fairfield Osborn and Edwin Grant Conklin.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Guess (36)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Old-Fashioned (5)  |  Survival (49)  |  Synonym (2)  |  Word (221)

The most important human endeavor is the striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance and even our very existence depend on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Balance (43)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Depend (56)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Existence (254)  |  Give (117)  |  Human (445)  |  Important (124)  |  Inner (27)  |  Life (917)  |  Morality (33)  |  Strive (35)

The same society which receives the rewards of technology must, as a cooperating whole, take responsibility for control. To deal with these new problems will require a new conservation. We must not only protect the countryside and save it from destruction, we must restore what has been destroyed and salvage the beauty and charm of our cities. Our conservation must be not just the classic conservation of protection and development, but a creative conservation of restoration and innovation. Its concern is not with nature alone, but with the total relation between man and the world around him. Its object is not just man's welfare, but the dignity of man's spirit.
In his 'Message to Congress on Conservation and Restoration of Natural Beauty' written to Congress (8 Feb 1965). It was a broad initiative aimed at beautifying America, guaranteeing water and air quality, and preserving natural areas. In Lyndon B. Johnson: Containing the Public Messages, Speeches, and Statements of the President (1965), Vol.1, 156. United States. President (1963-1969 : Johnson), Lyndon Baines Johnson, United States. Office of the Federal Register - 1970
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Charm (18)  |  City (37)  |  Classic (4)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Control (93)  |  Cooperation (27)  |  Countryside (3)  |  Creativity (66)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Development (228)  |  Environment (138)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Nature (1029)  |  New (340)  |  Object (110)  |  Problem (362)  |  Protection (23)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Reward (38)  |  Salvage (2)  |  Saving (19)  |  Society (188)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Technology (199)  |  Welfare (16)  |  World (667)

The sun alone appears, by virtue of his dignity and power, suited for this motive duty (of moving the planets) and worthy to become the home of God himself.
As quoted in Änne Bäumer-Schleinkofer, Science and Religion (1989), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Appear (55)  |  Duty (51)  |  God (454)  |  Home (58)  |  Move (58)  |  Planet (199)  |  Power (273)  |  Suited (2)  |  Sun (211)  |  Virtue (55)  |  Worthy (21)

What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind. What these blessed men have given us we must guard and try to keep alive with all our strength if humanity is not to lose its dignity, the security of its existence, and its joy in living.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Alive (38)  |  Bless (6)  |  Buddha (4)  |  Constructive (3)  |  Enquire (2)  |  Existence (254)  |  Give (117)  |  Guard (12)  |  High (78)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Jesus (8)  |  Joy (61)  |  Keep (47)  |  Live (186)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mind (544)  |  Moses (6)  |  Owe (15)  |  Personality (40)  |  Rank (19)  |  Security (27)  |  Strength (63)  |  Try (103)

Will we ever again be able to view a public object with civic dignity, unencumbered by commercial messages? Must city buses be fully painted as movable ads, lampposts smothered, taxis festooned, even seats in concert halls sold one by one to donors and embellished in perpetuity with their names on silver plaques?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  City (37)  |  Civic (2)  |  Commercial (25)  |  Concert (3)  |  Embellish (2)  |  Festoon (3)  |  Fully (11)  |  Hall (4)  |  Message (30)  |  Movable (2)  |  Name (118)  |  Object (110)  |  Paint (17)  |  Perpetuity (7)  |  Plaque (2)  |  Public (82)  |  Seat (5)  |  Sell (10)  |  Silver (26)  |  Smother (2)  |  Taxi (3)  |  View (115)

Yes, Shakespeare foremost and forever (Darwin too). But also teach about the excellence of pygmy bushcraft and Fuegian survival in the world’s harshest climate. Dignity and inspiration come in many guises. Would anyone choose the tinhorn patriotism of George Armstrong Custer over the eloquence of Chief Joseph in defeat?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (26)  |  Chief (25)  |  Choose (35)  |  Climate (38)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Defeat (13)  |  Eloquence (5)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Foremost (8)  |  Forever (42)  |  George (3)  |  Guise (4)  |  Harsh (7)  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Patriotism (6)  |  Shakespeare (3)  |  Survival (49)  |  Teach (102)  |  World (667)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.