Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Writing

Writing Quotes (189 quotes)

Dogbert (advice to Boss): Every credible scientist on earth says your products harm the environment. I recommend paying weasels to write articles casting doubt on the data. Then eat the wrong kind of foods and hope you die before the earth does.
Dilbert cartoon strip (30 Oct 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Article (22)  |  Casting (10)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Credibility (4)  |  Data (156)  |  Death (388)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eat (104)  |  Environment (216)  |  Food (199)  |  Harm (39)  |  Hope (299)  |  Kind (557)  |  Product (160)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Write (230)  |  Wrong (234)

If the Indians hadn’t spent the $24. In 1626 Peter Minuit, first governor of New Netherland, purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for about $24. … Assume for simplicity a uniform rate of 7% from 1626 to the present, and suppose that the Indians had put their $24 at [compound] interest at that rate …. What would be the amount now, after 280 years? 24 x (1.07)280 = more than 4,042,000,000.
The latest tax assessment available at the time of writing gives the realty for the borough of Manhattan as $3,820,754,181. This is estimated to be 78% of the actual value, making the actual value a little more than $4,898,400,000.
The amount of the Indians’ money would therefore be more than the present assessed valuation but less than the actual valuation.
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assessment (3)  |  Available (78)  |  Compound (113)  |  First (1283)  |  Governor (13)  |  Indian (27)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invest (18)  |  Island (46)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Manhattan (3)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Present (619)  |  Purchase (7)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spent (85)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tax (26)  |  Time (1877)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Year (933)

Nulla (enim) res tantum ad dicendum proficit, quantum scriptio
Nothing so much assists learning as writing down what we wish to remember.
In Jon R. Stone, The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations (2005), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Assist (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Learning (274)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Remember (179)  |  Wish (212)  |  Write (230)

[About Gauss’ mathematical writing style] He is like the fox, who effaces his tracks in the sand with his tail.
In G. F. Simmons, Calculus Gems (1992), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Efface (6)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Sand (62)  |  Track (38)

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?
Doctor: Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest.
Macbeth: Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
Doctor: Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
Macbeth: Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Macbeth (1606), V, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (9)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cleanse (5)  |  Coming (114)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dog (70)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  Lord (93)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minister (9)  |  Must (1526)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peril (9)  |  Physic (517)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Root (120)  |  Sick (81)  |  Small (477)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Variant (9)  |  Weigh (49)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Change (593)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Computer (127)  |  Cooking (11)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Death (388)  |  Design (195)  |  Diaper (2)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fight (44)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Insect (77)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Manure (8)  |  Meal (18)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Program (52)  |  Set (394)  |  Ship (62)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Wall (67)  |  Write (230)

A man would have to be an idiot to write a book of laws for an apple tree telling it to bear apples and not thorns, seeing that the apple-tree will do it naturally and far better than any laws or teaching can prescribe.
On Secular Authority (1523). In Harro Höpfl (ed.), Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority (1991), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Bear (159)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Do (1908)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thorn (5)  |  Tree (246)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

A student who wishes now-a-days to study geometry by dividing it sharply from analysis, without taking account of the progress which the latter has made and is making, that student no matter how great his genius, will never be a whole geometer. He will not possess those powerful instruments of research which modern analysis puts into the hands of modern geometry. He will remain ignorant of many geometrical results which are to be found, perhaps implicitly, in the writings of the analyst. And not only will he be unable to use them in his own researches, but he will probably toil to discover them himself, and, as happens very often, he will publish them as new, when really he has only rediscovered them.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometrical Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Possess (156)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Publish (36)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Toil (25)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

After the birth of printing books became widespread. Hence everyone throughout Europe devoted himself to the study of literature... Every year, especially since 1563, the number of writings published in every field is greater than all those produced in the past thousand years. Through them there has today been created a new theology and a new jurisprudence; the Paracelsians have created medicine anew and the Copernicans have created astronomy anew. I really believe that at last the world is alive, indeed seething, and that the stimuli of these remarkable conjunctions did not act in vain.
De Stella Nova, On the New Star (1606), Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 1, 330-2. Quoted in N. Jardine, The Birth of History and Philosophy of Science: Kepler's A Defence of Tycho Against Ursus With Essays on its Provenance and Significance (1984), 277-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Greater (288)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Last (426)  |  Literature (103)  |  Medicine (378)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Philippus Aureolus Paracelsus (19)  |  Past (337)  |  Printing (22)  |  Produced (187)  |  Publication (101)  |  Study (653)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Today (314)  |  Vain (83)  |  Widespread (22)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Again and again in reading even his [William Thomson] most abstract writings one is struck by the tenacity with which physical ideas control in him the mathematical form in which he expressed them. An instance of this is afforded by … an example of a mathematical result that is, in his own words, “not instantly obvious from the analytical form of my solution, but which we immediately see must be the case by thinking of the physical meaning of the result.”
As given in Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 1136. The ellipsis gives the reference to the quoted footnote, to a passage in his Mathematical and Physical Papers, Vol. 1, 457. [Note: William Thomson, later became Lord Kelvin. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Afford (17)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Control (167)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reading (133)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Understand (606)  |  Word (619)

All human discoveries seem to be made only for the purpose of confirming more strongly the truths come from on high, and contained in the sacred writings.
Quoted in Marcel de Serres, 'On the Physical Facts in the Bible Compared with the Discoveries of the Modern Sciences', The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal (1845), Vol. 38, 260.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discovery (780)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  More (2559)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Truth (1057)

Although few expressions are more commonly used in writing about science than “science revolution,” there is a continuing debate as to the propriety of applying the concept and term “revolution” to scientific change. There is, furthermore, a wide difference of opinion as to what may constitute a revolution. And although almost all historians would agree that a genuine alteration of an exceptionally radical nature (the Scientific Revolution) occurred in the sciences at some time between the late fifteenth (or early sixteenth) century and the end of the seventeenth century, the question of exactly when this revolution occurred arouses as much scholarly disagreement as the cognate question of precisely what it was.
The Newtonian Revolution (1980), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  15th Century (5)  |  16th Century (3)  |  17th Century (16)  |  All (4108)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Cognate (2)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Debate (38)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Expression (175)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Late (118)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurred (2)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Question (621)  |  Radical (25)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wide (96)

Among all the liberal arts, the first is logic, and specifically that part of logic which gives initial instruction about words. … [T]he word “logic” has a broad meaning, and is not restricted exclusively to the science of argumentative reasoning. [It includes] Grammar [which] is “the science of speaking and writing correctly—the starting point of all liberal studies.”
In John of Salisbury and Daniel D. McGarry (trans.), 'Whence grammar gets its name', The Metalogicon (2009), 37. It is footnoted: Isidore, Etym., i, 5, §1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  First (1283)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Include (90)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Point (580)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Start (221)  |  Study (653)  |  Word (619)

An acquaintance of mine, a notary by profession, who, by perpetual writing, began first to complain of an excessive wariness of his whole right arm which could be removed by no medicines, and which was at last succeeded by a perfect palsy of the whole arm. … He learned to write with his left hand, which was soon thereafter seized with the same disorder.
Concerning a notary, a scribe skilled in rapid writing, in a translation published by the University of Chicago Press (1940).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Arm (81)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Excessive (23)  |  First (1283)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Soon (186)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Write (230)

Anybody who has been seriously engaged in scientific work of any kind realizes that over the entrance to the gates of the temple of science are written the words: Ye must have faith. It is a quality which the scientist cannot dispense with.
In Max Planck and James Vincent Murphy (trans.), Where is Science Going?, (1932), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Faith (203)  |  Gate (32)  |  Kind (557)  |  Must (1526)  |  Quality (135)  |  Realize (147)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

Archimedes possessed so high a spirit, so profound a soul, and such treasures of highly scientific knowledge, that though these inventions [used to defend Syracuse against the Romans] had now obtained him the renown of more than human sagacity, he yet would not deign to leave behind him any commentary or writing on such subjects; but, repudiating as sordid and ignoble the whole trade of engineering, and every sort of art that lends itself to mere use and profit, he placed his whole affection and ambition in those purer speculations where there can be no reference to the vulgar needs of life; studies, the superiority of which to all others is unquestioned, and in which the only doubt can be whether the beauty and grandeur of the subjects examined, or the precision and cogency of the methods and means of proof, most deserve our admiration.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Affection (43)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Behind (137)  |  Commentary (3)  |  Defend (30)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Examine (78)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  High (362)  |  Highly (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignoble (2)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lend (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mere (84)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Possess (156)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profit (52)  |  Profound (104)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reference (33)  |  Renown (2)  |  Repudiate (7)  |  Roman (36)  |  Sagacity (10)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Knowledge (9)  |  Sort (49)  |  Soul (226)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Trade (31)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Unquestioned (7)  |  Use (766)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Whole (738)  |  Write (230)

As Bertrand Russell once wrote, two plus two is four even in the interior of the sun.
In When You Were a Tadpole and I Was a Fish: And Other Speculations About This and That (2009), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Four (6)  |  Interior (32)  |  Plus (43)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Sun (385)  |  Two (937)

As few subjects are more interesting to society, so few have been more frequently written upon than the education of youth.
Essay No. VI, 'On Education', first published in The Bee (10 Nov 1759), collected in The Works of Oliver Goldsmith (1900), Vol. 5, 95. Reprinted as Essay VII under the title 'On the Education of Youth', (1765). The Bee was a weekly paper wholly the work of Goldsmith.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (378)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Interesting (153)  |  More (2559)  |  Society (326)  |  Subject (521)  |  Youth (101)

As I am writing, another illustration of ye generation of hills proposed above comes into my mind. Milk is as uniform a liquor as ye chaos was. If beer be poured into it & ye mixture let stand till it be dry, the surface of ye curdled substance will appear as rugged & mountanous as the Earth in any place.
Letter to Thomas Burnet (Jan 1680/1. In H. W. Turnbull (ed.), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1676-1687 (1960), Vol. 2, 334.
Science quotes on:  |  Beer (10)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hill (20)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Stand (274)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surface (209)  |  Will (2355)

As to writing another book on geometry [to replace Euclid] the middle ages would have as soon thought of composing another New Testament.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Book (392)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  New (1216)  |  Soon (186)  |  Thought (953)

At night I would return home, set out a lamp before me, and devote myself to reading and writing. Whenever sleep overcame me or I became conscious of weakening, I would turn aside to drink a cup of wine, so that my strength would return to me. Then I would return to reading. And whenever sleep seized me I would see those very problems in my dream; and many questions became clear to me in my sleep. I continued in this until all of the sciences were deeply rooted within me and I understood them as is humanly possible. Everything which I knew at the time is just as I know it now; I have not added anything to it to this day. Thus I mastered the logical, natural, and mathematical sciences, and I had now reached the science.
Avicenna
W. E. Gohhnan, The Life of Ibn Sina: A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation (1974), 29-31.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drink (53)  |  Education (378)  |  Everything (476)  |  Home (170)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Master (178)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reading (133)  |  Return (124)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Strength (126)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understood (156)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wine (38)

At this point, however, I have no intention whatever of criticizing the false teachings of Galen, who is easily first among the professors of dissection, for I certainly do not wish to start off by gaining a reputation for impiety toward him, the author of all good things, or by seeming insubordinate to his authority. For I am well aware how upset the practitioners (unlike the followers of Aristotle) invariably become nowadays, when they discover in the course of a single dissection that Galen has departed on two hundred or more occasions from the true description of the harmony, function, and action of the human parts, and how grimly they examine the dissected portions as they strive with all the zeal at their command to defend him. Yet even they, drawn by their love of truth, are gradually calming down and placing more faith in their own not ineffective eyes and reason than in Galen’s writings.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, iv, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, liv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Command (58)  |  Course (409)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Examine (78)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Function (228)  |  Galen (19)  |  Good (889)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Intention (46)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Single (353)  |  Start (221)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Upset (18)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)  |  Zeal (11)

Brevity in writing is the best insurance for its perusal.
In Fielding Hudson Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine (1929), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Publication (101)

Buffon said unreservedly, "Genius is simply patience carried to the extreme." To those who asked how he achieved fame he replied: "By spending forty years of my life bent over my writing desk.”
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieved (2)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asked (2)  |  Bent (2)  |  Comte Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon (35)  |  Carried (2)  |  Desk (13)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fame (50)  |  Genius (284)  |  Life (1795)  |  Patience (56)  |  Replied (2)  |  Simply (53)  |  Spending (24)  |  Year (933)

Buffon, who, with all his theoretical ingenuity and extraordinary eloquence, I suspect had little actual information in the science on which he wrote so admirably For instance, he tells us that the cow sheds her horns every two years; a most palpable error. ... It is wonderful that Buffon who lived so much in the country at his noble seat should have fallen into such a blunder I suppose he has confounded the cow with the deer.
In The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1826), Vol. 3, 70, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Buffon_Georges (2)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Cow (39)  |  Deer (9)  |  Eloquence (7)  |  Error (321)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Horn (18)  |  Information (166)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noble (90)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shed (5)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

But the nature of our civilized minds is so detached from the senses, even in the vulgar, by abstractions corresponding to all the abstract terms our languages abound in, and so refined by the art of writing, and as it were spiritualized by the use of numbers, because even the vulgar know how to count and reckon, that it is naturally beyond our power to form the vast image of this mistress called ‘Sympathetic Nature.’
The New Science, bk. 2, para. 378 (1744, trans. 1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Count (105)  |  Detach (5)  |  Form (959)  |  Image (96)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Refine (8)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Write (230)

But, because my private lectures and domestic pupils are a great hinderance and interruption of my studies, I wish to live entirely exempt from the former, and in great measure from the latter. … in short, I should wish to gain my bread from my writings.
Reply upon being offered a professorship. Quoted in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei (1832), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Bread (39)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Former (137)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interruption (5)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Live (628)  |  Measure (232)  |  Money (170)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Research (664)  |  Short (197)  |  Wish (212)

Chemical signs ought to be letters, for the greater facility of writing, and not to disfigure a printed book ... I shall take therefore for the chemical sign, the initial letter of the Latin name of each elementary substance: but as several have the same initial letter, I shall distinguish them in the following manner:— 1. In the class which I shall call metalloids, I shall employ the initial letter only, even when this letter is common to the metalloid and to some metal. 2. In the class of metals, I shall distinguish those that have the same initials with another metal, or a metalloid, by writing the first two letters of the word. 3. If the first two letters be common to two metals, I shall, in that case, add to the initial letter the first consonant which they have not in common: for example, S = sulphur, Si = silicium, St = stibium (antimony), Sn = stannum (tin), C = carbonicum, Co = colbaltum (colbalt), Cu = cuprum (copper), O = oxygen, Os = osmium, &c.
'Essay on the Cause of Chemical Proportions, and on some circumstances relating to them: together with a short and easy method of expressing them', Annals of Philosophy, 1814, 3,51-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antimony (7)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Class (164)  |  Cobalt (4)  |  Common (436)  |  Consonant (3)  |  Copper (25)  |  Disfigure (2)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Employ (113)  |  Facility (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Initial (17)  |  Latin (38)  |  Letter (109)  |  Metal (84)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Osmium (3)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Print (17)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silicon (4)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tin (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)

Could Hamlet have been written by a committee, or the “Mona Lisa” painted by a club? Could the New Testament have been composed as a conference report? Creative ideas do not spring from groups. They spring from individuals. The divine spark leaps from the finger of God to the finger of Adam, whether it takes ultimate shape in a law of physics or a law of the land, a poem or a policy, a sonata or a mechanical computer.
Baccalaureate address (9 Jun 1957), Yale University. In In the University Tradition (1957), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Adam (7)  |  Club (4)  |  Committee (15)  |  Composition (84)  |  Computer (127)  |  Conference (17)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Divine (112)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Finger (44)  |  God (757)  |  Group (78)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Land (115)  |  Law (894)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Report (38)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sonata (2)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spring (133)  |  Ultimate (144)

Despite rapid progress in the right direction, the program of the average elementary school has been primarily devoted to teaching the fundamental subjects, the three R’s, and closely related disciplines… Artificial exercises, like drills on phonetics, multiplication tables, and formal writing movements, are used to a wasteful degree. Subjects such as arithmetic, language, and history include content that is intrinsically of little value. Nearly every subject is enlarged unwisely to satisfy the academic ideal of thoroughness… Elimination of the unessential by scientific study, then, is one step in improving the curriculum.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Average (82)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Education (378)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  History (673)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Include (90)  |  Language (293)  |  Little (707)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Progress (465)  |  Right (452)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Table (104)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thoroughness (3)  |  Value (365)

Doing an experiment is not more important than writing.
Concept attributed to Boring, but stated without quotation marks, by D.O. Hebb and Dalbir Bindra, in 'Scientific Writing and the General Problem of Communication', The American Psychologist (Oct 1952), 7, 569-673. Excerpted and cited in Ritchie R. Ward, Practical Technical Writing (1968), 32. If you know a verbatim primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Doing (280)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Importance (286)  |  More (2559)

Euclid and Archimedes are allowed to be knowing, and to have demonstrated what they say: and yet whosoever shall read over their writings without perceiving the connection of their proofs, and seeing what they show, though he may understand all their words, yet he is not the more knowing. He may believe, indeed, but does not know what they say, and so is not advanced one jot in mathematical knowledge by all his reading of those approved mathematicians.
In Conduct of the Understanding, sect. 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Approve (3)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Belief (578)  |  Connection (162)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jot (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Proof (287)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Show (346)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Understand (606)  |  Word (619)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Create (235)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (132)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Operate (17)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (144)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (168)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Same (157)  |  Space (500)  |  Step (231)  |  Student (300)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transition (26)  |  Treat (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variable (34)  |  Write (230)

Even fairly good students, when they have obtained the solution of the problem and written down neatly the argument, shut their books and look for something else. Doing so, they miss an important and instructive phase of the work. ... A good teacher should understand and impress on his students the view that no problem whatever is completely exhausted.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Book (392)  |  Completely (135)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Look (582)  |  Miss (51)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Phase (36)  |  Problem (676)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

Every work of science great enough to be well remembered for a few generations affords some exemplification of the defective state of the art of reasoning of the time when it was written; and each chief step in science has been a lesson in logic.
'The Fixation of Belief (1877). In Justus Buchler, The Philosophy of Pierce (1940), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Affording (2)  |  Art (657)  |  Chief (97)  |  Defect (31)  |  Enough (340)  |  Few (13)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Logic (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

Foreshadowings of the principles and even of the language of [the infinitesimal] calculus can be found in the writings of Napier, Kepler, Cavalieri, Pascal, Fermat, Wallis, and Barrow. It was Newton's good luck to come at a time when everything was ripe for the discovery, and his ability enabled him to construct almost at once a complete calculus.
In History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 366.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Isaac Barrow (8)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Complete (204)  |  Construct (124)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enable (119)  |  Everything (476)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Good (889)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Language (293)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Publication (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  John Wallis (3)

From my earliest childhood I nourished and cherished the desire to make a creditable journey in a new country, and write such a respectable account of its natural history as should give me a niche amongst the scientific explorers of the globe I inhabit, and hand my name down as a useful contributor of original matter.
Letter to Charles Darwin (1854), in Francis Darwin, More Letters of Charles Darwin (1903).
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Cherishing (2)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Contributor (2)  |  Country (251)  |  Creditable (3)  |  Desire (204)  |  Down (456)  |  Earliest (3)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Globe (47)  |  History (673)  |  Inhabiting (3)  |  Journey (42)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  New (1216)  |  Niche (9)  |  Nourishing (2)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Write (230)

From this time everything was copulated. Acetic, formic, butyric, margaric, &c., acids, alkaloids, ethers, amides, anilides, all became copulated bodies. So that to make acetanilide, for example, they no longer employed acetic acid and aniline, but they re-copulated a copulated oxalic acid with a copulated ammonia. I am inventing nothing—altering nothing. Is it my fault if, when writing history, I appear to be composing a romance?
Chemical Method (1855), 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Acetic Acid (2)  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Aniline (2)  |  Copulation (2)  |  Employ (113)  |  Ether (35)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fault (54)  |  History (673)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Romance (15)  |  Time (1877)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)

GOOSE, n. A bird that supplies quills for writing. These, by some occult process of nature, are penetrated and suffused with various degrees of the bird's intellectual energies and emotional character, so that when inked and drawn mechanically across paper by a person called an "author," there results a very fair and accurate transcript of the fowl's thought and feeling. The difference in geese, as discovered by this ingenious method, is considerable: many are found to have only trivial and insignificant powers, but some are seen to be very great geese indeed.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  119-120.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Author (167)  |  Bird (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Goose (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humour (116)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occult (8)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Result (677)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Various (200)

Having been the discoverer of many splendid things, he is said to have asked his friends and relations that, after his death, they should place on his tomb a cylinder enclosing a sphere, writing on it the proportion of the containing solid to that which is contained.
Plutarch, Life of Marcellus, 17.12. Trans. R. W. Sharples.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Death (388)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tomb (15)

Hieroglyphics, or picture writing, consisted of owls, canaries, garter snakes, and the insides of alarm clocks.
In The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody (1950), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (18)  |  Clock (47)  |  Consist (223)  |  Egyptology (3)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  Owl (3)  |  Picture (143)  |  Snake (26)

I am a strong advocate for free thought on all subjects, yet it appears to me (whether rightly or wrongly) that direct arguments against christianity & theism produce hardly any effect on the public; & freedom of thought is best promoted by the gradual illumination of men's minds, which follow[s] from the advance of science. It has, therefore, been always my object to avoid writing on religion, & I have confined myself to science. I may, however, have been unduly biassed by the pain which it would give some members of my family, if I aided in any way direct attacks on religion.
Letter to E.B. Aveling (13 Oct 1880).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advocate (18)  |  Against (332)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attack (84)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Best (459)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effect (393)  |  Family (94)  |  Follow (378)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Object (422)  |  Pain (136)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Way (1217)

I am just laboring in the vineyard. I am at the operating table, and I make my rounds. I believe there is a cross-fertilization between writing and surgery. If I withdraw from surgery, I would not have another word to write. Having become a writer makes me a better doctor.
[Reply to reporter's question whether he would rather be a full-time writer instead of a surgeon.]
Quoted in Thomas Lask, 'Publishing:Surgeon and Incisive Writer', New York Times (28 Sep 1979), C24.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Operating Table (2)  |  Question (621)  |  Reply (56)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Table (104)  |  Time (1877)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

I am putting together a secular bible. My Genesis is when the apple falls on Newton's head.
Quoted in interview by Tim Adams, 'This much I know: A.C. Grayling', The Observer (4 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apple (40)  |  Bible (91)  |  Fall (230)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Head (81)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Secular (11)  |  Together (387)

I am trying to get the hang of this new fangled writing machine, but I am not making a shining success of it. However, this is the first attempt I have ever made & yet I perceive I shall soon & easily acquire a fine facility in its use. … The machine has several virtues. I believe it will print faster than I can write. One may lean back in his chair & work it. It piles an awful stack of words on one page. It don't muss things or scatter ink blots around. Of course it saves paper.
Letter (9 Dec 1874). Quoted in B. Blivens, Jr., The Wonderful Writing Machine (1954), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Chair (24)  |  Course (409)  |  Facility (11)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Hang (45)  |  Ink (10)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  New (1216)  |  Page (30)  |  Paper (182)  |  Piles (7)  |  Print (17)  |  Save (118)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soon (186)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trying (144)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Use (766)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I can assure you, reader, that in a very few hours, even during the first day, you will learn more natural philosophy about things contained in this book, than you could learn in fifty years by reading the theories and opinions of the ancient philosophers. Enemies of science will scoff at the astrologers: saying, where is the ladder on which they have climbed to heaven, to know the foundation of the stars? But in this respect I am exempt from such scoffing; for in proving my written reason, I satisfy sight, hearing, and touch: for this reason, defamers will have no power over me: as you will see when you come to see me in my little Academy.
The Admirable Discourses (1580), trans. Aurele La Rocque (1957), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Book (392)  |  Climb (35)  |  Contain (68)  |  Day (42)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Exemption (3)  |  Fifty (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hour (186)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scoff (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I can see him now at the blackboard, chalk in one hand and rubber in the other, writing rapidly and erasing recklessly, pausing every few minutes to face the class and comment earnestly, perhaps on the results of an elaborate calculation, perhaps on the greatness of the Creator, perhaps on the beauty and grandeur of Mathematics, always with a capital M. To him mathematics was not the handmaid of philosophy. It was not a humanly devised instrument of investigation, it was Philosophy itself, the divine revealer of TRUTH.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Capital (15)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Class (164)  |  Comment (11)  |  Creator (91)  |  Devised (3)  |  Divine (112)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Face (212)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Handmaid (6)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minute (125)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Recklessly (2)  |  Result (677)  |  Rubber (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Truth (1057)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)

I don’t dawdle. I'm a surgeon. I make an incision, do what needs to be done and sew up the wound. There is a beginning, a middle, and an end.
[On writing.]
Quoted in Thomas Lask, 'Publishing:Surgeon and Incisive Writer', New York Times (28 Sep 1979), C24.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Incision (2)  |  Middle (16)  |  Planning (20)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Sewing (3)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Wound (26)  |  Writer (86)

I esteem his understanding and subtlety highly, but I consider that they have been put to ill use in the greater part of his work, where the author studies things of little use or when he builds on the improbable principle of attraction.
Writing about Newton's Principia. Huygens had some time earlier indicated he did not believe the theory of universal gravitation, saying it 'appears to me absurd.'
Quoted in Archana Srinivasan, Great Inventors (2007), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Author (167)  |  Build (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Greater (288)  |  Little (707)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Principia (13)  |  Principle (507)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Work (1351)

I have reviewed this work elsewhere under the title 'Natural Products Chemistry 1950 to 1980-A Personal View.' It is with some relish that I recall the flood of reprint requests prompted by the following footnote on the title page: 'Selected personal statements by the author were removed by the editor without Professor Djerassi's consent. An uncensored version of this paper can be obtained by writing to Professor C. Djerassi'.
Steroids Made it Possible (1990), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Author (167)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consent (14)  |  Flood (50)  |  Natural (796)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Paper (182)  |  Product (160)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Publication (101)  |  Relish (4)  |  Review (26)  |  Select (44)  |  Statement (142)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

I refrained from writing another one, thinking to myself: Never mind, I will prove that I am able to become a greater scientist than some of you, even without the title of doctor.
Reaction when his thesis (1922) on rocket experiments was rejected as too cursory. In Astronautics (1959), 4, No. 6, 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Degree (276)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Greater (288)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  PhD (8)  |  Prove (250)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

I resolved to obtain from myself [through automatic writing] what we were trying to obtain from them, namely a monologue spoken as rapidly as possible without any intervention on the part of the critical faculties, a monologue consequently unencumbered by the slightest inhibition and which was, as closely as possible akin to spoken thought. It had seemed to me, and still does … that the speed of thought does not necessarily defy language, nor even the fast-moving pen.
Science quotes on:  |  Critical (66)  |  Defy (11)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Language (293)  |  Myself (212)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Parapsychology (3)  |  Pen (20)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Speed (65)  |  Still (613)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Trying (144)

I sort of kept my hand in writing and went to work for the Sierra Club in ‘52, walked the plank there in ‘69, founded Friends of the Earth and the League of Conservation Voters after that.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Earth (996)  |  Founded (20)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hand (143)  |  Keep (101)  |  League (2)  |  Plank (4)  |  Sierra Club (2)  |  Sort (49)  |  Voter (3)  |  Walk (124)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

I was sitting writing at my textbook but the work did not progress; my thoughts were elsewhere. I turned my chair to the fire and dozed. Again the atoms were gambolling before my eyes. This time the smaller groups kept modestly in the background. My mental eye, rendered more acute by the repeated visions of the kind, could now distinguish larger structures of manifold confirmation: long rows, sometimes more closely fitted together all twining and twisting in snake like motion. But look! What was that? One of the snakes had seized hold of its own tail, and the form whirled mockingly before my eyes. As if by a flash of lightning I awoke; and this time also I spent the rest of the night in working out the rest of the hypothesis. Let us learn to dream, gentlemen, then perhaps we shall find the truth... But let us beware of publishing our dreams till they have been tested by waking understanding.
Kekule at Benzolfest in Berichte (1890), 23, 1302.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aromatic (3)  |  Atom (355)  |  Background (43)  |  Beware (16)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chair (24)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flash (49)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mental (177)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Progress (465)  |  Render (93)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ring (16)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Snake (26)  |  Spent (85)  |  Structure (344)  |  Test (211)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twisting (3)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Verification (31)  |  Vision (123)  |  Waking (17)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Work (1351)

I was suffering from a sharp attack of intermittent fever, and every day during the cold and succeeding hot fits had to lie down for several hours, during which time I had nothing to do but to think over any subjects then particularly interesting me. One day something brought to my recollection Malthus's 'Principles of Population', which I had read about twelve years before. I thought of his clear exposition of 'the positive checks to increase'—disease, accidents, war, and famine—which keep down the population of savage races to so much lower an average than that of more civilized peoples. It then occurred to me that these causes or their equivalents are continually acting in the case of animals also; and as animals usually breed much more rapidly than does mankind, the destruction every year from these causes must be enormous in order to keep down the numbers of each species, since they evidently do not increase regularly from year to year, as otherwise the world would long ago have been densely crowded with those that breed most quickly. Vaguely thinking over the enormous and constant destruction which this implied, it occurred to me to ask the question, Why do some die and some live? The answer was clearly, that on the whole the best fitted live. From the effects of disease the most healthy escaped; from enemies, the strongest, swiftest, or the most cunning; from famine, the best hunters or those with the best digestion; and so on. Then it suddenly flashed upon me that this self-acting process would necessarily improve the race, because in every generation the inferior would inevitably be killed off and the superior would remain—that is, the fittest would survive.
[The phrase 'survival of the fittest,' suggested by the writings of Thomas Robert Malthus, was expressed in those words by Herbert Spencer in 1865. Wallace saw the term in correspondence from Charles Darwin the following year, 1866. However, Wallace did not publish anything on his use of the expression until very much later, and his recollection is likely flawed.]
My Life: A Record of Events and Opinions (1905), Vol. 1, 361-362, or in reprint (2004), 190.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attack (84)  |  Average (82)  |  Best (459)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cold (112)  |  Constant (144)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Express (186)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Famine (15)  |  Fever (29)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Generation (242)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kill (100)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  Mankind (339)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Population (110)  |  Positive (94)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Remain (349)  |  Saw (160)  |  Self (267)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Species (401)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Subject (521)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Superior (81)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Survive (79)  |  Term (349)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  War (225)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself.
Manuscript fragment, no date, Box 1, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Desk (13)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Flat (33)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Made (14)  |  Myself (212)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Start (221)  |  Teacup (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Top (96)  |  Trash (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Observe (168)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

If a given scientist had not made a given discovery, someone else would have done so a little later. Johann Mendel dies unknown after having discovered the laws of heredity: thirty-five years later, three men rediscover them. But the book that is not written will never be written. The premature death of a great scientist delays humanity; that of a great writer deprives it.
Pensées d'un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Death (388)  |  Delay (20)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Else (4)  |  Given (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Later (18)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Never (1087)  |  Premature (20)  |  Rediscovery (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Someone (22)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)  |  Year (933)

If a lunatic scribbles a jumble of mathematical symbols it does not follow that the writing means anything merely because to the inexpert eye it is indistinguishable from higher mathematics.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), Vol. 2, 232. Also in J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956, 1960), Vol. 1, 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (419)  |  Follow (378)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Indistinguishable (2)  |  Inexpert (2)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Lunatic (9)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Scribble (5)  |  Symbol (93)

If all sentient beings in the universe disappeared, there would remain a sense in which mathematical objects and theorems would continue to exist even though there would be no one around to write or talk about them. Huge prime numbers would continue to be prime, even if no one had proved them prime.
In When You Were a Tadpole and I Was a Fish: And Other Speculations About This and That (), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Huge (25)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Prime (11)  |  Prime Number (5)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentient (7)  |  Talk (100)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Universe (857)  |  Write (230)

If Louis Pasteur were to come out of his grave because he heard that the cure for cancer still had not been found, NIH would tell him, “Of course we'll give you assistance. Now write up exactly what you will be doing during the three years of your grant.” Pasteur would say, “Thank you very much,” and would go back to his grave. Why? Because research means going into the unknown. If you know what you are going to do in science, then you are stupid! This is like telling Michelangelo or Renoir that he must tell you in advance how many reds and how many blues he will buy, and exactly how he will put those colors together.
Interview for Saturday Evening Post (Jan/Feb 1981), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Back (390)  |  Blue (56)  |  Buonarroti_Michelangelo (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Color (137)  |  Course (409)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Giving (11)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Paint (22)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Red (35)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Together (387)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)  |  Years (5)

If the actual order of the bases on one of the pair of chains were given, one could write down the exact order of the bases on the other one, because of the specific pairing. Thus one chain is, as it were, the complement of the other, and it is this feature which suggests how the deoxyribonucleic acid molecule might duplicate itself.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In 'Genetic Implications of the Structure of Deoxyribonucleic Acid', Nature (1958), 171, 965-966.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Actual (117)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Chain (50)  |  Complement (5)  |  Deoxyribonucleic Acid (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Duplicate (8)  |  Exact (68)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pair (9)  |  Specific (95)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Write (230)

If you could stop every atom in its position and direction, and if your mind could comprehend all the actions thus suspended, then if you were really, really good at algebra you could write the formula for all the future; and although nobody can be so clever as to do it, the formula must exist just as if one could.
Spoken by Thomasina in Arcadia (1993), Act I, Scene 1, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cleverness (15)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Formula (98)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Position (77)  |  Stop (80)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Write (230)

If you fix a piece of solid phosphorus in a quill, and write with it upon paper, the writing in a dark room will appear beautifully luminous.
From 'Artist and Mechanic', The artist & Tradesman’s Guide: embracing some leading facts & principles of science, and a variety of matter adapted to the wants of the artist, mechanic, manufacturer, and mercantile community (1827), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Dark (140)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Paper (182)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Solid (116)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

If you would not be forgotten
As soon as you are dead and rotten
Either write things worth reading,
Or do things worth the writing.
Collected in Poor Richard's Almanack (1914), 32, No. 285.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rotten (3)  |  Soon (186)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Worth (169)  |  Write (230)

In a notable family called Stein
There were Gertrude, and Ep, and then Ein.
Gert's writing was hazy,
Ep's statues were crazy,
And nobody understood Ein.
Out on a Limerick (1961), 76.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Call (769)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Family (94)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Statue (16)  |  Understood (156)

In my opinion the English excel in the art of writing text-books for mathematical teaching; as regards the clear exposition of theories and the abundance of excellent examples, carefully selected, very few books exist in other countries which can compete with those of Salmon and many other distinguished English authors that could be named.
In Projective Geometry (1886), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Clear (100)  |  Compete (6)  |  Country (251)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  English (35)  |  Example (94)  |  Excel (4)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Name (333)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Regard (305)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Select (44)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Write (230)

In the course of normal speaking the inhibitory function of the will is continuously directed to bringing the course of ideas and the articulatory movements into harmony with each other. If the expressive movement which which follows the idea is retarded through mechanical causes, as is the case in writing ... such anticipations make their appearance with particular ease.
Folk Psychology (1900)
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Direct (225)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Function (228)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

In the world’s history certain inventions and discoveries occurred of peculiar value, on account of their great efficiency in facilitating all other inventions and discoveries. Of these were the art of writing and of printing, the discovery of America, and the introduction of patent laws. The date of the first … is unknown; but it certainly was as much as fifteen hundred years before the Christian era; the second—printing—came in 1436, or nearly three thousand years after the first. The others followed more rapidly—the discovery of America in 1492, and the first patent laws in 1624.
Lecture 'Discoveries, Inventions and Improvements' (22 Feb 1860) in John George Nicolay and John Hay (eds.), Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln (1894), Vol. 5, 109-10.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Art (657)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Christian (43)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Era (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Invention (369)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patent (33)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Printing (22)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Inexact method of observation, as I believe, is one flaw in clinical pathology to-day. Prematurity of conclusion is another, and in part follows from the first; but in chief part an unusual craving and veneration for hypothesis, which besets the minds of most medical men, is responsible. Except in those sciences which deal with the intangible or with events of long past ages, no treatises are to be found in which hypothesis figures as it does in medical writings. The purity of a science is to be judged by the paucity of its recorded hypotheses. Hypothesis has its right place, it forms a working basis; but it is an acknowledged makeshift, and, at the best, of purpose unaccomplished. Hypothesis is the heart which no man with right purpose wears willingly upon his sleeve. He who vaunts his lady love, ere yet she is won, is apt to display himself as frivolous or his lady a wanton.
The Mechanism and Graphic Registration of the Heart Beat (1920), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Craving (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Display (56)  |  Event (216)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inexact (3)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Past (337)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physician (273)  |  Premature (20)  |  Purity (14)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Record (154)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Wanton (2)

It is a melancholy experience for a professional mathematician to find him writing about mathematics. The function of a mathematician is to do something, to prove new theorems, to add to mathematics, and not to talk about what he or other mathematicians have done. Statesmen despise publicists, painters despise art-critics, and physiologists, physicists, or mathematicians have usually similar feelings; there is no scorn more profound, or on the whole more justifiable, than that of men who make for the men who explain. Exposition, criticism, appreciation, is work for second-rate minds.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 61 (Hardy's opening lines after Snow's foreward).
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Art (657)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Find (998)  |  Function (228)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painter (29)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Professional (70)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prove (250)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Something (719)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

It is a safe rule to apply that, when a mathematical or philosophical author writes with a misty profoundity, he is talking nonsense.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Author (167)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Misty (6)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Rule (294)  |  Safe (54)  |  Safety (54)  |  Talking (76)  |  Write (230)

It is easy to follow in the sacred writings of the Jewish people the development of the religion of fear into the moral religion, which is carried further in the New Testament. The religions of all civilized peoples, especially those of the Orient, are principally moral religions. An important advance in the life of a people is the transformation of the religion of fear into the moral religion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Carry (127)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Especially (31)  |  Far (154)  |  Fear (197)  |  Follow (378)  |  Important (209)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Orient (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Principally (2)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Writings (6)

It so happens that the work which is likely to be our most durable monument, and to convey some knowledge of us to the most remote posterity, is a work of bare utility; not a shrine, not a fortress, not a palace, but a bridge.
Writing upon the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, New York.
'The Bridge as a Monument', Harper's Weekly (26 May 1883), 27, 326. In David P. Billington, The Tower and the Bridge: The New Art of Structural Engineering (1983), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (33)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Brooklyn Bridge (2)  |  Durable (7)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fortress (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Monument (45)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Palace (8)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Remote (83)  |  Shrine (8)  |  Utility (49)  |  Work (1351)

It took me so long to understand what I was writing about, that I knew how to write about it so most readers would understand it.
As quoted in Alex Bellos, 'Martin Gardner Obituary', The Guardian (27 May 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Reader (40)  |  Understand (606)  |  Write (230)

It wasn’t the finches that put the idea [of natural selection] in Darwin’s head, it was the tortoises. The reason he didn’t use the tortoises [in writing On the Origin of Species] was that, when he got back, he found he didn’t have localities on the tortoise specimens. Here the great god, the greatest naturalist we have records of, made a mistake. His fieldwork wasn’t absolutely perfect.
From interview with Brian Cox and Robert Ince, in 'A Life Measured in Heartbeats', New Statesman (21 Dec 2012), 141, No. 5138, 33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Fieldwork (3)  |  Finch (4)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Idea (843)  |  Locality (6)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reason (744)  |  Record (154)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Use (766)

It’s almost a sort of fairy story tale, just what a novelist would write about a discovery.
[Describing how the original idea on the principle of the maser came to him.]
Interview (2 Feb 1991), 'Creating the Light Fantastic', Academy of Achievement web site.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fairy (9)  |  Idea (843)  |  Novelist (6)  |  Principle (507)  |  Story (118)  |  Tale (16)  |  Write (230)

I’m much better. I just say what it is, who it is, how it is and get off there.
On how to she curbed her previously rather verbose writing style. As quoted in 'Words of the Week',Jet (3 Jan 1980), 57, No. 16, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Say (984)

Just now nuclear physicists are writing a great deal about hypothetical particles called neutrinos supposed to account for certain peculiar facts observed in β-ray disintegration. We can perhaps best describe the neutrinos as little bits of spin-energy that have got detached. I am not much impressed by the neutrino theory. In an ordinary way I might say that I do not believe in neutrinos… But I have to reflect that a physicist may be an artist, and you never know where you are with artists. My old-fashioned kind of disbelief in neutrinos is scarcely enough. Dare I say that experimental physicists will not have sufficient ingenuity to make neutrinos? Whatever I may think, I am not going to be lured into a wager against the skill of experimenters under the impression that it is a wager against the truth of a theory. If they succeed in making neutrinos, perhaps even in developing industrial applications of them, I suppose I shall have to believe—though I may feel that they have not been playing quite fair.
From Tarner Lecture, 'Discovery or Manufacture?' (1938), in The Philosophy of Physical Science (1939, 2012), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Application (242)  |  Artist (90)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Dare (50)  |  Deal (188)  |  Describe (128)  |  Disbelief (4)  |  Disintegration (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Impression (114)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Neutrino (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physicist (5)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Playing (42)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spin (26)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

Know thyself! This is the source of all wisdom, said the great thinkers of the past, and the sentence was written in golden letters on the temple of the gods. To know himself, Linnæus declared to be the essential indisputable distinction of man above all other creatures. I know, indeed, in study nothing more worthy of free and thoughtful man than the study of himself. For if we look for the purpose of our existence, we cannot possibly find it outside ourselves. We are here for our own sake.
As translated and quoted in Ernst Haeckel and E. Ray Lankester (trans.) as epigraph for Chap. 9, The History of Creation (1886), Vol. 1, 244.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Creature (233)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Essential (199)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indisputable (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Outside (141)  |  Past (337)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Sake (58)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Thyself (2)  |  Wisdom (221)

Little Birds are writing
Interesting books.
To be read by cooks:
Read, I say, not roasted—
Letterpress, when toasted,
Loses its good looks.
In Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893), 371.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Book (392)  |  Cook (17)  |  Good (889)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Lose (159)  |  Read (287)  |  Say (984)  |  Toast (8)  |  Write (230)

Little could Plato have imagined, when, indulging his instinctive love of the true and beautiful for their own sakes, he entered upon these refined speculations and revelled in a world of his own creation, that he was writing the grammar of the language in which it would be demonstrated in after ages that the pages of the universe are written.
From Lecture (4 Dec 1854) delivered to the Gresham Committee and the members of the Common Council of the City of London, 'A Probationary Lecture on Geometry', collected in Collected Mathematical Papers of James Joseph Sylvester (1908), Vol. 2, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Creation (327)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Enter (141)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Instinctive (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Page (30)  |  Plato (76)  |  Refine (8)  |  Revel (5)  |  Sake (58)  |  Speculation (126)  |  True (212)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

Man at last knows that he is alone in the unfeeling immensity of the universe, out of which he emerged only by chance. Neither his destiny nor his duty have been written down. The kingdom above or the darkness below: it is for him to choose.
Concluding remarks in Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1972), 180. Also seen translated as, “The ancient covenant is in pieces; man knows at last that he is alone in the universe’s unfeeling immensity, out of which he emerged only by chance. His destiny is nowhere spelled out, nor is his duty. The kingdom above or the darkness below: it is time for him to choose.”
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Chance (239)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Down (456)  |  Duty (68)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Universe (857)

Mathematicians do not write for the circulating library.
From 'The Principles of Success in Literature', The Fortnightly (1865), 1, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Library (48)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Write (230)

Montaigne simply turns his mind loose and writes whatever he feels like writing. Mostly, he wants to say that reason is not a special, unique gift of human beings, marking us off from the rest of nature.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Gift (104)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (18)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Say (984)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Special (184)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unique (67)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Want (497)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Write (230)

Most of his [Euler’s] memoirs are contained in the transactions of the Academy of Sciences at St. Petersburg, and in those of the Academy at Berlin. From 1728 to 1783 a large portion of the Petropolitan transactions were filled by his writings. He had engaged to furnish the Petersburg Academy with memoirs in sufficient number to enrich its acts for twenty years—a promise more than fulfilled, for down to 1818 [Euler died in 1793] the volumes usually contained one or more papers of his. It has been said that an edition of Euler’s complete works would fill 16,000 quarto pages.
In History of Mathematics (1897), 263-264.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academy (35)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Act (272)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contain (68)  |  Die (86)  |  Down (456)  |  Edition (5)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Large (394)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Memoir (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Page (30)  |  Paper (182)  |  Portion (84)  |  Promise (67)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Usually (176)  |  Volume (19)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writings (6)  |  Year (933)

Most writing online is devolving toward SMS and tweets that involve quick, throwaway notes with abbreviations and threaded references. This is not a form of lasting communication. In 2020 there is unlikely to be a list of classic tweets and blog posts that every student and educated citizen should have read.
Written response to the Pew Research Center and Elon University's 'Imagining the Internet' research initiative asking their survey question (2010), “Share your view of the Internet’s influence on the future of knowledge-sharing in 2020.” From 'Imagining the Internet' on elon.edu website.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (51)  |  Classic (11)  |  Communication (94)  |  Educated (12)  |  Form (959)  |  Involve (90)  |  List (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  Note (34)  |  Online (4)  |  Post (6)  |  Quick (13)  |  Read (287)  |  Reference (33)  |  Student (300)  |  Thread (32)  |  Toward (45)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Write (230)

Mr. Dalton's aspect and manner were repulsive. There was no gracefulness belonging to him. His voice was harsh and brawling; his gait stiff and awkward; his style of writing and conversation dry and almost crabbed. In person he was tall, bony, and slender. He never could learn to swim: on investigating this circumstance he found that his spec. grav. as a mass was greater than that of water; and he mentioned this in his lectures on natural philosophy in illustration of the capability of different persons for attaining the art of swimming. Independence and simplicity of manner and originality were his best qualities. Though in comparatively humble circumstances he maintained the dignity of the philosophical character. As the first distinct promulgator of the doctrine that the elements of bodies unite in definite proportions to form chemical compounds, he has acquired an undying fame.
Dr John Davy's (brother of Humphry Davy) impressions of Dalton written in c.1830-31 in Malta.
John Davy
Quoted in W. C. Henry, Memoirs of the Life and Scientific Researches of John Dalton (1854), 217-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Best (459)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brother (43)  |  Capability (41)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conversation (43)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Dry (57)  |  Element (310)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Greater (288)  |  Humble (50)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Impression (114)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mention (82)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)

My colleagues in elementary particle theory in many lands [and I] are driven by the usual insatiable curiosity of the scientist, and our work is a delightful game. I am frequently astonished that it so often results in correct predictions of experimental results. How can it be that writing down a few simple and elegant formulae, like short poems governed by strict rules such as those of the sonnet or the waka, can predict universal regularities of Nature?
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1969), in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.),Les Prix Nobel en 1969 (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Formula (98)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Game (101)  |  Govern (64)  |  Government (110)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Poem (96)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Short (197)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Strict (17)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)  |  Work (1351)

Natural historians tend to avoid tendentious preaching in this philosophical mode (although I often fall victim to such temptations in these essays). Our favored style of doubting is empirical: if I wish to question your proposed generality, I will search for a counterexample in flesh and blood. Such counterexamples exist in abundance, for the form a staple in a standard genre of writing in natural history–the “wonderment of oddity” or “strange ways of the beaver” tradition.
In 'Reversing Established Orders', Leonardo’s Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms (2011), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Blood (134)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essay (27)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fall (230)  |  Favor (63)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Form (959)  |  Generality (45)  |  Genre (3)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Mode (41)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Historian (2)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Often (106)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Preach (11)  |  Propose (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Search (162)  |  Standard (57)  |  Staple (3)  |  Strange (157)  |  Style (23)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Victim (35)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonderment (2)  |  Write (230)

Nature will be reported. Everything in nature is engaged in writing its own history; the planet and the pebble are attended by their shadows, the rolling rock leaves its furrows on the mountain-side, the river its channel in the soil; the animal, its bones in the stratum; the fern and leaf, their modest epitaph in the coal.
In The Prose Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1847, 1872), Vol. 2, 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Attend (65)  |  Bone (95)  |  Channel (21)  |  Coal (57)  |  Epitaph (19)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fern (9)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Furrow (4)  |  History (673)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Modest (15)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Planet (356)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Side (233)  |  Soil (86)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

Never ask me what I have said or what I have written; but if you will ask what my present opinions are, I will tell you.
As quoted by Drewry Ottley, 'The Life of John Hunter', in James Frederick Palmer (ed.), The Works of John Hunter (1835), Vol. 1, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Never (1087)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Present (619)  |  Tell (340)  |  Will (2355)

Never fear big long words.
Big long words name little things.
All big things have little names.
Such as life and death, peace and war.
Or dawn, day, night, hope, love, home.
Learn to use little words in a big way.
It is hard to do,
But they say what you mean.
When you don't know what you mean, use big words.
That often fools little people.
Quoted in Saturday Review (1962), 45, No. 2. It was written (1936) for his son, as advice for young copy writers. - 1995
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Big (48)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fool (116)  |  Hard (243)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Mean (809)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Peace (108)  |  People (1005)  |  Poem (96)  |  Publication (101)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

Newton took no exercise, indulged in no amusements, and worked incessantly, often spending eighteen or nineteen hours out of the twenty-four in writing.
In History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 358.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Hour (186)  |  Incessantly (3)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Spending (24)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

No one for a moment can pretend that printing is so great a discovery as writing, or algebra as a language.
Lothair (1879), preface, xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  Language (293)  |  Moment (253)  |  Printing (22)

Not seldom did he [Sir William Thomson], in his writings, set down some mathematical statement with the prefacing remark “it is obvious that” to the perplexity of mathematical readers, to whom the statement was anything but obvious from such mathematics as preceded it on the page. To him it was obvious for physical reasons that might not suggest themselves at all to the mathematician, however competent.
As given in Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 1136. [Note: William Thomson, later became Lord Kelvin —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Competent (20)  |  Down (456)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Page (30)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Physical (508)  |  Precede (23)  |  Preface (8)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remark (28)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Set (394)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Writings (6)

Oh, that my words were now written! Oh, that they were printed in a book! That with an graven with an iron pen and lead, in the rock for ever!
Bible
Reference to the antiquity of iron and lead, from Job 19:23-24, in The Holy Bible (1746), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Engraving (4)  |  Iron (96)  |  Lead (384)  |  Pen (20)  |  Printing (22)  |  Rock (161)  |  Word (619)

On one occasion when [William] Smart found him engrossed with his fundamental theory, he asked Eddington how many people he thought would understand what he was writing—after a pause came the reply, 'Perhaps seven.'
A. V. Douglas, The Life of Arthur Stanley Eddington (1956), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Occasion (85)  |  People (1005)  |  Publication (101)  |  Reply (56)  |  Smart (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)

People were getting ridiculous amounts [of bluefin tuna]. Somebody got on the radio and said, “Guys, maybe we should leave some for tomorrow.” Another guy came on and said, “Hey, they didn't leave any buffalo for me.” [Heard from fishermen crowding off Fire Island in 1998, which he cites as his source for the phrase “the last buffalo hunt” inspiring his writings on overfishing.]
As quoted by William J. Broad in 'High-Seas Hunter Pleads for Preservation of Fish', New York Times (22 Sep 1998), F1.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Buffalo (7)  |  Cite (8)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Island (46)  |  Last (426)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Radio (50)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Tomorrow (60)

People who write obscurely are either unskilled in writing or up to mischief.
From 'Science and Literature', Pluto’s Republic (1984), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Mischief (13)  |  Obscure (62)  |  People (1005)  |  Unskilled (4)  |  Write (230)

People wonder why the novel is the most popular form of literature; people wonder why it is read more than books of science or books of metaphysics. The reason is very simple; it is merely that the novel is more true than they are. … In the fiery alphabet of every sunset is written “to be continued in our next.”
'On Certain Modern Writers and the institution of the Family' Heretics (1903). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Book (392)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Fire (189)  |  Form (959)  |  Literature (103)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Novel (32)  |  People (1005)  |  Popular (29)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Why (491)  |  Wonder (236)

Sample recommendation letter:
Dear Search Committee Chair,
I am writing this letter for Mr. John Smith who has applied for a position in your department. I should start by saying that I cannot recommend him too highly.
In fact, there is no other student with whom I can adequately compare him, and I am sure that the amount of mathematics he knows will surprise you.
His dissertation is the sort of work you don’t expect to see these days.
It definitely demonstrates his complete capabilities.
In closing, let me say that you will be fortunate if you can get him to work for you.
Sincerely,
A. D. Visor (Prof.)
In A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper (1995), 43
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Applied (177)  |  Capability (41)  |  Chair (24)  |  Committee (15)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complete (204)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Department (92)  |  Dissertation (2)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Reference (33)  |  Sample (19)  |  Say (984)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Start (221)  |  Student (300)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Science demands great linguistic austerity and discipline, and the canons of good style in scientific writing are different from those in other kinds of literature.
In Biology and Language: An Introduction to the Methodology of the (1952), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Austerity (3)  |  Canon (3)  |  Demand (123)  |  Different (577)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Kind (557)  |  Linguistic (2)  |  Literature (103)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Style (23)  |  Write (230)

Science is a progressive activity. The outstanding peculiarity of man is that he stumbled onto the possibility of progressive activities. Such progress, the accumulation of experience from generation to generation, depended first on the development of language, then of writing and finally of printing. These allowed the accumulation of tradition and of knowledge, of the whole aura of cultural inheritance that surrounds us. This has so conditioned our existence that it is almost impossible for us to stop and examine the nature of our culture. We accept it as we accept the air we breathe; we are as unconscious of our culture as a fish, presumably, is of water.
The Nature of Natural History 1950)
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Condition (356)  |  Culture (143)  |  Depend (228)  |  Development (422)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  Generation (242)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Printing (22)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Scientists wrote beautifully through the 19th century and on into the early 20th. But somewhere after that, coincident with the explosive growth of research, the art of writing science suffered a grave setback, and the stultifying convention descended that the best scientific prose should sound like a non-human author addressing a mechanical reader.
In Boojums All the Way Through: Communicating Science in a Prosaic Age (1990), Preface, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  20th Century (36)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Best (459)  |  Century (310)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Convention (14)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent (27)  |  Early (185)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Grave (52)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Prose (11)  |  Reader (40)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Setback (3)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stultify (5)  |  Suffered (2)  |  Through (849)

Segregationalists will even argue that God was the first segregationalist. “Red birds and blue birds don't fly together”, they contend. … They turn to some pseudo-scientific writing and argue that the Negro’s brain is smaller than the white man’s brain. They do not know, or they refuse to know that the idea of an inferior or superior race has been refuted by the best evidence of the science of anthropology. Great anthropologists, like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Melville J. Herskovits, agree that, although there may be inferior and superior individuals within all races, there is no superior or inferior race. And segregationalists refuse to acknowledge that there are four types of blood, and these four types are found within every racial group.
'Love in Action', Strength To Love (1963, 1981), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Best (459)  |  Bigotry (4)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blood (134)  |  Brain (270)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Negro (7)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Race (268)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Superior (81)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Type (167)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; other to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books; else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. [The studies pass into the manners.]
'Of Studies' (1625) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 6, 498.
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Book (392)  |  Common (436)  |  Conference (17)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Extract (40)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wit (59)  |  Write (230)

Some guns were fired to give notice that the departure of the balloon was near. ... Means were used, I am told, to prevent the great balloon's rising so high as might endanger its bursting. Several bags of sand were taken on board before the cord that held it down was cut, and the whole weight being then too much to be lifted, such a quantity was discharged as would permit its rising slowly. Thus it would sooner arrive at that region where it would be in equilibrio with the surrounding air, and by discharging more sand afterwards, it might go higher if desired. Between one and two o’clock, all eyes were gratified with seeing it rise majestically from above the trees, and ascend gradually above the buildings, a most beautiful spectacle. When it was about two hundred feet high, the brave adventurers held out and waved a little white pennant, on both sides of their car, to salute the spectators, who returned loud claps of applause. The wind was very little, so that the object though moving to the northward, continued long in view; and it was a great while before the admiring people began to disperse. The persons embarked were Mr. Charles, professor of experimental philosophy, and a zealous promoter of that science; and one of the Messrs Robert, the very ingenious constructors of the machine.
While U.S. ambassador to France, writing about witnessing, from his carriage outside the garden of Tuileries, Paris, the first manned balloon ascent using hydrogen gas on the afternoon of 1 Dec 1783. A few days earlier, he had watched the first manned ascent in Montgolfier's hot-air balloon, on 21 Nov 1783.
Letter to Sir Charles Banks (1 Dec 1783). In The Writings of Benjamin Franklin: 1783-1788 (1906), Vol. 9, 119-120.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Brave (12)  |  Building (156)  |  Car (71)  |  Jacques-Alexandre-César Charles (2)  |  Clock (47)  |  Cut (114)  |  Down (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gas (83)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Lift (55)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Return (124)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Salute (3)  |  Sand (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Tree (246)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Watch (109)  |  Weight (134)  |  White (127)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wind (128)

Some years ago John Kenneth Galbraith wrote in an essay on his efforts at writing a history of economics: “As one approaches the present, one is filled with a sense of hopelessness; in a year and possibly even a month, there is now more economic comment in the supposedly serious literature than survives from the whole of the thousand years commonly denominated as the Middle Ages … anyone who claims to be familiar with it all is a confessing liar.” I believe that all physicists would subscribe to the same sentiments regarding their own professional literature. I do at any rate.
In H. Henry Stroke, 'The Physical Review Then and Now', Physical Review: The First Hundred Years: a Selection of Seminal Papers and Commentaries, Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Claim (146)  |  Comment (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Effort (227)  |  Essay (27)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fill (61)  |  John Kenneth Galbraith (11)  |  History (673)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Liar (6)  |  Literature (103)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Professional (70)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Serious (91)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

Sometimes my courage fails me and I think I ought to stop working, live in the country and devote myself to gardening. But I am held by a thousand bonds, and I don't know when I shall be able to arrange things otherwise. Nor do I know whether, even by writing scientific books, I could live without the laboratory.
Letter to her sister Bronya, September 1927. In Eve Curie, Madame Curie (1938), 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrange (30)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Bond (45)  |  Book (392)  |  Country (251)  |  Courage (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fail (185)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Live (628)  |  Myself (212)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)

Speech is the representation of the mind, and writing is the representation of speech.
Aristotle
In 'On Interpretation'. As quoted in New Encyclopedia Britannica (2003), Vol. 22, 567.
Science quotes on:  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Representation (53)  |  Speech (61)

Standard mathematics has recently been rendered obsolete by the discovery that for years we have been writing the numeral five backward. This has led to reevaluation of counting as a method of getting from one to ten. Students are taught advanced concepts of Boolean algebra, and formerly unsolvable equations are dealt with by threats of reprisals.
Getting Even (1978), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Boolean Algebra (2)  |  Concept (221)  |  Counting (26)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Education (378)  |  Equation (132)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Number (699)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Reevaluation (2)  |  Render (93)  |  Reprisal (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Threat (30)  |  Unsolvable (2)  |  Year (933)

Sylvester’s writings are flowery and eloquent. He was able to make the dullest subject bright, fresh and interesting. His enthusiasm is evident in every line. He would get quite close up to his subject, so that everything else looked small in comparison, and for the time would think and make others think that the world contained no finer matter for contemplation. His handwriting was bad, and a trouble to his printers. His papers were finished with difficulty. No sooner was the manuscript in the editor’s hands than alterations, corrections, ameliorations and generalizations would suggest themselves to his mind, and every post would carry further directions to the editors and printers.
In Nature (1897), 55, 494.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bright (79)  |  Carry (127)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Correction (40)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Dull (54)  |  Editor (9)  |  Eloquent (2)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evident (91)  |  Finish (59)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Hand (143)  |  Handwriting (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Look (582)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Post (6)  |  Printer (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Sooner (6)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggest (34)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  World (1774)

The art of writing history is the art of emphasizing the significant facts at the expense of the insignificant. And it is the same in every field of knowledge. Knowledge is power only if a man knows what facts not to bother about.
In The Orange Tree: A Volume of Essays (1926), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Field (364)  |  History (673)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Power (746)  |  Significant (74)  |  Write (230)

The authors of literary works may not have intended all the subtleties, complexities, undertones, and overtones that are attributed to them by critics and by students writing doctoral theses.” That’s what God says about geologists, I told him...
Basin and Range
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Author (167)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Critic (20)  |  Geologist (75)  |  God (757)  |  Intend (16)  |  Literary (13)  |  Overtone (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Student (300)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Undertone (2)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

The Congress shall have power to ... promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.
Founding U.S. Patents.
Constitution of the United States, Art. 1, Sec.8, Par. 8. In George Sewall Boutwell, The Constitution of the United States at the End of the First Century (1895), 219.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Congress (19)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Copyright (2)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Government (110)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Patent (33)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Promote (29)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)

The contents of this section will furnish a very striking illustration of the truth of a remark, which I have more than once made in my philosophical writings, and which can hardly be too often repeated, as it tends greatly to encourage philosophical investigations viz. That more is owing to what we call chance, that is, philosophically speaking, to the observation of events arising from unknown causes, than to any proper design, or pre-conceived theory in this business. This does not appear in the works of those who write synthetically upon these subjects; but would, I doubt not, appear very strikingly in those who are the most celebrated for their philosophical acumen, did they write analytically and ingenuously.
'On Dephlogisticated Air, and the Constitution of the Atmosphere', in The Discovery of Oxygen, Part I, Experiments by Joseph Priestley 1775 (Alembic Club Reprint, 1894), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arising (22)  |  Business (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Design (195)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Event (216)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Investigation (230)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Owing (39)  |  Proper (144)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

The description of some of the experiments, which are communicated here, was completely worked out at my writing-table, before I had seen anything of the phenomena in question. After making the experiments on the following day, it was found that nothing in the description required to be altered. I do not mention this from feelings of pride, but in order to make clear the extraordinary ease and security with which the relations in question can be considered on the principles of Arrhenius' theory of free ions. Such facts speak more forcibly then any polemics for the value of this theory .
Philosophical Magazine (1891), 32, 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Svante Arrhenius (11)  |  Communication (94)  |  Completely (135)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Description (84)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ease (35)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Free (232)  |  Ion (21)  |  Making (300)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Polemic (3)  |  Pride (78)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Relation (157)  |  Required (108)  |  Security (47)  |  Speak (232)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)

The enthusiasm of Sylvester for his own work, which manifests itself here as always, indicates one of his characteristic qualities: a high degree of subjectivity in his productions and publications. Sylvester was so fully possessed by the matter which for the time being engaged his attention, that it appeared to him and was designated by him as the summit of all that is important, remarkable and full of future promise. It would excite his phantasy and power of imagination in even a greater measure than his power of reflection, so much so that he could never marshal the ability to master his subject-matter, much less to present it in an orderly manner.
Considering that he was also somewhat of a poet, it will be easier to overlook the poetic flights which pervade his writing, often bombastic, sometimes furnishing apt illustrations; more damaging is the complete lack of form and orderliness of his publications and their sketchlike character, … which must be accredited at least as much to lack of objectivity as to a superfluity of ideas. Again, the text is permeated with associated emotional expressions, bizarre utterances and paradoxes and is everywhere accompanied by notes, which constitute an essential part of Sylvester’s method of presentation, embodying relations, whether proximate or remote, which momentarily suggested themselves. These notes, full of inspiration and occasional flashes of genius, are the more stimulating owing to their incompleteness. But none of his works manifest a desire to penetrate the subject from all sides and to allow it to mature; each mere surmise, conceptions which arose during publication, immature thoughts and even errors were ushered into publicity at the moment of their inception, with utmost carelessness, and always with complete unfamiliarity of the literature of the subject. Nowhere is there the least trace of self-criticism. No one can be expected to read the treatises entire, for in the form in which they are available they fail to give a clear view of the matter under contemplation.
Sylvester’s was not a harmoniously gifted or well-balanced mind, but rather an instinctively active and creative mind, free from egotism. His reasoning moved in generalizations, was frequently influenced by analysis and at times was guided even by mystical numerical relations. His reasoning consists less frequently of pure intelligible conclusions than of inductions, or rather conjectures incited by individual observations and verifications. In this he was guided by an algebraic sense, developed through long occupation with processes of forms, and this led him luckily to general fundamental truths which in some instances remain veiled. His lack of system is here offset by the advantage of freedom from purely mechanical logical activity.
The exponents of his essential characteristics are an intuitive talent and a faculty of invention to which we owe a series of ideas of lasting value and bearing the germs of fruitful methods. To no one more fittingly than to Sylvester can be applied one of the mottos of the Philosophic Magazine:
“Admiratio generat quaestionem, quaestio investigationem investigatio inventionem.”
In Mathematische Annalen (1898), 50, 155-160. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 176-178.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creative (137)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genius (284)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inception (3)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lack (119)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mature (16)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Production (183)  |  Promise (67)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Read (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surmise (7)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Veil (26)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The exterior appearance of human life is but the material embodiment, the substantial expression, of thought—the hieroglyphic writing of the soul.
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Expression (175)  |  Exterior (6)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Soul (226)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Thought (953)

The following story is true. There was a little boy, and his father said, “Do try to be like other people. Don’t frown.” And he tried and tried, but could not. So his father beat him with a strap; and then he was eaten up by lions. Reader, if young, take warning by his sad life and death. For though it may be an honour to be different from other people, if Carlyle’s dictum about the 30 million be still true, yet other people do not like it. So, if you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. In particular, if you are going to write a book, remember the wooden-headed. So be rigorous; that will cover a multitude of sins. And do not frown.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beat (41)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Thomas Carlyle (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Death (388)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Father (110)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hide (69)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Honour (56)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lion (22)  |  Little (707)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reader (40)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Sin (42)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Still (613)  |  Story (118)  |  Strap (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Warning (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worship (32)  |  Write (230)  |  Young (227)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Below (24)  |  Blank (11)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climber (7)  |  Crash (9)  |  Create (235)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crown (38)  |  Drive (55)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Five (16)  |  Flag (11)  |  Floor (20)  |  Fold (8)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Half (56)  |  Hard (243)  |  Head (81)  |  Heat (174)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (20)  |  India (16)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine (9)  |  Melt (16)  |  Mile (39)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Newly (4)  |  North (11)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plate (6)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Plow (7)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Push (62)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Self (267)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Sky (161)  |  Snow (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Stop (80)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tibet (4)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Volume (19)  |  Warm (69)  |  Write (230)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Appear (118)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Central (80)  |  Church (56)  |  Closely (12)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  David (6)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Especially (31)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (7)  |  Genius (284)  |  God (757)  |  Heretic (8)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Image (96)  |  Impress (64)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prison (13)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Saint (17)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Significant (74)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Stage (143)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)  |  Writings (6)

The last thing one settles in writing a book is what one should put first.
In Pensées (1670), Section 7, No. 29. As translated in Blaise Pascal and W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', No. 19, collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 14. Also seen translated as, “The last thing one knows when writing a book is what to put first.” From the original French, “La dernière chose qu’on trouve en faisant un ouvrage, est de savoir celle qu’il faut mettre la première,” in Ernest Havet (ed.), Pensées de Pascal (1892), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  First (1283)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Thing (3)  |  Settle (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Write (230)

The last thing one settles in writing a book is what one should put in first.
In Pensées. As translated by W.F. Trotter in Blaise Pascal: Thoughts, Letters, and Minor Works (1910), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  First (1283)  |  Last (426)  |  Last Thing (3)  |  Settle (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Write (230)

The most remarkable discovery made by scientists is science itself. The discovery must be compared in importance with the invention of cave-painting and of writing. Like these earlier human creations, science is an attempt to control our surroundings by entering into them and understanding them from inside. And like them, science has surely made a critical step in human development which cannot be reversed. We cannot conceive a future society without science.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cave Painting (2)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Control (167)  |  Creation (327)  |  Critical (66)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inside (26)  |  Invention (369)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Reversal (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  Step (231)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surroundings (5)  |  Understanding (513)

The ordinary man (or woman) thinks he knows what time is but cannot say. The learned man, physicist or philosopher, is not sure he knows but is ready to write volumes on the subject of his speculation and ignorance.
In Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World (1983), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Say (984)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volume (19)  |  Woman (151)  |  Write (230)

The process of preparing programs for a digital computer is especially attractive, not only because it can be economically and scientifically rewarding, but also because it can be an aesthetic experience much like composing poetry or music.
The Art of Computer Programming (1968), Vol. 1, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Computer (127)  |  Digital (10)  |  Experience (467)  |  Music (129)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Process (423)  |  Programming (2)  |  Reward (68)  |  Software (13)

The progress of science depends less than is usually believed on the efforts and performance of the individual genius ... many important discoveries have been made by men of ordinary talents, simply because chance had made them, at the proper time and in the proper place and circumstances, recipients of a body of doctrines, facts and techniques that rendered almost inevitable the recognition of an important phenomenon. It is surprising that some historian has not taken malicious pleasure in writing an anthology of 'one discovery' scientists. Many exciting facts have been discovered as a result of loose thinking and unimaginative experimentation, and described in wrappings of empty words. One great discovery does not betoken a great scientist; science now and then selects insignificant standard bearers to display its banners.
Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1986), 368
Science quotes on:  |  Banner (7)  |  Body (537)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Display (56)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Malicious (8)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Performance (48)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Proper (144)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Select (44)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Talent (94)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)

The reason Dick's [Richard Feynman] physics was so hard for ordinary people to grasp was that he did not use equations. The usual theoretical physics was done since the time of Newton was to begin by writing down some equations and then to work hard calculating solutions of the equations. This was the way Hans [Bethe] and Oppy [Oppenheimer] and Julian Schwinger did physics. Dick just wrote down the solutions out of his head without ever writing down the equations. He had a physical picture of the way things happen, and the picture gave him the solutions directly with a minimum of calculation. It was no wonder that people who had spent their lives solving equations were baffled by him. Their minds were analytical; his was pictorial.
Quoted in Michio Kaku and Jennifer Trainer Thompson, Beyond Einstein: the Cosmic Quest for the Theory of the Universe (1987, 1999), 56-57, citing Freeman Dyson, Disturbing the Universe (1979, 1981), 55-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Bafflement (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Hans Albrecht Bethe (5)  |  Biography (240)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Equation (132)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hard (243)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  J. Robert Oppenheimer (39)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Reason (744)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Spent (85)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

The results of even a cursory examination exceeded all the tales of eyewitnesses and my wildest expectations.
Writing his recollection of his first sight of the Tunguska destruction.
Quoted in Alan E. Rubin, Disturbing the Solar System (2002), 186
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expectation (65)  |  First (1283)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Result (677)  |  Sight (132)

The rigid career path of a professor at a modern university is that One Must Build the Big Research Group, recruit doctoral students more vigorously than the head football coach, bombard the federal agencies with grant applications more numerous than the pollen falling from the heavens in spring, and leave the paper writing and the research to the postdocs, research associates, and students who do all the bench work and all the computer programming. A professor is chained to his previous topics by his Big Group, his network of contacts built up laboriously over decades, and the impossibility of large funding except in areas where the grantee has grown the group from a corner of the building to an entire floor. The senior tenure-track faculty at a research university–the “silverbacks” in anthropological jargon–are bound by invisible chains stronger than the strongest steel to a narrow range of what the Prevailing Consensus agrees are Very Important Problems. The aspiring scientist is confronted with the reality that his mentors are all business managers.
In his Foreword to Cornelius Lanczos, Discourse on Fourier Series, ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Associate (25)  |  Bench (8)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Business (149)  |  Career (75)  |  Coach (5)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Contact (65)  |  Corner (57)  |  Decade (59)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Football (10)  |  Funding (19)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Large (394)  |  Manager (6)  |  Mentor (3)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Network (21)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Paper (182)  |  Path (144)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Postgraduate (2)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Research (664)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Senior (6)  |  Silverback (2)  |  Spring (133)  |  Steel (21)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Student (300)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Topic (21)  |  Track (38)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)

The sacred writings excepted, no Greek has been so much read and so variously translated as Euclid.
In Article 'Eucleides', in Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biology and Mythology (1902). A footnote adds: Riccardi, Bibliografia Euclidea (1887), lists nearly two thousand editions.
Science quotes on:  |  Edition (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Greek (107)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Read (287)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Translate (19)  |  Variously (2)  |  Writings (6)

The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.
In Process and Reality (1929), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Characterization (8)  |  Consist (223)  |  Do (1908)  |  Europe (43)  |  Extract (40)  |  Footnote (5)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mean (809)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Safest (7)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Series (149)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Wealth (94)

The subject-matter of Archaeology is threefold—the Oral, the Written and the Monumental.
In Lecture to the Oxford meeting of the Archaeological Institute (18 Jun 1850), printed in 'On the Study of Achaeology', Archaeological Journal (1851), 8, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Description (84)  |  Human (1468)  |  Matter (798)  |  Monument (45)  |  Sir Charles Thomas Newton (4)  |  Oral (2)  |  Past (337)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)

The surveyor ought to work in solitude. He must no more admit company while mapping than a writer admits visitors to his study while writing. This applies even to geological company, nay, even to the company of a skilled fellow-surveyor... The two authors of this book [Edward Greenly and Howell Williams] once thought that it would be pleasant to have a day's mapping together, and decided to break through their rule. The result was a ludicrous paralysis. The commonest operation seemed a mountain of difficulty. Next day the senior author (whose ground it was) swept an india-rubber over every line and went out again, when, hey presto! And all was clear.
Edward Greenly and Howell Williams, Methods in Geological Surveying (1930), 375-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Break (99)  |  Company (59)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ludicrous (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Operation (213)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Result (677)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Senior (6)  |  Skill (109)  |  Solitude (18)  |  Study (653)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

The traditional mathematics professor of the popular legend is absentminded. He usually appears in public with a lost umbrella in each hand. He prefers to face a blackboard and to turn his back on the class. He writes a, he says b, he means c, but it should be d. Some of his sayings are handed down from generation to generation:
“In order to solve this differential equation you look at it till a solution occurs to you.”
“This principle is so perfectly general that no particular application of it is possible.”
“Geometry is the science of correct reasoning on incorrect figures.”
“My method to overcome a difficulty is to go round it.”
“What is the difference between method and device? A method is a device which you used twice.”
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent-Minded (4)  |  Application (242)  |  Back (390)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Class (164)  |  Correct (86)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Equation (132)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Handed Down (2)  |  Incorrect (6)  |  Legend (17)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Particular (76)  |  Popular (29)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twice (17)  |  Umbrella (2)  |  Using (6)  |  Usually (176)  |  Write (230)

The true excellence and importance of those arts and sciences which exert and display themselves in writing, may be seen, in a more general point of view, in the great influence which they have exerted on the character and fate of nations, throughout the history of the world.
In Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern (1841), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Character (243)  |  Display (56)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Exert (39)  |  Fate (72)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Throughout (98)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

The use of thesis-writing is to train the mind, or to prove that the mind has been trained; the former purpose is, I trust, promoted, the evidences of the latter are scanty and occasional.
From Preface to First Edition to Notes on the Composition of Scientific Papers (1904), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Evidence (248)  |  Former (137)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Scanty (3)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Trust (66)  |  Use (766)

The word “definition” has come to have a dangerously reassuring sound, owing no doubt to its frequent occurrence in logical and mathematical writings.
In 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism', From a Logical Point of View: Nine Logico-Philosophical Essays (1953, 1961), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Definition (221)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Owing (39)  |  Reassure (7)  |  Sound (183)  |  Word (619)  |  Writings (6)

The words are strung together, with their own special grammar—the laws of quantum theory—to form sentences, which are molecules. Soon we have books, entire libraries, made out of molecular “sentences.” The universe is like a library in which the words are atoms. Just look at what has been written with these hundred words! Our own bodies are books in that library, specified by the organization of molecules—but the universe and literature are organizations of identical, interchangeable objects; they are information systems.
In The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the Language of Nature (1983), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Element (310)  |  Entire (47)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Identical (53)  |  Information (166)  |  Law (894)  |  Library (48)  |  Literature (103)  |  Look (582)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Object (422)  |  Organization (114)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Soon (186)  |  Special (184)  |  Specification (7)  |  String (21)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Word (619)

The Wright Brothers created the single greatest cultural force since the invention of writing. The airplane became the first World Wide Web, bringing people, languages, ideas, and values together.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (41)  |  Become (815)  |  Bring (90)  |  Brother (43)  |  Create (235)  |  Cultural (25)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Idea (843)  |  Invention (369)  |  Language (293)  |  People (1005)  |  Single (353)  |  Together (387)  |  Value (365)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)  |  World Wide Web (4)  |  Write (230)

Theorists write all the popular books on science: Heinz Pagels, Frank Wilczek, Stephen Hawking, Richard Feynman, et al. And why not? They have all that spare time.
In Leon Lederman and Dick Teresi, The God Particle: If the Universe is the Answer, What is the Question (1993), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Stephen W. Hawking (56)  |  Heinz R. Pagels (10)  |  Popular (29)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spare (9)  |  Spare Time (3)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  Frank Wilczek (2)  |  Write (230)

There are four subjects which must be taught: reading, writing and arithmetic, and the fear of God. The most difficult of these is arithmetic.
Quoted as a filler, without citation in The Record (3 Nov 1948), 40, No. 8, 2. (Student newspaper of the New York State College for Teachers.)
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Fear (197)  |  God (757)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teach (277)  |  Write (230)

There is a popular cliché ... which says that you cannot get out of computers any more than you have put in..., that computers can only do exactly what you tell them to, and that therefore computers are never creative. This cliché is true only in a crashingly trivial sense, the same sense in which Shakespeare never wrote anything except what his first schoolteacher taught him to write—words.
In The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design (1966, 1986), 64. Excerpted in Richard Dawkins, ‘Creation and Natural Selection’. New Scientist (25 Sep 1986), 111, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Cliche (7)  |  Computer (127)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Input (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Output (10)  |  Popular (29)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tell (340)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

There was a seminar for advanced students in Zürich that I was teaching and von Neumann was in the class. I came to a certain theorem, and I said it is not proved and it may be difficult. Von Neumann didn’t say anything but after five minutes he raised his hand. When I called on him he went to the blackboard and proceeded to write down the proof. After that I was afraid of von Neumann.
In George Pólya and Gerald L. Alexanderson (ed.) The Pólya Picture Album: Encounters of a Mathematician (1987), 154. Also footnoted in Matti Tedre, The Development of Computer Science: a Sociocultural Perspective (2006), 198, cited as from How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Down (456)  |  Minute (125)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proof (287)  |  Say (984)  |  Seminar (4)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Theorem (112)  |  John von Neumann (28)  |  Write (230)

These two orders of mountains [Secondary and Tertiary] offer the most ancient chronicle of our globe, least liable to falsifications and at the same time more legible than the writing of the primitive ranges. They are Nature's archives, prior to even the most remote records and traditions that have been preserved for our observant century to investigate, comment on and bring to the light of day, and which will not be exhausted for several centuries after our own.
Observations sur la Formation des Montagnes', Acta Academiae Scientiarum Imperialis Petropolitanae (1777) [1778], 46. Trans. Albert Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archive (5)  |  Century (310)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Comment (11)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Falsification (10)  |  Globe (47)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Least (75)  |  Legibility (2)  |  Liability (6)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Offer (141)  |  Order (632)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Range (99)  |  Record (154)  |  Remote (83)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

Thinking is the activity I love best, and writing to me is simply thinking through my fingers. I can write up to 18 hours a day. Typing 90 words a minute, I’ve done better than 50 pages a day. Nothing interferes with my concentration. You could put an orgy in my office and I wouldn't look up—well, maybe once.
When accepting the James T. Grady award from the American Chemical Society. As quoted in Something About the Author (1981), Vol. 26, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Finger (44)  |  Hour (186)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Minute (125)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Orgy (3)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

This work [an essay by Thomson, ‘On the method of analysing sulphate of zinc’] belongs to those few productions from which science will derive no advantage whatever. Much of the experimental part, even of the fundamental experiments, appears to have been made at the writing-desk; and the greatest civility which his contemporaries can show its author, is to forget it was ever published. … love of science makes it imperative to detect quackery, and expose it to the judgement of every one as it merits
In Jahresbericht (1827), 6, 77 and 181. Woehler's translation quoted in 'Attack of Berzelius on Dr. Thomson's Attempt to Establish the First Principles of Chemistry by Experiment', Philosophical Magazine (Dec 1828), 4, No. 24, 451. The latter article comments, “It well becomes Berzelius to expose fallacy in argument, or detect error in analysis; but let him not pass beyond the limits of fair criticism: let him not arraign the character of the individual., who may be actuated by motives and principles as pure as his own. Intemperate attacks, such as this, reflect back upon their author, and indicate a mind inflamed by pique, jealousy, or some unworthy passion.”
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Author (167)  |  Belong (162)  |  Derive (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Essay (27)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Expose (23)  |  Forget (115)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Love (309)  |  Merit (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Production (183)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Those who knew that the judgements of many centuries had reinforced the opinion that the Earth is placed motionless in the middle of heaven, as though at its centre, if I on the contrary asserted that the Earth moves, I hesitated for a long time whether to bring my treatise, written to demonstrate its motion, into the light of day, or whether it would not be better to follow the example of the Pythagoreans and certain others, who used to pass on the mysteries of their philosophy merely to their relatives and friends, not in writing but by personal contact, as the letter of Lysis to Hipparchus bears witness. And indeed they seem to me to have done so, not as some think from a certain jealousy of communicating their doctrines, but so that their greatest splendours, discovered by the devoted research of great men, should not be exposed to the contempt of those who either find it irksome to waste effort on anything learned, unless it is profitable, or if they are stirred by the exhortations and examples of others to a high-minded enthusiasm for philosophy, are nevertheless so dull-witted that among philosophers they are like drones among bees.
'To His Holiness Pope Paul III', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bee (40)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contact (65)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drone (4)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Hipparchus (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Waste (101)  |  Witness (54)

Though, probably, no competent geologist would contend that the European classification of strata is applicable to all other parts of the globe, yet most, if not all geologists, write as though it were so.
'Illogical Geology', The Universal Review (1859), 2, 54.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (242)  |  Classification (97)  |  Competence (11)  |  Contention (14)  |  Europe (43)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Globe (47)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Strata (35)  |  Write (230)

TO MY WIFE-who made the writing of my previous book a pleasure and writing of the present one a necessity.
Boranes in Organic Chemistry (1972), dedication.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Wife (41)

To present a scientific subject in an attractive and stimulating manner is an artistic task, similar to that of a novelist or even a dramatic writer. The same holds for writing textbooks.
Max Born
My Life & My Views (1968), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Artistic (23)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Book (392)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Present (619)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Task (147)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Writer (86)

Tolstoi explains somewhere in his writings why, in his opinion, “Science for Science's sake” is an absurd conception. We cannot know all the facts since they are infinite in number. We must make a selection ... guided by utility ... Have we not some better occupation than counting the number of lady-birds in existence on this planet?
In Science and Method (1914, 2003), 15
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Bird (149)  |  Conception (154)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Count Leo Tolstoy (16)  |  Utility (49)  |  Why (491)

Vagueness is very much more important in the theory of knowledge than you would judge it to be from the writings of most people. Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise, and everything precise is so remote from everything that we normally think, that you cannot for a moment suppose that is what we really mean when we say what we think.
In The Philosophy of Logical Atomism (1918, 1919), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Degree (276)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Important (209)  |  Judge (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Normal (28)  |  People (1005)  |  Precise (68)  |  Realize (147)  |  Remote (83)  |  Say (984)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vagueness (15)

Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.
In The Elements of Style (1918).
Science quotes on:  |  Concise (8)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Line (91)  |  Machine (257)  |  Paragraph (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

We are all writing God’s poem.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 8
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  God (757)  |  Poem (96)  |  Write (230)

We have a habit in writing articles published in scientific journals to make the work as finished as possible, to cover up all the tracks, to not worry about the blind alleys or describe how you had the wrong idea first, and so on. So there isn’t any place to publish, in a dignified manner, what you actually did in order to get to do the work.
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Alley (4)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Journal (30)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Publication (101)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Track (38)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

We may safely say, that the whole form of modern mathematical thinking was created by Euler. It is only with the greatest difficulty that one is able to follow the writings of any author immediately preceding Euler, because it was not yet known how to let the formulas speak for themselves. This art Euler was the first one to teach.
As quoted in W. Ahrens Scherz und Ernst in der Mathematik (1904), 251. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Precede (23)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Teach (277)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Whole (738)

We often hear that mathematics consists mainly of “proving theorems.” Is a writer's job mainly that of “writing sentences?”
In Rota's 'Introduction' written (1980) to preface Philip J. Davis and Reuben Hersh, The Mathematical Experience (1981, 2012), xxii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Consist (223)  |  Hear (139)  |  Job (82)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Proof (287)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Writer (86)

We seem to be heading for a state of affairs in which the determination of whether or not Doomsday has arrived will be made either by an automatic device ... or by a pre-programmed president who, whether he knows it or not, will be carrying out orders written years before by some operations analyst.
In The Race to Oblivion, (1970), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyst (8)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Before (8)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Determination (78)  |  Device (70)  |  Doomsday (5)  |  Heading (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  President (31)  |  Seeming (9)  |  State (491)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

We speak erroneously of “artificial” materials, “synthetics”, and so forth. The basis for this erroneous terminology is the notion that Nature has made certain things which we call natural, and everything else is “man-made”, ergo artificial. But what one learns in chemistry is that Nature wrote all the rules of structuring; man does not invent chemical structuring rules; he only discovers the rules. All the chemist can do is find out what Nature permits, and any substances that are thus developed or discovered are inherently natural. It is very important to remember that.
From 'The Comprehensive Man', Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure (1963), 75-76.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Basis (173)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Invention (369)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man-Made (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Permit (58)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rule (294)  |  Speak (232)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Thing (1915)

What politicians do not understand is that [Ian] Wilmut discovered not so much a technical trick as a new law of nature. We now know that an adult mammalian cell can fire up all the dormant genetic instructions that shut down as it divides and specializes and ages, and thus can become a source of new life. You can outlaw technique; you cannot repeal biology.
Writing after Wilmut's successful cloning of the sheep, Dolly, that research on the cloning of human beings cannot be suppressed.
'A Special Report on Cloning'. Charles Krauthammer in Time (10 Mar 1997).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ban (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cell (138)  |  Clone (8)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Fire (189)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Successful (123)  |  Technique (80)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Ian Wilmut (5)

When in many dissections, carried out as opportunity offered upon living animals, I first addressed my mind to seeing how I could discover the function and offices of the heart’s movement in animals through the use of my own eyes instead of through the books and writings of others, I kept finding the matter so truly hard and beset with difficulties that I all but thought, with Fracastoro, that the heart's movement had been understood by God alone.
De Motu Cordis (1628), The Circulation of the Blood and Other Writings, trans. Kenneth J. Franklin (1957), Chapter 1, author's motives for writing, 23.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Book (392)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Hard (243)  |  Heart (229)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Offer (141)  |  Office (71)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Truly (116)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)

When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in the warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as twenty thousand feet below the seafloor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth. If by some fiat I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence, this is the one I would choose: The summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Below (24)  |  Blank (11)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clear (100)  |  Climber (7)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everest (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Flag (11)  |  Foot (60)  |  High (362)  |  India (16)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine (9)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  North (11)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Seafloor (2)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Set (394)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Snow (37)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Turn (447)  |  Warm (69)  |  Write (230)

When the uncultured man sees a stone in the road it tells him no story other than the fact that he sees a stone … The scientist looking at the same stone perhaps will stop, and with a hammer break it open, when the newly exposed faces of the rock will have written upon them a history that is as real to him as the printed page.
In Nature’s Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science (1899), Vol. 1, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Break (99)  |  Culture (143)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hammer (25)  |  History (673)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Page (30)  |  Print (17)  |  Reality (261)  |  Road (64)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stop (80)  |  Story (118)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Will (2355)

When we seek a textbook case for the proper operation of science, the correction of certain error offers far more promise than the establishment of probable truth. Confirmed hunches, of course, are more upbeat than discredited hypotheses. Since the worst traditions of ‘popular’ writing falsely equate instruction with sweetness and light, our promotional literature abounds with insipid tales in the heroic mode, although tough stories of disappointment and loss give deeper insight into a methodology that the celebrated philosopher Karl Popper once labeled as ‘conjecture and refutation.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Bad (180)  |  Case (99)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Certain (550)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Correction (40)  |  Course (409)  |  Deep (233)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Discredit (8)  |  Equate (3)  |  Error (321)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Falsely (2)  |  Far (154)  |  Give (202)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Hunch (5)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Insight (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Label (11)  |  Light (607)  |  Literature (103)  |  Loss (110)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Offer (141)  |  Operation (213)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (47)  |  Popular (29)  |  Probable (20)  |  Promise (67)  |  Proper (144)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Story (118)  |  Sweetness (12)  |  Tale (16)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Tough (19)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worst (57)  |  Write (230)

Where there is much to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making.
In Areopagitica: A speech of Mr John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicenced printing to the Parliament of England (23 Nov 1644), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (23)  |  Good (889)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Making (300)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

Whilst I am writing to a Philosopher and a Friend, I can scarcely forget that I am also writing to the greatest Statesman of the present, or perhaps of any century, who spread the happy contagion of Liberty among his countrymen.
Letter to Benjamin Franklin, 29 May 1787. Quoted In Desmond King-Hele (ed.), The Letters of Erasmus Darwin (1981), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Forget (115)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Friend (168)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happy (105)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Present (619)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Spread (83)  |  Statesman (19)

With respect to those points, on which the declaration of Scripture is positive and decisive, as, for instance, in asserting the low antiquity of the human race; the evidence of all facts that have yet been established in Geology coincides with the records of Sacred History and Profane Tradition to confirm the conclusion that the existence of mankind can on no account be supposed to have taken its beginning before that time which is assigned to it in the Mosaic writings.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Low (80)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Point (580)  |  Positive (94)  |  Race (268)  |  Record (154)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tradition (69)

Without writing, the literate mind would not and could not think as it does, not only when engaged in writing but normally even when it is composing its thoughts in oral form. More than any other single invention writing has transformed human consciousness.
Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word (1982), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Composition (84)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Engagement (8)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invention (369)  |  Literacy (10)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Oral (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Single (353)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)

You can't really discover the most interesting conflicts and problems in a subject until you've tried to write about them. At that point, one discovers discontinuities in the data, perhaps, or in one's own thinking; then the act of writing forces you to work harder to resolve these contradictions.
From Robert S. Grumet, 'An Interview with Anthony F. C. Wallace', Ethnohistory (Winter 1998), 45, No. 1, 109.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Data (156)  |  Discontinuity (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Force (487)  |  Harder (6)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Most (1731)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Try (283)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)  |  Write (230)

Bernard Frank quote: You could write the story of man’s growth in terms of his epic concerns with water.
You could write the story of man’s growth in terms of his epic concerns with water.
Opening sentence of 'Our Need For Water', United States Department of Agriculture, The Yearbook of Agriculture, 1955 (1955), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Epic (12)  |  Growth (187)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Story (118)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Water (481)  |  Write (230)

You don’t get rich writing science fiction. If you want to get rich, you start a religion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Religion (361)  |  Rich (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Start (221)  |  Want (497)  |  Write (230)

You have read my writings, and from them you have certainly understood which was the true and real motive that caused, under the lying mask of religion, this war against me that continually restrains and undercuts me in all directions, so that neither can help come to me from outside nor can I go forth to defend myself, there having been issued an express order to all Inquisitors that they should not allow any of my works to be reprinted which had been printed many years ago or grant permission to any new work that I would print. … a most rigorous and general order, I say, against all my works, omnia et edenda; so that it is left to me only to succumb in silence under the flood of attacks, exposures, derision, and insult coming from all sides.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Attack (84)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Coming (114)  |  Defend (30)  |  Derision (8)  |  Direction (175)  |  Exposure (7)  |  Express (186)  |  Flood (50)  |  General (511)  |  Grant (73)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Insult (14)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mask (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Outside (141)  |  Permission (7)  |  Print (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Side (233)  |  Silence (56)  |  Succumb (6)  |  Undercut (3)  |  Understood (156)  |  War (225)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

You have read my writings, and from them you have certainly understood which was the true and real motive that caused, under the lying mask of religion, this war against me that continually restrains and undercuts me in all directions, so that neither can help come to me from outside nor can I go forth to defend myself, there having been issued an express order to all Inquisitors that they should not allow any of my works to be reprinted which had been printed many years ago or grant permission to any new work that I would print. … a most rigorous and general order, I say, against all my works, omnia et edenda; so that it is left to me only to succumb in silence under the flood of attacks, exposures, derision, and insult coming from all sides.
In Letter to Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (16 Mar 1635). As quoted in translation in Giorgio de Santillana, The Crime of Galileo (1976), 324, with footnote that “he had known about the reserved orders to the provincial Inquisitors from Micanzio in Venice. On September 8, 1633, the Pope had further reprimanded the Inquisitor of Florence for giving permission to reprint some past works.”
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Attack (84)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Coming (114)  |  Direction (175)  |  Express (186)  |  Flood (50)  |  General (511)  |  Grant (73)  |  Insult (14)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mask (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Outside (141)  |  Read (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Say (984)  |  Side (233)  |  Silence (56)  |  Undercut (3)  |  Understood (156)  |  War (225)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

You know that I write slowly. This is chiefly because I am never satisfied until I have said as much as possible in a few words, and writing briefly takes far more time than writing at length.
Quoted in G. Simmons, Calculus Gems (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Possible (552)  |  Publication (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

You may translate books of science exactly. ... The beauties of poetry cannot be preserved in any language except that in which it was originally written.
Quoted in James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. (1826), Vol. 3, 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Language (293)  |  Original (58)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Translate (19)  |  Translation (21)

You tell your doctor, that y’are ill
and what does he, but write a bill?
Of which you need not read one letter;
The worse the scrawl, the dose the better,
For if you knew but what you take,
Though you recover, he must break.
In Alma Canto III. Collected in Poems on Several Occasions (1709), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Bill (14)  |  Break (99)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dose (16)  |  Letter (109)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Scrawl (3)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Worse (24)  |  Write (230)

Young writers find out what kinds of writers they are by experiment. If they choose from the outset to practice exclusively a form of writing because it is praised in the classroom or otherwise carries appealing prestige, they are vastly increasing the risk inherent in taking up writing in the first place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Carry (127)  |  Choose (112)  |  Classroom (10)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Kind (557)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outset (7)  |  Place (177)  |  Practice (204)  |  Praise (26)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Risk (61)  |  Vastly (8)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)  |  Young (227)

[About mathematicians’ writings] Extreme external elegance, sometimes a somewhat weak skeleton of conclusions characterizes the French; the English, above all Maxwell, are distinguished by the greatest dramatic bulk.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zy Graz (1888), 29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 187. From the original German, “Höchste äussere Eleganz, mitunter etwas schwaches Knochengerüste der Schlüsse charakterisirt die Franzosen, die grösste dramatische Wucht die Engländer, vor Allen Maxwell.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Elegance (37)  |  English (35)  |  External (57)  |  Extreme (75)  |  French (20)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Weak (71)

[There is] one distinctly human thing - the story. There can be as good science about a turnip as about a man. ... [Or philosophy, or theology] ...There can be, without any question at all, as good higher mathematics about a turnip as about a man. But I do not think, though I speak in a manner somewhat tentative, that there could be as good a novel written about a turnip as a man.
In 'A Much Repeated Repetition', Daily News (26 Mar 1904). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Novel (32)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speak (232)  |  Story (118)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Turnip (3)

[Using a hand calculator and writing things down longhand] I was able to solve this problem because I don’t have a computer. I know what I am doing every step, and the steps go slowly enough that I can think.
As quoted in Charles Petit, 'The Curious Quester', The San Francisco Chronicle. Reprinted in The Courier-Journal (3 Mar 1991), Magazine, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculator (9)  |  Computer (127)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Know (1518)  |  Problem (676)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solve (130)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Write (230)

[Writing this letter] has permitted me, for a moment, to abstract myself from the dry and dreary waste of politics, into which I have been impressed by the times on which I happened, and to indulge in the rich fields of nature, where alone I should have served as a volunteer, if left to my natural inclinations and partialties.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Alone (311)  |  Dry (57)  |  Field (364)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Letter (109)  |  Moment (253)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Politics (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volunteer (7)  |  Waste (101)

~~[Orphan]~~ When writing about transcendental issues, be transcendentally clear.
Quoted, without citation, in George F. Simmons, Calculus Gems (1992, 2007), 89. It is a bad sign that other quotes on the same page do have sources footnoted, but not for this subject quote. So, Webmaster regards the quote as an orphan (better attributed to anonymous) having so far being unable to locate a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Transcendental (10)  |  Write (230)

… on these expanded membranes [butterfly wings] Nature writes, as on a tablet, the story of the modifications of species, so truly do all changes of the organisation register themselves thereon. Moreover, the same colour-patterns of the wings generally show, with great regularity, the degrees of blood-relationship of the species. As the laws of nature must be the same for all beings, the conclusions furnished by this group of insects must be applicable to the whole world.
From The Naturalist on the River Amazons: A record of Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator, During Eleven Years of Travel (1864), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (242)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Degree (276)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Furnishing (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  Insect (77)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Modification (55)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organization (114)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Register (21)  |  Registration (2)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  Story (118)  |  Tablet (6)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truly (116)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth…” Whatever our speculations may be in regard to a “beginning,” and when it was, it is written in the rocks that, like the animals and plants upon its surface, the earth itself grew.
In Nature's Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science (1899), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Genesis (23)  |  God (757)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Plant (294)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rock (161)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Surface (209)  |  Whatever (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.