Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: First

First Quotes (174 quotes)

... we must first base such words as “between” upon clear concepts, a thing which is quite feasible but which I have not seen done.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (43)  |  Clear (52)  |  Concept (102)  |  Feasible (2)  |  See (197)  |  Word (221)

1122 … Thereafter there were many sailors on the sea and on inland water who said that they had seen a great and extensive fire near the ground in the northeast which continuously increased in width as it mounted to the sky. And the heavens opened into four parts and fought against it as if determined to put it out, and the fire stopped rising upwards. They saw that fire at the first streak of dawn, and it lasted until full daylight: this happened on 7 December.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 250. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  Continuously (7)  |  Dawn (10)  |  Daylight (7)  |  Determined (8)  |  Extensive (10)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fire (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heavens (16)  |  Increase (107)  |  Meteorology (29)  |  Open (38)  |  Part (146)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sailor (9)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sky (68)  |  Stop (56)  |  Upwards (4)

Imprimisque hominis est propria veri inquisitio atque investigatio.
The first duty of man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth.
De Officiis I., 4, 18. In Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (classical) (3rd Ed., 1906), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Duty (51)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Man (345)  |  Seek (57)  |  Truth (750)

Le premier regard de l’homme jeté sur l’univers n’y découvre que variété, diversité, multiplicité des phénomènes. Que ce regard soit illuminé par la science,—par la science qui rapproche l’homme de Dieu,—et la simplicité et l’unité brillent de toutes parts.
Man’s first glance at the universe discovers only variety, diversity, multiplicity of phenomena. Let that glance be illuminated by science—by the science which brings man closer to God,—and simplicity and unity shine on all sides.
Original French quoted in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1901), 209. Translation by Google translate, tweaked by Webmaster. The English version of the book, omits this passage, except for “Science, which brings man nearer to God.” In The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 1, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Closer (6)  |  Discover (115)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Glance (8)  |  God (454)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Multiplicity (6)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Shine (22)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Unity (43)  |  Universe (563)  |  Variety (53)

A man who is convinced of the truth of his religion is indeed never tolerant. At the least, he is to feel pity for the adherent of another religion but usually it does not stop there. The faithful adherent of a religion will try first of all to convince those that believe in another religion and usually he goes on to hatred if he is not successful. However, hatred then leads to persecution when the might of the majority is behind it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  Behind (25)  |  Belief (400)  |  Convince (17)  |  Convinced (16)  |  Faithful (5)  |  Feel (93)  |  Hatred (16)  |  Lead (101)  |  Least (43)  |  Majority (32)  |  Persecution (9)  |  Pity (7)  |  Religion (210)  |  Stop (56)  |  Successful (20)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Truth (750)  |  Try (103)  |  Usually (20)

A man’s first duty, a young man’s at any rate, is to be ambitious … the noblest ambition is that of leaving behind one something of permanent value.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (25)  |  Duty (51)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Man (345)  |  Noble (41)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Value (180)  |  Young (72)

A mathematical theory is not to be considered complete until you have made it so clear that you can explain it to the first man whom you meet on the street.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (52)  |  Complete (43)  |  Consider (45)  |  Explain (61)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Meet (16)  |  Street (17)  |  Theory (582)

A practical botanist will distinguish, at the first glance, the plant of different quarters of the globe, and yet will be at a loss to tell by what mark he detects them. There is, I know not what look—sinister, dry, obscure, in African plants; superb and elevated in the Asiatic; smooth and cheerful in the American; stunted and indurated in the Alpine.
Quoted in William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences (1847), Vol. 3, 355-356, citing ‘Philosophia Botanica’ (1751), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Botanist (16)  |  Detection (12)  |  Difference (208)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Glance (8)  |  Globe (39)  |  Loss (62)  |  Mark (28)  |  Plant (173)  |  Practical (93)  |  Quarter (2)  |  Recognition (62)

A wonderful exhilaration comes from holding in the mind the deepest questions we can ask. Such questions animate all scientists. Many students of science were first attracted to the field as children by popular accounts of important unsolved problems. They have been waiting ever since to begin working on a mystery. [With co-author Arthur Zajonc]
In George Greenstein and Arthur Zajonc, The Quantum Challenge: Modern Research on the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (2006), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Animate (6)  |  Ask (99)  |  Attract (15)  |  Begin (52)  |  Child (189)  |  Exhilaration (5)  |  Field (119)  |  Important (124)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Popular (21)  |  Problem (362)  |  Question (315)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Student (131)  |  Unsolved (7)  |  Wait (38)  |  Wonderful (37)  |  Work (457)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Art (205)  |  Effort (94)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Humankind (7)  |  Link (29)  |  Magic (67)  |  Matter (270)  |  Modern (104)  |  Science (1699)  |  Secret (98)  |  Systematic (25)  |  Unlock (4)

All of today’s DNA, strung through all the cells of the earth, is simply an extension and elaboration of [the] first molecule.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (125)  |  DNA (67)  |  Earth (487)  |  Elaboration (6)  |  Extension (20)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  String (17)  |  Today (86)

Almost all really new ideas have a certain aspect of foolishness when they are first produced.
In Science and the Modern World (1926, 2011), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (37)  |  Foolishness (8)  |  Idea (440)  |  New (340)

An important fact, an ingenious aperçu, occupies a very great number of men, at first only to make acquaintance with it; then to understand it; and afterwards to work it out and carry it further.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Extend (20)  |  Fact (609)  |  Great (300)  |  Important (124)  |  Ingenious (18)  |  Number (179)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Understand (189)  |  Work (457)

As a second year high school chemistry student, I still have a vivid memory of my excitement when I first saw a chart of the periodic table of elements. The order in the universe seemed miraculous, and I wanted to study and learn as much as possible about the natural sciences.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 555.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Chart (5)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Element (129)  |  Excitement (33)  |  High School (6)  |  Learn (160)  |  Memory (81)  |  Miraculous (7)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Order (167)  |  Periodic (2)  |  Student (131)  |  Study (331)  |  Table (25)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vivid (16)

As immoral and unethical as this may be [to clone a human], there is a real chance that could have had some success. This is a pure numbers game. If they have devoted enough resources and they had access to enough eggs, there is a distinct possibility. But, again, without any scientific data, one has to be extremely skeptical.
Commenting on the announcement of the purported birth of the first cloned human.
Transcript of TV interview by Sanjay Gupta aired on CNN (27 Dec 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Access (12)  |  Announcement (8)  |  Birth (81)  |  Chance (122)  |  Clon (3)  |  Clone (7)  |  Comment (8)  |  Data (100)  |  Devote (23)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Egg (41)  |  Extremely (10)  |  Game (45)  |  Human (445)  |  Immoral (3)  |  Number (179)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Pure (62)  |  Purport (2)  |  Real (95)  |  Resource (47)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Skeptical (6)  |  Skepticism (18)  |  Success (202)

As to how far in advance of the first flight the man should know he’s going. I’m not in agreement with the argument that says word should be delayed until the last possible moment to save the pilot from developing a bad case of the jitters. If we don’t have the confidence to keep from getting clutched at that time, we have no business going at all. If I’m the guy going, I’ll be glad to get the dope as soon as possible. As for keeping this a big secret from us and having us all suited up and then saying to one man “you go” and stuffing him in and putting the lid on that thing and away he goes, well, we’re all big boys now.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38. In fact, he was the first to fly in Earth orbit on 20 Feb 1962, though Alan Shepard was picked for the earlier first suborbital flight.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Agreement (29)  |  Argument (59)  |  Bad (78)  |  Big (33)  |  Boy (33)  |  Case (64)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Delay (8)  |  Develop (55)  |  Dope (2)  |  Flight (45)  |  Glad (4)  |  Go (6)  |  Going (6)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Last (19)  |  Moment (61)  |  Pilot (10)  |  Save (46)  |  Say (126)  |  Secret (98)  |  Soon (17)  |  Stuff (15)  |  Suit (7)  |  Word (221)

At first the squirrel spins his cage; then the cage spins him. Men of business may take warning.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (71)  |  Cage (5)  |  Spin (8)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Warning (10)

At first, the people talking about ecology were only defending the fishes, the animals, the forest, and the river. They didn’t realize that human beings were in the forest—and that these humans were the real ecologists, because they couldn’t live without the forest and the forest couldn’t be saved without them.
Quoted in Andrew Revkin, The Burning Season
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Defend (20)  |  Ecologist (6)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Fish (85)  |  Forest (88)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Live (186)  |  People (269)  |  Real (95)  |  Realize (43)  |  River (68)  |  Save (46)  |  Talk (61)

At first, the sea, the earth, and the heaven, which covers all things, were the only face of nature throughout the whole universe, which men have named Chaos; a rude and undigested mass, and nothing more than an inert weight, and the discordant atoms of things not harmonizing, heaped together in the same spot.
Describing the creation of the universe from chaos, at the beginning of Book I of Metamorphoses, lines 5-9. As translated by Henry T. Riley, The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol I: Books I-VII (1858), 1-2. Riley footnoted: “A rude and undigested mass.—Ver. 7. This is very similar to the words of the Scriptures, ‘And the earth was without form and void,’ Genesis, ch. i. ver. 2.”
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Creation (211)  |  Discord (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Face (69)  |  Harmonize (4)  |  Heap (12)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Inert (9)  |  Mass (61)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Rude (5)  |  Sea (143)  |  Throughout (2)  |  Together (48)  |  Undigested (2)  |  Universe (563)  |  Weight (61)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Audience (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Basket (5)  |  Basketball (2)  |  Battle (30)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (3)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cheer (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conference (8)  |  Country (121)  |  Court (16)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Curious (24)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Emotionally (2)  |  Event (97)  |  Exception (33)  |  Foot (39)  |  Game (45)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardly (12)  |  High (78)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (170)  |  Involve (27)  |  Jump (13)  |  Leave (63)  |  Local (15)  |  Long (95)  |  March (15)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Military (24)  |  Move (58)  |  Murmur (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Net (10)  |  Night (73)  |  Occur (26)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (60)  |  Player (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (3)  |  Promise (27)  |  Providence (6)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Rest (64)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Right (144)  |  Routine (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (20)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whirl (2)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (214)

But weightier still are the contentment which comes from work well done, the sense of the value of science for its own sake, insatiable curiosity, and, above all, the pleasure of masterly performance and of the chase. These are the effective forces which move the scientist. The first condition for the progress of science is to bring them into play.
from his preface to Claude Bernard's 'Experimental Medicine'
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (53)  |  Chase (11)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contentment (10)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Effective (20)  |  Force (194)  |  Insatiable (4)  |  Masterly (2)  |  Move (58)  |  Performance (27)  |  Play (60)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Progress Of Science (20)  |  Sake (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sense (240)  |  Value (180)  |  Work (457)

By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the most bitter.
Confucius
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 109
Science quotes on:  |  Bitter (12)  |  Easy (56)  |  Experience (268)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Learn (160)  |  Method (154)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Second (33)  |  Third (11)  |  Wisdom (151)

Catastrophe Theory is—quite likely—the first coherent attempt (since Aristotelian logic) to give a theory on analogy. When narrow-minded scientists object to Catastrophe Theory that it gives no more than analogies, or metaphors, they do not realise that they are stating the proper aim of Catastrophe Theory, which is to classify all possible types of analogous situations.
From 'La Théorie des catastrophes État présent et perspective', as quoted in Erick Christopher Zeeman, (ed.), Catastrophe Theory: Selected Papers, 1972-1977 (1977), 637, as cited in Martin Krampe (ed.), Classics of Semiotics (1987), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (46)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Catastrophe Theory (2)  |  Classify (4)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Likely (23)  |  Logic (187)  |  Metaphor (19)  |  Narrow-Minded (5)  |  Object (110)  |  Possible (100)  |  Realise (12)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Situation (41)  |  Type (34)

Early in my school days a boy had a copy of the “Wonders of the World,” which I often read, and disputed with other boys about the veracity of some of the statements; and I believe that this book first gave me a wish to travel in remote countries, which was ultimately fulfilled by the voyage of the Beagle.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Beagle (11)  |  Belief (400)  |  Book (181)  |  Country (121)  |  Dispute (15)  |  Read (83)  |  Remote (27)  |  School (87)  |  Statement (56)  |  Travel (40)  |  Veracity (2)  |  Voyage (4)  |  Wish (62)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)

Electricity is but yet a new agent for the arts and manufactures, and, doubtless, generations unborn will regard with interest this century, in which it has been first applied to the wants of mankind.
In Preface to the Third Edition ofElements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (1851), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Application (117)  |  Arts (3)  |  Century (94)  |  Doubtless (5)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Generation (111)  |  Interest (170)  |  Mankind (196)  |  New (340)  |  Regard (58)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Want (120)

Entropy theory is indeed a first attempt to deal with global form; but it has not been dealing with structure. All it says is that a large sum of elements may have properties not found in a smaller sample of them.
In Entropy and Art: An Essay on Disorder and Order (1974), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Deal (25)  |  Element (129)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Form (210)  |  Global (14)  |  Large (82)  |  Property (96)  |  Sample (8)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Structure (191)  |  Sum (30)  |  Theory (582)

Every creature alive on the earth today represents an unbroken line of life that stretches back to the first primitive organism to appear on this planet; and that is about three billion years.
In talk, 'Origin of Death' (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Back (55)  |  Billion (52)  |  Creature (127)  |  Earth (487)  |  Life (917)  |  Line (44)  |  Organism (126)  |  Planet (199)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Representing (2)  |  Unbroken (9)  |  Year (214)

Every individual alive today, even the very highest, is to be derived in an unbroken line from the first and lowest forms.
In Heredity (1892), Vol. 1, 161. As cited in James C. Fernald Scientific Side-lights: Illustrating Thousands of Topics by Selections from Standard Works of the Masters of Science Throughout the World (1903), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Derive (18)  |  Form (210)  |  Highest (16)  |  Individual (177)  |  Line (44)  |  Lowest (7)  |  Unbroken (9)

Failure is so much more interesting because you learn from it. That’s what we should be teaching children at school, that being successful the first time, there’s nothing in it. There’s no interest, you learn nothing actually.
Interview with Carole Cadwalladr, The Observer (9 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Failure (118)  |  Interest (170)  |  Learning (174)  |  Nothing (267)  |  School (87)  |  Success (202)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Time (439)

Martin Luther King quote: Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.
Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.
Epigraph (without citation) in Pia Hansen, Mathematics Coaching Handbook: Working with Teachers to Improve Instruction (2009), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Faith (131)  |  See (197)  |  Step (67)  |  Whole (122)

First they told us the world was flat. Then they told us it was round. Now they are telling us it isn’t even there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Flat (13)  |  Round (15)  |  Tell (67)  |  World (667)

First you guess. Don’t laugh, this is the most important step. Then you compute the consequences. Compare the consequences to experience. If it disagrees with experience, the guess is wrong. In that simple statement is the key to science. It doesn’t matter how beautiful your guess is or how smart you are or what your name is. If it disagrees with experience, it’s wrong. That’s all there is to it.
Quoted in Florentin Smarandache, V. Christianto, Multi-Valued Logic, Neutrosophy, and Schrodinger Equation? (2006), 73, but without any primary source. If you know it, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Compare (15)  |  Compute (10)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Disagree (6)  |  Experience (268)  |  Guess (36)  |  Important (124)  |  Key (38)  |  Laugh (18)  |  Matter (270)  |  Name (118)  |  Science (1699)  |  Simple (111)  |  Smart (13)  |  Statement (56)  |  Step (67)  |  Wrong (116)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (2)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Character (82)  |  Chief (25)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desk (10)  |  Drive (38)  |  Force (194)  |  Fund (12)  |  Institution (32)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observe (48)  |  Professional (27)  |  Project (22)  |  Raise (20)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Second (33)  |  Sky (68)  |  Spend (24)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Time (439)

For me, the first challenge for computing science is to discover how to maintain order in a finite, but very large, discrete universe that is intricately intertwined. And a second, but not less important challenge is how to mould what you have achieved in solving the first problem, into a teachable discipline: it does not suffice to hone your own intellect (that will join you in your grave), you must teach others how to hone theirs. The more you concentrate on these two challenges, the clearer you will see that they are only two sides of the same coin: teaching yourself is discovering what is teachable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Clear (52)  |  Coin (9)  |  Compute (10)  |  Concentrate (11)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Discover (115)  |  Discrete (6)  |  Finite (22)  |  Grave (20)  |  Important (124)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Intertwine (3)  |  Join (15)  |  Large (82)  |  Less (54)  |  Maintain (22)  |  Mold (26)  |  Order (167)  |  Problem (362)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Second (33)  |  See (197)  |  Side (36)  |  Solve (41)  |  Suffice (3)  |  Teach (102)  |  Theirs (3)  |  Universe (563)

Freedom, the first-born of science.
To Monsieur d'Ivernois. In Thomas Jefferson, Richard Holland Johnston, Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association of the United States, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Vol. 19, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (81)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Science (1699)

Genius always gives its best at first, prudence at last.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Genius (186)  |  Last (19)

George Sears, called Nessmuk, whose “Woodcraft,” published in 1884, was the first American book on forest camping, and is written with so much wisdom, wit, and insight that it makes Henry David Thoreau seem alien, humorless, and French.
Coming into the Country
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (25)  |  American (34)  |  Book (181)  |  Call (68)  |  Camp (2)  |  Forest (88)  |  French (12)  |  George (3)  |  Insight (57)  |  Publish (18)  |  Seem (89)  |  Henry Thoreau (73)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Wit (27)  |  Write (87)

Giordano Bruno was the martyr; though the cause for which he suffered was not that of science, but that of free imaginative speculation. His death in the year 1600 ushered in the first century of modern science in the strict sense of the term.
In 'The Origins of Modern Science', Science and the Modern World (1926, 2011), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Giordano Bruno (8)  |  Cause (231)  |  Century (94)  |  Death (270)  |  Free (59)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Modern Science (10)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Suffer (25)

He who thus considers things in their first growth and origin ... will obtain the clearest view of them.
Aristotle
Politics, Benjamin Jowett trans., Franklin Center, PA, Franklin Library (1977), 4. In Leonard C. Bruno and Donna Olendorf, Science & Technology Firsts (1977), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (52)  |  Consider (45)  |  Growth (111)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Origin (77)  |  View (115)

His spiritual insights were in three major areas: First, he has inspired mankind to see the world anew as the ultimate reality. Second, he perceived and described the physical universe itself as immanently divine. And finally, he challenged us to accept the ultimate demands of modern science which assign humanity no real or ultimate importance in the universe while also aspiring us to lives of spiritual celebration attuned to the awe, beauty and wonder about us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Anew (5)  |  Area (18)  |  Aspire (4)  |  Assign (5)  |  Awe (24)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Celebration (6)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Demand (52)  |  Describe (38)  |  Divine (42)  |  Finally (10)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Importance (183)  |  Insight (57)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Live (186)  |  Major (24)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Modern Science (10)  |  Perceive (18)  |  Physical (94)  |  Real (95)  |  Reality (140)  |  Second (33)  |  See (197)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Base (43)  |  Bind (18)  |  Brief (14)  |  Daily Life (5)  |  Dead (45)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dependent (14)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Exert (9)  |  Exist (89)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Inner (27)  |  Know (321)  |  Labor (53)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Lot (23)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mortal (19)  |  Myself (22)  |  Order (167)  |  Outer (7)  |  People (269)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Receive (39)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Remind (5)  |  Same (92)  |  Sense (240)  |  Smile (13)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Strange (61)  |  Sympathy (15)  |  Think (205)  |  Tie (21)  |  Time (439)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Well-Being (4)  |  Wholly (7)

I am not insensible to natural beauty, but my emotional joys center on the improbable yet sometimes wondrous works of that tiny and accidental evolutionary twig called Homo sapiens. And I find, among these works, nothing more noble than the history of our struggle to understand nature—a majestic entity of such vast spatial and temporal scope that she cannot care much for a little mammalian afterthought with a curious evolutionary invention, even if that invention has, for the first time in so me four billion years of life on earth, produced recursion as a creature reflects back upon its own production and evolution. Thus, I love nature primarily for the puzzles and intellectual delights that she offers to the first organ capable of such curious contemplation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (3)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Back (55)  |  Billion (52)  |  Call (68)  |  Capable (26)  |  Care (73)  |  Center (30)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Creature (127)  |  Curious (24)  |  Delight (51)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Entity (23)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Find (248)  |  First Time (3)  |  History (302)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Improbable (9)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Invention (283)  |  Joy (61)  |  Life On Earth (5)  |  Little (126)  |  Love (164)  |  Majestic (7)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Natural Beauty (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Noble (41)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Offer (16)  |  Organ (60)  |  Primarily (9)  |  Produce (63)  |  Production (105)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Scope (13)  |  Sometimes (27)  |  Spatial (4)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Temporal (4)  |  Tiny (25)  |  Twig (7)  |  Understand (189)  |  Vast (56)  |  Wondrous (7)  |  Work (457)  |  Year (214)

I ask any one who has adopted the calling of an engineer, how much time he lost when he left school, because he had to devote himself to pursuits which were absolutely novel and strange, and of which he had not obtained the remotest conception from his instructors? He had to familiarize himself with ideas of the course and powers of Nature, to which his attention had never been directed during his school-life, and to learn, for the first time, that a world of facts lies outside and beyond the world of words.
From After-Dinner Speech (Apr 1869) delivered before the Liverpool Philomathic Society, 'Scientific Education', collected in Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 63. Previously published in Macmillan’s Magazine.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (76)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Conception (63)  |  Course (57)  |  Directed (2)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Fact (609)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Idea (440)  |  Instructor (4)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lose (53)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Novel (16)  |  Outside (37)  |  Power (273)  |  School (87)  |  Strange (61)  |  Time (439)  |  Word (221)  |  World (667)

I can assure you, reader, that in a very few hours, even during the first day, you will learn more natural philosophy about things contained in this book, than you could learn in fifty years by reading the theories and opinions of the ancient philosophers. Enemies of science will scoff at the astrologers: saying, where is the ladder on which they have climbed to heaven, to know the foundation of the stars? But in this respect I am exempt from such scoffing; for in proving my written reason, I satisfy sight, hearing, and touch: for this reason, defamers will have no power over me: as you will see when you come to see me in my little Academy.
The Admirable Discourses (1580), trans. Aurele La Rocque (1957), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (11)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Astrologer (6)  |  Book (181)  |  Climb (14)  |  Contain (37)  |  Day (38)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Exemption (2)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Hour (42)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Ladder (7)  |  Learning (174)  |  Natural Philosophy (21)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Power (273)  |  Proof (192)  |  Reader (22)  |  Reading (51)  |  Reason (330)  |  Respect (57)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sight (25)  |  Star (251)  |  Theory (582)  |  Touch (48)  |  Writing (72)  |  Year (214)

I could burn my fingers that I wrote that first letter to Roosevelt.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Burn (29)  |  Finger (38)  |  Letter (36)  |  Write (87)

I had no idea of the worldwide influence of it [the world’s first kidney transplant]. It expanded to other organs, multiple organs.
As quoted by Alvin Powell in 'A Transplant Makes History', Harvard Gazette (22 Sep 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Expand (14)  |  Idea (440)  |  Influence (110)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Organ (60)  |  Transplant (8)  |  World (667)

I have never seen a food writer mention this, but all shrimp imported into the United States must first be washed in chlorine bleach to kill bugs. What this does for the taste, I do not know, but I think we should be told.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (2008), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Bleach (2)  |  Bug (10)  |  Chlorine (11)  |  Food (139)  |  Kill (37)  |  Know (321)  |  Mention (12)  |  Shrimp (5)  |  State (96)  |  Taste (35)  |  Think (205)  |  Told (4)  |  United (8)  |  Washed (2)  |  Writer (35)

I know with sure and certain knowledge that a man’s work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened.
In Lyrical and Critical Essays (1967), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Great (300)  |  Heart (110)  |  Image (38)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Opened (2)  |  Presence (26)  |  Simple (111)  |  Slow (36)  |  Work (457)

I like to handle babies. You can learn a lot from the way they respond, the way they slide down your hips, the way they trust you. The first thing a child must learn is to trust.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (18)  |  Child (189)  |  Handle (6)  |  Hip (2)  |  Learn (160)  |  Respond (4)  |  Slide (5)  |  Trust (40)

I think she [Rosalind Franklin] was a good experimentalist but certainly not of the first rank. She was simply not in the same class as Eigen or Bragg or Pauling, nor was she as good as Dorothy Hodgkin. She did not even select DNA to study. It was given to her. Her theoretical crystallography was very average.
Letter to Charlotte Friend (18 Sep 1979). In Francis Harry Compton Crick Papers, Wellcome Library for the History and Understanding of Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (31)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (12)  |  Class (64)  |  Crystallography (4)  |  DNA (67)  |  Manfred Eigen (7)  |  Experimentalist (11)  |  Rosalind Franklin (17)  |  Good (228)  |  Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (7)  |  Linus Pauling (54)  |  Rank (19)  |  Select (5)  |  Study (331)  |  Theoretical (10)

If a man devotes himself to the promotion of science, he is firstly opposed, and then he is informed that his ground is already occupied. At first men will allow no value to what we tell them, and then they behave as if they knew it all themselves.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (24)  |  Behave (13)  |  Devote (23)  |  Ground (63)  |  Inform (8)  |  Know (321)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Oppose (16)  |  Promotion (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Tell (67)  |  Value (180)

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again.
Anonymous
Old saying.
Science quotes on:  |  Again (3)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Research (517)  |  Success (202)  |  Try (103)

If at first, the idea is not absurd, there is no hope for it.
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Hope (129)  |  Idea (440)

If I were to awaken after having slept for a thousand years, my first question would be: Has the Riemann hypothesis been proven?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Awaken (8)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Prove (60)  |  Question (315)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Year (214)

If there is anything that we wish to change in a child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could be better changed in ourselves.
Carl Jung
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Change (291)  |  Child (189)  |  Examine (24)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  See (197)  |  Wish (62)

If we wish to make a new world we have the material ready. The first one, too, was made out of chaos.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (63)  |  Material (124)  |  New World (2)  |  Ready (16)  |  Wish (62)

If you wish to make an apple pie truly from scratch, you must first invent the universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apple Pie (2)  |  Invent (30)  |  Scratch (6)  |  Truly (19)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wish (62)

In all science, error precedes the truth, and it is better it should go first than last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Error (230)  |  Precede (11)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truth (750)

In an objective system … any mingling of knowledge with values is unlawful, forbidden. But [the] … “first commandment” which ensures the foundation of objective knowledge, is not itself objective. It cannot be objective: it is an ethical guideline, a rule for conduct. True knowledge is ignorant of values, but it cannot be grounded elsewhere than upon a value judgment…
In Chance and Necessity (1970), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Commandment (6)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Elsewhere (7)  |  Ensure (8)  |  Ethics (30)  |  Forbidden (8)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Ground (63)  |  Guideline (3)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mingle (6)  |  Objective (49)  |  Rule (135)  |  System (141)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unlawful (2)  |  Value (180)

In the discovery of lemmas the best aid is a mental aptitude for it. For we may see many who are quick at solutions and yet do not work by method ; thus Cratistus in our time was able to obtain the required result from first principles, and those the fewest possible, but it was his natural gift which helped him to the discovery.
Proclus
As given in Euclid, The Thirteen Books of Euclid's Elements, translated from the text of Johan Ludvig Heiberg by Sir Thomas Little Heath, Vol. 1, Introduction and Books 1,2 (1908), 133. The passage also states that Proclus gives the definition of the term lemma as a proposition not proved beforehand. Glenn Raymond Morrow in A Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements (1992), 165, states nothing more seems to be known of Cratistus.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Aid (23)  |  Aptitude (10)  |  Best (129)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Fewest (3)  |  Gift (47)  |  Method (154)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural (128)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Principle (228)  |  Quick (7)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Result (250)  |  Solution (168)  |  Work (457)

In the matter of physics, the first lessons should contain nothing but what is experimental and interesting to see. A pretty experiment is in itself often more valuable than twenty formulae extracted from our minds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Contain (37)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Experimental (12)  |  Extract (13)  |  Formula (51)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Often (69)  |  Physics (301)  |  Pretty (10)  |  See (197)  |  Value (180)

In the tropical and subtropical regions, endemic malaria takes first place almost everywhere among the causes of morbidity and mortality and it constitutes the principal obstacle to the acclimatization of Europeans in these regions.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1907), 'Protozoa as Causes of Diseases', collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967, 1999), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Europe (32)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Mortality (13)  |  Obstacle (21)  |  Place (111)  |  Principal (15)  |  Region (26)  |  Tropical (4)

Included in this ‘almost nothing,’ as a kind of geological afterthought of the last few million years, is the first development of self-conscious intelligence on this planet–an odd and unpredictable invention of a little twig on the mammalian evolutionary bush. Any definition of this uniqueness, embedded as it is in our possession of language, must involve our ability to frame the world as stories and to transmit these tales to others. If our propensity to grasps nature as story has distorted our perceptions, I shall accept this limit of mentality upon knowledge, for we receive in trade both the joys of literature and the core of our being.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Accept (37)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Both (52)  |  Bush (8)  |  Core (11)  |  Definition (152)  |  Development (228)  |  Distort (6)  |  Embed (5)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Frame (17)  |  Geological (11)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Include (27)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Invention (283)  |  Involve (27)  |  Joy (61)  |  Kind (99)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Language (155)  |  Limit (86)  |  Literature (64)  |  Little (126)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Million (89)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Odd (12)  |  Perception (53)  |  Planet (199)  |  Possession (37)  |  Propensity (7)  |  Receive (39)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Story (58)  |  Tale (12)  |  Trade (24)  |  Transmit (7)  |  Twig (7)  |  Uniqueness (7)  |  Unpredictable (10)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

It is a common observation that a science first begins to be exact when it is quantitatively treated. What are called the exact sciences are no others than the mathematical ones.
On The Doctrine of Chances, with Later Reflections (1878), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Common (92)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Observation (418)  |  Science (1699)  |  Treatment (88)

It is a good thing for a physician to have prematurely grey hair and itching piles. The first makes him appear to know more than he does, and the second gives him an expression of concern which the patient interprets as being on his behalf.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Behalf (2)  |  Concern (76)  |  Expression (82)  |  Give (117)  |  Good (228)  |  Grey (6)  |  Hair (19)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Itch (5)  |  Know (321)  |  Patient (116)  |  Physician (232)  |  Pile (8)  |  Premature (17)  |  Second (33)

It is a remarkable illustration of the ranging power of the human intellect that a principle first detected in connection with the clumsy puffing of the early steam engines should be found to apply to the whole world, and possibly, even to the whole cosmic universe.
In Man and Energy (1955, 1963), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (38)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Connection (86)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Human Intellect (4)  |  Illustration (24)  |  Principle (228)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

It may not always be profitable at first for businesses to be online, but it is certainly going to be unprofitable not to be online.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Business (71)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Online (2)  |  Profitable (6)  |  Unprofitable (2)

It’s hard to explain to people what the significance of an invention is, so it’s hard to get funding. The first thing they say is that it can’t be done. Then they say, “You didn't do it right.” Then, when you’ve done it, they finally say, “Well, it was obvious anyway.”
http://www.thetech.org/nmot/detail.cfm?id=95&st=awardDate&qt=1997&kiosk=Off
Science quotes on:  |  Explain (61)  |  Finally (10)  |  Funding (12)  |  Hard (70)  |  Invention (283)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Person (114)  |  Right (144)  |  Say (126)  |  Significance (60)

James Watt patented his steam engine on the eve of the American Revolution, consummating a relationship between coal and the new Promethean spirit of the age, and humanity made its first tentative steps into an industrial way of life that would, over the next two centuries, forever change the world.
In The Hydrogen Economy: The Creation of the Worldwide Energy Web and the Redistribution of Power on Earth (2002), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Century (94)  |  Change (291)  |  Coal (41)  |  Consummation (4)  |  Eve (3)  |  Forever (42)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Industrial Revolution (8)  |  New (340)  |  Patent (23)  |  Prometheus (5)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  Step (67)  |  Tentative (7)  |  James Watt (11)  |  Way Of Life (5)  |  World (667)

Kidney transplants seem so routine now. But the first one was like Lindbergh’s flight across the ocean.
In interview with reporter Gina Kolata, '2 American Transplant Pioneers Win Nobel Prize in Medicine', New York Times (9 Oct 1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Flight (45)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Charles A. Lindbergh (22)  |  Routine (11)  |  Transatlantic (3)  |  Transplant (8)

Kids like their fossils. I’ve taken my godson fossil-hunting and there’s nothing more magical than finding a shiny shell and knowing you’re the first person to have seen it for 150 million years.
As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Find (248)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Kid (12)  |  Know (321)  |  Magic (67)  |  Million (89)  |  See (197)  |  Shell (35)  |  Shiny (2)  |  Year (214)

Knowledge always desires increase; it is like fire which must first be kindled by some external agent, but which will afterward propagate itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afterward (2)  |  Agent (27)  |  Desire (101)  |  External (45)  |  Fire (117)  |  Increase (107)  |  Kindle (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Propagate (4)

Let there be light! said God; and forthwith light
Ethereal, first of things, quintessence, pure.
From Paradise Lost (1821), Book 7, 209.
Science quotes on:  |  God (454)  |  Light (246)  |  Pure (62)  |  Quintessence (3)

Look around when you have got your first mushroom or made your first discovery: they grow in clusters.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Cluster (10)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Growth (111)  |  Mushroom (4)

Many times every day I think of taking off in that missile. I’ve tried a thousand times to visualize that moment, to anticipate how I’ll feel if I’m first, which I very much want to be. But whether I go first or go later. I approach it now with some awe, and I’m sure I’ll approach it with even more awe on my day. In spite of the fact that I will he very busy getting set and keeping tabs on all the instruments, there’s no question that I’ll need—and will have—all my confidence.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (8)  |  Approach (33)  |  Awe (24)  |  Busy (21)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Later (11)  |  Missile (5)  |  Moment (61)  |  Need (211)  |  Question (315)  |  Think (205)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Visualize (5)  |  Want (120)

Mathematical physics is in the first place physics and it could not exist without experimental investigations.
From inaugural lecture at Utrecht on the kinetic theory of matter and its modern development (1913), as quoted in Julio Antonio Gonzalo and Carmen Aragó López (eds.), Great Solid State Physicists of the 20th Century (2003), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (254)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mathematical Physics (3)  |  Place (111)

Mathematics is an experimental science, and definitions do not come first, but later on.
In 'On Operators in Physical Mathematics, part II', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (15 Jun 1893), 54, 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Later (11)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Science (1699)

Men are not going to embrace eugenics. They are going to embrace the first likely, trim-figured girl with limpid eyes and flashing teeth who comes along, in spite of the fact that her germ plasm is probably reeking with hypertension, cancer, haemophilia, colour blindness, hay fever, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Blindness (8)  |  Cancer (44)  |  Color (78)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Epilepsy (3)  |  Eugenics (4)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fact (609)  |  Flash (25)  |  Germ (27)  |  Girl (15)  |  Hay Fever (2)  |  Lateral (3)  |  Likely (23)  |  Plasm (2)  |  Probably (21)  |  Spite (10)  |  Tooth (23)

Men first appeared as fish. When they were able to help themselves they took to land.
These are certainly not exact words from Anaximander, though it summarizes Plutarch’s version of what Anaximander believed. Although the subject quote is widely seen, no original of Anaximander’s writings survived on this hypothesis. What we know of Anaximander is what other, later, ancient Greek writers handed down in a kind of ancient Greek telephone game. These include Hippolytus, Aetius and Plutarch. Their expressions of what Anaximander believed relate by a general theme, but notably differ in specifics. For the fragmentary evidence, see Felix M. Cleve, The Giants of Pre-Sophistic Greek Philosophy: An Attempt to Reconstruct Their Thoughts (2012), 145-148. An example of the subject quote is given by David M. Neuberger, without quotation marks: Anaximander said men were produced first in fishes and, that when they were able to help themselves, they were thrown up on the land. Opening sentence 'A Call to the Chemist to Purge Industry of its Contamination of Our Coast and Inland Waters', Chemical Age (Oct 1923), 31, No. 10, 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fish (85)  |  Land (83)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Survive (28)

More of cosmic history occurred in the first millisecond than has occurred in the ensuing 10 billion years.
As given in an epigraph, without citation, in David M. Harland (ed.), The Big Bang: A View from the 21st Century (2003), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (52)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  History (302)  |  Year (214)

My belief (is) that one should take a minimum of care and preparation over first experiments. If they are unsuccessful one is not then discouraged since many possible reasons for failure can be thought of, and improvements can be made. Much can often be learned by the repetition under different conditions, even if the desired result is not obtained. If every conceivable precaution is taken at first, one is often too discouraged to proceed at all.
Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), Vol. 3, 364.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Care (73)  |  Condition (119)  |  Desire (101)  |  Different (110)  |  Discourage (3)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Failure (118)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Learning (174)  |  Minimum (10)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Possible (100)  |  Precaution (4)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Reason (330)  |  Repetition (21)  |  Result (250)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Unsuccessful (2)

My position is a naturalistic one; I see philosophy not as an a priori propaedeutic or groundwork for science, but as continuous with science. I see philosophy and science as in the same boat—a boat which, to revert to Neurath’s figure as I so often do, we can rebuild only at sea while staying afloat in it. There is no external vantage point, no first philosophy.
Ontological Relativity and Other Essays, pp. 126-127, Columbia University Press (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Afloat (2)  |  Boat (13)  |  Continuous (24)  |  External (45)  |  Figure (32)  |  Groundwork (3)  |  Often (69)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Point (72)  |  Position (54)  |  Rebuild (3)  |  Revert (4)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sea (143)  |  See (197)  |  Stay (15)

Necessity first mothered invention. Now invention has little ones of her own, and they look just like grandma.
In 'The Old and the New,' The New Yorker (19 Jun 1937), collected in Writings from The New Yorker, 1925-1976 (1976, 2006), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Invention (283)  |  Little (126)  |  Mother (59)  |  Necessity (125)

New, distant Scenes of endless Science rise:
So pleas'd at first, the towring Alps we try,...
In An Essay on Criticism (1711), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Alps (4)  |  Distant (16)  |  Endless (20)  |  New (340)  |  Rise (51)  |  Scene (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Try (103)

No idea should be suppressed. … And it applies to ideas that look like nonsense. We must not forget that some of the best ideas seemed like nonsense at first. The truth will prevail in the end. Nonsense will fall of its own weight, by a sort of intellectual law of gravitation. If we bat it about, we shall only keep an error in the air a little longer. And a new truth will go into orbit.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 233.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Bat (8)  |  End (141)  |  Error (230)  |  Fall (89)  |  Idea (440)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Law Of Gravitation (15)  |  Longer (5)  |  New (340)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Prevail (13)  |  Seem (89)  |  Suppress (3)  |  Truth (750)  |  Weight (61)

No, this trick wont work ... How on earth are you ever going to explain in terms of chemistry and physics so important a biological phenomenon as first love?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (21)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Earth (487)  |  Explain (61)  |  Important (124)  |  Love (164)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physics (301)  |  Term (87)  |  Trick (19)  |  Work (457)

Nothing can be believed unless it is first understood; and that for any one to preach to others that which either he has not understood nor they have understood is absurd.
From Historia Calamitatum, Chap. 9. As translated in Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, 'The Word Amen' reprinted from The Independent in Friends' Intelligencer (1872), Vol. 28, 575.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Belief (400)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Preach (9)  |  Understand (189)

Nothing is in the intellect that was not first in the senses.
Nihil est in intellectu quod non sit prius in sensu.
Original Latin in Quaestiones Disputatae de Veritate, q. 2 a. 3 arg. 19. Also seen translated as “There is nothing in the mind that has not been previously in the senses.” In plain language, it means that the knowledge (or understanding) of outward objects “is conveyed to the mind through the senses,” as given in William Sullivan and George Barrell Emerson, The Political Class Book: Intended to Instruct the Higher Classes in Schools (1831), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Intellect (157)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Observation (418)  |  Research (517)  |  Sense (240)  |  Understanding (317)

Now, at Suiattle Pass, Brower was still talking about butterflies. He said he had raised them from time to time and had often watched them emerge from the chrysalis—first a crack in the case, then a feeler, and in an hour a butterfly. He said he had felt that he wanted to help, to speed them through the long and awkward procedure; and he had once tried. The butterflies came out with extended abdomens, and their wings were balled together like miniature clenched fists. Nothing happened. They sat there until they died. ‘I have never gotten over that,’ he said. ‘That kind of information is all over in the country, but it’s not in town.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (2)  |  Awkward (6)  |  Ball (20)  |  Brower (2)  |  Butterfly (19)  |  Case (64)  |  Clench (2)  |  Country (121)  |  Crack (11)  |  Die (46)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Extend (20)  |  Feel (93)  |  Feeler (2)  |  Fist (2)  |  Happen (63)  |  Help (68)  |  Hour (42)  |  Information (102)  |  Kind (99)  |  Long (95)  |  Miniature (5)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Often (69)  |  Pass (60)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Raise (20)  |  Say (126)  |  Sit (24)  |  Speed (27)  |  Talk (61)  |  Time (439)  |  Together (48)  |  Town (18)  |  Try (103)  |  Want (120)  |  Watch (39)  |  Wing (36)

Once we have judged a thing a work of art, we have judged it ethically of the first importance and put it beyond the reach of the moralist.
In Art (1913), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Importance (183)  |  Judge (43)  |  Moralist (2)  |  Reach (68)  |  Work (457)

One of the first and foremost duties of the teacher is not to give his students the impression that mathematical problems have little connection with each other, and no connection at all with anything else. We have a natural opportunity to investigate the connections of a problem when looking back at its solution.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (55)  |  Connection (86)  |  Duty (51)  |  Foremost (8)  |  Giving (11)  |  Impression (51)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Look (46)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Natural (128)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solution (168)  |  Student (131)  |  Teacher (90)

Our first endeavors are purely instinctive prompting of an imagination vivid and undisciplined. As we grow older reason asserts itself and we become more and more systematic and designing. But those early impulses, though not immediately productive, are o
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (11)  |  Become (100)  |  Design (92)  |  Early (39)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Grow (66)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Old (104)  |  Productive (10)  |  Prompt (5)  |  Purely (15)  |  Reason (330)  |  Systematic (25)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Vivid (16)

Our laboratory work involved close contact with many non-clinical scientists. Sir Peter Medawar, 1960 Nobel Laureate, was a frequent visitor to our lab and to the hospital. He once commented, after visiting an early renal transplant patient, that it was the first time he had been in a hospital ward.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Comment (8)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Sir Peter B. Medawar (54)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Patient (116)  |  Renal (4)  |  Transplant (8)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Ward (4)

Philosophy is written in that great book that lies before our gaze—I mean the universe—but we cannot understand it if we do not first learn the language and grasp the symbols in which it is written.
In Francis Crick, The Astonishing Hypothesis: the Scientific Search for the Soul (1995), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Gaze (12)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Great (300)  |  Language (155)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lie (80)  |  Mean (63)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Symbol (35)  |  Understand (189)  |  Universe (563)  |  Write (87)

Philosophy [the universe] is written in that great book which ever lies before our eyes ... We cannot understand it if we do not first learn the language and grasp the symbols in which it is written. The book is written in the mathematical language ... without whose help it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word of it, and without which one wanders in vain through a dark labyrinth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Comprehend (19)  |  Dark (49)  |  Eye (159)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Great (300)  |  Help (68)  |  Humanly (4)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Language (155)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lie (80)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Single (72)  |  Symbol (35)  |  Understand (189)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vain (26)  |  Wander (16)  |  Word (221)  |  Write (87)

Physio-philosophy has to show how, and in accordance indeed with what laws, the Material took its origin; and, therefore, how something derived its existence from nothing. It has to portray the first periods of the world's development from nothing; how the elements and heavenly bodies originated; in what method by self-evolution into higher and manifold forms, they separated into minerals, became finally organic, and in Man attained self-consciousness.
In Lorenz Oken, trans. by Alfred Tulk, Elements of Physiophilosophy (1847), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (8)  |  Body (193)  |  Creation (211)  |  Definition (152)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Development (228)  |  Element (129)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Form (210)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Law (418)  |  Man (345)  |  Manifold (7)  |  Material (124)  |  Method (154)  |  Mineral (37)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Organic (48)  |  Origin (77)  |  Origination (7)  |  Period (49)  |  Separation (32)  |  Showing (6)  |  World (667)

Psychogenesis has led to man. Now it effaces itself, relieved or absorbed by another and a higher function—the engendering and subsequent development of the mind, in one word noogenesis. When for the first time in a living creature instinct perceived itself in its own mirror, the whole world took a pace forward.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 181. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Absorbed (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Development (228)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Forward (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Higher (28)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Living (44)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Pace (4)  |  Perceived (4)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  Time (439)  |  Whole (122)  |  Word (221)  |  World (667)

Restlessness and discontent are the first necessities of Progress.
In Dagobert David Runes (ed.), The Diary and Sundry Observations of Thomas Alva Edison (1948), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Discontent (3)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Progress (317)  |  Restlessness (4)

Science gives us the grounds of premises from which religious truths are to be inferred; but it does not set about inferring them, much less does it reach the inference;Mthat is not its province. It brings before us phenomena, and it leaves us, if we will, to call them works of design, wisdom, or benevolence; and further still, if we will, to proceed to confess an Intelligent Creator. We have to take its facts, and to give them a meaning, and to draw our own conclusions from them. First comes Knowledge, then a view, then reasoning, then belief. This is why Science has so little of a religious tendency; deductions have no power of persuasion. The heart is commonly reached, not through the reason, but through the imagination, by means of direct impressions, by the testimony of facts and events, by history, by description. Persons influence us, voices melt us, looks subdue us, deeds inflame us. Many a man will live and die upon a dogma; no man will be a martyr for a conclusion.
Tamworth Reading Room (1841).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Benevolence (5)  |  Bring (53)  |  Call (68)  |  Commonly (7)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Confess (9)  |  Creator (40)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deed (17)  |  Description (72)  |  Design (92)  |  Die (46)  |  Direct (44)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Draw (25)  |  Event (97)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Give (117)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  History (302)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impression (51)  |  Infer (10)  |  Inference (26)  |  Influence (110)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Leave (63)  |  Less (54)  |  Little (126)  |  Live (186)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Melt (15)  |  Person (114)  |  Persuasion (3)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Power (273)  |  Premise (14)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Province (11)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reason (330)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Subdue (5)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Truth (750)  |  View (115)  |  Voice (41)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Work (457)

Science is a capital or fund perpetually reinvested; it accumulates, rolls up, is carried forward by every new man. Every man of science has all the science before him to go upon, to set himself up in business with. What an enormous sum Darwin availed himself of and reinvested! Not so in literature; to every poet, to every artist, it is still the first day of creation, so far as the essentials of his task are concerned. Literature is not so much a fund to be reinvested as it is a crop to be ever new-grown.
Indoor Studies, vol. 12, Collected Works, Houghton (1913).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (18)  |  Artist (46)  |  Avail (3)  |  Business (71)  |  Capital (15)  |  Carry (35)  |  Concern (76)  |  Creation (211)  |  Crop (16)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Essential (87)  |  Far (77)  |  Forward (21)  |  Fund (12)  |  Literature (64)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  New (340)  |  Perpetually (2)  |  Poet (59)  |  Roll (7)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Sum (30)  |  Task (68)

Science knows no country because knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world. Science is the highest personification of the nation because that nation will remain the first which carries the furthest the works of thought and intelligence.
From banquet Toast (1876), at the International Congress of Sericulture, Milan, Italy, as translated in René Dubos, Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1960), 85. Banquet date identified in Maurice B. Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 519.
Science quotes on:  |  Country (121)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Illumination (12)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nation (111)  |  Personification (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Thought (374)  |  Torch (7)  |  Work (457)

Scientists are entitled to be proud of their accomplishments, and what accomplishments can they call ‘theirs’ except the things they have done or thought of first? People who criticize scientists for wanting to enjoy the satisfaction of intellectual ownership are confusing possessiveness with pride of possession. Meanness, secretiveness and, sharp practice are as much despised by scientists as by other decent people in the world of ordinary everyday affairs; nor, in my experience, is generosity less common among them, or less highly esteemed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Affair (24)  |  Call (68)  |  Common (92)  |  Confuse (13)  |  Criticize (4)  |  Decent (4)  |  Despise (7)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Entitle (2)  |  Esteem (8)  |  Everyday (13)  |  Experience (268)  |  Generosity (6)  |  Highly (8)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Less (54)  |  Meanness (5)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  People (269)  |  Possession (37)  |  Practice (67)  |  Pride (45)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sharp (12)  |  Theirs (3)  |  Thought (374)  |  Want (120)  |  World (667)

Some writers, rejecting the idea which science had reached, that reefs of rocks could be due in any way to “animalcules,” have talked of electrical forces, the first and last appeal of ignorance.
In Corals and Coral Islands (1879), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Animalcule (10)  |  Appeal (30)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Force (194)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Last (19)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reef (6)  |  Rejection (24)  |  Rock (107)  |  Science (1699)  |  Talk (61)  |  Writer (35)

The best way to study Mars is with two hands, eyes and ears of a geologist, first at a moon orbiting Mars … and then on the surface.
In his article, '40 Years After Apollo 11 Moon Landing, It's Time for a Mission to Mars', in Washington post (16 Jul 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Ear (21)  |  Eye (159)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Hand (103)  |  Mars (26)  |  Moon (132)  |  Study (331)  |  Surface (74)

The book of Nature is the book of Fate. She turns the gigantic pages,—leaf after leaf,—never re-turning one. One leaf she lays down, a floor of granite; then a thousand ages, and a bed of slate; a thousand ages, and a measure of coal; a thousand ages, and a layer of marl and mud: vegetable forms appear; her first misshapen animals, zoophyte, trilobium, fish; then, saurians,—rude forms, in which she has only blocked her future statue, concealing under these unwieldy monsters the fine type of her coming king. The face of the planet cools and dries, the races meliorate, and man is born. But when a race has lived its term, it comes no more again.
From 'Fate', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume 6: The Conduct of Life (1860), 15. This paragraph is the prose version of his poem, 'Song of Nature'.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Animal (309)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Bed (20)  |  Birth (81)  |  Block (8)  |  Book (181)  |  Book Of Fate (2)  |  Book Of Nature (6)  |  Coal (41)  |  Coming (10)  |  Concealing (2)  |  Cool (9)  |  Dry (12)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Face (69)  |  Fate (38)  |  Fine (24)  |  Fish (85)  |  Floor (16)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Gigantic (16)  |  Granite (6)  |  King (23)  |  Layer (14)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Life (917)  |  Measure (70)  |  Monster (21)  |  Mud (14)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Page (18)  |  Planet (199)  |  Race (76)  |  Returning (2)  |  Rude (5)  |  Saurian (2)  |  Statue (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Turn (72)  |  Type (34)  |  Unwieldy (2)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Zoophyte (4)

The cell was the first invention of the animal kingdom, and all higher animals are and must be cellular in structure. Our tissues were formed ages on ages ago; they have all persisted. Most of our organs are as old as worms. All these are very old, older than the mountains.
In The Whence and Whither of Man; a Brief History of his Origin and Development through Conformity to Environment; being the Morse Lectures of 1895. (1896), 173. The Morse lectureship was founded by Prof. Samuel F.B. Morse in 1865 at Union Theological Seminary, the lectures to deal with “the relation of the Bible to any of the sciences.”
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Animal Kingdom (9)  |  Cell (125)  |  Formed (4)  |  Invention (283)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Old (104)  |  Older (5)  |  Organ (60)  |  Persist (8)  |  Structure (191)  |  Tissue (24)  |  Worm (25)

The doctrine that logical reasoning produces no new truths, but only unfolds and brings into view those truths which were, in effect, contained in the first principles of the reasoning, is assented to by almost all who, in modern times, have attended to the science of logic.
In The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History (1840), Vol. 1, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Contained (2)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Logic (187)  |  New (340)  |  Principle (228)  |  Produce (63)  |  Reason (330)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unfold (7)  |  View (115)

The existence of a first cause of the universe is a necessity of thought ... Amid the mysteries which become more mysterious the more they are thought about, there will remain the one absolute certainty that we are over in the presence of an Infinite, Eternal Energy from which all things proceed.
As quoted in John Murdoch, India's Needs: Material, Political, Social, Moral, and Religious (1886), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Cause (231)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Energy (185)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Existence (254)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Presence (26)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Remain (77)  |  Thought (374)  |  Universe (563)

The first and last thing demanded of Genius is love of truth.
In George Henry Lewes, Life of J.W. von Goethe (1902), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Genius (186)  |  Last (19)  |  Love (164)  |  Truth (750)

The first experiment a child makes is a physical experiment: the suction-pump is but an imitation of the first act of every new-born infant.
Lecture 'On the Study of Physics', Royal Institution of Great Britain (Spring 1854). Collected in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Child (189)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Infant (13)  |  New-born (2)  |  Physics (301)  |  Pump (5)  |  Suction (2)

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.
From Commencement Address, Caltech (1974). On Caltech library website.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (12)  |  Easy (56)  |  Fool (70)  |  Honest (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Scientist (447)

The first quality we know in matter is centrality,—we call it gravity,—which holds the universe together, which remains pure and indestructible in each mote, as in masses and planets, and from each atom rays out illimitable influence. To this material essence answers Truth, in the intellectual world,—Truth, whose centre is everywhere, and its circumference nowhere, whose existence we cannot disimagine,—the soundness and health of things, against which no blow can be struck but it recoils on the striker,—Truth, on whose side we always heartily are. And the first measure of a mind is its centrality, its capacity of truth, and its adhesion to it.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 477.
Science quotes on:  |  Adhesion (4)  |  Answer (201)  |  Atom (251)  |  Blow (13)  |  Call (68)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Centrality (2)  |  Centre (19)  |  Circumference (12)  |  Essence (42)  |  Everywhere (14)  |  Existence (254)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Health (136)  |  Heartily (3)  |  Hold (56)  |  Illimitable (2)  |  Indestructible (7)  |  Influence (110)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Know (321)  |  Mass (61)  |  Material (124)  |  Matter (270)  |  Measure (70)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nowhere (19)  |  Planet (199)  |  Pure (62)  |  Quality (65)  |  Ray (32)  |  Recoil (5)  |  Remain (77)  |  Soundness (4)  |  Strike (21)  |  Together (48)  |  Truth (750)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

The first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Part (146)  |  Rule (135)  |  Save (46)  |  Tinker (5)

The first step in finding the solution to a problem often involves discovering a problem with the existing solution.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Existing (9)  |  Finding (30)  |  Involving (2)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solution (168)  |  Step (67)

The first step in knowledge is to learn that we are ignorant.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Step (67)

The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (44)  |  Jet (4)  |  See (197)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Time (439)

The Gombe Stream chimpanzees … in their ability to modify a twig or stick to make it suitable for a definite purpose, provide the first examples of free-ranging nonhuman primates actually making very crude tools.
In 'Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve', collected in Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes (1965), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Actually (14)  |  Animal Behavior (9)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Crude (14)  |  Example (57)  |  Gombe (2)  |  Modify (11)  |  Primate (8)  |  Provide (48)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Stick (19)  |  Stream (27)  |  Tool (70)  |  Twig (7)

The history of acceptance of new theories frequently shows the following steps: At first the new idea is treated as pure nonsense, not worth looking at. Then comes a time when a multitude of contradictory objections are raised, such as: the new theory is too fancy, or merely a new terminology; it is not fruitful, or simply wrong. Finally a state is reached when everyone seems to claim that he had always followed this theory. This usually marks the last state before general acceptance.
In 'Field Theory and the Phase Space', collected in Melvin Herman Marx, Psychological Theory: Contemporary Readings (1951), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Claim (52)  |  Contradictory (4)  |  Fancy (16)  |  Finally (10)  |  Following (16)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  General (92)  |  History (302)  |  Idea (440)  |  Merely (35)  |  Multitude (14)  |  New (340)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Objection (16)  |  Pure (62)  |  Raised (3)  |  Reach (68)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Terminology (7)  |  Theory (582)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Wrong (116)

The human mind has first to construct forms, independently, before we can find them in things.
Essays in Science (1934), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Construction (69)  |  Find (248)  |  Form (210)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Independence (32)  |  Thing (37)

The laws expressing the relations between energy and matter are, however, not solely of importance in pure science. They necessarily come first in order ... in the whole record of human experience, and they control, in the last resort, the rise or fall of political systems, the freedom or bondage of nations, the movements of commerce and industry, the origin of wealth and poverty, and the general physical welfare of the race.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Commerce (14)  |  Control (93)  |  Energy (185)  |  Experience (268)  |  Expression (82)  |  Freedom (76)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Importance (183)  |  Industry (91)  |  Law (418)  |  Matter (270)  |  Movement (65)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin (77)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Politics (77)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Race (76)  |  Record (56)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rise And Fall (2)  |  Solely (6)  |  System (141)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Welfare (16)  |  Whole (122)

The life history of the individual is first and foremost an accommodation to the patterns and standards traditionally handed down in his community. From the moment of birth the customs into which he is born shape his experience and behavior.
In 'The Science of Custom', Patterns of Culture (1934, 2005), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (5)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Birth (81)  |  Community (65)  |  Custom (24)  |  Experience (268)  |  Foremost (8)  |  Individual (177)  |  Life History (2)  |  Moment (61)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Shape (52)  |  Standard (41)  |  Traditional (9)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Act (80)  |  Age (137)  |  America (74)  |  Authority (50)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Beginnings (2)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Common (92)  |  Consolidation (3)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (4)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Emergency (6)  |  Eminently (2)  |  Emphasize (6)  |  Enterprise (20)  |  Era (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Face (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Federal (5)  |  Find (248)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Growth (111)  |  Ideology (7)  |  Important (124)  |  Individualism (2)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Intense (11)  |  Large (82)  |  Largely (12)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (70)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (24)  |  Modern (104)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Number (179)  |  Organization (79)  |  Original (36)  |  Part (146)  |  Portray (3)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Private (17)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Public (82)  |  Quicken (2)  |  Recent (23)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Resistance (23)  |  Response (24)  |  Result (250)  |  Right (144)  |  Save (46)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (188)  |  State (96)  |  Step (67)  |  Stress (8)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Suspicion (25)  |  Time (439)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  Try (103)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Widespread (9)  |  Work (457)  |  Worth (74)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (214)

The main Business of Natural Philosophy is to argue from Phænomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these, and to such like Questions.
From 'Query 31', Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 344.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (17)  |  Business (71)  |  Cause (231)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Deduce (8)  |  Effect (133)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Natural Philosophy (21)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Question (315)  |  Resolve (11)  |  Unfold (7)  |  World (667)

The mathematician's patterns … must be beautiful … Beauty is the first test; there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Permanence (15)  |  Place (111)  |  Test (96)  |  Ugly (11)  |  World (667)

The maxim of science is simply that of common sense—simple cases first; begin with seeing how the main force acts when there is as little as possible to impede it, and when you thoroughly comprehend that, add to it in succession the separate effects of each of the incumbering and interfering agencies.
Collected in The Works of Walter Bagehot (1889), Vol. 5, 319-320.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Add (26)  |  Agency (13)  |  Begin (52)  |  Case (64)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Comprehend (19)  |  Effect (133)  |  Force (194)  |  Impede (2)  |  Little (126)  |  Main (16)  |  Maxim (13)  |  Possible (100)  |  Science (1699)  |  Separate (46)  |  Simple (111)  |  Succession (39)  |  Thoroughly (7)

The Mind of Man is, at first, … like a Tabula rasa; or like Wax, which while it is soft, is capable of any Impression, until Time hath hardened it.
In 'A Tritical Essay Upon the Faculties of the Mind' (6 Aug 1707). A tabula rasa means a “scraped tablet” or “blank slate” and refers to a kind of wax-surfaced tablet used to inscribe notes, that can be erased by heating the wax.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (26)  |  Impression (51)  |  Mind (544)  |  Soft (10)  |  Tabula Rasa (2)  |  Time (439)  |  Wax (8)

The Moon and its phases gave man his first calendar. Trying to match that calendar with the seasons helped give him mathematics. The usefulness of the calendar helped give rise to the thought of beneficent gods. And with all that the Moon is beautiful, too.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Beneficent (6)  |  Calendar (5)  |  God (454)  |  Match (13)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Moon (132)  |  Phase (14)  |  Rise (51)  |  Season (24)  |  Thought (374)  |  Usefulness (70)

The nose is the first and foremost instrument of respiration.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Foremost (8)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Nose (9)  |  Respiration (12)

The planned and orderly development and conservation of our natural resources is the first duty of the United States. It is the only form of insurance that will certainly protect us against disasters that lack of foresight has repeatedly brought down on nations since passed away.
In 'The Conservation of Natural Resources', The Outlook (12 Oxt 1907), 87, 294.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (84)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Development (228)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Duty (51)  |  Foresight (4)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Lack (52)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Orderly (6)  |  Plan (69)  |  Protect (26)  |  United States (31)

The printed page is to thought what a nursery is to the first kiss.
From Aphorism 62 in Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797-1800). As translated by Luis H. Gray in Kuno Francke and Isidore Singer (eds.), The German Classics: Masterpieces of German Literature Translated Into English (1913), Vol. 4, 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Nursery (3)  |  Page (18)  |  Printing (12)  |  Publication (83)  |  Thought (374)

The puritanical potentialities of science have never been forecast. If it evolves a body of organized rites, and is established as a religion, hierarchically organized, things more than anything else will be done in the name of 'decency.' The coarse fumes of tobacco and liquors, the consequent tainting of the breath and staining of white fingers and teeth, which is so offensive to many women, will be the first things attended to.
Wyndham Lewis: an Anthology of his Prose (1969), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (24)  |  Decency (3)  |  Establish (30)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Finger (38)  |  Forecast (8)  |  Fume (5)  |  Hierarchy (11)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Organization (79)  |  Potential (34)  |  Puritan (3)  |  Religion (210)  |  Rite (3)  |  Stain (8)  |  Taint (4)  |  Teeth (11)  |  Tobacco (16)  |  Woman (94)

The Romans would never have found time to conquer the world if they had been obliged first to learn Latin.
In Heinrich Heinne and Charles Godfrey Leland (trans.), Pictures of Travel (1871), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Conquer (12)  |  Find (248)  |  Latin (20)  |  Learn (160)  |  Linguistics (24)  |  Obliged (4)  |  Roman (16)  |  Time (439)  |  World (667)

The shortest and surest way of arriving at real knowledge is to unlearn the lessons we have been taught, to remount to first principles, and take no body’s word about them.
In Letters, on the Spirit of Patriotism: On the Idea of a Patriot King (1749), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Arriving (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Mount (7)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Principle (228)  |  Real (95)  |  Surest (5)  |  Taught (4)  |  Unlearn (5)  |  Word (221)

The starting point of Darwin’s theory of evolution is precisely the existence of those differences between individual members of a race or species which morphologists for the most part rightly neglect. The first condition necessary, in order that any process of Natural Selection may begin among a race, or species, is the existence of differences among its members; and the first step in an enquiry into the possible effect of a selective process upon any character of a race must be an estimate of the frequency with which individuals, exhibiting any given degree of abnormality with respect to that, character, occur. The unit, with which such an enquiry must deal, is not an individual but a race, or a statistically representative sample of a race; and the result must take the form of a numerical statement, showing the relative frequency with which the various kinds of individuals composing the race occur.
Biometrika: A Joumal for the Statistical Study of Biological Problems (1901), 1, 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Composition (52)  |  Condition (119)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Difference (208)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Form (210)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Individual (177)  |  Kind (99)  |  Member (27)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Neglect (23)  |  Number (179)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Precision (38)  |  Process (201)  |  Race (76)  |  Relative (24)  |  Representative (9)  |  Result (250)  |  Sample (8)  |  Species (181)  |  Start (68)  |  Starting Point (6)  |  Statement (56)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Step (67)  |  Theory (582)  |  Various (25)

The United States is the most powerful technically advanced country in the world to-day. Its influence on the shaping of international relations is absolutely incalculable. But America is a large country and its people have so far not shown much interest in great international problems, among which the problem of disarmament occupies first place today. This must be changed, if only in the essential interests of the Americans. The last war has shown that there are no longer any barriers between the continents and that the destinies of all countries are closely interwoven. The people of this country must realize that they have a great responsibility in the sphere of international politics. The part of passive spectator is unworthy of this country and is bound in the end to lead to disaster all round.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Advance (123)  |  America (74)  |  American (34)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Bind (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Closely (8)  |  Continent (39)  |  Country (121)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Disarmament (3)  |  Disaster (36)  |  End (141)  |  Essential (87)  |  Far (77)  |  Great (300)  |  Influence (110)  |  Interest (170)  |  International (18)  |  Interwoven (6)  |  Large (82)  |  Lead (101)  |  Long (95)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Part (146)  |  Passive (5)  |  People (269)  |  Place (111)  |  Politics (77)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Problem (362)  |  Realize (43)  |  Relation (96)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Round (15)  |  Shape (52)  |  Show (55)  |  Spectator (6)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Technically (2)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Today (86)  |  Unworthy (8)  |  Usa (6)  |  War (144)  |  World (667)

The world always makes the assumption that the exposure of an error is identical with the discovery of truth that the error and truth are simply opposite. They are nothing of the sort. What the world turns to, when it is cured on one error, is usually simply another error, and maybe one worse than the first one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Badly (9)  |  Cure (88)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Exposure (5)  |  Identical (17)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Simply (34)  |  Sort (32)  |  Truth (750)  |  Turn (72)  |  Usually (20)  |  World (667)

There are many different styles of composition. I characterize them always as Mozart versus Beethoven. When Mozart began to write at that time he had the composition ready in his mind. He wrote the manuscript and it was ‘aus einem Guss’ (casted as one). And it was also written very beautiful. Beethoven was an indecisive and a tinkerer and wrote down before he had the composition ready and plastered parts over to change them. There was a certain place where he plastered over nine times and one did remove that carefully to see what happened and it turned out the last version was the same as the first one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Beethoven (3)  |  Begin (52)  |  Carefully (9)  |  Cast (15)  |  Certain (84)  |  Change (291)  |  Characterize (9)  |  Composition (52)  |  Different (110)  |  Down (44)  |  Happen (63)  |  Manuscript (7)  |  Mind (544)  |  Part (146)  |  Place (111)  |  Plaster (4)  |  Ready (16)  |  Remove (18)  |  Same (92)  |  See (197)  |  Style (15)  |  Time (439)  |  Turned Out (3)  |  Version (6)  |  Write (87)

There are only two kinds of math books. Those you cannot read beyond the first sentence, and those you cannot read beyond the first page.
Attributed, but without reference. For example, in John Mitchinson, John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People? (2009), 31. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (65)  |  Book (181)  |  Kind (99)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Page (18)  |  Read (83)  |  Sentence (20)

There are two kinds of truth; the truth that lights the way and the truth that warms the heart. The first of these is science, and the second is art. Without art, science would be as useless as a pair of high forceps in the hands of a plumber. Without science, art would become a crude mess of folklore and emotional quackery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Become (100)  |  Crude (14)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Folklore (2)  |  Hand (103)  |  Heart (110)  |  High (78)  |  Kind (99)  |  Light (246)  |  Mess (10)  |  Pair (10)  |  Plumber (7)  |  Quackery (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Second (33)  |  Truth (750)  |  Useless (24)  |  Warm (20)

There are two processes which we adopt consciously or unconsciously when we try to prophesy. We can seek a period in the past whose conditions resemble as closely as possible those of our day, and presume that the sequel to that period will, save for some minor alterations, be similar. Secondly, we can survey the general course of development in our immediate past, and endeavor to prolong it into the near future. The first is the method the historian; the second that of the scientist. Only the second is open to us now, and this only in a partial sphere.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Condition (119)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Course (57)  |  Development (228)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Future (229)  |  General (92)  |  Historian (30)  |  Method (154)  |  Minor (7)  |  Open (38)  |  Partial (2)  |  Past (109)  |  Possible (100)  |  Presume (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Prolong (8)  |  Prophesy (7)  |  Resemble (16)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sequel (2)  |  Similar (22)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Survey (14)  |  Unconsciously (3)

There is a popular cliché ... which says that you cannot get out of computers any more than you have put in..., that computers can only do exactly what you tell them to, and that therefore computers are never creative. This cliché is true only in a crashingly trivial sense, the same sense in which Shakespeare never wrote anything except what his first schoolteacher taught him to write—words.
In The Blind Watchmaker: Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design (1966, 1986), 64. Excerpted in Richard Dawkins, ‘Creation and Natural Selection’. New Scientist (25 Sep 1986), 111, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Cliche (6)  |  Computer (84)  |  Creativity (66)  |  Do (22)  |  Exactly (8)  |  Exception (33)  |  Input (2)  |  Never (22)  |  Output (9)  |  Popular (21)  |  Sense (240)  |  William Shakespeare (90)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Trivial (30)  |  Truth (750)  |  Word (221)  |  Writing (72)

There is not, we believe, a single example of a medicine having been received permanently into the Materia Medica upon the sole ground of its physical, chemical, or physiological properties. Nearly every one has become a popular remedy before being adopted or even tried by physicians; by far the greater number were first employed in countries which were and are now in a state of scientific ignorance....
Therapeutics and Materia Medica (2006), 31
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (9)  |  Become (100)  |  Belief (400)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Country (121)  |  Employ (14)  |  Example (57)  |  Far (77)  |  Great (300)  |  Ground (63)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Number (179)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physician (232)  |  Physiological (6)  |  Popular (21)  |  Property (96)  |  Receive (39)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Single (72)  |  Sole (9)  |  State (96)  |  Try (103)

There is only one law of Nature—the second law of thermodynamics—which recognises a distinction between past and future more profound than the difference of plus and minus. It stands aloof from all the rest. … It opens up a new province of knowledge, namely, the study of organisation; and it is in connection with organisation that a direction of time-flow and a distinction between doing and undoing appears for the first time.
In The Nature of the Physical World (1928, 2005), 67-68.
Science quotes on:  |  Direction (56)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Doing (36)  |  Flow (31)  |  Future (229)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Organization (79)  |  Past (109)  |  Profound (46)  |  Province (11)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (13)  |  Study (331)  |  Time (439)  |  Undoing (2)

There is something particularly human about using tools; the first and most important tool being language.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Human (445)  |  Important (124)  |  Language (155)  |  Linguistics (24)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Tool (70)

There’s no value in digging shallow wells in a hundred places. Decide on one place and dig deep ... If you leave that to dig another well, all the first effort is wasted and there is no proof you won’t hit rock again.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 258
Science quotes on:  |  Decide (25)  |  Deep (81)  |  Dig (9)  |  Effort (94)  |  Hit (14)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Leave (63)  |  Place (111)  |  Proof (192)  |  Rock (107)  |  Shallow (5)  |  Value (180)  |  Waste (57)

They may say what they like; everything is organized matter. The tree is the first link of the chain; man is the last. Men are young; the earth is old. Vegetable and animal chemistry are still in their infancy. Electricity, galvanism,—what discoveries in a few years!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Chain (38)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Everything (120)  |  Galvanism (6)  |  Infancy (6)  |  Link (29)  |  Matter (270)  |  Old (104)  |  Organize (14)  |  Say (126)  |  Tree (143)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Year (214)  |  Young (72)

They say that habit is second nature. Who knows but nature is only first habit?
As quoted in epigraph in Edward Kasner and James Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination (1940, 1949), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Habit (78)  |  Know (321)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Say (126)  |  Second (33)

This also explains how it is that truths which have been recognised are at first tacitly admitted, and then gradually spread, so that the very thing which was obstinately denied appears at last as something quite natural.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Appear (55)  |  Deny (29)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Natural (128)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Spread (19)  |  Truth (750)

This is really the cornerstone of our situation. Now, I believe what we should try to bring about is the general conviction that the first thing you have to abolish is war at all costs, and every other point of view must be of secondary importance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (11)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bring (53)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Cornerstone (3)  |  Cost (31)  |  General (92)  |  Importance (183)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Really (50)  |  Secondary (11)  |  Situation (41)  |  Try (103)  |  War (144)

Those who are not shocked when they first come across quantum mechanics cannot possibly have understood it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (9)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Quantum Mechanics (31)  |  Shock (12)  |  Understand (189)

Those who came before us made certain that this country rode the first waves of the industrial revolution, the first waves of modern invention, and the first wave of nuclear power, and this generation does not intend to founder in the backwash of the coming age of space. We mean to be a part of it—we mean to lead it.
Address at Rice University in Houston (12 Sep 1962). On website of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (84)  |  Founder (12)  |  Generation (111)  |  Industrial Revolution (8)  |  Intend (7)  |  Invention (283)  |  Lead (101)  |  Modern (104)  |  Nuclear Power (9)  |  United States (31)  |  Wave (55)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (6)  |  Available (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Data (100)  |  Descent (14)  |  Directly (15)  |  Discuss (14)  |  Effect (133)  |  Exemplify (2)  |  Historical (10)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Increase (107)  |  Little (126)  |  Middle (10)  |  Object (110)  |  Observe (48)  |  Orchid (2)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Record (56)  |  Render (17)  |  Several (14)  |  Single (72)  |  Stage (39)  |  Sum Up (2)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Work (457)  |  Worm (25)

To be the first to enter the cosmos, to engage, single-handed, in an unprecedented duel with nature—could one dream of anything more?
From remarks made minutes before launch (12 Apr 1961), as quoted in Ulrike Landfester, Nina-Louisa Remuss, Kai-Uwe Schrogl, Jean-Claude Worms (eds.), Humans in Outer Space - Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2010), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmos (39)  |  Dream (92)  |  Duel (2)  |  Enter (20)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Unprecedented (7)

To many of us, the first law of dietetics seems to be: if it tastes good, it’s bad for you.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (78)  |  Good (228)  |  Law (418)  |  Quip (75)  |  Seem (89)  |  Taste (35)

Srinivasa Ramanujan quote: To preserve my brains I want food and this is now my first consideration. Any sympathetic letter from
To preserve my brains I want food and this is now my first consideration. Any sympathetic letter from you will be helpful to me here to get a scholarship…
Letter to G.H. Hardy (27 Feb 1913). Excerpt in obituary notice by G.H. Hardy in the Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society (2) (1921), 19, xl—lviii. Reprinted in G.H. Hardy, P.V. Seshu Aiyar and B.M. Wilson (eds.) Collected Papers of Srinivasa Ramanujan (1927), xxvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Food (139)  |  Helpful (10)  |  Letter (36)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  Sympathetic (3)

To save every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.
Round River
Science quotes on:  |  Cog (3)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Precaution (4)  |  Save (46)  |  Tinker (5)  |  Wheel (13)

Very little comes easily to our poor, benighted species (the first creature, after all, to experiment with the novel evolutionary inventions of self-conscious philosophy and art). Even the most ‘obvious,’ ‘accurate,’ and ‘natural’ style of thinking or drawing must be regulated by history and won by struggle. Solutions must therefore arise within a social context and record the complex interactions of mind and environment that define the possibility of human improvement.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Arise (32)  |  Art (205)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Complex (78)  |  Context (17)  |  Creature (127)  |  Define (29)  |  Draw (25)  |  Easily (16)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Experiment (543)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Invention (283)  |  Little (126)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural (128)  |  Novel (16)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Poor (46)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Record (56)  |  Regulate (4)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Solution (168)  |  Species (181)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Style (15)  |  Think (205)  |  Win (25)

We are not to think that Jupiter has four satellites given him by nature, in order, by revolving round him, to immortalize the name of the Medici, who first had notice of the observation. These are the dreams of idle men, who love ludicrous ideas better than our laborious and industrious correction of the heavens.—Nature abhors so horrible a chaos, and to the truly wise, such vanity is detestable.
From Nodus Gordius, Appendix, as cited in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei: With Illustrations of the Advancement of Experimental Philosophy (1832), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhor (3)  |  Better (131)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Correction (28)  |  Dream (92)  |  Gift (47)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Idea (440)  |  Idleness (8)  |  Immortalize (2)  |  Industrious (6)  |  Jupiter (17)  |  Laborious (3)  |  Love (164)  |  Ludicrous (3)  |  Moon (132)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Notice (20)  |  Observation (418)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Satellite (22)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Truly (19)  |  Vanity (14)  |  Wise (43)

We may regard [Scheele] not only as having given the first indication of the rich harvest to be reaped by the investigation of the compounds of organic chemistry, but as having been the first to discover and make use of characteristic reactions by which closely allied substances can be detected and separated, so that he must be considered one of the chief founders of analytical chemistry.
In Treatise on Chemistry (1877, 1890), Vol. 1, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Allied (2)  |  Analytical Chemistry (2)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Chief (25)  |  Close (40)  |  Compound (53)  |  Consider (45)  |  Detect (9)  |  Discover (115)  |  Founder (12)  |  Harvest (14)  |  Indication (21)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Organic Chemistry (33)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Reap (6)  |  Regard (58)  |  Rich (48)  |  Carl Wilhelm Scheele (5)  |  Separate (46)  |  Substance (73)

We reverence ancient Greece as the cradle of western science. Here for the first time the world witnessed the miracle of a logical system which proceeded from step to step with such precision that every single one of its propositions was absolutely indubitable—I refer to Euclid’s geometry. This admirable triumph of reasoning gave the human intellect the necessary confidence in itself for its subsequent achievements. If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker.
From 'On the Method of Theoretical Physics', in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Admirable (11)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Born (14)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Failed (3)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Greece (7)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Kindle (4)  |  Logic (187)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Precision (38)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Single (72)  |  Step (67)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  System (141)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)  |  Western (14)  |  World (667)

We see a universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws, but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations. I am fascinated by Spinoza’s pantheism, but admire even more his contributions to modern thought because he is the first philosopher to deal with the soul and the body as one, not two separate things.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Arrange (15)  |  Body (193)  |  Certain (84)  |  Constellation (9)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Deal (25)  |  Dimly (4)  |  Fascinate (5)  |  Force (194)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Law (418)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mind (544)  |  Modern (104)  |  Move (58)  |  Mysterious (21)  |  Obey (13)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  See (197)  |  Separate (46)  |  Soul (139)  |  Spinozas (2)  |  Thought (374)  |  Understand (189)  |  Universe (563)

What was at first merely by-the-way may become the very heart of a matter. Flints were long flaked into knives, arrowheads, spears. Incidentally it was found that they struck fire; to-day that is their one use.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrowhead (3)  |  Become (100)  |  By The Way (2)  |  Find (248)  |  Fire (117)  |  Flake (5)  |  Flint (6)  |  Heart (110)  |  Incidental (8)  |  Knife (10)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mere (41)  |  Spear (4)  |  Strike (21)  |  Today (86)

Wheeler’s First Moral Principle: Never make a calculation until you know the answer. Make an estimate before every calculation, try a simple physical argument (symmetry! invariance! conservation!) before every derivation, guess the answer to every paradox and puzzle. Courage: No one else needs to know what the guess is. Therefore make it quickly, by instinct. A right guess reinforces this instinct. A wrong guess brings the refreshment of surprise. In either case life as a spacetime expert, however long, is more fun!
In E.F. Taylor and J.A. Wheeler, Spacetime Physics (1992), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Argument (59)  |  Bring (53)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Case (64)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Courage (39)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Expert (42)  |  Fun (28)  |  Guess (36)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Invariance (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Moral (100)  |  Need (211)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Physics (301)  |  Principle (228)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Quickly (9)  |  Refreshment (2)  |  Right (144)  |  Simple (111)  |  Spacetime (4)  |  Surprise (44)  |  Symmetry (26)  |  Try (103)  |  Wrong (116)

When not protected by law, by popular favor or superstition, or by other special circumstances, [birds] yield very readily to the influences of civilization, and, though the first operations of the settler are favorable to the increase of many species, the great extension of rural and of mechanical industry is, in a variety of ways, destructive even to tribes not directly warred upon by man.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 93-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Bird (96)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Extension (20)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Favor (22)  |  Favorable (7)  |  Great (300)  |  Increase (107)  |  Industry (91)  |  Influence (110)  |  Law (418)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Operation (96)  |  Popular (21)  |  Protection (23)  |  Rural (5)  |  Special (51)  |  Species (181)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Tribe (10)  |  Variety (53)  |  War (144)  |  Way (36)  |  Yield (23)

When the practice of farming spread over the earth, mankind experienced its first population explosion.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Earth (487)  |  Experience (268)  |  Farming (7)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Spread (19)

When ultra-violet light acts on a mixture of water, carbon dioxide, and ammonia, a vast variety of organic substances are made, including sugars and apparently some of the materials from which proteins are built up…. But before the origin of life they must have accumulated till the primitive oceans reached the consistency of hot dilute soup…. The first living or half-living things were probably large molecules synthesized under the influence of the sun’s radiation, and only capable of reproduction in the particularly favorable medium in which they originated….
In 'The Origin of Life', The Inequality of Man: And Other Essays (1932, 1937), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (18)  |  Act (80)  |  Ammonia (11)  |  Carbon Dioxide (20)  |  Compound (53)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Favorable (7)  |  Hot (17)  |  Influence (110)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Medium (12)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Organic (48)  |  Origin Of Life (32)  |  Originate (14)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Protein (43)  |  Radiation (22)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reproduction (57)  |  Soup (4)  |  Sugar (13)  |  Sun (211)  |  Synthesize (2)  |  Variety (53)  |  Water (244)

When you treat a disease, first treat the mind.
Chen Jen
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (257)  |  Mind (544)  |  Treat (17)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Aim (58)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Analyze (3)  |  Answer (201)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Apparatus (30)  |  Argue (17)  |  Arise (32)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Break (33)  |  Briefly (3)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Conform (5)  |  Connect (15)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Consciously (4)  |  Construction (69)  |  Country (121)  |  Decision (58)  |  Define (29)  |  Definite (27)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demand (52)  |  Deny (29)  |  Describe (38)  |  Design (92)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Dominate (13)  |  Easy (56)  |  Element (129)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exclusion (11)  |  Existence (254)  |  Explain (61)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  Form (210)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Human (445)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instance (18)  |  Intention (25)  |  Learn (160)  |  Likely (23)  |  Merely (35)  |  Method (154)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Movement (65)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Observe (48)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Part (146)  |  Path (59)  |  Pattern (56)  |  People (269)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Produce (63)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Raise (20)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Result (250)  |  Room (29)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Single (72)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Sciences (4)  |  Society (188)  |  Sort (32)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Technical (26)  |  Theoretical (10)  |  Thought (374)  |  Totality (9)  |  Track (9)  |  Traverse (4)  |  Try (103)  |  Type (34)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wild (39)

Without the slightest doubt there is something through which material and spiritual energy hold togehter and are complementary. In the last analysis, somehow or other, there must be a single energy operating in the world. And the first idea that occurs to us is that the 'soul' must be as it were the focal point of transformation at which, from all the points of nature, the forces of bodies converge, to become interiorised and sublimated in beauty and truth.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 63. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Become (100)  |  Body (193)  |  Complementary (8)  |  Converge (2)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Energy (185)  |  Force (194)  |  Hold (56)  |  Idea (440)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occur (26)  |  Operating (4)  |  Point (72)  |  Single (72)  |  Slightest (2)  |  Somehow (3)  |  Soul (139)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Together (48)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Truth (750)  |  World (667)

Workers must root out the idea that by keeping the results of their labors to themselves a fortune will be assured to them. Patent fees are so much wasted money. The flying machine of the future will not be born fully fledged and capable of a flight for 1,000 miles or so. Like everything else it must be evolved gradually. The first difficulty is to get a thing that will fly at all. When this is made, a full description should be published as an aid to others. Excellence of design and workmanship will always defy competition.
As quoted in Octave Chanute, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (23)  |  Assured (2)  |  Born (14)  |  Capable (26)  |  Competition (26)  |  Defy (5)  |  Description (72)  |  Design (92)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Fee (9)  |  Flight (45)  |  Fly (65)  |  Flying Machine (6)  |  Fortune (23)  |  Fully (11)  |  Future (229)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Idea (440)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Labor (53)  |  Made (14)  |  Mile (24)  |  Money (125)  |  Patent (23)  |  Publish (18)  |  Result (250)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Wasted (2)  |  Worker (23)  |  Workmanship (3)

Young writers find out what kinds of writers they are by experiment. If they choose from the outset to practice exclusively a form of writing because it is praised in the classroom or otherwise carries appealing prestige, they are vastly increasing the risk inherent in taking up writing in the first place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (30)  |  Carry (35)  |  Choose (35)  |  Classroom (5)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Find Out (12)  |  Form (210)  |  Increase (107)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Kind (99)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Outset (4)  |  Place (111)  |  Practice (67)  |  Praise (17)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Risk (29)  |  Vastly (5)  |  Write (87)  |  Writer (35)  |  Young (72)

[In treating the sick], the first thing to consider is the provision of fresh air, clean water, and a healthy diet.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Clean (20)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Diet (41)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Providing (5)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Water (244)

[Jethro Tull] was the first Englishman—perhaps the first writer, ancient and modern—who has attempted, with any tolerable degree of success, to reduce the art of agriculture to certain and uniform principles; and it must be acknowledged that he has done more towards establishing a rational and practical method of husbandry than all the writers who have gone before him.
Anonymous
In Letter (18 Oct 1764), signed only “D.Y.” from Hungerford, in Sylvanus Urban (ed.), 'Observations on the late Improvements in Agriculture', The Gentleman’s Magazine (Nov 1764), 525.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Art (205)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Certain (84)  |  Englishman (3)  |  Establishing (7)  |  Method (154)  |  Modern (104)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Rational (42)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Success (202)  |  Jethro Tull (2)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Writer (35)

[On solving problems:] The first thing you do is scream.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Problem (362)  |  Scream (4)  |  Solve (41)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.