Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: First

First Quotes (1283 quotes)

From thus meditating on the great similarity of the structure of the warm-blooded animals, and at the same time of the great changes they undergo both before and after their nativity; and by considering in how minute a portion of time many of the changes of animals above described have been produced; would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Association (46)  |  Attend (65)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Filament (4)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Minute (125)  |  New (1216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volition (3)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  World (1774)

(1) A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
(2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law.
(3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
'The Three Laws of Robotics', in I, Robot (1950), Frontispiece.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Existence (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obey (40)  |  Order (632)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Robot (13)  |  Through (849)

-------------- are like snowmen, fun at first, but not much future.
Anonymous
In Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp and Deborah Fripp, Speaking of Science (2000), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  Fun (38)  |  Future (429)  |  Like (22)  |  Snowman (2)

... we must first base such words as “between” upon clear concepts, a thing which is quite feasible but which I have not seen done.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Clear (100)  |  Concept (221)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Must (1526)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

...after my first feeling of revulsion had passed, I spent three of the most entertaining and instructive weeks of my life studying the fascinating molds which appeared one by one on the slowly disintegrating mass of horse-dung. Microscopic molds are both very beautiful and absorbingly interesting. The rapid growth of their spores, the way they live on each other, the manner in which the different forms come and go, is so amazing and varied that I believe a man could spend his life and not exhaust the forms or problems contained in one plate of manure.
The World Was My Garden (1938, 1941), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Biology (216)  |  Both (493)  |  Different (577)  |  Dung (7)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Horse (74)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mold (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Problem (676)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Spore (3)  |  Studying (70)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)

...great difficulties are felt at first and these cannot be overcome except by starting from experiments .. and then be conceiving certain hypotheses ... But even so, very much hard work remains to be done and one needs not only great perspicacity but often a degree of good fortune.
Letter to Tschirnhaus (1687). Quoted in Archana Srinivasan, Great Inventors (2007), 37-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Degree (276)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Luck (42)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Work (1351)

...on opening the incubator I experienced one of those rare moments of intense emotion which reward the research worker for all his pains: at first glance I saw that the broth culture, which the night before had been very turbid was perfectly clear: all the bacteria had vanished... as for my agar spread it was devoid of all growth and what caused my emotion was that in a flash I understood: what causes my spots was in fact an invisible microbe, a filterable virus, but a virus parasitic on bacteria. Another thought came to me also, If this is true, the same thing will have probably occurred in the sick man. In his intestine, as in my test-tube, the dysentery bacilli will have dissolved away under the action of their parasite. He should now be cured.
In Allan Chase, Magic Shots: A Human and Scientific Account of the Long and Continuing Struggle to Eradicated Infectious Diseases by Vaccination (1982), 249-250. Also in Allan J. Tobin and Jennie Dusheck, Asking About Life (2005), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriophage (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Culture (143)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flash (49)  |  Glance (34)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pain (136)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Rare (89)  |  Research (664)  |  Reward (68)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spread (83)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understood (156)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)

...reality is a system, completely ordered and fully intelligible, with which thought in its advance is more and more identifying itself. We may look at the growth of knowledge … as an attempt by our mind to return to union with things as they are in their ordered wholeness…. and if we take this view, our notion of truth is marked out for us. Truth is the approximation of thought to reality … Its measure is the distance thought has travelled … toward that intelligible system … The degree of truth of a particular proposition is to be judged in the first instance by its coherence with experience as a whole, ultimately by its coherence with that further whole, all comprehensive and fully articulated, in which thought can come to rest.
The Nature of Thought (1939), Vol II, 264. Quoted in Erhard Scheibe and Brigitte Falkenburg (ed), Between Rationalism and Empiricism: Selected Papers in the Philosophy of Physics (2001), 233
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Completely (135)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distance (161)  |  Experience (467)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Marked (55)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Union (51)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholeness (9)

1. The First Law of Ecology: Everything is connected to everything else.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Connect (125)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Everything (476)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Ecology (5)

1066. … At that time, throughout all England, a portent such as men had never seen before was seen in the heavens. Some declared that the star was a comet, which some call “the long-haired star”: it first appeared on the eve of the festival of Letania Maior, that is on 24 April, and shone every night for a week.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 195. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. The monasteries continued independently updating these annals. This quote comes from a copy once owned by Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury. Known as the Winchester (or Parker) Chronicle, it is the oldest surviving manuscript.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  April (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Comet (54)  |  Declared (24)  |  England (40)  |  Eve (4)  |  Festival (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Long (790)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Portent (2)  |  Shine (45)  |  Star (427)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Week (70)

1104 … In this year the first day of Whitsuntide was on 5 June, and on the following Tuesday at noon there appeared four intersecting halos around the sun, white in color, and looking as if they had been painted. All who saw it were astonished, for they did not remember seeing anything like it before.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 239. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Color (137)  |  Halo (7)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Looking (189)  |  Noon (14)  |  Remember (179)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sun (385)  |  White (127)  |  Year (933)

1106. … In the first week of Lent, on the Friday, 16 February, a strange star appeared in the evening, and for a long time afterwards was seen shining for a while each evening. The star made its appearance in the south-west, and seemed to be small and dark, but the light that shone from it was very bright, and appeared like an enormous beam of light shining north-east; and one evening it seemed as if the beam were flashing in the opposite direction towards the star. Some said that they had seen other unknown stars about this time, but we cannot speak about these without reservation, because we did not ourselves see them.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 240. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. This quote comes from the copy known as the Peterborough Chronicle (a.k.a. Laud manuscript).
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bright (79)  |  Comet (54)  |  Dark (140)  |  Direction (175)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Flash (49)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  See (1081)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Small (477)  |  South (38)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Strange (157)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Week (70)

1122 … Thereafter there were many sailors on the sea and on inland water who said that they had seen a great and extensive fire near the ground in the northeast which continuously increased in width as it mounted to the sky. And the heavens opened into four parts and fought against it as if determined to put it out, and the fire stopped rising upwards. They saw that fire at the first streak of dawn, and it lasted until full daylight: this happened on 7 December.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 250. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Daylight (22)  |  December (3)  |  Determined (9)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Increase (210)  |  Last (426)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Mount (42)  |  Open (274)  |  Part (222)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sky (161)  |  Stop (80)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Water (481)

Ode to The Amoeba
Recall from Time's abysmal chasm
That piece of primal protoplasm
The First Amoeba, strangely splendid,
From whom we're all of us descended.
That First Amoeba, weirdly clever,
Exists today and shall forever,
Because he reproduced by fission;
He split himself, and each division
And subdivision deemed it fitting
To keep on splitting, splitting, splitting;
So, whatsoe'er their billions be,
All, all amoebas still are he.
Zoologists discern his features
In every sort of breathing creatures,
Since all of every living species,
No matter how their breed increases
Or how their ranks have been recruited,
From him alone were evoluted.
King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba
And Hoover sprang from that amoeba;
Columbus, Shakespeare, Darwin, Shelley
Derived from that same bit of jelly.
So famed is he and well-connected,
His statue ought to be erected,
For you and I and William Beebe
Are undeniably amoebae!
(1922). Collected in Gaily the Troubadour (1936), 18.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abyss (29)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  William Beebe (5)  |  Billion (95)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Breed (24)  |  Chasm (8)  |  Clever (38)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Descend (47)  |  Discern (33)  |  Division (65)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fission (10)  |  Forever (103)  |  Himself (461)  |  Herbert Hoover (13)  |  Increase (210)  |  Jelly (6)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Ode (3)  |  Poem (96)  |  Primal (5)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Mary Shelley (9)  |  Species (401)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Split (13)  |  Statue (16)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Zoologist (12)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Experience (467)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)

Clarke's First Law - Corollary: When, however, the lay public rallies round an idea that is denounced by distinguished but elderly scientists and supports that idea with great fervor and emotion—the distinguished but elderly scientists are then, after all, probably right.
'Asimov's Corollary', Fantasy & Science Fiction (Feb 1977). In collection Quasar, Quasar, Burning Bright (1978), 231.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Arthur C. Clarke (40)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fervor (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Law (894)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Support (147)

Clarke's First Law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
'Hazards of Prophecy: The Failure of Imagination'. In the collection. Profiles of the Future: An Enquiry into the Limits of the Possible (1962, rev. 1973), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Law (894)  |  Possible (552)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  State (491)  |  Wrong (234)

Das ist nicht Mathematik, das ist Theologie!
This is not mathematics; this is theology.
[Remark about David Hilbert's first proof of his finite basis theorem.]
Attributed. It does not seem to appear in Gordan’s written work. According to Colin McClarty, in 'Theology and its Discontents: the Origin of the Myth of Modern Mathematics' (2008), “The quote first appeared a quarter of a century after the event, as an unexplained side comment in a eulogy to Gordan by his long-time colleague Max Noether. Noether was a reliable witness, but he says little about what Gordan meant.” See Noether's obituary of Gordan in Mathematische Annalen (1914), 75, 18. It is still debated if the quote is pejorative, complimentary or merely a joke.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basis (173)  |  Finite (59)  |  David Hilbert (46)  |  Joke (83)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Proof (287)  |  Theology (52)  |  Theorem (112)

Energie is the operation, efflux or activity of any being: as the light of the Sunne is the energie of the Sunne, and every phantasm of the soul is the energie of the soul.
[The first recorded definition of the term energy in English]
In Platonica: A Platonicall Song of the Soul (1642). In this book of poems, More uses the word energie many times, and in the opening section, 'To the Reader'. The definition quoted appears at the end of the book in 'The interpretation of the more unusual names or words that occurre in the foregoing Poems.'
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Being (1278)  |  Definition (221)  |  Energy (344)  |  Light (607)  |  Operation (213)  |  Phantasm (3)  |  Record (154)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sun (385)  |  Term (349)

Haec quippe prima sapientiae clavis definitur, assidua scilicet seu frequens interrogatio … Dubitando enim ad inquisitionem venimus; inquirendo veritatem percipimus.
For this is the first key to wisdom, assiduous and frequent questioning. ... By doubting we come to inquiry; by inquiry we perceive the truth.
Sic et Non (c. 1120). Latin text in Peter Abelard, E.L.T. Henke and G.S. Lindenkohl (eds.), Sic et Non (1851), 16-17. Title translates as Yes or No. As translated in Frederick Denison Maurice, Mediaeval Philosophy; Or, A Treatise of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy (1870), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wisdom (221)

He who doth with the greatest exactness imaginable, weigh every individual thing that shall or hath hapned to his Patient, and may be known from the Observations of his own, or of others, and who afterwards compareth all these with one another, and puts them in an opposite view to such Things as happen in a healthy State; and lastly, from all this with the nicest and severest bridle upon his reasoning faculty riseth to the knowledge of the very first Cause of the Disease, and of the Remedies fit to remove them; He, and only He deserveth the Name of a true Physician.
Aphorism No. 13 in Boerhaave’s Aphorisms: Concerning The Knowledge and Cure of Diseases (1715), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Disease (328)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Fit (134)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Name (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Remove (45)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Weigh (49)

If the Indians hadn’t spent the $24. In 1626 Peter Minuit, first governor of New Netherland, purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for about $24. … Assume for simplicity a uniform rate of 7% from 1626 to the present, and suppose that the Indians had put their $24 at [compound] interest at that rate …. What would be the amount now, after 280 years? 24 x (1.07)280 = more than 4,042,000,000.
The latest tax assessment available at the time of writing gives the realty for the borough of Manhattan as $3,820,754,181. This is estimated to be 78% of the actual value, making the actual value a little more than $4,898,400,000.
The amount of the Indians’ money would therefore be more than the present assessed valuation but less than the actual valuation.
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assessment (3)  |  Available (78)  |  Compound (113)  |  Governor (13)  |  Indian (27)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invest (18)  |  Island (46)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Manhattan (3)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Present (619)  |  Purchase (7)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spent (85)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tax (26)  |  Time (1877)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

Imprimisque hominis est propria veri inquisitio atque investigatio.
The first duty of man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth.
De Officiis I., 4, 18. In Thomas Benfield Harbottle, Dictionary of Quotations (classical) (3rd Ed., 1906), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Duty (68)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Man (2251)  |  Seek (213)  |  Truth (1057)

Is mihi semper dicendus est inventor, qui primus evuIgaverit, vel saltem cum amicis communicaverit.
I should always call inventor him who first publishes, or at least communicates [the idea] to his friends.
Meditationes Analyticae (1785), ii-iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Publish (36)

La determination de la relation & de la dépendance mutuelle de ces données dans certains cas particuliers, doit être le premier but du Physicien; & pour cet effet, il falloit one mesure exacte qui indiquât d’une manière invariable & égale dans tous les lieux de la terre, le degré de l'électricité au moyen duquel les expéiences ont été faites… Aussi, l'histoire de l'électricité prouve une vérité suffisamment reconnue; c'est que le Physicien sans mesure ne fait que jouer, & qu'il ne diffère en cela des enfans, que par la nature de son jeu & la construction de ses jouets.
The determination of the relationship and mutual dependence of the facts in particular cases must be the first goal of the Physicist; and for this purpose he requires that an exact measurement may be taken in an equally invariable manner anywhere in the world… Also, the history of electricity yields a well-known truth—that the physicist shirking measurement only plays, different from children only in the nature of his game and the construction of his toys.
'Mémoire sur la mesure de force de l'électricité', Journal de Physique (1782), 21, 191. English version by Google Translate tweaked by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Construction (112)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exact (68)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Game (101)  |  Goal (145)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invariable (4)  |  Known (454)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particular (76)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Play (112)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Toy (19)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)  |  Yield (81)

Le premier regard de l’homme jeté sur l’univers n’y découvre que variété, diversité, multiplicité des phénomènes. Que ce regard soit illuminé par la science,—par la science qui rapproche l’homme de Dieu,—et la simplicité et l’unité brillent de toutes parts.
Man’s first glance at the universe discovers only variety, diversity, multiplicity of phenomena. Let that glance be illuminated by science—by the science which brings man closer to God,—and simplicity and unity shine on all sides.
Original French quoted in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1901), 209. Translation by Google translate, tweaked by Webmaster. The English version of the book, omits this passage, except for “Science, which brings man nearer to God.” In The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 1, 194.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Closer (43)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Glance (34)  |  God (757)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shine (45)  |  Side (233)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Variety (132)

L’art du chercheur c’est d’abord de se trouver un bon patron.
The researcher’s art is first of all to find himself a good boss.
Cited in Review of Advice to a Young Scientist by P. B. Medawar. In Max Perutz, Is Science Necessary?: Essays on Science and Scientists (1991), 194.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Boss (4)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Researcher (33)

Meine Herren, der Senat ist doch keine Badeanstalt.
The faculty is not a pool changing room.
Indignant reply to the blatent sex discrimination expressed in a colleague’s opposition when Hilbert proposed appointing Emmy Noether as the first woman professor at their university.
Quoted in A L Mackay, Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1994).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Discrimination (9)  |  Express (186)  |  Emmy Noether (7)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reply (56)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sex Discrimination (2)  |  University (121)  |  Woman (151)

Parkinson's First Law: Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.
Parkinson's Law or the Pursuit of Progress1 (1958), 4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Availability (10)  |  Available (78)  |  Completion (22)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Law (894)  |  Parkinson’s Law (4)  |  Quip (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

Primo enim paranda est Historia Naturalis et Experimentalis, suffidens et bona; quod fundamentum rei est: neque enim fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat.
For first of all we must prepare a Natural and Experimental History, sufficient and good; and this is the foundation of all; for we are not to imagine or suppose, but to discover, what nature does or may be made to do.
In Novum Organum, Book 2, Aphorism 10. As translated in Francis Bacon and James Spedding with ‎Robert Leslie Ellis (eds.), 'The New Organon', The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the Philosophical Works (1858), Vol. 4, 127. Also seen in epigraphs as a shorter quote, “Non fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat,” which can also be translated as “We have not to imagine or to think out, but to find out what Nature does or produces.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suppose (156)

Quelquefois, par exemple, je me figure que je suis suspendu en l’air, et que j’y demeure sans mouvement, pendant que la Terre tourne sous moi en vingt-quatre heures. Je vois passer sous mes yeux tous ces visages différents, les uns blancs, les autres noirs, les autres basanés, les autres olivâtres. D’abord ce sont des chapeaux et puis des turbans, et puis des têtes chevelues, et puis des têtes rasées; tantôt des villes à clochers, tantôt des villes à longues aiguilles qui ont des croissants, tantôt des villes à tours de porcelaine, tantôt de grands pays qui n’ont que des cabanes; ici de vastes mers, là des déserts épouvantables; enfin, toute cette variété infinie qui est sur la surface de la Terre.
Sometimes, for instance, I imagine that I am suspended in the air, and remain there motionless, while the earth turns under me in four-and-twenty hours. I see pass beneath me all these different countenances, some white, others black, others tawny, others olive-colored. At first they wear hats, and then turbans, then heads with long hair, then heads shaven; sometimes towns with steeples, sometimes towns with long spires, which have crescents, sometimes towns with porcelain towers, sometimes extensive countries that have only huts; here wide seas; there frightful deserts; in short, all this infinite variety on the surface of the earth.
In 'Premier Soir', Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (1686, 1863), 43. French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 117-118.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Black (42)  |  Color (137)  |  Countenance (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Crescent (4)  |  Desert (56)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hair (25)  |  Hat (9)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hut (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Porcelain (4)  |  Remain (349)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Spire (5)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tawny (3)  |  Tower (42)  |  Turban (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  White (127)  |  Wide (96)

Question: State the relations existing between the pressure, temperature, and density of a given gas. How is it proved that when a gas expands its temperature is diminished?
Answer: Now the answer to the first part of this question is, that the square root of the pressure increases, the square root of the density decreases, and the absolute temperature remains about the same; but as to the last part of the question about a gas expanding when its temperature is diminished, I expect I am intended to say I don't believe a word of it, for a bladder in front of a fire expands, but its temperature is not at all diminished.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175, Question 1. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bladder (3)  |  Density (25)  |  Diminution (5)  |  Examination (98)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gas (83)  |  Howler (15)  |  Increase (210)  |  Intention (46)  |  Last (426)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  Relation (157)  |  Remain (349)  |  Root (120)  |  Say (984)  |  Square (70)  |  Square Root (12)  |  State (491)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Word (619)

Ratbert (as lab rat, to scientist): Doc, we have to talk. Every day you feed me over a hundred pounds of macaroni and cheese. At first I thought you were just being a good host. But lately I’ve been thinking it could be something far more sinister.
Scientist (thinking): Macaroni and cheese causes paranoia.
Dilbert cartoon strip (24 Jul 1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cheese (9)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Food (199)  |  Good (889)  |  Host (16)  |  Hundred (229)  |  More (2559)  |  Paranoia (3)  |  Rat (37)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Something (719)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)

Ron Hutcheson, a Knight-Ridder reporter: [Mr. President, what are your] personal views [about the theory of] intelligent design?
President George W. Bush: [Laughing. You're] doing a fine job of dragging me back to the past [days as governor of Texas]. ... Then, I said that, first of all, that decision should be made to local school districts, but I felt like both sides ought to be properly taught...”
Hutcheson: Both sides ought to be properly taught?
President: Yes ... so people can understand what the debate is about.
Hutcheson: So the answer accepts the validity of “intelligent design” as an alternative to evolution?
President: I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought, and I'm not suggesting—you're asking me whether or not people ought to be exposed to different ideas, and the answer is yes.
Hutcheson: So we've got to give these groups—...
President: [interrupting] Very interesting question, Hutch. [Laughter from other reporters]
From conversation with reporters at the White House (1 Aug 2005), as quoted by Matthew Cooper in 'Fanning the Controversy Over “Intelligent Design”', Time (3 Aug 2005). The Time writer stated, “The president has gone farther in questioning the widely-taught theories of evolution and natural selection than any president since Ronald Reagan, who advocated teaching creationism in public schools alongside evolution.” Just a few months later, in the nation's first case on that point, on 20 Dec 2005, “a federal judge [John E. Jones] ruled it was unconstitutional for a Pennsylvania school district to present intelligent design as an alternative in high school biology courses, because it is a religious viewpoint,” as reported by Laurie Goodstein in 'Judge Rejects Teaching Intelligent Design', New York Times (21 Dec 2005). Goodstein also wrote “Judge Jones, a Republican appointed by President Bush, concluded that intelligent design was not science,” and that “the evidence in the trial proved that intelligent design was 'creationism relabeled.' The Supreme Court has already ruled that creationism ... cannot be taught as science in a public school.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Answer (366)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Both (493)  |  Debate (38)  |  Decision (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  District (9)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Governor (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Local (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  President (31)  |  Question (621)  |  School (219)  |  Side (233)  |  Teach (277)  |  Texas (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Validity (47)  |  View (488)

Science for the Citizen is ... also written for the large and growing number of adolescents, who realize that they will be the first victims of the new destructive powers of science misapplied.
Science for the Citizen: A Self-Educator based on the Social Background of Scientific Discovery (1938), Author's Confessions, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (51)  |  Growing (98)  |  Large (394)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Victim (35)  |  Will (2355)

The Devil: Reformers … will thrust you first into religion, where you will sprinkle water on babies to save their souls from me ; then it will drive you from religion into science, where you will snatch the babies from the water sprinkling and inoculate them with disease to save them from catching it accidentally.
In Man and Superman: A Comedy and a Philosophy (1903), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Baby (28)  |  Devil (31)  |  Disease (328)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Reformer (5)  |  Religion (361)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Vaccination (6)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

Third Fisherman: Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the sea.
First Fisherman: Why, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones: I can compare our rich misers to nothing so fitly as to a whale; a’ plays and tumbles, driving the poor fry before him, and at last devours them all at a mouthful: such whales have I heard on o’ the land, who never leave gaping till they’ve swallowed the whole parish, church, steeple, bells, and all.
In Pericles (1609), Act 2, Scene 1, line 29-38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bell (35)  |  Church (56)  |  Compare (69)  |  Devour (29)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driving (28)  |  Eat (104)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Master (178)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Poor (136)  |  Sea (308)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Whale (32)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

To Laplace, on receiving a copy of the Mécanique Céleste:
The first six months, which I can spare will be employed in reading it.
Correspondance de Napoléon ler, 27 vendémiaire an VIII [19 October 1799] no. 4384 (1861), Vol. 6, I. Trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Copy (33)  |  Employ (113)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Month (88)  |  Reading (133)  |  Will (2355)

Ultima se tangunt. How expressive, how nicely characterizing withal is mathematics! As the musician recognizes Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert in the first chords, so the mathematician would distinguish his Cauchy, Gauss, Jacobi, Helmholtz in a few pages.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 186-187. From the original German, “Ultima se tangunt. Und wie ausdrucksfähig, wie fein charakterisirend ist dabei die Mathematik. Wie der Musiker bei den ersten Tacten Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert erkennt, so würde der Mathematiker nach wenig Seiten, seinen Cauchy, Gauss, Jacobi, Helmholtz unterscheiden.” [The Latin words translate as “the final touch”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy (10)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Chord (4)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (28)  |  Karl Jacobi (10)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mozart (2)  |  Musician (21)  |  Page (30)  |  Recognize (125)

Wenn sich für ein neues Fossil kein, auf eigenthümliche Eigenschaften desselben hinweisender, Name auffinden lassen Will; als in welchem Falle ich mich bei dem gegenwärtigen zu befinden gestehe; so halte ich es für besser, eine solche Benennung auszuwählen, die an sich gar nichts sagt, und folglich auch zu keinen unrichtigen Begriffen Anlass geben kann. Diesem zufolge will ich den Namen für die gegenwärtige metallische Substanz, gleichergestalt wie bei dem Uranium geschehen, aus der Mythologie, und zwar von den Ursöhnen der Erde, den Titanen, entlehnen, und benenne also dieses neue Metallgeschlecht: Titanium.
Wherefore no name can be found for a new fossil [element] which indicates its peculiar and characteristic properties (in which position I find myself at present), I think it is best to choose such a denomination as means nothing of itself and thus can give no rise to any erroneous ideas. In consequence of this, as I did in the case of Uranium, I shall borrow the name for this metallic substance from mythology, and in particular from the Titans, the first sons of the earth. I therefore call this metallic genus TITANIUM.
Martin Heinrich Klaproth. Original German edition, Beiträge Zur Chemischen Kenntniss Der Mineralkörper (1795), Vol. 1 , 244. English edition, translator not named, Analytical Essays Towards Promoting the Chemical Knowledge of Mineral Substances (1801), Vol. 1, 210. Klaproth's use of the term fossil associates his knowledge of the metal as from ore samples dug out of a mine.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Borrowing (4)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Find (998)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Genus (25)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metal (84)  |  Myself (212)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particular (76)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Rise (166)  |  Son (24)  |  Substance (248)  |  Think (1086)  |  Titan (2)  |  Titanium (2)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Will (2355)

[About reading Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, age 14, in the back seat of his parents' sedan. I almost threw up. I got physically ill when I learned that ospreys and peregrine falcons weren't raising chicks because of what people were spraying on bugs at their farms and lawns. This was the first time I learned that humans could impact the environment with chemicals. [That a corporation would create a product that didn't operate as advertised] was shocking in a way we weren't inured to.
As quoted by Eliza Griswold, in 'The Wild Life of “Silent Spring”', New York Times (23 Sep 2012), Magazine 39.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Back (390)  |  Bug (10)  |  Rachel Carson (43)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chick (3)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Create (235)  |  Environment (216)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Farm (26)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impact (42)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Parent (76)  |  People (1005)  |  Product (160)  |  Reading (133)  |  Shock (37)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spring (133)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

[On seeing the marsupials in Australia for the first time and comparing them to placental mammals:] An unbeliever … might exclaim “Surely two distinct Creators must have been at work.”
In Diary (19 Jan 1836). In Richard D. Keynes (ed.), The Beagle Record: Selections from the Original Pictorial Records and Written Accounts of the Voyage of HMS Beagle (1979), 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Australia (8)  |  Creator (91)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Marsupial (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unbeliever (3)  |  Work (1351)

[Recalling Professor Ira Remsen's remarks (1895) to a group of his graduate students about to go out with their degrees into the world beyond the university:]
He talked to us for an hour on what was ahead of us; cautioned us against giving up the desire to push ahead by continued study and work. He warned us against allowing our present accomplishments to be the high spot in our lives. He urged us not to wait for a brilliant idea before beginning independent research, and emphasized the fact the Lavoisier's first contribution to chemistry was the analysis of a sample of gypsum. He told us that the fields in which the great masters had worked were still fruitful; the ground had only been scratched and the gleaner could be sure of ample reward.
Quoted in Frederick Hutton Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1980), 73.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Against (332)  |  Ample (4)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Caution (24)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Gypsum (2)  |  High (362)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Live (628)  |  Master (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Professor (128)  |  Push (62)  |  Ira Remsen (6)  |  Research (664)  |  Reward (68)  |  Sample (19)  |  Scratch (13)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

[When questioned on his longevity] First of all, I selected my ancestors very wisely. ... They were long-lived, healthy people. Then, as a chemist, I know how to eat, how to exercise, keep my blood circulating. ... I don't worry. I don't get angry at people. I don't worry about things I can't help. I do what I can to make the world a better place to live, but I don't complain if things aren't right. As a scientist I take the world as I find it.
[About celebrating his 77th birthday by swimming a half mile in 22 minutes] I used swim fins and webbed gloves because a man of intelligence should apply his power efficiently, not just churn the water.
As quoted in obituary by Wallace Turner, 'Joel Hildebrand, 101', New York Times (3 May 1983), D27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Anger (20)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Better (486)  |  Birthday (8)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Churn (4)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fin (3)  |  Find (998)  |  Glove (4)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Lived (2)  |  Longevity (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minute (125)  |  Obituary (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

A ... hypothesis may be suggested, which supposes the word 'beginning' as applied by Moses in the first of the Book of Genesis, to express an undefined period of time which was antecedent to the last great change that affected the surface of the earth, and to the creation of its present animal and vegetable inhabitants; during which period a long series of operations and revolutions may have been going on, which, as they are wholly unconnected with the history of the human race, are passed over in silence by the sacred historian, whose only concern with them was largely to state, that the matter of the universe is not eternal and self-existent but was originally created by the power of the Almighty.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (23)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Express (186)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Silence (56)  |  State (491)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconnected (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Word (619)

A bird maintains itself in the air by imperceptible balancing, when near to the mountains or lofty ocean crags; it does this by means of the curves of the winds which as they strike against these projections, being forced to preserve their first impetus bend their straight course towards the sky with divers revolutions, at the beginning of which the birds come to a stop with their wings open, receiving underneath themselves the continual buffetings of the reflex courses of the winds.
'Flight', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Balance (77)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Continual (43)  |  Course (409)  |  Curve (49)  |  Flight (98)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Open (274)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sky (161)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strike (68)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wing (75)

A chemist says that the first alcohol was distilled in Arabia, which may explain those nights.
Anonymous
Space filler, citing Detroit News, in The School of Education Record of the University of North Dakota (Jun 1926), 11 No. 9, 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Distill (2)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Explain (322)  |  Night (120)  |  Say (984)

A Chinese tale tells of some men sent to harm a young girl who, upon seeing her beauty, become her protectors rather than her violators. That’s how I felt seeing the Earth for the first time. "I could not help but love and cherish her.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Earth (996)  |  Feel (367)  |  First Time (10)  |  Girl (37)  |  Harm (39)  |  Help (105)  |  Love (309)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Send (22)  |  Tale (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Young (227)

A few days afterwards, I went to him [the same actuary referred to in another quote] and very gravely told him that I had discovered the law of human mortality in the Carlisle Table, of which he thought very highly. I told him that the law was involved in this circumstance. Take the table of the expectation of life, choose any age, take its expectation and make the nearest integer a new age, do the same with that, and so on; begin at what age you like, you are sure to end at the place where the age past is equal, or most nearly equal, to the expectation to come. “You don’t mean that this always happens?”—“Try it.” He did try, again and again; and found it as I said. “This is, indeed, a curious thing; this is a discovery!” I might have sent him about trumpeting the law of life: but I contented myself with informing him that the same thing would happen with any table whatsoever in which the first column goes up and the second goes down.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Actuary (2)  |  Age (499)  |  Begin (260)  |  Choose (112)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Column (15)  |  Content (69)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Equal (83)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Highly (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inform (47)  |  Informing (5)  |  Integer (10)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  New Age (6)  |  Past (337)  |  Place (177)  |  Quote (42)  |  Send (22)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trumpet (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Up (5)  |  Whatsoever (41)

A first step in the study of civilization is to dissect it into details, and to classify these in their proper groups. Thus, in examining weapons, they are to be classed under spear, club, sling, bow and arrow, and so forth; among textile arts are to be ranged matting, netting, and several grades of making and weaving threads; myths are divided under such headings as myths of sunrise and sunset, eclipse-myths, earthquake-myths, local myths which account for the names of places by some fanciful tale, eponymic myths which account for the parentage of a tribe by turning its name into the name of an imaginary ancestor; under rites and ceremonies occur such practices as the various kinds of sacrifice to the ghosts of the dead and to other spiritual beings, the turning to the east in worship, the purification of ceremonial or moral uncleanness by means of water or fire. Such are a few miscellaneous examples from a list of hundreds … To the ethnographer, the bow and arrow is the species, the habit of flattening children’s skulls is a species, the practice of reckoning numbers by tens is a species. The geographical distribution of these things, and their transmission from region to region, have to be studied as the naturalist studies the geography of his botanical and zoological species.
In Primitive Culture (1871), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Arrow (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Botany (57)  |  Bow (14)  |  Ceremony (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Club (4)  |  Death (388)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Fire (189)  |  Geography (36)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purification (7)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Rite (3)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Skull (5)  |  Sling (4)  |  Spear (6)  |  Species (401)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Tale (16)  |  Textile (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Worship (32)  |  Zoological (5)

A first-rate laboratory is one in which mediocre scientists can produce outstanding work.
Quoted by M. G. K. Menon in his commemoration lecture on H. J. Bhabba, Royal Institution 1967.
Science quotes on:  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mediocre (14)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Work (1351)

A good ornithologist should be able to distinguish birds by their air as well as by their colors and shape; on the ground as well as on the wing, and in the bush as well as in the hand. For, though it must not be said that every species of birds has a manner peculiar to itself, yet there is somewhat, in most genera at least, that at first sight discriminates them and enables a judicious observer to pronounce upon them with some certainty.
Letter (7 Aug 1778) to Daines Barrington, collected in The Natural History of Selborne (1829), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bush (9)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Color (137)  |  Discriminate (4)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Enable (119)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Genus (25)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hand (143)  |  Judicious (3)  |  Least (75)  |  Manner (58)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observer (43)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sight (132)  |  Species (401)  |  Wing (75)

A great ball of fire about a mile in diameter, changing colors as it kept shooting upward, from deep purple to orange, expanding, growing bigger, rising as it was expanding, an elemental force freed from its bonds after being chained for billions of years.
On the first atomic explosion in New Mexico, 16 Jul 1945.
From 'Drama of the Atomic Bomb Found Climax in July 16 Test', in New York Times (26 Sep 1945). This was the first of a series of articles by Laurence, who was the only civilian witness of the first bomb test. He was on a flight to see the dropping of a bomb on Nagasaki. Laurence, science writer for the NYT, had been requested for service to the War Department to explain the atomic bomb to the lay public.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chained (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Mile (39)  |  New (1216)  |  Orange (14)  |  Purple (3)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Upward (43)  |  Year (933)

A man who is convinced of the truth of his religion is indeed never tolerant. At the least, he is to feel pity for the adherent of another religion but usually it does not stop there. The faithful adherent of a religion will try first of all to convince those that believe in another religion and usually he goes on to hatred if he is not successful. However, hatred then leads to persecution when the might of the majority is behind it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Belief (578)  |  Convince (41)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Pity (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Stop (80)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

A man who sets out to justify his existence and his activities has to distinguish two different questions. The first is whether the work which he does is worth doing; and the second is why he does it (whatever its value may be).
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Doing (280)  |  Existence (456)  |  Justification (48)  |  Man (2251)  |  Question (621)  |  Set (394)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

A man’s first duty, a young man’s at any rate, is to be ambitious … the noblest ambition is that of leaving behind one something of permanent value.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 77.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Behind (137)  |  Duty (68)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  Noble (90)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Something (719)  |  Value (365)  |  Young (227)

A man’s value to the community depends primarily on how far his feelings, thoughts, and actions are directed towards promoting the good of his fellows. We call him good or bad according to how he stands in this matter. It looks at first sight as if our estimate of a man depended entirely on his social qualities.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  Bad (180)  |  Call (769)  |  Community (104)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Far (154)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Good (889)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Promote (29)  |  Quality (135)  |  Sight (132)  |  Social (252)  |  Stand (274)  |  Thought (953)  |  Value (365)

A mathematical theory is not to be considered complete until you have made it so clear that you can explain it to the first man whom you meet on the street.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Explain (322)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meet (31)  |  Street (23)  |  Theory (970)

A mathematician of the first rank, Laplace quickly revealed himself as only a mediocre administrator; from his first work we saw that we had been deceived. Laplace saw no question from its true point of view; he sought subtleties everywhere; had only doubtful ideas, and finally carried the spirit of the infinitely small into administration.
As quoted in E.T. Bell, Men of Mathematics (1937, 1965), 182. Without citation, except, “As it is often quoted as … Napoleon’s famous estimate of Laplace, of which he is reported to have delivered himself while he was a prisoner at St. Helena.” Laplace had a six-week tenure in the Ministry of the Interior.
Science quotes on:  |  Administration (12)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mediocre (14)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Question (621)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seek (213)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

A moment's consideration of this case shows what a really great advance in the theory and practise of breeding has been obtained through the discovery of Mendel's law. What a puzzle this case would have presented to the biologist ten years ago! Agouti crossed with chocolate gives in the second filial generation (not in the first) four varieties, viz., agouti, chocolate, black and cinnamon. We could only have shaken our heads and looked wise (or skeptical).
Then we had no explanation to offer for such occurrences other than the 'instability of color characters under domestication,' the 'effects of inbreeding,' 'maternal impressions.' Serious consideration would have been given to the proximity of cages containing both black and cinnamon-agouti mice.
Now we have a simple, rational explanation, which anyone can put to the test. We are able to predict the production of new varieties, and to produce them.
We must not, of course, in our exuberance, conclude that the powers of the hybridizer know no limits. The result under consideration consists, after all, only in the making of new combinations of unit characters, but it is much to know that these units exist and that all conceivable combinations of them are ordinarily capable of production. This valuable knowledge we owe to the discoverer and to the rediscoverers of Mendel's law.
'New Colour Variety of the Guinea Pig', Science, 1908, 28, 250-252.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Cage (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Character (243)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Color (137)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Course (409)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (746)  |  Predict (79)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Rational (90)  |  Result (677)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Wise (131)  |  Year (933)

John Ray quote: A multitude of words doth rather obscure than illustrate, they being a burden to the memory, and the first apt t
A multitude of words doth rather obscure than illustrate, they being a burden to the memory, and the first apt to be forgotten, before we come to the last. So that he that uses many words for the explaining of any subject, doth, like the cuttle-fish, hide himself, for the most part, in his own ink.
John Ray
The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation (1691).
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Burden (27)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fish (120)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Ink (10)  |  Last (426)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Subject (521)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (105)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edge (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Form (959)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Green (63)  |  Growing (98)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vague (47)  |  Victim (35)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

A person filled with gumption doesn’t sit about stewing about things. He’s at the front of the train of his own awareness, watching to see what’s up the track and meeting it when it comes. That’s gumption. If you’re going to repair a motorcycle, an adequate supply of gumption is the first and most important tool. If you haven’t got that you might as well gather up all the other tools and put them away, because they won’t do you any good.
In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974), 272.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fill (61)  |  Front (16)  |  Gather (72)  |  Good (889)  |  Gumption (2)  |  Important (209)  |  Meet (31)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motorcycle (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Repair (11)  |  See (1081)  |  Sit (48)  |  Stew (2)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tool (117)  |  Track (38)  |  Train (114)  |  Watch (109)

A physician’s subject of study is necessarily the patient, and his first field for observation is the hospital. But if clinical observation teaches him to know the form and course of diseases, it cannot suffice to make him understand their nature; to this end he must penetrate into the body to find which of the internal parts are injured in their functions. That is why dissection of cadavers and microscopic study of diseases were soon added to clinical observation. But to-day these various methods no longer suffice; we must push investigation further and, in analyzing the elementary phenomena of organic bodies, must compare normal with abnormal states. We showed elsewhere how incapable is anatomy alone to take account of vital phenenoma, and we saw that we must add study of all physico-chemical conditions which contribute necessary elements to normal or pathological manifestations of life. This simple suggestion already makes us feel that the laboratory of a physiologist-physician must be the most complicated of all laboratories, because he has to experiment with phenomena of life which are the most complex of all natural phenomena.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Already (222)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organic (158)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Patient (199)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Push (62)  |  Saw (160)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Understand (606)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Why (491)

A practical botanist will distinguish, at the first glance, the plant of different quarters of the globe, and yet will be at a loss to tell by what mark he detects them. There is, I know not what look—sinister, dry, obscure, in African plants; superb and elevated in the Asiatic; smooth and cheerful in the American; stunted and indurated in the Alpine.
Quoted in William Whewell, History of the Inductive Sciences (1847), Vol. 3, 355-356, citing ‘Philosophia Botanica’ (1751), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  African (10)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (16)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Dry (57)  |  Glance (34)  |  Globe (47)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mark (43)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Plant (294)  |  Practical (200)  |  Quarter (5)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Tell (340)  |  Will (2355)

A scientific observation is always a committed observation. It confirms or denies one’s preconceptions, one’s first ideas, one’s plan of observation. It shows by demonstration. It structures the phenomenon. It transcends what is close at hand. It reconstructs the real after having reconstructed its representation.
In The New Scientific Spirit (1934).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Idea (843)  |  Observation (555)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plan (117)  |  Preconception (13)  |  Representation (53)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transcend (26)

A sound Physics of the Earth should include all the primary considerations of the earth's atmosphere, of the characteristics and continual changes of the earth's external crust, and finally of the origin and development of living organisms. These considerations naturally divide the physics of the earth into three essential parts, the first being a theory of the atmosphere, or Meteorology, the second, a theory of the earth's external crust, or Hydrogeology, and the third, a theory of living organisms, or Biology.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 18.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Continual (43)  |  Crust (38)  |  Development (422)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  Geology (220)  |  Include (90)  |  Living (491)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Primary (80)  |  Sound (183)  |  Theory (970)

A wonderful exhilaration comes from holding in the mind the deepest questions we can ask. Such questions animate all scientists. Many students of science were first attracted to the field as children by popular accounts of important unsolved problems. They have been waiting ever since to begin working on a mystery. [With co-author Arthur Zajonc]
In George Greenstein and Arthur Zajonc, The Quantum Challenge: Modern Research on the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (2006), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Animate (6)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attract (23)  |  Author (167)  |  Begin (260)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Exhilaration (6)  |  Field (364)  |  Important (209)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Popular (29)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

About ten months ago [1609] a report reached my ears that a certain Fleming [Hans Lippershey] had constructed a spyglass, by means of which visible objects, though very distant from the eye of the observer, were distinctly seen as if nearby... Of this truly remarkable effect several experiences were related, to which some persons gave credence while others denied them. A few days later the report was confirmed to me in a letter from a noble Frenchman at Paris, Jacques Badovere, which caused me to apply myself wholeheartedly to enquire into the means by which I might arrive at the invention of a similar instrument. This I did shortly afterwards, my basis being the theory of refraction. First I prepared a tube of lead, at the ends of which I fitted two glass lenses, both plane on one side while on the other side one was spherically convex and the other concave.
The Starry Messenger (1610), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Certain (550)  |  Concave (6)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Construct (124)  |  Convex (6)  |  Ear (68)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Glass (92)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lens (14)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Month (88)  |  Myself (212)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Reach (281)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Side (233)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Visible (84)

According to Democritus, atoms had lost the qualities like colour, taste, etc., they only occupied space, but geometrical assertions about atoms were admissible and required no further analysis. In modern physics, atoms lose this last property, they possess geometrical qualities in no higher degree than colour, taste, etc. The atom of modern physics can only be symbolized by a partial differential equation in an abstract multidimensional space. Only the experiment of an observer forces the atom to indicate a position, a colour and a quantity of heat. All the qualities of the atom of modern physics are derived, it has no immediate and direct physical properties at all, i.e. every type of visual conception we might wish to design is, eo ipso, faulty. An understanding of 'the first order' is, I would almost say by definition, impossible for the world of atoms.
Philosophic Problems of Nuclear Science, trans. F. C. Hayes (1952), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  According (237)  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Conception (154)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Direct (225)  |  Equation (132)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Force (487)  |  Heat (174)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Last (426)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Required (108)  |  Say (984)  |  Space (500)  |  Taste (90)  |  Type (167)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

According to my derivative hypothesis, a change takes place first in the structure of the animal, and this, when sufficiently advanced, may lead to modifications of habits… . “Derivation” holds that every species changes, in time, by virtue of inherent tendencies thereto. “Natural Selection” holds that no such change can take place without the influence of altered external circumstances educing or selecting such change… . The hypothesis of “natural selection” totters on the extension of a conjectural condition, explanatory of extinction to the majority of organisms, and not known or observed to apply to the origin of any species.
In On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1868), Vol. 3, 808.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extension (59)  |  External (57)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Known (454)  |  Lead (384)  |  Majority (66)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virtue (109)

According to my views, aiming at quantitative investigations, that is at establishing relations between measurements of phenomena, should take first place in the experimental practice of physics. By measurement to knowledge [door meten tot weten] I should like to write as a motto above the entrance to every physics laboratory.
'The Significance of Quantitative Research in Physics', Inaugural Address at the University of Leiden (1882). In Hendrik Casimir, Haphazard Reality: Half a Century of Science (1983), 160-1.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Door (93)  |  Entrance (15)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Motto (28)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practice (204)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  View (488)  |  Write (230)

Accordingly the primordial state of things which I picture is an even distribution of protons and electrons, extremely diffuse and filling all (spherical) space, remaining nearly balanced for an exceedingly long time until its inherent instability prevails. We shall see later that the density of this distribution can be calculated; it was about one proton and electron per litre. There is no hurry for anything to begin to happen. But at last small irregular tendencies accumulate, and evolution gets under way. The first stage is the formation of condensations ultimately to become the galaxies; this, as we have seen, started off an expansion, which then automatically increased in speed until it is now manifested to us in the recession of the spiral nebulae.
As the matter drew closer together in the condensations, the various evolutionary processes followed—evolution of stars, evolution of the more complex elements, evolution of planets and life.
The Expanding Universe (1933), 56-57.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Closer (43)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Density (25)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formation (96)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (356)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Proton (21)  |  Remaining (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed (65)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Stage (143)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)

Adam is fading out. It is on account of Darwin and that crowd. I can see that he is not going to last much longer. There's a plenty of signs. He is getting belittled to a germ—a little bit of a speck that you can't see without a microscope powerful enough to raise a gnat to the size of a church. They take that speck and breed from it: first a flea; then a fly, then a bug, then cross these and get a fish, then a raft of fishes, all kinds, then cross the whole lot and get a reptile, then work up the reptiles till you've got a supply of lizards and spiders and toads and alligators and Congressmen and so on, then cross the entire lot again and get a plant of amphibiums, which are half-breeds and do business both wet and dry, such as turtles and frogs and ornithorhyncuses and so on, and cross-up again and get a mongrel bird, sired by a snake and dam'd by a bat, resulting in a pterodactyl, then they develop him, and water his stock till they've got the air filled with a million things that wear feathers, then they cross-up all the accumulated animal life to date and fetch out a mammal, and start-in diluting again till there's cows and tigers and rats and elephants and monkeys and everything you want down to the Missing Link, and out of him and a mermaid they propagate Man, and there you are! Everything ship-shape and finished-up, and nothing to do but lay low and wait and see if it was worth the time and expense.
'The Refuge of the Derelicts' collected in Mark Twain and John Sutton Tuckey, The Devil's Race-Track: Mark Twain's Great Dark Writings (1980), 340-41. - 1980
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Adam (7)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bird (149)  |  Both (493)  |  Bug (10)  |  Business (149)  |  Church (56)  |  Cow (39)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dry (57)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expense (16)  |  Feather (12)  |  Finish (59)  |  Fish (120)  |  Flea (11)  |  Fly (146)  |  Frog (38)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Lot (151)  |  Low (80)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Missing (21)  |  Missing Link (4)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pterodactyl (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Reptile (29)  |  See (1081)  |  Ship (62)  |  Snake (26)  |  Speck (23)  |  Spider (14)  |  Start (221)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tiger (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toad (10)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Wait (58)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

Adam, the first man, didn’t know anything about the nucleus but Dr. George Gamow, visiting professor from George Washington University, pretends he does. He says for example that the nucleus is 0.00000000000003 feet in diameter. Nobody believes it, but that doesn't make any difference to him.
He also says that the nuclear energy contained in a pound of lithium is enough to run the United States Navy for a period of three years. But to get this energy you would have to heat a mixture of lithium and hydrogen up to 50,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit. If one has a little stove of this temperature installed at Stanford, it would burn everything alive within a radius of 10,000 miles and broil all the fish in the Pacific Ocean.
If you could go as fast as nuclear particles generally do, it wouldn’t take you more than one ten-thousandth of a second to go to Miller's where you could meet Gamow and get more details.
'Gamow interviews Gamow' Stanford Daily, 25 Jun 1936. In Helge Kragh, Cosmology and Controversy: The Historica1 Development of Two Theories of the Universe (1996), 90.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Burn (87)  |  Degree (276)  |  Detail (146)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lithium (3)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Nuclear Power (12)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pacific Ocean (5)  |  Particle (194)  |  Period (198)  |  Professor (128)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  State (491)  |  Temperature (79)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

After a tremendous task has been begun in our time, first by Copernicus and then by many very learned mathematicians, and when the assertion that the earth moves can no longer be considered something new, would it not be much better to pull the wagon to its goal by our joint efforts, now that we have got it underway, and gradually, with powerful voices, to shout down the common herd, which really does not weigh arguments very carefully?
Letter to Galileo (13 Oct 1597). In James Bruce Ross (ed.) and Mary Martin (ed., trans.), 'Comrades in the Pursuit of Truth', The Portable Renaissance Reader (1953, 1981), 599. As quoted and cited in Merry E. Wiesner, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789 (2013), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Common (436)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copernicus_Nicolaud (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effort (227)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Herd (15)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pull (43)  |  Shout (25)  |  Something (719)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Voice (52)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Weigh (49)

After having produced aquatic animals of all ranks and having caused extensive variations in them by the different environments provided by the waters, nature led them little by little to the habit of living in the air, first by the water's edge and afterwards on all the dry parts of the globe. These animals have in course of time been profoundly altered by such novel conditions; which so greatly influenced their habits and organs that the regular gradation which they should have exhibited in complexity of organisation is often scarcely recognisable.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Different (577)  |  Dry (57)  |  Edge (47)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Habit (168)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Organ (115)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rank (67)  |  Regular (46)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Water (481)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (32)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (120)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spite (55)  |  Spring (133)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

After what has been premised, I think we may lay down the following Conclusions. First, It is plain Philosophers amuse themselves in vain, when they inquire for any natural efficient Cause, distinct from a Mind or Spirit. Secondly, Considering the whole Creation is the Workmanship of a wise and good Agent, it should seem to become Philosophers, to employ their Thoughts (contrary to what some hold) about the final Causes of Things: And I must confess, I see no reason, why pointing out the various Ends, to which natural Things are adapted and for which they were originally with unspeakable Wisdom contrived, should not be thought one good way of accounting for them, and altogether worthy a Philosopher.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [first published 1710], (1734), 126-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Agent (70)  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confess (42)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creation (327)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Final (118)  |  Good (889)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vain (83)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Workmanship (7)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Effort (227)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Link (43)  |  Magic (86)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Unlock (10)

Alcmaeon was the first to define the difference between man and animals, saying that man differs from the latter in the fact that he alone has the power of understanding.
On Sense Perceptions, section 25. In Edwin Clarke and C. D. O'Malley, The Human Brain and Spinal Cord (1968), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Man (2251)  |  Man And Animals (5)  |  Power (746)  |  Understanding (513)

Algebra and money are essentially levelers; the first intellectually, the second effectively.
In Gravity and Grace (1952), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Effective (59)  |  Essential (199)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Level (67)  |  Money (170)

Alike fantastic, if too new, or old;
Be not the first by whom the new are try'd,
Not yet the last to lay the old aside.
In An Essay on Criticism. With notes by Mr. Warburton (1749), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Last (426)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Try (283)

All admit that the mountains of the globe are situated mostly along the border regions of the continents (taking these regions as 300 to 1000 miles or more in width), and that over these same areas the sedimentary deposits have, as a general thing, their greatest thickness. At first thought, it would seem almost incredible that the upliftings of mountains, whatever their mode of origin, should have taken place just where the earth’s crust, through these sedimentary accumulations, was the thickest, and where, therefore, there was the greatest weight to be lifted. … Earthquakes show that even now, in this last of the geological ages, the same border regions of the continents, although daily thickening from the sediments borne to the ocean by rivers, are the areas of the greatest and most frequent movements of the earth’s crust. (1866)
[Thus, the facts were known long ago; the explanation by tectonic activity came many decades later.]
In 'Observations on the Origin of Some of the Earth's Features', The American Journal of Science (Sep 1866), Second Series, 42, No. 125, 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Border (9)  |  Continent (76)  |  Crust (38)  |  Daily (87)  |  Decade (59)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Lift (55)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Movement (155)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  River (119)  |  Sediment (8)  |  Show (346)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Uplift (6)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whatever (234)

All creation is a mine, and every man a miner.
The whole earth, and all within it, upon it, and round about it, including himself … are the infinitely various “leads” from which, man, from the first, was to dig out his destiny.
Opening sentences of lecture 'Discoveries and Inventions', (1860) in Discoveries and Inventions (1915).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Creation (327)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Dig (21)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Himself (461)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lead (384)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

All fossil anthropoids found hitherto have been known only from mandibular or maxillary fragments, so far as crania are concerned, and so the general appearance of the types they represented had been unknown; consequently, a condition of affairs where virtually the whole face and lower jaw, replete with teeth, together with the major portion of the brain pattern, have been preserved, constitutes a specimen of unusual value in fossil anthropoid discovery. Here, as in Homo rhodesiensis, Southern Africa has provided documents of higher primate evolution that are amongst the most complete extant. Apart from this evidential completeness, the specimen is of importance because it exhibits an extinct race of apes intermediate between living anthropoids and man ... Whether our present fossil is to be correlated with the discoveries made in India is not yet apparent; that question can only be solved by a careful comparison of the permanent molar teeth from both localities. It is obvious, meanwhile, that it represents a fossil group distinctly advanced beyond living anthropoids in those two dominantly human characters of facial and dental recession on one hand, and improved quality of the brain on the other. Unlike Pithecanthropus, it does not represent an ape-like man, a caricature of precocious hominid failure, but a creature well advanced beyond modern anthropoids in just those characters, facial and cerebral, which are to be anticipated in an extinct link between man and his simian ancestor. At the same time, it is equally evident that a creature with anthropoid brain capacity and lacking the distinctive, localised temporal expansions which appear to be concomitant with and necessary to articulate man, is no true man. It is therefore logically regarded as a man-like ape. I propose tentatively, then, that a new family of Homo-simidæ be created for the reception of the group of individuals which it represents, and that the first known species of the group be designated Australopithecus africanus, in commemoration, first, of the extreme southern and unexpected horizon of its discovery, and secondly, of the continent in which so many new and important discoveries connected with the early history of man have recently been made, thus vindicating the Darwinian claim that Africa would prove to be the cradle of mankind.
'Australopithicus africanus: The Man-Ape of South Africa', Nature, 1925, 115, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Ape (53)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Character (243)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commemoration (2)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continent (76)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Early (185)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Face (212)  |  Failure (161)  |  Family (94)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Primate (11)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Reception (15)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)

All geologic history is full of the beginning and the ends of species–of their first and last days; but it exhibits no genealogies of development.
Lecture to the Edinburgh Philosophical Institution, 'Geology in its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Part 1', collected in The Testimony of the Rocks: or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed (1857), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Development (422)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Genealogy (4)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Last (426)  |  Species (401)

All human affairs follow nature's great analogue, the growth of vegetation. There are three periods of growth in every plant. The first, and slowest, is the invisible growth by the root; the second and much accelerated is the visible growth by the stem; but when root and stem have gathered their forces, there comes the third period, in which the plant quickly flashes into blossom and rushes into fruit.
The beginnings of moral enterprises in this world are never to be measured by any apparent growth. ... At length comes the sudden ripeness and the full success, and he who is called in at the final moment deems this success his own. He is but the reaper and not the labourer. Other men sowed and tilled and he but enters into their labours.
Life Thoughts (1858), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogue (7)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entering (3)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Final (118)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Laborer (7)  |  Labour (98)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Moment (253)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reaper (3)  |  Research (664)  |  Ripeness (2)  |  Root (120)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Stem (31)  |  Success (302)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Visible (84)  |  World (1774)

All knowledge resolves itself into probability. ... In every judgment, which we can form concerning probability, as well as concerning knowledge, we ought always to correct the first judgment deriv'd from the nature of the object, by another judgment, deriv'd from the nature of the understanding.
In A treatise of Human Nature (1888), 181-182.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Concern (228)  |  Correction (40)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Form (959)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Ought (3)  |  Probability (130)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Understanding (513)

All material Things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid Particles … variously associated with the first Creation by the Counsel of an intelligent Agent. For it became him who created them to set them in order: and if he did so, it is unphilosophical to seek for any other Origin of the World, or to pretend that it might arise out of a Chaos by the mere Laws of Nature.
From Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 377-378.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Associated (2)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Composed (3)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Creation (327)  |  Hard (243)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Law (894)  |  Material (353)  |  Mere (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Earth (9)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Solid (116)  |  Thing (1915)  |  World (1774)

All of today’s DNA, strung through all the cells of the earth, is simply an extension and elaboration of [the] first molecule.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 27.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Cell (138)  |  DNA (77)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Extension (59)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  String (21)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)

All other men, being born of woman, have a navel, by reason of the umbilical vessels inserted into it, which from the placenta carry nourishment to children in the womb of their mothers; but it could not be so with our first parents. It cannot be believed that God gave them navels which would have been altogether useless.
A Treatise of Laws of Nature (1727).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carry (127)  |  Children (200)  |  God (757)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reason (744)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Woman (151)  |  Womb (24)

All our knowledge derived from observation … is knowledge gotten at first hand. Hereby we see and know things as they are, or as they appear to us; we take the impressions of them on our minds from the original objects themselves which give a clearer and stronger conception of things.
In Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1793), Vols 3-4, Vol 4, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Clear (100)  |  Conception (154)  |  First Hand (2)  |  Impression (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Original (58)  |  See (1081)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)

All palaetiological sciences, all speculations which attempt to ascend from the present to the remote past, by the chain of causation, do also, by an inevitable consequence, urge us to look for the beginning of the state of things which we thus contemplate; but in none of these cases have men been able, by the aid of science, to arrive at a beginning which is homogeneous with the known course of events. The first origin of language, of civilization, of law and government, cannot be clearly made out by reasoning and research; and just as little, we may expect, will a knowledge of the origin of the existing and extinct species of plants and animals, be the result of physiological and geological investigation.
In History of the Inductive Sciences (1837), Vol. 3, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Causation (14)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Geology (220)  |  Government (110)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Origin (239)  |  Palaetiology (2)  |  Past (337)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plant (294)  |  Present (619)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

All successful men have agreed to one thing,—they were causationists. They believed that things went not by luck, but by law; that there was not a weak or a cracked link in the chain that joins the first and last of things.
From 'Power', The Conduct of Life (1860), collected in The Prose Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1870), 343.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Luck (42)  |  Successful (123)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weak (71)

All the inventions that the world contains,
Were not by reason first found out, nor brains;
But pass for theirs who had the luck to light
Upon them by mistake or oversight.
Under 'Butler's Poems: Miscellaneous Thoughts', in Samuel Johnson (ed.), The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper(1810), Vol. 8, 227.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Invention (369)  |  Light (607)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Reason (744)  |  World (1774)

All the modern higher mathematics is based on a calculus of operations, on laws of thought. All mathematics, from the first, was so in reality; but the evolvers of the modern higher calculus have known that it is so. Therefore elementary teachers who, at the present day, persist in thinking about algebra and arithmetic as dealing with laws of number, and about geometry as dealing with laws of surface and solid content, are doing the best that in them lies to put their pupils on the wrong track for reaching in the future any true understanding of the higher algebras. Algebras deal not with laws of number, but with such laws of the human thinking machinery as have been discovered in the course of investigations on numbers. Plane geometry deals with such laws of thought as were discovered by men intent on finding out how to measure surface; and solid geometry with such additional laws of thought as were discovered when men began to extend geometry into three dimensions.
In Lectures on the Logic of Arithmetic (1903), Preface, 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Extend (128)  |  Future (429)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Present (619)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reality (261)  |  Solid (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wrong (234)

All the real true knowledge we have of Nature is intirely experimental, insomuch that, how strange soever the assertion seems, we may lay this down as the first fundamental unerring rule in physics, That it is not within the compass of human understanding to assign a purely speculative reason for any one phaenomenon in nature.
In The Procedure, Extent, and Limits of Human Understanding (1728, 1729), 205-206.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Compass (34)  |  Down (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Purely (109)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Seem (145)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Strange (157)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

All these delusions of Divination have their root and foundation from Astrology. For whether the lineaments of the body, countenance, or hand be inspected, whether dream or vision be seen, whether marking of entrails or mad inspiration be consulted, there must be a Celestial Figure first erected, by the means of whole indications, together with the conjectures of Signs and Similitudes, they endeavour to find out the truth of what is desired.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Body (537)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Countenance (8)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Dream (208)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Entrails (4)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Indication (33)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Mad (53)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Root (120)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)

All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. [Caution: expressed in this wording, it is likely misattributed.]
Schopenhauer did write a different reflection with this theme, much less tersely, on how the acceptance of truth has “only one short victory celebration is granted between the two long periods where it is despised as paradox and condemned as trivial.” See the Introduction to The World as Will and Representation (1819), xvi. The “three stages” quote is included here so it may be found with this caution: it is questionable that Schopenhauer expressed this idea with this wording. Although widely repeated, Webmaster has not yet found any citation to a primary source for these words. (Schopenhauer was German, so any quote in English represents a translation.) According to Ralph Keys, diligent search by scholars has found no written source in German, either. The sentiment has been variously restated and attributed to other authors. A somewhat better-documented version of the “three stages of truth” is attributed to Louis Agassiz, though still with only second-person references. See Ralph Keyes, The Quote Verifier (2006), 225-226.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Caution (24)  |  Evident (91)  |  Express (186)  |  Misattributed (19)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Stage (143)  |  Three (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)

All you really need to know for the moment is that the universe is a lot more complicated than you might think, even if you start from a position of thinking it’s pretty damn complicated in the first place.
In Mostly Harmless (1992), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Start (221)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Universe (857)

All your names I and my friend approve of or nearly all as to sense & expression, but I am frightened by their length & sound when compounded. As you will see I have taken deoxide and skaiode because they agree best with my natural standard East and West. I like Anode & Cathode better as to sound, but all to whom I have shewn them have supposed at first that by Anode I meant No way.
Letter (3 May 1834) to William Whewell, who coined the terms. In Frank A. J. L. James (ed.), The Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1993), Vol. 2, 181. Note: Here “No way” is presumably not an idiomatic exclamation, but a misinterpretation from the Greek prefix, -a “not”or “away from,” and hodos meaning “way.” The Greek ἄνοδος anodos means “way up” or “ascent.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anode (4)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Compound (113)  |  Electrolysis (7)  |  Expression (175)  |  Friend (168)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sound (183)  |  Way (1217)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Will (2355)

Almost all really new ideas have a certain aspect of foolishness when they are first produced.
In Science and the Modern World (1926, 2011), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Certain (550)  |  Foolishness (10)  |  Idea (843)  |  New (1216)  |  Produced (187)

Although a science fair can seem like a big “pain” it can help you understand important scientific principles, such as Newton’s First Law of Inertia, which states: “A body at rest will remain at rest until 8:45 p.m. the night before the science fair project is due, at which point the body will come rushing to the body’s parents, who are already in their pajamas, and shout, “I JUST REMEMBERED THE SCIENCE FAIR IS TOMORROW AND WE GOTTA GO TO THE STORE RIGHT NOW!”
'Science: It’s Just Not Fair', Miami Herald (22 Mar 1998)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Body (537)  |  Due (141)  |  Important (209)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Pain (136)  |  Parent (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fair (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shout (25)  |  State (491)  |  Store (48)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

Although I was first drawn to math and science by the certainty they promised, today I find the unanswered questions and the unexpected connections at least as attractive.
In Warped Passages (2005), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (23)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Connection (162)  |  Draw (137)  |  Find (998)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Promise (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Today (314)  |  Unanswered (8)  |  Unexpected (52)

Although I was four years at the University [of Wisconsin], I did not take the regular course of studies, but instead picked out what I thought would be most useful to me, particularly chemistry, which opened a new world, mathematics and physics, a little Greek and Latin, botany and and geology. I was far from satisfied with what I had learned, and should have stayed longer.
[Enrolled in Feb 1861, left in 1863 without completing a degree, and began his first botanical foot journey.]
John Muir
The Story of My Boyhood and Youth (1913), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (57)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Geology (220)  |  Greek (107)  |  Journey (42)  |  Latin (38)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Regular (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Although my Aachen colleagues and students at first regarded the “pure mathematician” with suspicion, I soon had the satisfaction of being accepted a useful member not merely in teaching but also engineering practice; thus I was requested to render expert opinions and to participate in the Ingenieurverein [engineering association].
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 527. Cited from 'Autobiographische Skizze', Gesammelte Schriften, Vol 4, 673–682.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Association (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Expert (65)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Member (41)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Participate (8)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pure (291)  |  Regard (305)  |  Render (93)  |  Request (7)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Soon (186)  |  Student (300)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Useful (250)

Although the ocean’s surface seems at first to be completely homogeneous, after half a month we began to differentiate various seas and even different parts of oceans by their characteristic shades. We were astonished to discover that, during an flight, you have to learn anew not only to look, but also to see. At first the finest nuances of color elude you, but gradually your vision sharpens and your color perception becomes richer, and the planet spreads out before you with all its indescribable beauty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Color (137)  |  Completely (135)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Elude (10)  |  Fine (33)  |  Flight (98)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Half (56)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Indescribable (2)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Month (88)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Part (222)  |  Perception (97)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rich (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Shade (31)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Spread (83)  |  Surface (209)  |  Various (200)  |  Vision (123)

Although [Charles Darwin] would patiently go on repeating experiments where there was any good to be gained, he could not endure having to repeat an experiment which ought, if complete care had been taken, to have told its story at first—and this gave him a continual anxiety that the experiment should not be wasted; he felt the experiment to be sacred, however slight a one it was. He wished to learn as much as possible from an experiment, so that he did not confine himself to observing the single point to which the experiment was directed, and his power of seeing a number of other things was wonderful. ... Any experiment done was to be of some use, and ... strongly he urged the necessity of keeping the notes of experiments which failed, and to this rule he always adhered.
In Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1908), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Care (186)  |  Complete (204)  |  Continual (43)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Note (34)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Single (353)  |  Story (118)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonderful (149)

America, so far as her physical history is concerned, has been falsely denominated the New World. Hers was the first dry land lifted out of the waters, hers the first shore washed by the ocean that enveloped all the earth beside; and while Europe was represented only by islands rising here and there above the sea, America already stretched an unbroken line of land from Nova Scotia to the Far West.
Geological Sketches (1866), I.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  America (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Dry (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  History (673)  |  Island (46)  |  Lift (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nova (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Physical (508)  |  Represent (155)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Wash (21)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Among all the liberal arts, the first is logic, and specifically that part of logic which gives initial instruction about words. … [T]he word “logic” has a broad meaning, and is not restricted exclusively to the science of argumentative reasoning. [It includes] Grammar [which] is “the science of speaking and writing correctly—the starting point of all liberal studies.”
In John of Salisbury and Daniel D. McGarry (trans.), 'Whence grammar gets its name', The Metalogicon (2009), 37. It is footnoted: Isidore, Etym., i, 5, §1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Include (90)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Point (580)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Start (221)  |  Study (653)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

An acquaintance of mine, a notary by profession, who, by perpetual writing, began first to complain of an excessive wariness of his whole right arm which could be removed by no medicines, and which was at last succeeded by a perfect palsy of the whole arm. … He learned to write with his left hand, which was soon thereafter seized with the same disorder.
Concerning a notary, a scribe skilled in rapid writing, in a translation published by the University of Chicago Press (1940).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Arm (81)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Soon (186)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

An amino acid residue (other than glycine) has no symmetry elements. The general operation of conversion of one residue of a single chain into a second residue equivalent to the first is accordingly a rotation about an axis accompanied by translation along the axis. Hence the only configurations for a chain compatible with our postulate of equivalence of the residues are helical configurations.
[Co-author with American chemist, ert B. Corey (1897-1971) and H. R. Branson]
'The Structure of Proteins: Two Hydrogen-bonded Helical Configurations of the Polypeptide Chain', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1951), 37, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Axis (9)  |  Chain (50)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Compatibility (4)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Element (310)  |  Equivalence (6)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  General (511)  |  Helix (10)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Residue (9)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Single (353)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Translation (21)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Higgledy-Piggledy', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Get Rid (4)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incoherency (2)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Introduced (3)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Patience (56)  |  Rid (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Shy (3)  |  Wear (18)

An idea must not be condemned for being a little shy and incoherent; all new ideas are shy when introduced first among our old ones. We should have patience and see whether the incoherency is likely to wear off or to wear on, in which latter case the sooner we get rid of them the better.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216-217.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Patience (56)  |  See (1081)

An important fact, an ingenious aperçu, occupies a very great number of men, at first only to make acquaintance with it; then to understand it; and afterwards to work it out and carry it further.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Carry (127)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Great (1574)  |  Important (209)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Understand (606)  |  Work (1351)

An old French geometer used to say that a mathematical theory was never to be considered complete till you had made it so clear that you could explain it to the first man you met in the street.
In Nature (1873), 8, 458.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Explain (322)  |  French (20)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meet (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Say (984)  |  Street (23)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (970)

Anaxagoras of Clazomenae, son of Hegesiboulos, held that the first principles of things were the homoeomeries. For it seemed to him quite impossible that anything should come into being from the non-existent or be dissolved into it. Anyhow we take in nourishment which is simple and homogeneous, such as bread or water, and by this are nourished hair, veins, arteries, flesh, sinews, bones and all the other parts of the body. Which being so, we must agree that everything that exists is in the nourishment we take in, and that everything derives its growth from things that exist. There must be in that nourishment some parts that are productive of blood, some of sinews, some of bones, and so on-parts which reason alone can apprehend. For there is no need to refer the fact that bread and water produce all these things to sense-perception; rather, there are in bread and water parts which only reason can apprehend.
Aetius 1.3.5. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 375.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bread (39)  |  Derive (65)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Growth (187)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vein (25)  |  Water (481)

Anaximander son of Praxiades, of Miletus: he said that the principle and element is the Indefinite, not distinguishing air or water or anything else. … he was the first to discover a gnomon, and he set one up on the Sundials (?) in Sparta, according to Favorinus in his Universal History, to mark solstices and equinoxes; and he also constructed hour indicators. He was the first to draw an outline of earth and sea, but also constructed a [celestial] globe. Of his opinions he made a summary exposition, which I suppose Apollodorus the Athenian also encountered. Apollodorus says in his Chronicles that Anaximander was sixty-four years old in the year of the fifty-eighth Olympiad [547/6 B.C.], and that he died shortly afterwards (having been near his prime approximately during the time of Polycrates, tyrant of Samos).
Diogenes Laërtius II, 1-2. In G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1957), 99. The editors of this translation note that Anaximander may have introduced the gnomon into Greece, but he did not discover it—the Babylonians used it earlier, and the celestial sphere, and the twelve parts of the day.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Air (347)  |  Anaximander (5)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Construct (124)  |  Discover (553)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  History (673)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Principle (507)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Set (394)  |  Summary (11)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universal (189)  |  Water (481)  |  Year (933)

Anaximander the Milesian, a disciple of Thales, first dared to draw the inhabited world on a tablet; after him Hecataeus the Milesian, a much-travelled man, made the map more accurate, so that it became a source of wonder.
Agathemerus 1.1. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Anaximander (5)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Draw (137)  |  Man (2251)  |  Map (44)  |  More (2559)  |  Tablet (6)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

And for rejecting such a Medium, we have the Authority of those the oldest and most celebrated Philosophers of Greece and Phoenicia, who made a Vacuum, and Atoms, and the Gravity of Atoms, the first Principles of their Philosophy; tacitly attributing Gravity to some other Cause than dense Matter. Later Philosophers banish the Consideration of such a Cause out of natural Philosophy, feigning Hypotheses for explaining all things mechanically, and referring other Causes to Metaphysicks: Whereas the main Business of natural Philosophy is to argue from Phaenomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects, till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these and such like Questions. What is there in places almost empty of Matter, and whence is it that the Sun and Planets gravitate towards one another, without dense Matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain; and whence arises all that Order and Beauty which we see in the World? ... does it not appear from phaenomena that there is a Being incorporeal, living, intelligent, omnipresent, who in infinite space, as it were in his Sensory, sees the things themselves intimately, and thoroughly perceives them, and comprehends them wholly by their immediate presence to himself.
In Opticks, (1704, 2nd. Ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 28, 343-5. Newton’s reference to “Nature does nothing in vain” recalls the axiom from Aristotle, which may be seen as “Natura nihil agit frustra” in the Aristotle Quotes on this web site.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Atom (355)  |  Authority (95)  |  Banish (11)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Business (149)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  God (757)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greek (107)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Omnipresent (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Planet (356)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Question (621)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Resolve (40)  |  See (1081)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Space (500)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Vain (83)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

And if you want the exact moment in time, it was conceived mentally on 8th March in this year one thousand six hundred and eighteen, but submitted to calculation in an unlucky way, and therefore rejected as false, and finally returning on the 15th of May and adopting a new line of attack, stormed the darkness of my mind. So strong was the support from the combination of my labour of seventeen years on the observations of Brahe and the present study, which conspired together, that at first I believed I was dreaming, and assuming my conclusion among my basic premises. But it is absolutely certain and exact that the proportion between the periodic times of any two planets is precisely the sesquialterate proportion of their mean distances.
Harmonice Mundi, The Harmony of the World (1619), book V, ch. 3. Trans. E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan and J. V. Field (1997), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Basic (138)  |  Tycho Brahe (23)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Distance (161)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Labour (98)  |  March (46)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Period (198)  |  Planet (356)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Premise (37)  |  Present (619)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strong (174)  |  Study (653)  |  Support (147)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

André Weil suggested that there is a logarithmic law at work: first-rate people attract other first-rate people, but second-rate people tend to hire third-raters, and third-rate people hire fifth-raters. If a dean or a president is genuinely interested in building and maintaining a high-quality university (and some of them are), then he must not grant complete self-determination to a second-rate department; he must, instead, use his administrative powers to intervene and set things right. That’s one of the proper functions of deans and presidents, and pity the poor university in which a large proportion of both the faculty and the administration are second-raters; it is doomed to diverge to minus infinity.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: an Automathography (1985), 123.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Administration (12)  |  Attract (23)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Complete (204)  |  Dean (2)  |  Department (92)  |  Determination (78)  |  Diverge (3)  |  Doom (32)  |  Faculty (72)  |  First-Rate (2)  |  Function (228)  |  Grant (73)  |  High (362)  |  Hire (7)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Minus (7)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Poor (136)  |  Power (746)  |  President (31)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quality (135)  |  Right (452)  |  Second-Rate (4)  |  Self (267)  |  Set (394)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  University (121)  |  Use (766)  |  André Weil (3)  |  Work (1351)

Anybody who looks at living organisms knows perfectly well that they can produce other organisms like themselves. This is their normal function, they wouldn’t exist if they didn’t do this, and it’s not plausible that this is the reason why they abound in the world. In other words, living organisms are very complicated aggregations of elementary parts, and by any reasonable theory of probability or thermodynamics highly improbable. That they should occur in the world at all is a miracle of the first magnitude; the only thing which removes, or mitigates, this miracle is that they reproduce themselves. Therefore, if by any peculiar accident there should ever be one of them, from there on the rules of probability do not apply, and there will be many of them, at least if the milieu is reasonable. But a reasonable milieu is already a thermodynamically much less improbable thing. So, the operations of probability somehow leave a loophole at this point, and it is by the process of self-reproduction that they are pierced.
From lecture series on self-replicating machines at the University of Illinois, Lecture 5 (Dec 1949), 'Re-evaluation of the Problems of Complicated Automata—Problems of Hierarchy and Evolution', Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata (1966).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abound (17)  |  Accident (88)  |  Aggregation (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Apply (160)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exist (443)  |  Function (228)  |  Improbable (13)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Milieu (5)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Mitigate (3)  |  Normal (28)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pierce (3)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Point (580)  |  Probability (130)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remove (45)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Rule (294)  |  Self (267)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Anyone who tries to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn’t know the first thing about either.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Education (378)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Know (1518)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)

Anything worth doing is worth doing twice, the first time quick and dirty and the second time the best way you can.
As quoted in Steven Chu and Charles H. Townes, 'Arthur Schawlow', Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (2003), Vol. 83, 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Doing (280)  |  Quick (13)  |  Research (664)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worth (169)

Are you aware that humanity is just a blip? Not even a blip. Just a fraction of a fraction of what the universe has been and will become? Talk about perspective. I figure I can’t feel so entirely stupid about saying what I said because, first of all, it’s true. And second of all, there will be no remnant of me or my stupidity. No fossil or geographical shift that can document, really, even the most important historical human beings, let alone my paltry admissions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admission (17)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aware (31)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blip (2)  |  Document (7)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Feel (367)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Historical (70)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Important (209)  |  Let (61)  |  Most (1731)  |  Paltry (4)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Really (78)  |  Remnant (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Shift (44)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Talk (100)  |  True (212)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Arithmetic is the first of the sciences and the mother of safety.
In Samuel Brohl and Partner (1883), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Mother (114)  |  Safety (54)  |  Science (3879)

Art and religion first; then philosophy; lastly science. That is the order of the great subjects of life, that’s their order of importance.
Dialog by the character Miss Brodie, in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961, 2004), 23-24.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Order (632)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)

As a second year high school chemistry student, I still have a vivid memory of my excitement when I first saw a chart of the periodic table of elements. The order in the universe seemed miraculous, and I wanted to study and learn as much as possible about the natural sciences.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 555.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Chart (6)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Element (310)  |  Excitement (50)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Memory (134)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Order (632)  |  Periodic (3)  |  Periodic Table (17)  |  Possible (552)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seemed (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Table (104)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Want (497)  |  Year (933)

As an Art, Mathematics has its own standard of beauty and elegance which can vie with the more decorative arts. In this it is diametrically opposed to a Baroque art which relies on a wealth of ornamental additions. Bereft of superfluous addenda, Mathematics may appear, on first acquaintance, austere and severe. But longer contemplation reveals the classic attributes of simplicity relative to its significance and depth of meaning.
In The Skeleton Key of Mathematics (1949), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Addition (66)  |  Appear (118)  |  Art (657)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Austere (7)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bereft (2)  |  Classic (11)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Depth (94)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Longer (10)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Opposed (3)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Relative (39)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Severe (16)  |  Significance (113)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Standard (57)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Wealth (94)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Common (436)  |  Communication (94)  |  Compass (34)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (91)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Extend (128)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  France (27)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Judge (108)  |  Key (50)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Past (337)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (619)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silk (13)  |  Spark (31)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Storm (51)  |  String (21)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)

As far as the meaning of life in general, or in the abstract, as far as I can see, there is none. If all of life were suddenly to disappear from earth and anywhere else it may exist, or if none had ever formed in the first place, I think the Universe would continue to exist without perceptible change. However, it is always possible for an individual to invest his own life with meaning that he can find significant. He can so order his life that he may find as much beauty and wisdom in it as he can, and spread as much of that to others as possible.
In a book proposal for The Meaning of Life edited by Hugh S. Moorhead, 1989.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invest (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Significant (74)  |  Spread (83)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)

As I have already mentioned, wherever cells are formed, this tough fluid precedes the first solid structures that indicate the presence of future cells. Moreover, we must assume that this substance furnishes the material for the formation of the nucleus and of the primitive sac, not only because these structures are closely apposed to it, but also because,they react to iodine in the same way. We must assume also that the organization of this substance is the process that inaugurates the formation of new cells. It therefore seems justifiable for me to propose a name that refers to its physiological function: I propose the word protoplasma.
H. Mohl, Botanisch Zeitung (1846), 4, col. 73, trans. Henry Harris, The Birth of the Cell (1999), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Cell (138)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Mention (82)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Organization (114)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Presence (63)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Process (423)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tough (19)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Word (619)

As I review the nature of the creative drive in the inventive scientists that have been around me, as well as in myself, I find the first event is an urge to make a significant intellectual contribution that can be tangible embodied in a product or process.
Quoted in New York Times (2 Mar 1991), 1 and 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Drive (55)  |  Embody (16)  |  Event (216)  |  Find (998)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Review (26)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Significant (74)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Urge (17)

As immoral and unethical as this may be [to clone a human], there is a real chance that could have had some success. This is a pure numbers game. If they have devoted enough resources and they had access to enough eggs, there is a distinct possibility. But, again, without any scientific data, one has to be extremely skeptical.
Commenting on the announcement of the purported birth of the first cloned human.
Transcript of TV interview by Sanjay Gupta aired on CNN (27 Dec 2002).
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Birth (147)  |  Chance (239)  |  Clon (3)  |  Clone (8)  |  Comment (11)  |  Data (156)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Egg (69)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Game (101)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immoral (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purport (3)  |  Real (149)  |  Resource (63)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Success (302)

As Karl Marx once noted: “Hegel remarks somewhere that all great, world-historical facts and personages occur, as it were, twice. He forgot to add: the first time as tragedy, the second as farce.” William Jennings Bryan and the Scopes trial was a tragedy. The creationists and intelligent design theorists are a farce.
In '75 Years and Still No Peace'. Humanist (Sep 2000)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Design (195)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Farce (5)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Karl Marx (21)  |  Occur (150)  |  Personage (4)  |  Scope (45)  |  John T. Scopes (5)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Trial (57)  |  World (1774)

As our researches have made clear, an animal high in the organic scale only reaches this rank by passing through all the intermediate states which separate it from the animals placed below it. Man only becomes man after traversing transitional organisatory states which assimilate him first to fish, then to reptiles, then to birds and mammals.
Annales des Sciences Naturelles (1834), 2 (ii), 248. Trans. in E. S. Russell, Form and Function (1916), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Become (815)  |  Below (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Clarification (7)  |  Fish (120)  |  High (362)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organization (114)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Research (664)  |  Scale (121)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)

As science is more and more subject to grave misuse as well as to use for human benefit it has also become the scientist's responsibility to become aware of the social relations and applications of his subject, and to exert his influence in such a direction as will result in the best applications of the findings in his own and related fields. Thus he must help in educating the public, in the broad sense, and this means first educating himself, not only in science but in regard to the great issues confronting mankind today.
Message to University Students Studying Science', Kagaku Asahi 11, no. 6 (1951), 28-29. Quoted in Elof Axel Carlson, Genes, Radiation, and Society: The Life and Work of H. J. Muller (1981), 371.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Application (242)  |  Become (815)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Best (459)  |  Direction (175)  |  Education (378)  |  Exert (39)  |  Field (364)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Issue (42)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misuse (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relation (157)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Subject (521)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

As soon as the art of Flying is Found out, some of their Nation will make one of the first Colonies, that shall Transplant into that other World.
In A Discovery of a New World, Or, a Discourse: Tending to Prove, that 'tis Probable There May Be Another Habitable World in the Moon (1638, 1684), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Colony (8)  |  Flying (72)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nation (193)  |  Other (2236)  |  Soon (186)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

As soon as we got rid of the backroom attitude and brought our apparatus fully into the Department with an inexhaustible supply of living patients with fascinating clinical problems, we were able to get ahead really fast. Any new technique becomes more attractive if its clinical usefulness can be demonstrated without harm, indignity or discomfort to the patient... Anyone who is satisfied with his diagnostic ability and with his surgical results is unlikely to contribute much to the launching of a new medical science. He should first be consumed with a divine discontent with things as they are. It greatly helps, of course, to have the right idea at the right time, and quite good ideas may come, Archimedes fashion, in one's bath..
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Become (815)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Divine (112)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Living (491)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Supply (93)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usefulness (86)

As soon … as it was observed that the stars retained their relative places, that the times of their rising and setting varied with the seasons, that sun, moon, and planets moved among them in a plane, … then a new order of things began.… Science had begun, and the first triumph of it was the power of foretelling the future; eclipses were perceived to recur in cycles of nineteen years, and philosophers were able to say when an eclipse was to be looked for. The periods of the planets were determined. Theories were invented to account for their eccentricities; and, false as those theories might be, the position of the planets could be calculated with moderate certainty by them.
Lecture delivered to the Royal Institution (5 Feb 1864), 'On the Science of History'. Collected in Notices of the Proceedings at the Meetings of the Members of the Royal Institution of Great Britain with Abstracts of the Discourses (1866), Vol. 4, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (429)  |  Look (582)  |  Moon (237)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plane (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Season (47)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Year (933)

As systematic unity is what first raises ordinary knowledge to the rank of science, that is, makes a system out of a mere aggregate of knowledge, architectonic is the doctrine of the scientific in our knowledge, and therefore necessarily forms part of the doctrine of method.
In'The Transcendental Doctrine of Method', Critique of Pure Reason (2016), 653. Note: architectonic = the art of constructing systems.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Form (959)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Rank (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Unity (78)

As the Director of the Theoretical Division of Los Alamos, I participated at the most senior level in the World War II Manhattan Project that produced the first atomic weapons.
Now, at age 88, I am one of the few remaining such senior persons alive. Looking back at the half century since that time, I feel the most intense relief that these weapons have not been used since World War II, mixed with the horror that tens of thousands of such weapons have been built since that time—one hundred times more than any of us at Los Alamos could ever have imagined.
Today we are rightly in an era of disarmament and dismantlement of nuclear weapons. But in some countries nuclear weapons development still continues. Whether and when the various Nations of the World can agree to stop this is uncertain. But individual scientists can still influence this process by withholding their skills.
Accordingly, I call on all scientists in all countries to cease and desist from work creating, developing, improving and manufacturing further nuclear weapons - and, for that matter, other weapons of potential mass destruction such as chemical and biological weapons.
[On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of Hiroshima.]
Letter, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Nov 1995), 51:6, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Back (390)  |  Biological (137)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Continue (165)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Development (422)  |  Disarmament (6)  |  Division (65)  |  Era (51)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Horror (14)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Looking (189)  |  Los Alamos (5)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Weapon (17)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Potential (69)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Project (73)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Senior (6)  |  Skill (109)  |  Still (613)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Various (200)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

As the first monogamian family has improved greatly since the commencement of civilization, and very sensibly in our times, it is at least supposable that it is capable of still further improvement until the equality of the sexes is attained.
As quoted in Charles H. Seaholm, The Kelts and the Vikings (1974), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Capable (168)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Equality (31)  |  Family (94)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)

As to how far in advance of the first flight the man should know he’s going. I’m not in agreement with the argument that says word should be delayed until the last possible moment to save the pilot from developing a bad case of the jitters. If we don’t have the confidence to keep from getting clutched at that time, we have no business going at all. If I’m the guy going, I’ll be glad to get the dope as soon as possible. As for keeping this a big secret from us and having us all suited up and then saying to one man “you go” and stuffing him in and putting the lid on that thing and away he goes, well, we’re all big boys now.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38. In fact, he was the first to fly in Earth orbit on 20 Feb 1962, though Alan Shepard was picked for the earlier first suborbital flight.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bad (180)  |  Big (48)  |  Boy (94)  |  Business (149)  |  Case (99)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Delay (20)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dope (3)  |  Flight (98)  |  Glad (7)  |  Go (6)  |  Going (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Possible (552)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Secret (194)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Suit (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Word (619)

As to the need of improvement there can be no question whilst the reign of Euclid continues. My own idea of a useful course is to begin with arithmetic, and then not Euclid but algebra. Next, not Euclid, but practical geometry, solid as well as plane; not demonstration, but to make acquaintance. Then not Euclid, but elementary vectors, conjoined with algebra, and applied to geometry. Addition first; then the scalar product. Elementary calculus should go on simultaneously, and come into vector algebraic geometry after a bit. Euclid might be an extra course for learned men, like Homer. But Euclid for children is barbarous.
Electro-Magnetic Theory (1893), Vol. 1, 148. In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Addition (66)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Applied (177)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Barbarous (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Education (378)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Next (236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Product (160)  |  Question (621)  |  Reign (23)  |  Solid (116)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vector (6)

Ask a follower of Bacon what [science] the new philosophy, as it was called in the time of Charles the Second, has effected for mankind, and his answer is ready; “It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the splendour of the day; it has extended the range of the human vision; it has multiplied the power of the human muscles; it has accelerated motion; it has annihilated distance; it has facilitated intercourse, correspondence, all friendly offices, all dispatch of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, to cross the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind. These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first-fruits; for it is a philosophy which never rests, which has never attained, which is never perfect. Its law is progress. A point which yesterday was invisible is its goal to-day, and will be its starting-point to-morrow.”
From essay (Jul 1837) on 'Francis Bacon' in Edinburgh Review. In Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay and Lady Trevelyan (ed.) The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete (1871), Vol. 6, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Against (332)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Business (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Car (71)  |  Cave (15)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Depth (94)  |  Descend (47)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extend (128)  |  Father (110)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Knot (11)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lighting (5)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mining (18)  |  Motion (310)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Office (71)  |  Pain (136)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Range (99)  |  Rest (280)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Strength (126)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Thunderbolt (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vision (123)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yesterday (36)

Astronomy, Benjamin mused, was a lot like a detective story with the clues revealed first, and the actual body only later—if ever.
Eater (2000). In Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations: From the Inner Mind to the Outer Limits (2006), 323.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Body (537)  |  Detective (10)  |  Lot (151)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Story (118)

At first he who invented any art that went beyond the common perceptions of man was naturally admired by men, not only because there was something useful in the inventions, but because he was thought wise and superior to the rest. But as more arts were invented, and some were directed to the necessities of life, others to its recreation, the inventors of the latter were always regarded as wiser than the inventors of the former, because their branches of knowledge did not aim at utility.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 981b, 13-20. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1553.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Common (436)  |  Direct (225)  |  Former (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Something (719)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Wise (131)

At first it seems obvious, but the more you think about it the stranger the deductions from this axiom seem to become; in the end you cease to understand what is meant by it.
As quoted, without citation, in Stories about Sets (1968), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Become (815)  |  Cease (79)  |  Deduction (82)  |  End (590)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strange (157)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)

At first sight nothing seems more obvious than that everything has a beginning and an end, and that everything can be subdivided into smaller parts. Nevertheless, for entirely speculative reasons the philosophers of Antiquity, especially the Stoics, concluded this concept to be quite unnecessary. The prodigious development of physics has now reached the same conclusion as those philosophers, Empedocles and Democritus in particular, who lived around 500 B.C. and for whom even ancient man had a lively admiration.
'Development of the Theory of Electrolytic Dissociation', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1903. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1901-1921 (1966), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Empedocles (10)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Lively (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sight (132)  |  Unnecessary (23)

At first the squirrel spins his cage; then the cage spins him. Men of business may take warning.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (149)  |  Cage (12)  |  Spin (26)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Warning (17)

At first, the people talking about ecology were only defending the fishes, the animals, the forest, and the river. They didn’t realize that human beings were in the forest—and that these humans were the real ecologists, because they couldn’t live without the forest and the forest couldn’t be saved without them.
Quoted in Andrew Revkin, The Burning Season
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Defend (30)  |  Ecologist (9)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Fish (120)  |  Forest (150)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Live (628)  |  People (1005)  |  Real (149)  |  Realize (147)  |  River (119)  |  Save (118)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)

At first, the sea, the earth, and the heaven, which covers all things, were the only face of nature throughout the whole universe, which men have named Chaos; a rude and undigested mass, and nothing more than an inert weight, and the discordant atoms of things not harmonizing, heaped together in the same spot.
Describing the creation of the universe from chaos, at the beginning of Book I of Metamorphoses, lines 5-9. As translated by Henry T. Riley, The Metamorphoses of Ovid, Vol I: Books I-VII (1858), 1-2. Riley footnoted: “A rude and undigested mass.—Ver. 7. This is very similar to the words of the Scriptures, ‘And the earth was without form and void,’ Genesis, ch. i. ver. 2.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discord (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Harmonize (4)  |  Heap (14)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Inert (14)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Rude (6)  |  Sea (308)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Together (387)  |  Undigested (2)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whole (738)

At length being at Clapham where there is, on the common, a large pond which, I observed to be one day very rough with the wind, I fetched out a cruet of oil and dropt a little of it on the water. I saw it spread itself with surprising swiftness upon the surface; but the effect of smoothing the waves was not produced; for I had applied it first on the leeward side of the pond, where the waves were largest, and the wind drove my oil back upon the shore. I then went to the windward side, where they began to form; and there the oil, though not more than a tea-spoonful, produced an instant calm over a space several yards square, which spread amazingly, and extended itself gradually till it reached the leeside, making all that quarter of the pond, perhaps half an acre, as smooth as a looking-glass.
[Experiment to test an observation made at sea in 1757, when he had seen the wake of a ship smoothed, explained by the captain as presumably due to cooks emptying greasy water in to the sea through the scuppers.]
Letter, extract in 'Of the still of Waves by Means of Oil The Gentleman's Magazine (1775), Vol. 45, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calm (31)  |  Captain (14)  |  Common (436)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extend (128)  |  Form (959)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Instant (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Looking (189)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oil (59)  |  Pond (15)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reach (281)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Side (233)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Space (500)  |  Spread (83)  |  Square (70)  |  Still (613)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tea (12)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wind (128)

At no period of [Michael Faraday’s] unmatched career was he interested in utility. He was absorbed in disentangling the riddles of the universe, at first chemical riddles, in later periods, physical riddles. As far as he cared, the question of utility was never raised. Any suspicion of utility would have restricted his restless curiosity. In the end, utility resulted, but it was never a criterion to which his ceaseless experimentation could be subjected.
'The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge', Harper's Magazine (Jun/Nov 1939), No. 179, 546. In Hispania (Feb 1944), 27, No. 1, 77.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Car (71)  |  Career (75)  |  Ceaseless (6)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Interest (386)  |  Never (1087)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Question (621)  |  Restless (11)  |  Result (677)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Universe (857)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Utility (49)

At the age of eleven, I began Euclid, with my brother as my tutor. ... I had not imagined that there was anything so delicious in the world. After I had learned the fifth proposition, my brother told me that it was generally considered difficult, but I had found no difficulty whatsoever. This was the first time it had dawned on me that I might have some intelligence.
In Autobiography: 1872-1914 (1967), Vol. 1, 37-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brother (43)  |  Consider (416)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  World (1774)

At the age of three I began to look around my grandfather’s library. My first knowledge of astronomy came from reading and looking at pictures at that time. By the time I was six I remember him buying books for me. … I think I was eight, he bought me a three-inch telescope on a brass mounting. … So, as far back as I can remember, I had an early interest in science in general, astronomy in particular.
Oral History Transcript of interview with Dr. Jesse Greenstein by Paul Wright (31 Jul 1974), on website of American Institute of Physics.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Book (392)  |  Early (185)  |  General (511)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Library (48)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Particular (76)  |  Picture (143)  |  Reading (133)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)

At this point, however, I have no intention whatever of criticizing the false teachings of Galen, who is easily first among the professors of dissection, for I certainly do not wish to start off by gaining a reputation for impiety toward him, the author of all good things, or by seeming insubordinate to his authority. For I am well aware how upset the practitioners (unlike the followers of Aristotle) invariably become nowadays, when they discover in the course of a single dissection that Galen has departed on two hundred or more occasions from the true description of the harmony, function, and action of the human parts, and how grimly they examine the dissected portions as they strive with all the zeal at their command to defend him. Yet even they, drawn by their love of truth, are gradually calming down and placing more faith in their own not ineffective eyes and reason than in Galen’s writings.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, iv, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), Preface, liv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Command (58)  |  Course (409)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Examine (78)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  False (100)  |  Follower (11)  |  Function (228)  |  Galen (19)  |  Good (889)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Intention (46)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Professor (128)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Single (353)  |  Start (221)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Upset (18)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)  |  Writing (189)  |  Zeal (11)

AZT stood up and said, 'Stop your pessimism. Stop your sense of futility. Go back to the lab. Go back to development. Go back to clinical trials. Things will work.'
[On the impact of AZT emerging as the long-sought first significant AIDS drug.]
As quoted in Emily Langer, 'Researcher Jerome P. Horwitz, 93, created AZT, the first approved treatment for HIV/AIDS' Washington Post (19 Sep 2012). The article was excerpted on blogs, sometimes referring to this quote by saying "AZT was more a cure for fatalism than for AIDS."
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  AIDS (3)  |  AZT (2)  |  Back (390)  |  Clinic (4)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Clinical Trial (3)  |  Development (422)  |  Drug (57)  |  Futility (7)  |  Impact (42)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Pessimism (4)  |  Research (664)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significant (74)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trial (57)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Bacon first taught the world the true method of the study of nature, and rescued science from that barbarism in which the followers of Aristotle, by a too servile imitation of their master.
A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Barbarism (7)  |  Follower (11)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Master (178)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Servile (3)  |  Study (653)  |  World (1774)

Basic research at universities comes in two varieties: research that requires big bucks and research that requires small bucks. Big bucks research is much like government research and in fact usually is government research but done for the government under contract. Like other government research, big bucks academic research is done to understand the nature and structure of the universe or to understand life, which really means that it is either for blowing up the world or extending life, whichever comes first. Again, that's the government's motivation. The universities' motivation for conducting big bucks research is to bring money in to support professors and graduate students and to wax the floors of ivy-covered buildings. While we think they are busy teaching and learning, these folks are mainly doing big bucks basic research for a living, all the while priding themselves on their terrific summer vacations and lack of a dress code.
Smalls bucks research is the sort of thing that requires paper and pencil, and maybe a blackboard, and is aimed primarily at increasing knowledge in areas of study that don't usually attract big bucks - that is, areas that don't extend life or end it, or both. History, political science, and romance languages are typically small bucks areas of basic research. The real purpose of small bucks research to the universities is to provide a means of deciding, by the quality of their small bucks research, which professors in these areas should get tenure.
Accidental Empires (1992), 78.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Code (31)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Government (110)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  History (673)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Money (170)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Political (121)  |  Political Science (2)  |  Professor (128)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Summer (54)  |  Support (147)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  University (121)  |  Usually (176)  |  Wax (13)  |  World (1774)

Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Test (211)  |  World (1774)

Before the promulgation of the periodic law the chemical elements were mere fragmentary incidental facts in nature; there was no special reason to expect the discovery of new elements, and the new ones which were discovered from time to time appeared to be possessed of quite novel properties. The law of periodicity first enabled us to perceive undiscovered elements at a distance which formerly were inaccessible to chemical vision, and long ere they were discovered new elements appeared before our eyes possessed of a number of well-defined properties.
In Faraday Lecture, delivered before the Fellows of the Chemical Society in the Theatre of the Royal Institution (4 Jun 1889), printed in Professor Mendeléeff, 'The Periodic Law of the Chemical Elements', Transactions of the Chemical Society (1889), 55, 648.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (292)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Element (310)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fragmentary (8)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Novel (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Periodic Law (6)  |  Periodicity (6)  |  Possess (156)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Property (168)  |  Reason (744)  |  Special (184)  |  Time (1877)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Vision (123)  |  Well-Defined (8)

Belief has no place as far as science reaches, and may be first permitted to take root where science stops.
Translation of the original German: “Soweit die Wissenschaft reicht, kein Glaube existirt und der Glaube erst da anfangen darf, wo die Wissenschaft aufhört”, from 'Der Mensch' (1849), collected in Gesammelte abhandlungen zur wissenschaftlichen medicin (1856), 6. As translated in Lelland J. Rather (ed.), 'On Man', Disease, Life, and Man: Selected Essays (1958), 83. Google translate gives “As far as science goes, no faith exists and faith can only begin where science ends.”
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)

Biology has become as unthinkable without gene-splicing techniques as sending an explorer into the jungle without a compass.
Magazine interview (1981); one year after becoming the first scientist to make bacteria produce a facsimile of human interferon.
'Shaping Life in the Lab'. In Time (9 Mar 1981).
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Compass (34)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Gene (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Technique (80)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Year (933)

Biology is a science of three dimensions. The first is the study of each species across all levels of biological organization, molecule to cell to organism to population to ecosystem. The second dimension is the diversity of all species in the biosphere. The third dimension is the history of each species in turn, comprising both its genetic evolution and the environmental change that drove the evolution. Biology, by growing in all three dimensions, is progressing toward unification and will continue to do so.
In 'Systematics and the Future of Biology', Systematics and the Origin of Species: on Ernst Mayr's 100th anniversary, Volume 102, Issues 22-26 (2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  History (673)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Population (110)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unification (11)  |  Will (2355)

BIRTH, n. The first and direst of all disasters. As to the nature of it there appears to be no uniformity. Castor and Pollux were born from the egg. Pallas came out of a skull. Galatea was once a block of stone. Peresilis, who wrote in the tenth century, avers that he grew up out of the ground where a priest had spilled holy water. It is known that Arimaxus was derived from a hole in the earth, made by a stroke of lightning. Leucomedon was the son of a cavern in Mount Etna, and I have myself seen a man come out of a wine cellar.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Century (310)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egg (69)  |  Etna (5)  |  Ground (217)  |  Holy (34)  |  Humour (116)  |  Known (454)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Etna (2)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Priest (28)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Water (481)  |  Wine (38)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciatively (2)  |  Audience (26)  |  Back (390)  |  Basket (7)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (5)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conference (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Court (33)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Curious (91)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  Foot (60)  |  Game (101)  |  Graceful (3)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jump (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Leave (130)  |  Local (19)  |  Long (790)  |  March (46)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Net (11)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Promise (67)  |  Providence (18)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Routine (25)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Southern (3)  |  Start (221)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Team (15)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warming (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (933)

Breadth-first search is the bulldozer of science.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Breadth (15)  |  Bulldozer (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)

Briefly, in the act of composition, as an instrument there intervenes and is most potent, fire, flaming, fervid, hot; but in the very substance of the compound there intervenes, as an ingredient, as it is commonly called, as a material principle and as a constituent of the whole compound the material and principle of fire, not fire itself. This I was the first to call phlogiston.
Specimen Beccherianum (1703). Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry (1961), Vol. 2, 668.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Call (769)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Fervid (2)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Hot (60)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Potency (10)  |  Potent (12)  |  Principle (507)  |  Substance (248)  |  Whole (738)

But as my conclusions have lately been much misrepresented, and it has been stated that I attribute the modification of species exclusively to natural selection, I may be permitted to remark that in the first edition of this work, and subsequently, I placed in a most conspicuous position—namely, at the close of the Introduction—the following words: “I am convinced that natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification.” This has been of no avail. Great is the power of steady misrepresentation; but the history of science shows that fortunately this power does not long endure.
In The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection with additions and corrections from sixth and last English edition (1899), Vol. 2, 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conspicuous (12)  |  Edition (5)  |  Endure (20)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misrepresentation (5)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Power (746)  |  Remark (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Selection (128)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

But for twenty years previous to 1847 a force had been at work in a little county town of Germany destined to effect the education of Christendom, and at the same time to enlarge the boundaries of human knowledge, first in chemistry and the allied branches, then in every other one of the natural sciences. The place was Giessen; the inventor Liebig; the method, a laboratory for instruction and research.
A Semi-Centennial Discourse, 1847-97' (28 Oct 1897), The Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University. Quoted in Daniel Coit Gilman, University Problems in the United States (1898), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Destined (42)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Force (487)  |  Human (1468)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Other (2236)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

But Geology carries the day: it is like the pleasure of gambling, speculating, on first arriving, what the rocks may be; I often mentally cry out 3 to 1 Tertiary against primitive; but the latter have hitherto won all the bets.
Letter to W. D. Fox, May 1832. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1821-1836 (1985), Vol. 1, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Bet (12)  |  Cry (29)  |  Geology (220)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Rock (161)

But in science the credit goes to the man who convinces the world, not to the man to whom the idea first occurs. Not the man who finds a grain of new and precious quality but to him who sows it, reaps it, grinds it and feeds the world on it.
First Galton Lecture before the Eugenics Society', Eugenics Review, 1914, 6, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Convince (41)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Grain (50)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Precious (41)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reap (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  World (1774)

But it is precisely mathematics, and the pure science generally, from which the general educated public and independent students have been debarred, and into which they have only rarely attained more than a very meagre insight. The reason of this is twofold. In the first place, the ascendant and consecutive character of mathematical knowledge renders its results absolutely insusceptible of presentation to persons who are unacquainted with what has gone before, and so necessitates on the part of its devotees a thorough and patient exploration of the field from the very beginning, as distinguished from those sciences which may, so to speak, be begun at the end, and which are consequently cultivated with the greatest zeal. The second reason is that, partly through the exigencies of academic instruction, but mainly through the martinet traditions of antiquity and the influence of mediaeval logic-mongers, the great bulk of the elementary text-books of mathematics have unconsciously assumed a very repellant form,—something similar to what is termed in the theory of protective mimicry in biology “the terrifying form.” And it is mainly to this formidableness and touch-me-not character of exterior, concealing withal a harmless body, that the undue neglect of typical mathematical studies is to be attributed.
In Editor’s Preface to Augustus De Morgan and Thomas J. McCormack (ed.), Elementary Illustrations of the Differential and Integral Calculus (1899), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Academic (18)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Assume (38)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Character (243)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Consecutive (2)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Debar (2)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Educated (12)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Exigency (3)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Exterior (6)  |  Field (364)  |  Form (959)  |  Formidable (7)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Independent (67)  |  Influence (222)  |  Insight (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meager (2)  |  Medieval (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Part (222)  |  Patient (199)  |  Person (363)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Protective (5)  |  Public (96)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Reason (744)  |  Render (93)  |  Repellent (4)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Term (349)  |  Terrify (11)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Typical (13)  |  Unacquainted (2)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Undue (4)  |  Zeal (11)

But neither thirty years, nor thirty centuries, affect the clearness, or the charm, of Geometrical truths. Such a theorem as “the square of the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the sides” is as dazzlingly beautiful now as it was in the day when Pythagoras first discovered it, and celebrated its advent, it is said, by sacrificing a hecatomb of oxen—a method of doing honour to Science that has always seemed to me slightly exaggerated and uncalled-for. One can imagine oneself, even in these degenerate days, marking the epoch of some brilliant scientific discovery by inviting a convivial friend or two, to join one in a beefsteak and a bottle of wine. But a hecatomb of oxen! It would produce a quite inconvenient supply of beef.
Written without pseudonym as Charles L. Dodgson, in Introduction to A New Theory of Parallels (1888, 1890), xvi. Note: a hecatomb is a great public sacrifice, originally of a hundred oxen.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beef (4)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Celebration (7)  |  Charm (51)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doing (280)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hypotenuse (4)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Method (505)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Oxen (8)  |  Proof (287)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Side (233)  |  Square (70)  |  Steak (3)  |  Sum (102)  |  Supply (93)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Wine (38)  |  Year (933)

But nothing of a nature foreign to the duties of my profession [clergyman] engaged my attention while I was at Leeds so much as the, prosecution of my experiments relating to electricity, and especially the doctrine of air. The last I was led into a consequence of inhabiting a house adjoining to a public brewery, where first amused myself with making experiments on fixed air [carbon dioxide] which found ready made in the process of fermentation. When I removed from that house, I was under the necessity making the fixed air for myself; and one experiment leading to another, as I have distinctly and faithfully noted in my various publications on the subject, I by degrees contrived a convenient apparatus for the purpose, but of the cheapest kind. When I began these experiments I knew very little of chemistry, and had in a manner no idea on the subject before I attended a course of chymical lectures delivered in the Academy at Warrington by Dr. Turner of Liverpool. But I have often thought that upon the whole, this circumstance was no disadvantage to me; as in this situation I was led to devise an apparatus and processes of my own, adapted to my peculiar views. Whereas, if I had been previously accustomed to the usual chemical processes, I should not have so easily thought of any other; and without new modes of operation I should hardly have discovered anything materially new.
Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley, in the Year 1795 (1806), Vol. 1, 61-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjoining (3)  |  Air (347)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Duty (68)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Fixed Air (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mode (41)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Process (423)  |  Profession (99)  |  Publication (101)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Situation (113)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call the attention of all astronomers and philosophers, is this: namely, that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any one of the astronomers before my time, which have their orbits round a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round the sun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which facts were discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening my mind.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Excite (15)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Four (6)  |  Front (16)  |  God (757)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Previously (11)  |  Star (427)  |  Sun (385)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Venus (20)  |  Will (2355)

But the idea that any of the lower animals have been concerned in any way with the origin of man—is not this degrading? Degrading is a term, expressive of a notion of the human mind, and the human mind is liable to prejudices which prevent its notions from being invariably correct. Were we acquainted for the first time with the circumstances attending the production of an individual of our race, we might equally think them degrading, and be eager to deny them, and exclude them from the admitted truths of nature.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deny (66)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Lower (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Production (183)  |  Race (268)  |  Term (349)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)

But the World being once fram’d, and the course of Nature establish’d, the Naturalist, (except in some few cases, where God, or Incorporeal Agents interpose), has recourse to the first Cause but for its general and ordinary Support and Influence, whereby it preserves Matter and Motion from Annihilation or Desition; and in explicating particular phenomena, considers onely the Size, Shape, Motion, (or want of it) Texture, and the resulting Qualities and Attributes of the small particles of Matter.
The Origine of Formes and Qualities (1666), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Influence (222)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Small (477)  |  Support (147)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

But weightier still are the contentment which comes from work well done, the sense of the value of science for its own sake, insatiable curiosity, and, above all, the pleasure of masterly performance and of the chase. These are the effective forces which move the scientist. The first condition for the progress of science is to bring them into play.
from his preface to Claude Bernard's 'Experimental Medicine'
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chase (14)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Effective (59)  |  Force (487)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Masterly (2)  |  Move (216)  |  Performance (48)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Still (613)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)

But, but, but … if anybody says he can think about quantum theory without getting giddy it merely shows that he hasn’t understood the first thing about it!
Quoted in Otto R. Frisch, What Little I Remember (1979), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Merely (316)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)

By firm immutable immortal laws Impress’d on Nature by the GREAT FIRST CAUSE,
Say, MUSE! how rose from elemental strife
Organic forms, and kindled into life;
How Love and Sympathy with potent charm
Warm the cold heart, the lifted hand disarm;
Allure with pleasures, and alarm with pains,
And bind Society in golden chains.
From 'Production of Life', The Temple of Nature; or, The Origin of Society: A Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), 3, Canto I, lines 1-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (18)  |  Allure (4)  |  Bind (25)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cold (112)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Firm (47)  |  Form (959)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Kindled (2)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Muse (10)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poem (96)  |  Potent (12)  |  Rose (34)  |  Say (984)  |  Society (326)  |  Strife (9)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Warm (69)

By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third, by experience, which is the most bitter.
Confucius
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 109
Science quotes on:  |  Bitter (30)  |  Easy (204)  |  Experience (467)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Second (62)  |  Third (15)  |  Wisdom (221)

Catastrophe Theory is—quite likely—the first coherent attempt (since Aristotelian logic) to give a theory on analogy. When narrow-minded scientists object to Catastrophe Theory that it gives no more than analogies, or metaphors, they do not realise that they are stating the proper aim of Catastrophe Theory, which is to classify all possible types of analogous situations.
From 'La Théorie des catastrophes État présent et perspective', as quoted in Erick Christopher Zeeman, (ed.), Catastrophe Theory: Selected Papers, 1972-1977 (1977), 637, as cited in Martin Krampe (ed.), Classics of Semiotics (1987), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Aristotelian (2)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Catastrophe Theory (2)  |  Classify (6)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Likely (34)  |  Logic (287)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Narrow-Minded (5)  |  Object (422)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proper (144)  |  Realize (147)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Situation (113)  |  Theory (970)  |  Type (167)

Cell and tissue, shell and bone, leaf and flower, are so many portions of matter, and it is in obedience to the laws of physics that their particles have been moved, moulded and confirmed. They are no exception to the rule that God always geometrizes. Their problems of form are in the first instance mathematical problems, their problems of growth are essentially physical problems, and the morphologist is, ipso facto, a student of physical science.
On Growth and Form (1917), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (95)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Exception (73)  |  Flower (106)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Growth (187)  |  Law (894)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Matter (798)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Portion (84)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shell (63)  |  Student (300)  |  Tissue (45)

Charlie Holloway (human): “What we hoped to achieve was to meet our makers. To get answers. Why they even made us in the first place.”
David (AI robot): “Why do you think your people made me?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “We made you because we could.”
David (AI robot): “Can you imagine how disappointing it would be for you to hear the same thing from your creator?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “I guess it’s good you can’t be disappointed.”
Prometheus (2012)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Creator (91)  |  David (6)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Maker (34)  |  Meet (31)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Robot (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)

Chemical signs ought to be letters, for the greater facility of writing, and not to disfigure a printed book ... I shall take therefore for the chemical sign, the initial letter of the Latin name of each elementary substance: but as several have the same initial letter, I shall distinguish them in the following manner:— 1. In the class which I shall call metalloids, I shall employ the initial letter only, even when this letter is common to the metalloid and to some metal. 2. In the class of metals, I shall distinguish those that have the same initials with another metal, or a metalloid, by writing the first two letters of the word. 3. If the first two letters be common to two metals, I shall, in that case, add to the initial letter the first consonant which they have not in common: for example, S = sulphur, Si = silicium, St = stibium (antimony), Sn = stannum (tin), C = carbonicum, Co = colbaltum (colbalt), Cu = cuprum (copper), O = oxygen, Os = osmium, &c.
'Essay on the Cause of Chemical Proportions, and on some circumstances relating to them: together with a short and easy method of expressing them', Annals of Philosophy, 1814, 3,51-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antimony (7)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Class (164)  |  Cobalt (4)  |  Common (436)  |  Consonant (3)  |  Copper (25)  |  Disfigure (2)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Employ (113)  |  Facility (11)  |  Greater (288)  |  Initial (17)  |  Latin (38)  |  Letter (109)  |  Metal (84)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Osmium (3)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Print (17)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silicon (4)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tin (18)  |  Two (937)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

Coming to the question of life being found on other planets, Professor Haldane apologized for discoursing, as a mere biologist, on a subject on which we had been expecting a lecture by a physicist [J. D. Bernal]. He mentioned three hypotheses:
(a) That life had a supernatural origin,
(b) That it originated from inorganic materials, and (c) That life is a constituent of the Universe and can only arise from pre-existing life. The first hypothesis, he said, should be taken seriously, and he would proceed to do so. From the fact that there are 400,000 species of beetle on this planet, but only 8,000 species of mammals, he concluded that the Creator, if he exists, has a special preference for beetles, and so we might be more likely to meet them than any other type of animal on a planet which would support life.
In Mark Williamson, 'Haldane’s Special Preference', The Linnean, 1992, 8, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Coming (114)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Insect (77)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Planet (356)  |  Preference (28)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Support (147)  |  Type (167)  |  Universe (857)

Common sense iz instinkt, and instinkt don’t make enny blunders mutch, no more than a rat duz, in coming out, or going intew a hole, he hits the hole the fust time, and just fills it.
In The Complete Works of Josh Billings (1876), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (21)  |  Coming (114)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Fill (61)  |  Hit (20)  |  Hole (16)  |  Instinct (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)

Compare the length of a moment with the period of ten thousand years; the first, however minuscule, does exist as a fraction of a second. But that number of years, or any multiple of it that you may name, cannot even be compared with a limitless extent of time, the reason being that comparisons can be drawn between finite things, but not between finite and infinite.
The Consolation of Philosophy [before 524], Book II, trans. P. G. Walsh (1999), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extent (139)  |  Finite (59)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Moment (253)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Name (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Period (198)  |  Reason (744)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

Conscientious and careful physicians allocate causes of disease to natural laws, while the ablest scientists go back to medicine for their first principles.
Aristotle
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conscientious (7)  |  Disease (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Physician (273)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scientist (820)

Consciousness… does not appear to itself chopped up in bits. Such words as “chain” or “train” do not describe it fitly as it presents itself in the first instance. It is nothing jointed; it flows. A “river” or a “stream” are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described. In talking of it hereafter, let us call it the stream of thought, of consciousness, or of subjective life.
Source of the expression “stream of consciousness”.
The Principles of Psychology (1890), Vol. 1, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expression (175)  |  Flow (83)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  River (119)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Word (619)

Copernicus, the most learned man whom we are able to name other than Atlas and Ptolemy, even though he taught in a most learned manner the demonstrations and causes of motion based on observation, nevertheless fled from the job of constructing tables, so that if anyone computes from his tables, the computation is not even in agreement with his observations on which the foundation of the work rests. Therefore first I have compared the observations of Copernicus with those of Ptolemy and others as to which are the most accurate, but besides the bare observations, I have taken from Copernicus nothing other than traces of demonstrations. As for the tables of mean motion, and of prosthaphaereses and all the rest, I have constructed these anew, following absolutely no other reasoning than that which I have judged to be of maximum harmony.
Dedication to the Duke of Prussia, Prutenicae Tabulae (1551), 1585 edition, as quoted in Owen Gingerich, The Eye of Heaven: Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler (1993), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Atlas (3)  |  Bare (33)  |  Cause (541)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Computation (24)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Job (82)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Name (333)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ptolemy (17)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Table (104)  |  Trace (103)  |  Work (1351)

Counting stars by candlelight all are dim but one is bright; the spiral light of Venus rising first and shining best, from the northwest corner of a brand-new crescent moon crickets and cicadas sing a rare and different tune.
Terrapin Station
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Bright (79)  |  Candlelight (3)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Corner (57)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Crescent (4)  |  Cricket (7)  |  Different (577)  |  Dim (8)  |  Light (607)  |  Moon (237)  |  New (1216)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Sing (26)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Tune (19)  |  Venus (20)

Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality which guarantees the others.
Aristotle
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (69)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Human (1468)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quality (135)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Appear (118)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complication (29)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contour (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curve (49)  |  Defined (4)  |  Derivative (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Distance (161)  |  Draw (137)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (6)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Function (228)  |  Glass (92)  |  Hear (139)  |  Increase (210)  |  Involve (90)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Magnifying Glass (3)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Prohibit (3)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (267)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Tangent (6)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Use (766)  |  White (127)

Darwin was a biological evolutionist, because he was first a uniformitarian geologist. Biology is pre-eminent to-day among the natural sciences, because its younger sister, Geology, gave it the means.
Presidential Address to the Geology Section, Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1892), 696.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Science (3879)  |  Uniformitarian (4)  |  Younger (21)

Darwin's theory was received in Russia with profound sympathy. While in Western Europe it met firmly established old traditions which it had first to overcome, in Russia its appearance coincided with the awakening of our society after the Crimean War and here it immediately received the status of full citizenship and ever since has enjoyed widespread popularity.
Quoted in Thomas F. Glick (ed.), The Comparative Reception of Darwinism (1988), 229-30.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Crimean War (2)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Old (481)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Profound (104)  |  Russia (13)  |  Society (326)  |  Status (35)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tradition (69)  |  War (225)  |  Western (45)  |  Widespread (22)

Darwin’s book is very important and serves me as a basis in natural science for the class struggle in history. One has to put up with the crude English method of development, of course. Despite all deficiencies not only is the death-blow dealt here for the first time to “teleology” in the natural sciences, but their rational meaning is empirically explained.
Karl Marx
Marx to Lasalle, 16 Jan 1861. In Marx-Engels Selected Correspondence, 1846-95, trans. Donna Torr (1934), 125.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Blow (44)  |  Book (392)  |  Class (164)  |  Course (409)  |  Crude (31)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Death (388)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Development (422)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  England (40)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  History (673)  |  Importance (286)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Rational (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Teleology (2)  |  Time (1877)

Descriptive geometry has two objects: the first is to establish methods to represent on drawing paper which has only two dimensions,—namely, length and width,—all solids of nature which have three dimensions,—length, width, and depth,—provided, however, that these solids are capable of rigorous definition.
The second object is to furnish means to recognize accordingly an exact description of the forms of solids and to derive thereby all truths which result from their forms and their respective positions.
From On the Purpose of Descriptive Geometry as translated by Arnold Emch in David Eugene Smith, A Source Book in Mathematics (1929), 426.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Capable (168)  |  Definition (221)  |  Depth (94)  |  Derive (65)  |  Description (84)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Exact (68)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Length (23)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Paper (182)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Solid (116)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Width (5)

Dibdin said: 'I see you've put your own name at the top of your paper, Mr Woods.' His eyes looked sad and thoughtful. 'I always make it a matter of principle to put my name as well on every paper that comes out of the department.' 'Yours?' Albert said incredulously. 'Yes,' said Dibdin, still sad and thoughtful. 'I make it a matter of principle, Mr Woods. And I like my name to come first—it makes it easier for purposes of identification.' He rounded it off. 'First come, first served'.
The Struggles of Albert Woods (1952), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Department (92)  |  Easier (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  Identification (16)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Name (333)  |  Paper (182)  |  Principle (507)  |  Publication (101)  |  Purpose (317)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Top (96)  |  Wood (92)

Direct observation of the testimony of the earth … is a matter of the laboratory, of the field naturalist, of indefatigable digging among the ancient archives of the earth’s history. If Mr. Bryan, with an open heart and mind, would drop all his books and all the disputations among the doctors and study first hand the simple archives of Nature, all his doubts would disappear; he would not lose his religion; he would become an evolutionist.
'Evolution and Religion', New York Times (5 Mar 1922), 91. Written in response to an article a few days earlier in which William Jennings Bryan challenged the theory of evolution as lacking proof.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archive (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Digging (11)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Drop (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Field (364)  |  Field Naturalist (3)  |  First Hand (2)  |  Heart (229)  |  History (673)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lose (159)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Proof (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Research (664)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Testimony (21)

Dirichlet was not satisfied to study Gauss’ Disquisitiones arithmetical once or several times, but continued throughout life to keep in close touch with the wealth of deep mathematical thoughts which it contains by perusing it again and again. For this reason the book was never placed on the shelf but had an abiding place on the table at which he worked. … Dirichlet was the first one, who not only fully understood this work, but made it also accessible to others.
In Dirichlet, Werke, Bd. 2, 315. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Book (392)  |  Close (69)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continue (165)  |  Deep (233)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (2)  |  Fully (21)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Keep (101)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peruse (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Reason (744)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Shelf (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Work (1351)

Disease is not something personal and special, but only a manifestation of life under modified conditions, operating according to the same laws as apply to the living body at all times, from the first moment until death.
In Ian F. McNeely, Medicine on a Grand Scale: Rudolf Virchow, Liberalism, and the Public Health (2002), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Body (537)  |  Condition (356)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Moment (253)  |  Something (719)  |  Special (184)  |  Time (1877)

DNA was the first three-dimensional Xerox machine.
From paper presented at Laramie College of Commerce and Industry, University of Wyoming, 'Energy and the Environment' (Jan 1976), 2, as quoted in Richard P. Beilock (ed.) Illustrating Economics: Beasts, Ballads and Aphorisms (1980, 2010), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  DNA (77)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Machine (257)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)

Do not let the sun rise upon a strangulated hernia if first seen at night; and do not let the sun set upon a strangulated hernia if first seen by day.
Quoted in Alexander Bryan Johnson, Operative Therapeusis (1915), Vol. 4, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Hernia (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  Set (394)  |  Sun (385)  |  Urgency (12)

During the first half of the present century we had an Alexander von Humboldt, who was able to scan the scientific knowledge of his time in its details, and to bring it within one vast generalization. At the present juncture, it is obviously very doubtful whether this task could be accomplished in a similar way, even by a mind with gifts so peculiarly suited for the purpose as Humboldt's was, and if all his time and work were devoted to the purpose.
In Hermann von Helmholtz and Edmund Atkinson (trans.), 'The Aim and Progress of Physical Science', Popular Scientific Lectures on Scientific Subjects (1873), 363.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Century (310)  |  Detail (146)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Gift (104)  |  Baron Alexander von Humboldt (20)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Scan (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vast (177)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

During the half-century that has elapsed since the enunciation of the cell-theory by Schleiden and Schwann, in 1838-39, it has became ever more clearly apparent that the key to all ultimate biological problems must, in the last analysis, be sought in the cell. It was the cell-theory that first brought the structure of plants and animals under one point of view by revealing their common plan of organization. It was through the cell-theory that Kolliker and Remak opened the way to an understanding of the nature of embryological development, and the law of genetic continuity lying at the basis of inheritance. It was the cell-­theory again which, in the hands of Virchaw and Max Schultze, inaugurated a new era in the history of physiology and pathology, by showing that all the various functions of the body, in health and in disease, are but the outward expression of cell­-activities. And at a still later day it was through the cell-theory that Hertwig, Fol, Van Beneden, and Strasburger solved the long-standing riddle of the fertilization of the egg, and the mechanism of hereditary transmission. No other biological generalization, save only the theory of organic evolution, has brought so many apparently diverse phenomena under a common point of view or has accomplished more far the unification of knowledge. The cell-theory must therefore be placed beside the evolution-theory as one of the foundation stones of modern biology.
In The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1896), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Basis (173)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell Theory (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Common (436)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Development (422)  |  Disease (328)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Enunciation (7)  |  Era (51)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Function (228)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Health (193)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Oskar Hertwig (2)  |  History (673)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Key (50)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Problem (676)  |  Robert Remak (2)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Save (118)  |  Theodor Schwann (12)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unification (11)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)  |  Way (1217)

During the school period the student has been mentally bending over his desk; at the University he should stand up and look around. For this reason it is fatal if the first year at the University be frittered away in going over the old work in the old spirit. At school the boy painfully rises from the particular towards glimpses at general ideas; at the University he should start from general ideas and study their applications to concrete cases.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Boy (94)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Education (378)  |  Frittering (2)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Look (582)  |  Old (481)  |  Particular (76)  |  Period (198)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rise (166)  |  School (219)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Early Greek astronomers, derived their first knowledge from the Egyptians, and these from the Chaldeans, among whom the science was studied, at a very early period. Their knowledge of astronomy, which gave their learned men the name of Magi, wise men, afterwards degenerated into astrology, or the art of consulting the position of the stars to foretel events—and hence sprung the silly occupation of sooth saying, for which the Chaldeans were noted to a proverb, in later ages.
In Elements of Useful Knowledge (1806), Vol. 1, 8-9. Note “foretel” is as printed in this text.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Art (657)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Consult (6)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Early (185)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Event (216)  |  Foretell (11)  |  Greek (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Name (333)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Period (198)  |  Position (77)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silly (17)  |  Spring (133)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Wise (131)

Early in my school days a boy had a copy of the “Wonders of the World,” which I often read, and disputed with other boys about the veracity of some of the statements; and I believe that this book first gave me a wish to travel in remote countries, which was ultimately fulfilled by the voyage of the Beagle.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Beagle (13)  |  Belief (578)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Copy (33)  |  Country (251)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Early (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Remote (83)  |  School (219)  |  Statement (142)  |  Travel (114)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Veracity (2)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

Edward [Teller] isn’t the cloistered kind of scientist. He gets his ideas in conversation and develops them by trying them out on people. We were coming back from Europe on the Ile de France and I was standing in the ship’s nightclub when he came up and said, 'Freddie, I think I have an idea.’ It was something he’d just thought of about magnetohydrodynamics. I was a bachelor then and I’d located several good-looking girls on the ship, but I knew what I had to do, so I disappeared and started working on the calculations. I’d get something finished and start prowling on the deck again when Edward would turn up out of the night and we’d walk the deck together while he talked and I was the brick wall he was bouncing these things off of. By the end of the trip we had a paper. He’d had the ideas, and I’d done some solving of equations. But he insisted that we sign in alphabetical order, which put my name first.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Bounce (2)  |  Brick (18)  |  Brick Wall (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Equation (132)  |  Finish (59)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insist (20)  |  Kind (557)  |  Looking (189)  |  Name (333)  |  Order (632)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Reclusive (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Ship (62)  |  Solve (130)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Edward Teller (44)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wall (67)

EFFECT, n. The second of two phenomena which always occur together in the same order. The first, called a Cause, is said to generate the other—which is no more sensible than it would be for one who has never seen a dog except in pursuit of a rabbit to declare the rabbit the cause of the dog.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 86. Later published as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Declare (45)  |  Dog (70)  |  Effect (393)  |  Generate (16)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rabbit (8)  |  Same (157)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)

Electricity is but yet a new agent for the arts and manufactures, and, doubtless, generations unborn will regard with interest this century, in which it has been first applied to the wants of mankind.
In Preface to the Third Edition ofElements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (1851), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Art (657)  |  Arts (3)  |  Century (310)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Generation (242)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  New (1216)  |  Regard (305)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Engineering is more closely akin to the arts than perhaps any other of the professions; first, because it requires the maximum of natural aptitude and of liking for the work in order to offset other factors; second, because it demands, like the arts, an almost selfless consecration to the job; and, third, because out of the hundreds who faithfully devote themselves to the task, only a few are destined to receive any significant reward—in either money or fame.
As coauthor with Frank W. Skinner, and Harold E. Wessman, 'Foreward', Vocational Guidance in Engineering Lines (1933), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Art (657)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Demand (123)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devote (35)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Factor (46)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Fame (50)  |  Few (13)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Job (82)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Offset (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Profession (99)  |  Receive (114)  |  Require (219)  |  Reward (68)  |  Selfless (2)  |  Significant (74)  |  Task (147)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Work (1351)

Entropy theory is indeed a first attempt to deal with global form; but it has not been dealing with structure. All it says is that a large sum of elements may have properties not found in a smaller sample of them.
In Entropy and Art: An Essay on Disorder and Order (1974), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Deal (188)  |  Element (310)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Form (959)  |  Global (35)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Large (394)  |  Property (168)  |  Sample (19)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sum (102)  |  Theory (970)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Best (459)  |  Both (493)  |  Circle (110)  |  Computation (24)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Design (195)  |  Determine (144)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Division (65)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equation (132)  |  Expression (175)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Invent (51)  |  Line (91)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Place (177)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sort (49)  |  Surface (209)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Wherefore (2)  |  Will (2355)

Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare.
Let all who prate of Beauty hold their peace,
And lay them prone upon the earth and cease
To ponder on themselves, the while they stare
At nothing, intricately drawn nowhere
In shapes of shifting lineage; let geese
Gabble and hiss, but heroes seek release
From dusty bondage into luminous air.
O blinding hour, O holy, terrible day,
When first the shaft into his vision shone
Of light anatomized! Euclid alone
Has looked on Beauty bare. Fortunate they
Who, though once only and then but far away,
Have heard her massive sandal set on stone.
Poem, 'Euclid Alone Has Looked on Beauty Bare", collected in Wallace Warner Douglas and Hallett Darius Smith (eds.), The Critical Reader: Poems, Stories, Essays (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blind (95)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Cease (79)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Goose (12)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hold (95)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hour (186)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Lineage (3)  |  Look (582)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Massive (9)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Peace (108)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Prone (7)  |  Release (27)  |  Sandal (3)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Shaft (5)  |  Shape (72)  |  Shift (44)  |  Shine (45)  |  Stare (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Vision (123)

Euler could repeat the Aeneid from the beginning to the end, and he could even tell the first and last lines in every page of the edition which he used. In one of his works there is a learned memoir on a question in mechanics, of which, as he himself informs us, a verse of Aeneid gave him the first idea. [“The anchor drops, the rushing keel is staid.”]
In Letters of Euler (1872), Vol. 1, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Anchor (10)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Drop (76)  |  Edition (5)  |  End (590)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Give (202)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inform (47)  |  Keel (4)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Page (30)  |  Question (621)  |  Refer (14)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Rush (18)  |  Tell (340)  |  Verse (11)  |  Work (1351)

Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver after the cozy indoor warmth of traditional humanizing myths, in the end the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own.
What I Believe (1925). In The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell, 1903-1959 (1992), 370.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  End (590)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Myth (56)  |  Open (274)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Window (58)

Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. An insurrection has consequently begun of science talents and courage against rank and birth, which have fallen into contempt. It has failed in its first effort, because the mobs of the cities, the instrument used for its accomplishment, debased by ignorance, poverty and vice, could not be restrained to rational action. But the world will soon recover from the panic of this first catastrophe.
Letter to John Adams (Monticello, 1813). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 49. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 4, 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  Birth (147)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Courage (69)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mob (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rational (90)  |  Read (287)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Talent (94)  |  Vice (40)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Ever since I was a boy, I’ve been fascinated by crazy science and such things as perpetual motion machines and logical paradoxes. I’ve always enjoyed keeping up with those ideas. I suppose I didn’t get into it seriously until I wrote my first book, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science. I was influenced by the Dianetics movement, now called Scientology, which was then promoted by John Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction. I was astonished at how rapidly the thing had become a cult.
In Scot Morris, 'Interview: Martin Gardner', Omni, 4, No. 4 (Jan 1982), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Call (769)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Cult (4)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Logical (55)  |  Machine (257)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Name (333)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Write (230)

Every creature alive on the earth today represents an unbroken line of life that stretches back to the first primitive organism to appear on this planet; and that is about three billion years.
In talk, 'Origin of Death' (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Back (390)  |  Billion (95)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Organism (220)  |  Planet (356)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representing (2)  |  Today (314)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Year (933)

Every great improvement has come after repeated failures. Virtually nothing comes out right the first time. Failures, repeated failures, are finger posts on the road to achievement. One fails forward toward success.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Right (452)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)

Every great scientific truth goes through three states: first, people say it conflicts with the Bible; next, they say it has been discovered before; lastly, they say they always believed it.
Attributed; it does not appear directly in this form in any writings by Agassiz. This version of the quote comes from the Saturday Evening Post (1890), as cited in Ralph Keyes, The Quote Verifier (2006), 226. Since the quote was not printed within quotation marks, it is unlikely that this is a verbatim statement. Keyes discusses variations of the “three stages of truth” that have been attributed to a various other authors, but provides some substantiation with examples of similar quotes linked to Agassiz as related in second-person accounts.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Discover (553)  |  Great (1574)  |  Next (236)  |  People (1005)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)

Every honest researcher I know admits he’s just a professional amateur. He’s doing whatever he’s doing for the first time. That makes him an amateur. He has sense enough to know that he’s going to have a lot of trouble, so that makes him a professional.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admit (45)  |  Amateur (19)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enough (340)  |  First Time (10)  |  Honest (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Professional (70)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Whatever (234)

Every individual alive today, even the very highest, is to be derived in an unbroken line from the first and lowest forms.
In Heredity (1892), Vol. 1, 161. As cited in James C. Fernald Scientific Side-lights: Illustrating Thousands of Topics by Selections from Standard Works of the Masters of Science Throughout the World (1903), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Derive (65)  |  Form (959)  |  Highest (18)  |  Individual (404)  |  Line (91)  |  Lowest (10)  |  Today (314)  |  Unbroken (10)

Every Man being conscious to himself, That he thinks, and that which his Mind is employ'd about whilst thinking, being the Ideas, that are there, 'tis past doubt, that Men have in their Minds several Ideas, such as are those expressed by the words, Whiteness, Hardness, Sweetness, Thinking, Motion, Man, Elephant, Army, Drunkenness, and others: It is in the first place then to be inquired, How he comes by them? I know it is a received Doctrine, That Men have native Ideas, and original Characters stamped upon their Minds, in their very first Being.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 1, Section 1, 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Employ (113)  |  Express (186)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Native (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Sweetness (12)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Word (619)

Every new theory as it arises believes in the flush of youth that it has the long sought goal; it sees no limits to its applicability, and believes that at last it is the fortunate theory to achieve the 'right' answer. This was true of electron theory—perhaps some readers will remember a book called The Electrical Theory of the Universe by de Tunzelman. It is true of general relativity theory with its belief that we can formulate a mathematical scheme that will extrapolate to all past and future time and the unfathomed depths of space. It has been true of wave mechanics, with its first enthusiastic claim a brief ten years ago that no problem had successfully resisted its attack provided the attack was properly made, and now the disillusionment of age when confronted by the problems of the proton and the neutron. When will we learn that logic, mathematics, physical theory, are all only inventions for formulating in compact and manageable form what we already know, like all inventions do not achieve complete success in accomplishing what they were designed to do, much less complete success in fields beyond the scope of the original design, and that our only justification for hoping to penetrate at all into the unknown with these inventions is our past experience that sometimes we have been fortunate enough to be able to push on a short distance by acquired momentum.
The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 136.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attack (84)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compact (13)  |  Complete (204)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Disillusionment (2)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Goal (145)  |  Invention (369)  |  Justification (48)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Neutron (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Physical (508)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proton (21)  |  Push (62)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Remember (179)  |  Right (452)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scope (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Space (500)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)  |  Youth (101)

Every vision is a joke until the first man accomplishes it; once realized, it becomes commonplace.
His reaction to a harsh, inaccurate, article in the New York Times that questioned the practicality of his goals in rocket research, (1920). As quoted by Dr. Kurt Debus, Director of Kennedy Space Center, NASA, in address (15 Jul 1965) at First World Exhibition of Transport and communications, Munich, collected in Chronology on Astronautics and Aeronautics in 1965 (1966), 332. This is the earliest evidence of this quote that Webmaster, as yet, has found. Please contact Webmaster if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Become (815)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Joke (83)  |  Man (2251)  |  Realize (147)  |  Vision (123)

Everybody now wants to discover universal laws which will explain the structure and behavior of the nucleus of the atom. But actually our knowledge of the elementary particles that make up the nucleus is tiny. The situation calls for more modesty. We should first try to discover more about these elementary particles and about their laws. Then it will be the time for the major synthesis of what we really know, and the formulation of the universal law.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Call (769)  |  Discover (553)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elementary Particle (2)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Explain (322)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Major (84)  |  Modesty (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Particle (194)  |  Situation (113)  |  Structure (344)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Try (283)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Everything material which is the subject of knowledge has number, order, or position; and these are her first outlines for a sketch of the universe. If our feeble hands cannot follow out the details, still her part has been drawn with an unerring pen, and her work cannot be gainsaid. So wide is the range of mathematical sciences, so indefinitely may it extend beyond our actual powers of manipulation that at some moments we are inclined to fall down with even more than reverence before her majestic presence. But so strictly limited are her promises and powers, about so much that we might wish to know does she offer no information whatever, that at other moments we are fain to call her results but a vain thing, and to reject them as a stone where we had asked for bread. If one aspect of the subject encourages our hopes, so does the other tend to chasten our desires, and he is perhaps the wisest, and in the long run the happiest, among his fellows, who has learned not only this science, but also the larger lesson which it directly teaches, namely, to temper our aspirations to that which is possible, to moderate our desires to that which is attainable, to restrict our hopes to that of which accomplishment, if not immediately practicable, is at least distinctly within the range of conception.
From Presidential Address (Aug 1878) to the British Association, Dublin, published in the Report of the 48th Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1878), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Actual (117)  |  Ask (411)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bread (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Chasten (2)  |  Conception (154)  |  Desire (204)  |  Detail (146)  |  Directly (22)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fall (230)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hand (143)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hope (299)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Least (75)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Long (790)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Material (353)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Namely (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Number (699)  |  Offer (141)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outline (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Pen (20)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Practicable (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promise (67)  |  Range (99)  |  Reject (63)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Result (677)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Still (613)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teach (277)  |  Temper (9)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vain (83)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)

Exactness cannot be established in the arguments unless it is first introduced into the definitions.
In Science et Méthode, as translated by Francis Maitland, in Science and Method (1914), 123-124.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Definition (221)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Introduce (63)

Examining this water...I found floating therein divers earthy particles, and some green streaks, spirally wound serpent-wise...and I judge that some of these little creatures were above a thousand times smaller than the smallest ones I have ever yet seen, upon the rind of cheese, in wheaten flour, mould, and the like.
[The first recorded observation of protozoa.]
Letter to the Royal Society, London (7 Sep 1674). In John Carey, Eyewitness to Science (1997), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheese (9)  |  Creature (233)  |  Flour (4)  |  Green (63)  |  Judge (108)  |  Little (707)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Mold (33)  |  Observation (555)  |  Particle (194)  |  Protozoa (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wound (26)

Extremely hazardous is the desire to explain everything, and to supply whatever appears a gap in history—for in this propensity lies the first cause and germ of all those violent and arbitrary hypotheses which perplex and pervert the science of history far more than the open avowal of our ignorance, or the uncertainty of our knowledge: hypotheses which give an oblique direction, or an exaggerated and false extension, to a view of the subjec