Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Drain

Drain Quotes (11 quotes)

A huge net is being dragged across the sea floor, destroying everything in its path. Ahead of it bloom undersea forests and their hundreds and thousands of living creatures, both plant and animal; behind it is a desert. The net is pulled to the surface and most of the dead and dying life forms in it are thrown out. A few marketable species are retained. [Trawling] is like taking a front-end loader and scraping up your entire front garden and shredding it, keeping a few pebbles, and dumping the rest of it down the drain.
In Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth (2008), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bloom (9)  |  Both (493)  |  Bulldozer (6)  |  Creature (233)  |  Desert (56)  |  Down (456)  |  Dump (2)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Garden (60)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Most (1731)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Path (144)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pull (43)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retain (56)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shred (7)  |  Species (401)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Trawling (6)

However much we may enlarge our ideas of the time which has elapsed since the Niagara first began to drain the waters of the upper lakes, we have seen that this period was one only of a series, all belonging to the present zoological epoch; or that in which the living testaceous fauna, whether freshwater or marine, had already come into being. If such events can take place while the zoology of the earth remains almost stationary and unaltered, what ages may not be comprehended in those successive tertiary periods during which the Flora and Fauna of the globe have been almost entirely changed. Yet how subordinate a place in the long calendar of geological chronology do the successive tertiary periods themselves occupy! How much more enormous a duration must we assign to many antecedent revolutions of the earth and its inhabitants! No analogy can be found in the natural world to the immense scale of these divisions of past time, unless we contemplate the celestial spaces which have been measured by the astronomer.
Travels in North America (1845), Vol. 1, 51-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Freshwater (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Lake (32)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marine Geology (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Niagara Falls (4)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Scale (121)  |  Series (149)  |  Space (500)  |  Stationary (10)  |  Successive (73)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)

My method consists in allowing the mind to play freely for a very brief period, until a couple or so of ideas have passed through it, and then, while the traces or echoes of those ideas are still lingering in the brain, to turn the attention upon them with a sudden and complete awakening; to arrest, to scrutinise them, and to record their exact appearance... The general impression they have left upon me is like that which many of us have experienced when the basement of our house happens to be under thorough sanitary repairs, and we realise for the first time the complex system of drains and gas and water pipes, flues, bell-wires, and so forth, upon which our comfort depends, but which are usually hidden out of sight, and with whose existence, so long as they acted well, we had never troubled ourselves.
Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development (1883),185-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Attention (190)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Bell (35)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brief (36)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consist (223)  |  Depend (228)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Gas (83)  |  General (511)  |  Happen (274)  |  House (140)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impression (114)  |  Long (790)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pass (238)  |  Period (198)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Record (154)  |  Sight (132)  |  Still (613)  |  Sudden (67)  |  System (537)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Usually (176)  |  Water (481)  |  Wire (35)

Once the forest has been removed and the swamp starts being drained, that organic matter begins to oxidise and give off continuing emissions. It’s sort of like the goose that keeps on giving.
From interview with Inter Press Service (IPS), with Stephen de Tarczynski, 'Environment—Indonesia: Deforestation Causing More Than Landslides' (9 Mar 2008).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Emission (17)  |  Forest (150)  |  Giving (11)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  Goose (12)  |  Keeping (9)  |  Matter (798)  |  Organic (158)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Removal (11)  |  Start (221)  |  Swamp (7)

The Anglo-Dane appears to possess an aptitude for mathematics which is not shared by the native of any other English district as a whole, and it is in the exact sciences that the Anglo-Dane triumphs.
In A Study of British Genius (1904), 69. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 131. Moritz adds an editorial footnote: “The mathematical tendencies of Cambridge are due to the fact that Cambridge drains the ability of nearly the whole Anglo-Danish district.”
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  District (9)  |  Due (141)  |  English (35)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Native (38)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Whole (738)

The difficulty really is psychological and exists in the perpetual torment that results from your saying to yourself, “But how can it be like that?” which is a reflection of uncontrolled but utterly vain desire to see it in terms of something familiar. … If you will simply admit that maybe [Nature] does behave like this, you will find her a delightful, entrancing thing. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possible avoid it, "But how can it be like that?" because you will get 'down the drain', into a blind alley from which nobody has escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that.
[About wave-particle duality.]
'Probability abd Uncertainty—the Quantum Mechanical View of Nature', the sixth of his Messenger Lectures (1964), Cornell University. Collected in The Character of Physical Law (1967), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Behave (17)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Alley (4)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Entrancing (2)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Find (998)  |  Know (1518)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Possible (552)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Torment (18)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Vain (83)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wave-Particle Duality (2)  |  Will (2355)

The earth holds a silver treasure, cupped between ocean bed and tenting sky. Forever the heavens spend it, in the showers that refresh our temperate lands, the torrents that sluice the tropics. Every suckling root absorbs it, the very soil drains it down; the rivers run unceasing to the sea, the mountains yield it endlessly… Yet none is lost; in vast convection our water is returned, from soil to sky, and sky to soil, and back gain, to fall as pure as blessing. There was never less; there could never be more. A mighty mercy on which life depends, for all its glittering shifts, water is constant.
In A Cup of Sky (1950), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Bed (23)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Constant (144)  |  Convection (3)  |  Cup (7)  |  Depend (228)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endlessly (3)  |  Fall (230)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gain (145)  |  Glittering (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hold (95)  |  Land (115)  |  Less (103)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lost (34)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mighty (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pure (291)  |  Refresh (4)  |  Return (124)  |  River (119)  |  Root (120)  |  Run (174)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shift (44)  |  Shower (6)  |  Silver (46)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sluice (2)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spend (95)  |  Suckling (2)  |  Torrent (5)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Tropic (2)  |  Unceasing (3)  |  Vast (177)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Cycle (3)  |  Yield (81)

The Earthworm plows the whole world with his tunnels, drains and aerates the earth… If you ever buy any land, be sure it has plenty of Earthworms toiling and moiling all day so that you can sit down and relax. (1949)
How to Attract the Wombat (2002), 165
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthworm (6)  |  Plow (7)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Worm (42)

The known is finite, the unknown infinite; spiritually we find ourselves on a tiny island in the middle of a boundless ocean of the inexplicable. It is our task, from generation to generation, to drain a small amount of additional land.
As given in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 212. It is a restatement of an original quote from concluding remarks to a chapter by Thomas Huxley, 'On the Reception of the ‘Origin of Species’', the last chapter in Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887), Vol. 1, 557. Webmaster suggests, the original Huxley quote was translated for the original German text, and when that was translated for the English edition, the quote morphed into into the form above.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (6)  |  Amount (151)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Generation (242)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Middle (16)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Small (477)  |  Spiritually (3)  |  Task (147)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Unknown (182)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abnormality (2)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Burden (27)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cost (86)  |  Development (422)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Domination (12)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Incident (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negative (63)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Policy (24)  |  Possession (65)  |  Predator (6)  |  Price (51)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Regard (305)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universality (22)  |  Victory (39)  |  View (488)

You don’t ask the frogs when you drain the marsh.
a director of Electricite de France, when asked if the public was consulted on the siting of a nuclear power station, in The Guardian, 1986.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Frog (38)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.