Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Record

Record Quotes (56 quotes)

Lyveris to-forn us
Useden to marke
For selkouthes that thei seighen,
Hir sones for to teche;
And helden it an heigh science
Hir wittes to knowe.
Ac thorugh hir science soothly
Was nevere no soule y-saved,
Ne broght by hir bokes
To blisse ne to joye;
For alle hir kynde knowynges
Come but of diverse sightes.
Patriarkes and prophetes
Repreveden hir science,
And seiden hir wordes and hir wisdomes
Nas but a folye
And to the clergie of Crist
Counted it but a trufle.

Our ancestors in olden days used to record
The strange things they saw, and teach them to their sons;
And they held it a high science, to have knowledge of such things.
But no soul was ever saved by all that science,
Nor brought by books into eternal bliss;
Their science was only a series of sundry observations.
So patriarchs and prophets disapproved of their science,
And said their so-called words of wisdom were but folly—
And compared with Christian philosophy, a contemptible thing.
In William Langland and B. Thomas Wright (ed.) The Vision and Creed of Piers Ploughman (1842), 235-236. Modern translation by Terrence Tiller in Piers Plowman (1981, 1999), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Bliss (3)  |  Book (181)  |  Christian (17)  |  Compared (8)  |  Contemptible (7)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Folly (27)  |  High (78)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Observation (418)  |  Old (104)  |  Patriarch (3)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Prophet (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Series (38)  |  Son (16)  |  Soul (139)  |  Strange (61)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Teach (102)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Word (221)

A conflict arises when a religious community insists on the absolute truthfulness of all statements recorded in the Bible. This means an intervention on the part of religion into the sphere of science; this is where the struggle of the Church against the doctrines of Galileo and Darwin belongs. On the other hand, representatives of science have often made an attempt to arrive at fundamental judgments with respect to values and ends on the basis of scientific method, and in this way have set themselves in opposition to religion. These conflicts have all sprung from fatal errors.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Arise (32)  |  Arrive (17)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Basis (60)  |  Belong (33)  |  Bible (83)  |  Church (30)  |  Community (65)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  End (141)  |  Error (230)  |  Fatal (10)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  Insist (13)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Means (109)  |  Often (69)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Part (146)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Representative (9)  |  Respect (57)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Set (56)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Spring (47)  |  Statement (56)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Value (180)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Construction (69)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Development (228)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fact (609)  |  Formation (54)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Geology (187)  |  History (302)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Language (155)  |  Life (917)  |  Man (345)  |  Method (154)  |  Modern (104)  |  Organic (48)  |  Pebble (17)  |  Period (49)  |  Progress (317)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Speech (40)  |  Stratum (7)  |  Task (68)  |  Word (221)

A page from a journal of modern experimental physics will be as mysterious to the uninitiated as a Tibetan mandala. Both are records of enquiries into the nature of the universe.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Journal (13)  |  Modern Physics (12)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Page (18)  |  Tibet (2)  |  Universe (563)

Among the older records, we find chapter after chapter of which we can read the characters, and make out their meaning: and as we approach the period of man’s creation, our book becomes more clear, and nature seems to speak to us in language so like our own, that we easily comprehend it. But just as we begin to enter on the history of physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us—a leaf has been torn out from nature's record, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (33)  |  Book (181)  |  Chapter (7)  |  Character (82)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Comprehension (51)  |  Creation (211)  |  Enter (20)  |  Event (97)  |  Failure (118)  |  Hidden (34)  |  History (302)  |  Language (155)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Old (104)  |  Period (49)  |  Physical Change (4)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Succession (39)  |  Tear (20)

As for my memory, I have a particularly good one. I never keep any record of my investigations or experiments. My memory files all these things away conveniently and reliably. I should say, though, that I didn’t cumber it up with a lot of useless matter.
From George MacAdam, 'Steinmetz, Electricity's Mastermind, Enters Politics', New York Times (2 Nov 1913), SM3.
Science quotes on:  |  Encumber (3)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Matter (270)  |  Memory (81)  |  Useless (24)

At times the [radio telescope] records exhibited a feature characteristic of interference, occurring some time later than the passage of the two known sources. This intermittent feature was curious, and I recall saying once that we would have to investigate the origin of that interference some day. We joked that it was probably due to the faulty ignition of some farm hand returning from a date.
From address to the 101st Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, Gainesville, Florida (27 Dec 1958). Printed in 'An Account of the Discovery of Jupiter as a Radio Source', The Astronomical Journal (Mar 1959), 64, No. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Curious (24)  |  Date (8)  |  Farm (17)  |  Faulty (2)  |  Hand (103)  |  Ignition (2)  |  Interference (12)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Origin (77)  |  Radio Telescope (5)  |  Returning (2)  |  Source (71)

But, as we consider the totality of similarly broad and fundamental aspects of life, we cannot defend division by two as a natural principle of objective order. Indeed, the ‘stuff’ of the universe often strikes our senses as complex and shaded continua, admittedly with faster and slower moments, and bigger and smaller steps, along the way. Nature does not dictate dualities, trinities, quarterings, or any ‘objective’ basis for human taxonomies; most of our chosen schemes, and our designated numbers of categories, record human choices from a cornucopia of possibilities offered by natural variation from place to place, and permitted by the flexibility of our mental capacities. How many seasons (if we wish to divide by seasons at all) does a year contain? How many stages shall we recognize in a human life?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admittedly (2)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Basis (60)  |  Big (33)  |  Broad (18)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Category (10)  |  Choice (64)  |  Choose (35)  |  Complex (78)  |  Consider (45)  |  Contain (37)  |  Continua (3)  |  Defend (20)  |  Designation (10)  |  Dictate (9)  |  Divide (24)  |  Division (27)  |  Fast (24)  |  Flexibility (5)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Life (917)  |  Mental (57)  |  Moment (61)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Number (179)  |  Objective (49)  |  Offer (16)  |  Often (69)  |  Order (167)  |  Permit (20)  |  Place (111)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Principle (228)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Season (24)  |  Sense (240)  |  Shade (12)  |  Similarly (3)  |  Slow (36)  |  Small (97)  |  Stage (39)  |  Step (67)  |  Strike (21)  |  Stuff (15)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Totality (9)  |  Universe (563)  |  Variation (50)  |  Wish (62)  |  Year (214)

Changes, cyclic or otherwise, within the solar system or within our galaxy, would seem to be the easy and incontrovertible solution for everything that I have found remarkable in the stratigraphical record.
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Galaxy (38)  |  Incontrovertible (5)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Solution (168)  |  Stratigraphy (6)

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. … All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It’s an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no “why” in those examples. We don’t understand why electricity travels. We don’t know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Building (51)  |  Computer (84)  |  Constant (40)  |  Dog (39)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Example (57)  |  Forever (42)  |  Happening (32)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Light (246)  |  Need (211)  |  Observation (418)  |  Rocket (29)  |  Ship (33)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Speed (27)  |  Travel (40)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Why (6)

Evolution is the conviction that organisms developed their current forms by an extended history of continual transformation, and that ties of genealogy bind all living things into one nexus. Panselectionism is a denial of history, for perfection covers the tracks of time. A perfect wing may have evolved to its current state, but it may have been created just as we find it. We simply cannot tell if perfection be our only evidence. As Darwin himself understood so well, the primary proofs of evolution are oddities and imperfections that must record pathways of historical descent–the panda’s thumb and the flamingo’s smile of my book titles (chosen to illustrate this paramount principle of history).
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Choose (35)  |  Continual (13)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Cover (23)  |  Create (98)  |  Current (43)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Denial (13)  |  Descent (14)  |  Develop (55)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Extend (20)  |  Find (248)  |  Flamingo (2)  |  Form (210)  |  Genealogy (4)  |  Historical (10)  |  History (302)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Living Things (3)  |  Nexus (3)  |  Oddity (4)  |  Organism (126)  |  Panda (2)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Primary (29)  |  Principle (228)  |  Proof (192)  |  Simply (34)  |  Smile (13)  |  State (96)  |  Tell (67)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Tie (21)  |  Time (439)  |  Title (10)  |  Track (9)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Understand (189)  |  Wing (36)

For the sake of our children and our future, we must do more to combat climate change. Now, it’s true that no single event makes a trend. But the fact is the 12 hottest years on record have all come in the last 15. Heat waves, droughts, wildfires, floods—all are now more frequent and more intense. We can choose to believe that Superstorm Sandy, and the most severe drought in decades, and the worst wildfires some states have ever seen were all just a freak coincidence. Or we can choose to believe in the overwhelming judgment of science—and act before it’s too late.
From second State of the Union Address (12 Feb 2013) at the U.S. Capitol.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Belief (400)  |  Children (20)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Combat (9)  |  Decade (19)  |  Drought (9)  |  Event (97)  |  Fact (609)  |  Flood (26)  |  Freak (3)  |  Frequent (10)  |  Future (229)  |  Hottest (2)  |  Intense (11)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Late (28)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Sake (17)  |  Sandy (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Severe (7)  |  State (96)  |  Trend (16)  |  Worst (14)  |  Year (214)

Geology got into the hands of the theoreticians who were conditioned by the social and political history of their day more than by observations in the field. … We have allowed ourselves to be brainwashed into avoiding any interpretation of the past that involves extreme and what might be termed “catastrophic” processes. However, it seems to me that the stratigraphical record is full of examples of processes that are far from “normal” in the usual sense of the word. In particular we must conclude that sedimentation in the past has often been very rapid indeed and very spasmodic. This may be called the “Phenomenon of the Catastrophic Nature of the Stratigraphic Record.”
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (3rd ed., 1993), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoidance (9)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Conditioning (3)  |  Example (57)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Field (119)  |  Geology (187)  |  Hand (103)  |  History (302)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Involving (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Normal (21)  |  Observation (418)  |  Often (69)  |  Past (109)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Politics (77)  |  Process (201)  |  Rapid (17)  |  Sense (240)  |  Social (93)  |  Stratigraphy (6)  |  Term (87)  |  Theorist (24)  |  Word (221)

I am particularly fond of (Emmanuel Mendes da Costa’s) Natural History of Fossils because treatise, more than any other work written in English, records a short episode expressing one of the grand false starts in the history of natural science–and nothing can be quite so informative and instructive as a juicy mistake.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  English (23)  |  Episode (3)  |  Express (32)  |  False (79)  |  Fond (9)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Grand (15)  |  History (302)  |  Informative (2)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Short (31)  |  Start (68)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Work (457)  |  Write (87)

If the Commission is to enquire into the conditions “to be observed,” it is to be presumed that they will give the result of their enquiries; or, in other words, that they will lay down, or at least suggest, “rules” and “conditions to be (hereafter) observed” in the construction of bridges, or, in other words, embarrass and shackle the progress of improvement to-morrow by recording and registering as law the prejudices or errors of to-day.
[Objecting to any interference by the State with the freedom of civil engineers in the conduct of their professional work.]
Letter (13 Mar 1848) to the Royal Commission on the Application of Iron in Railway Structures. Collected in The Life of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Civil Engineer (1870), 487. The above verbatim quote may be the original source of the following statement as seen in books and on the web without citation: “I am opposed to the laying down of rules or conditions to be observed in the construction of bridges lest the progress of improvement tomorrow might be embarrassed or shackled by recording or registering as law the prejudices or errors of today.” Webmaster has not yet found a primary source for his latter form, and suspects it may be a synopsis, rather than a verbatim quote. If you know of such a primary source, please inform Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (22)  |  Commission (3)  |  Condition (119)  |  Construction (69)  |  Embarrassment (3)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Error (230)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Law (418)  |  Observation (418)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Presume (5)  |  Progress (317)  |  Register (9)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Rule (135)  |  Shackle (4)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomorrow (29)

Inexact method of observation, as I believe, is one flaw in clinical pathology to-day. Prematurity of conclusion is another, and in part follows from the first; but in chief part an unusual craving and veneration for hypothesis, which besets the minds of most medical men, is responsible. Except in those sciences which deal with the intangible or with events of long past ages, no treatises are to be found in which hypothesis figures as it does in medical writings. The purity of a science is to be judged by the paucity of its recorded hypotheses. Hypothesis has its right place, it forms a working basis; but it is an acknowledged makeshift, and, at the best, of purpose unaccomplished. Hypothesis is the heart which no man with right purpose wears willingly upon his sleeve. He who vaunts his lady love, ere yet she is won, is apt to display himself as frivolous or his lady a wanton.
The Mechanism and Graphic Registration of the Heart Beat (1920), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Craving (5)  |  Event (97)  |  Flaw (8)  |  Frivolous (3)  |  History (302)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mind (544)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Paucity (3)  |  Physician (232)  |  Premature (17)  |  Purity (13)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Science (1699)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Wanton (2)

It is easier to love humanity as a whole than to love one’s neighbor. There may even be a certain antagonism between love of humanity and love of neighbor; a low capacity for getting along with those near us often goes hand in hand with a high receptivity to the idea of the brotherhood of men. About a hundred years ago a Russian landowner by the name of Petrashevsky recorded a remarkable conclusion: “Finding nothing worthy of my attachment either among women or among men, I have vowed myself to the service of mankind.” He became a follower of Fourier, and installed a phalanstery on his estate. The end of the experiment was sad, but what one might perhaps have expected: the peasants—Petrashevsky’s neighbors-burned the phalanstery.
In 'Brotherhood', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Antagonism (5)  |  Attachment (5)  |  Become (100)  |  Brotherhood (5)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Certain (84)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Easy (56)  |  End (141)  |  Estate (3)  |  Expect (27)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Find (248)  |  Follower (7)  |  Fourier (2)  |  Hand In Hand (2)  |  High (78)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Love (164)  |  Low (16)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Myself (22)  |  Name (118)  |  Neighbor (10)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Often (69)  |  Peasant (4)  |  Receptivity (2)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Russian (2)  |  Sadness (26)  |  Service (54)  |  Vow (4)  |  Whole (122)  |  Woman (94)  |  Worthy (21)  |  Year (214)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (20)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Available (18)  |  Back (55)  |  Best (129)  |  Blind (35)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Branch (61)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Charge (29)  |  Collect (10)  |  Collection (38)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Country (121)  |  Creation (211)  |  Creator (40)  |  Cultivation (23)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Direct (44)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Face (69)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Geographical (3)  |  Government (85)  |  Handiwork (5)  |  Higher (28)  |  History (302)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (177)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Institution (32)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Invaluable (4)  |  Invariably (8)  |  Known (15)  |  Letter (36)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Long (95)  |  Look (46)  |  Lost (28)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Museum (22)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Natural (128)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Obscure (19)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perish (23)  |  Person (114)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (317)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remain (77)  |  Render (17)  |  Rest (64)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Secure (13)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Species (181)  |  Step (67)  |  Strange (61)  |  Study (331)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Tropical (4)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Variation (50)  |  Volume (13)  |  Want (120)  |  Wealth (50)

It is usual to say that the two sources of experience are Observation and Experiment. When we merely note and record the phenomena which occur around us in the ordinary course of nature we are said to observe. When we change the course of nature by the intervention of our will and muscular powers, and thus produce unusual combinations and conditions of phenomena, we are said to experiment. [Sir John] Herschel has justly remarked that we might properly call these two modes of experience passive and active observation. In both cases we must certainly employ our senses to observe, and an experiment differs from a mere observation in the fact that we more or less influence the character of the events which we observe. Experiment is thus observation plus alteration of conditions.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Definition (152)  |  Event (97)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Influence (110)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Note (22)  |  Observation (418)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Sense (240)  |  Source (71)

It wasn’t the finches that put the idea [of natural selection] in Darwin’s head, it was the tortoises. The reason he didn’t use the tortoises [in writing On the Origin of Species] was that, when he got back, he found he didn’t have localities on the tortoise specimens. Here the great god, the greatest naturalist we have records of, made a mistake. His fieldwork wasn’t absolutely perfect.
From interview with Brian Cox and Robert Ince, in 'A Life Measured in Heartbeats', New Statesman (21 Dec 2012), 141, No. 5138, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Fieldwork (3)  |  Finch (4)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Idea (440)  |  Locality (6)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Origin Of Species (39)  |  Specimen (12)  |  Tortoise (8)

I’m doing my part, building plants at a record rate, having historic conservation levels. The only people not doing their part is the federal government that is siding with the energy companies against the interests of the people of California.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Build (80)  |  California (7)  |  Company (28)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Energy (185)  |  Federal (5)  |  Government (85)  |  Historic (2)  |  Interest (170)  |  Level (51)  |  Part (146)  |  People (269)  |  Plant (173)  |  Rate (22)  |  Side (36)

John Dalton's records, carefully preserved for a century, were destroyed during the World War II bombing of Manchester. It is not only the living who are killed in war.
In Anu Garg, Another Word a Day (2005), 210. If you know a primary print source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Bomb (17)  |  Century (94)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Kill (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Manchester (4)  |  Preserve (38)  |  War (144)

Lately, however, on abandoning the brindled and grey mosquitos and commencing similar work on a new, brown species, of which I have as yet obtained very few individuals, I succeeded in finding in two of them certain remarkable and suspicious cells containing pigment identical in appearance to that of the parasite of malaria. As these cells appear to me to be very worthy of attention … I think it would be advisable to place on record a brief description both of the cells and of the mosquitos.
In 'On Some Peculiar Pigmented Cells Found in Two Mosquitoes Fed on Malarial Blood', British Medical Journal (18 Dec 1897), 1786. Ross continued this study and identified how malaria was transmitted.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Attention (76)  |  Cell (125)  |  Description (72)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Mosquito (12)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Pigment (7)  |  Success (202)  |  Suspicion (25)

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal. Note his history, as sketched above. It seems plain to me that whatever he is he is not a reasoning animal. His record is the fantastic record of a maniac. I consider that the strongest count against his intelligence is the fact that with that record back of him he blandly sets himself up as the head animal of the lot: whereas by his own standards he is the bottom one.
In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which the other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately.
Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh—not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.
In Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings (),
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Bone (57)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Brahman (2)  |  Cage (5)  |  Cat (31)  |  Catholic (5)  |  Chaos (63)  |  China (17)  |  Christian (17)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Dispute (15)  |  Dog (39)  |  Dove (2)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Fool (70)  |  Fox (8)  |  Friend (63)  |  Goose (9)  |  Greek (46)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Ireland (7)  |  Learning (174)  |  Methodist (2)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Peace (58)  |  Proof (192)  |  Rabbit (6)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Scotland (3)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Tame (4)  |  Theology (35)  |  Think (205)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wild (39)

Meat-eating has not, to my knowledge, been recorded from other parts of the chimpanzee’s range in Africa, although if it is assumed that human infants are in fact taken for food, the report that five babies were carried off in West Africa suggests that carnivorous behavior may be widespread.
In 'Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve', collected in Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes (1965), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (15)  |  Animal Behavior (9)  |  Assume (19)  |  Baby (18)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Carnivorous (3)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Eating (21)  |  Fact (609)  |  Food (139)  |  Human (445)  |  Infant (13)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Meat (11)  |  Range (38)  |  Report (31)  |  Suggest (15)  |  Widespread (9)

Not marble graven with public records, whereby breath and life return to goodly heroes after death.
Horace
In Ode 8, 'In Praise of Poesy', Horace, The Odes and Epodes (1921), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (42)  |  Breath (24)  |  Death (270)  |  Hero (29)  |  Life (917)  |  Marble (10)  |  Public (82)  |  Return (35)

Only once in the historical record has a jump on the San Andreas exceeded the jump of 1906. In 1857, near Tejon Pass outside Los Angeles, the two sides shifted thirty feet.
Assembling California
Science quotes on:  |  Angeles (4)  |  Exceed (7)  |  Foot (39)  |  Historical (10)  |  Jump (13)  |  Los (4)  |  Outside (37)  |  Pass (60)  |  Shift (21)  |  Side (36)  |  Thirty (4)

Our failure to discern a universal good does not record any lack of insight or ingenuity, but merely demonstrates that nature contains no moral messages framed in human terms. Morality is a subject for philosophers, theologians, students of the humanities, indeed for all thinking people. The answers will not be read passively from nature; they do not, and cannot, arise from the data of science. The factual state of the world does not teach us how we, with our powers for good and evil, should alter or preserve it in the most ethical manner.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (19)  |  Answer (201)  |  Arise (32)  |  Contain (37)  |  Data (100)  |  Demonstrate (25)  |  Discern (7)  |  Ethical (10)  |  Factual (8)  |  Failure (118)  |  Frame (17)  |  Good (228)  |  Good And Evil (2)  |  Human (445)  |  Humanities (14)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Insight (57)  |  Lack (52)  |  Manner (35)  |  Merely (35)  |  Message (30)  |  Moral (100)  |  Morality (33)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Passively (3)  |  People (269)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Read (83)  |  Science (1699)  |  State (96)  |  Student (131)  |  Subject (129)  |  Teach (102)  |  Term (87)  |  Theologian (14)  |  Think (205)  |  Universal (70)  |  World (667)

Publication has been extended far beyond our present ability to make real use of the record.
From article 'As We May Think', in Atlantic Magazine (Jul 1945). Bush was expressing concern that the vastly increasing body of research information and knowledge needed mechanical systems to store and effectively manage its retrieval.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Extend (20)  |  Far (77)  |  Present (103)  |  Publication (83)  |  Real (95)

Science began to be powerful when it began to be cumulative, when observers began to preserve detailed records, to organize cooperating groups in order to pool and criticize their experiences.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Cooperation (27)  |  Criticize (4)  |  Cumulative (8)  |  Detail (65)  |  Experience (268)  |  Group (52)  |  Observer (33)  |  Order (167)  |  Organization (79)  |  Pool (10)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Science (1699)

Several very eminent living paleontologists frequently emphasise the abruptness of some of the major changes that have occurred, and seek for an external cause. This is a heady wine and has intoxicated palaeontologists since the days when they could blame it all on Noah's flood. In fact, books are still being published by the lunatic fringe with the same explanation. In case this book should be read by some fundamentalist searching for straws to prop up his prejudices, let me state categorically that all my experience (such as it is) has led me to an unqualified acceptance of evolution by natural selection as a sufficient explanation for what I have seen in the fossil record
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Abruptness (2)  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Blame (17)  |  Book (181)  |  Cause (231)  |  Change (291)  |  Eminent (6)  |  Emphasis (14)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Experience (268)  |  Explanation (161)  |  External (45)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Fundamentalist (4)  |  Heady (2)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Major (24)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Paleontologist (15)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Prop (6)  |  Publish (18)  |  Reading (51)  |  Search (85)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Straw (5)  |  Sufficient (24)  |  Wine (23)

Sir,—The Planet [Neptune] whose position you marked out actually exists. On the day on which your letter reached me, I found a star of the eighth magnitude, which was not recorded in the excellent map designed by Dr. Bremiker, containing the twenty-first hour of the collection published by the Royal Academy of Berlin. The observation of the succeeding day showed it to be the Planet of which we were in quest.
Letter, from Berlin (25 Sep 1846). In John Pringle Nichol, The Planet Neptune: An Exposition and History (1848), 89. Galle thus confirmed the existence of the planet Neptune, found at the position predicted in a letter he had just received from Urbain Le Verrier.
Science quotes on:  |  Existence (254)  |  Letter (36)  |  Map (21)  |  Mark (28)  |  Neptune (8)  |  Observation (418)  |  Planet (199)  |  Position (54)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Quest (24)  |  Star (251)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Assure (11)  |  Beard (5)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Broad (18)  |  Care (73)  |  Certain (84)  |  Channel (17)  |  Class (64)  |  Compose (7)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Construction (69)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (121)  |  Cross (9)  |  Cruelty (14)  |  Daughter (11)  |  Deed (17)  |  Delight (51)  |  Destined (5)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (23)  |  Event (97)  |  Eventually (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Faith (131)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Gentleman (17)  |  Globe (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Grow (66)  |  Happen (63)  |  Holy (14)  |  Include (27)  |  Know (321)  |  Live (186)  |  London (12)  |  Lose (53)  |  Love (164)  |  Manner (35)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Particular (54)  |  Passage (14)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reason (330)  |  Same (92)  |  Say (126)  |  Scribe (3)  |  South (8)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Time (439)  |  Travel (40)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trillion (2)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Unspeakably (2)  |  Upper (3)  |  Version (6)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  White (38)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)  |  Youth (57)

Somehow we believe it is normal and natural for us to be alone in the world. Yet in fact, if you look at the fossil record, you find that this is totally unusual—this may be the first time that we have ever had just one species of humans in the world. We have a history of diversity and competition among human species which began some five million years ago and came to an end with the emergence of modern humans. Two million years ago, for example, there were at least four human species on the same landscape.
In interview with Amy Otchet, 'The Humans We Left Behind', UNESCO Courier (Dec 2000), 53, No. 12, 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Diversity (46)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Homo Sapiens (19)  |  Human (445)  |  Species (181)

Something to remember. If you have remembered every word in this article, your memory will have recorded about 150 000 bits of information. Thus, the order in your brain will have increased by about 150 000 units. However, while you have been reading the article, you will have converted about 300 000 joules of ordered energy, in the form of food, into disordered energy, in the form of heat which you lose to the air around you by convection and sweat. This will increase the disorder of the Universe by about 3 x 1024 units, about 20 million million million times the increase in order because you remember my article.
An afterword to his three-page article discussing thermodynamics and entropy, in 'The Direction of Time', New Scientist (9 Jul 1987), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (15)  |  Bit (13)  |  Brain (181)  |  Convection (2)  |  Convert (15)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Energy (185)  |  Food (139)  |  Heat (90)  |  Increase (107)  |  Information (102)  |  Joule (2)  |  Memory (81)  |  Million (89)  |  Order (167)  |  Remember (53)  |  Sweat (12)  |  Time (439)  |  Universe (563)  |  Word (221)

The bushels of rings taken from the fingers of the slain at the battle of Cannæ, above two thousand years ago, are recorded; … but the bushels of corn produced in England at this day, or the number of the inhabitants of the country, are unknown, at the very time that we are debating that most important question, whether or not there is sufficient substance for those who live in the kingdom.
In The Statistical Breviary: Shewing, on a Principle Entirely New, the Resources of Every State and Kingdom in Europe (1801), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (30)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Corn (10)  |  Country (121)  |  Debate (19)  |  England (31)  |  Importance (183)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Number (179)  |  Produce (63)  |  Question (315)  |  Ring (14)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Substance (73)  |  Sufficient (24)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Year (214)

The effects of general change in literature are most tellingly recorded not in alteration of the best products, but in the transformation of the most ordinary workaday books; for when potboilers adopt the new style, then the revolution is complete.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (9)  |  Alteration (22)  |  Best (129)  |  Book (181)  |  Change (291)  |  Complete (43)  |  Effect (133)  |  General (92)  |  Literature (64)  |  New (340)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Product (72)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Style (15)  |  Transformation (47)

The geologist, in those tables of stone which form his records, finds no examples of dynasties once passed away again returning. There has no repetition of the dynasty of the fish, of the reptile, of the mammal. The dynasty of the future is to have glorified man for its inhabitant; but it is to be the dynasty—“the kingdom”—not of glorified man made in the image of God, but of God himself in the form man.
The Testimony of the Rocks: or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed (1857), 178.
Science quotes on:  |  Dynasty (5)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fish (85)  |  Future (229)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Glorify (2)  |  God (454)  |  Image (38)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Reptile (23)  |  Stone (57)

The history of science is a record of the transformations of contempts amd amusements.
Wild Talents (1932, 2004), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (20)  |  Contempt (11)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Transformation (47)

The history of Science is not a mere record of isolated discoveries; it is a narrative of the conflict of two contending powers, the expansive force of the human intellect on one side, and the compression arising from traditionary faith and human interests on the other.
In History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science (1875), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Arising (3)  |  Compression (4)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Expansive (2)  |  Faith (131)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Human (445)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Interest (170)  |  Isolated (12)  |  Mere (41)  |  Narrative (6)  |  Traditional (9)

The history of this paper suggests that highly speculative investigations, especially by an unknown author, are best brought before the world through some other channel than a scientific society, which naturally hesitates to admit into its printed records matters of uncertain value. Perhaps one may go further and say that a young author who believes himself capable of great things would usually do well to secure the favourable recognition of the scientific world by work whose scope is limited and whose value is easily judged, before embarking upon higher flights.
'On the Physics of Media that are Composed of Free and Perfectly Elastic Molecules in a State of Motion', Philosophical Transactions (1892), 183, 560.
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (10)  |  Author (39)  |  Channel (17)  |  Embarkation (2)  |  Favor (22)  |  Flight (45)  |  Hesitation (8)  |  History (302)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Limited (13)  |  Paper (52)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Scope (13)  |  Society (188)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Uncertainty (37)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Value (180)

The horrors of Vivisection have supplanted the solemnity, the thrilling fascination, of the old unetherized operation upon the human sufferer. Their recorded phenomena, stored away by the physiological inquisitor on dusty shelves, are mostly of as little present use to man as the knowledge of a new comet or of a tungstate of zirconium … —contemptibly small compared with the price paid for it in agony and torture.
From address to the Massachusetts Medical Society (7 Jun 1871), 'Medical Education in America', collected in Surgical Anaesthesia: Addresses, and Other Papers (1894, 1900), 309.
Science quotes on:  |  Agony (3)  |  Comet (43)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Contempt (11)  |  Dusty (3)  |  Ether (24)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Horror (6)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  New (340)  |  Operation (96)  |  Pay (30)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Price (26)  |  Shelf (5)  |  Small (97)  |  Solemnity (4)  |  Store (17)  |  Sufferer (3)  |  Supplanting (2)  |  Thrill (14)  |  Torture (13)  |  Vivisection (7)  |  Zirconium (2)

The laws expressing the relations between energy and matter are, however, not solely of importance in pure science. They necessarily come first in order ... in the whole record of human experience, and they control, in the last resort, the rise or fall of political systems, the freedom or bondage of nations, the movements of commerce and industry, the origin of wealth and poverty, and the general physical welfare of the race.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Commerce (14)  |  Control (93)  |  Energy (185)  |  Experience (268)  |  Expression (82)  |  First (174)  |  Freedom (76)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Importance (183)  |  Industry (91)  |  Law (418)  |  Matter (270)  |  Movement (65)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Origin (77)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Politics (77)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Race (76)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rise And Fall (2)  |  Solely (6)  |  System (141)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Welfare (16)  |  Whole (122)

The noble science of Geology loses glory from the extreme imperfection of the record. The crust of the earth with its embedded remains must not be looked at as a well-filled museum, but as a poor collection made at hazard and at rare intervals.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 423.
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (38)  |  Crust (17)  |  Earth (487)  |  Embed (5)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Geology (187)  |  Glory (44)  |  Hazard (11)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Interval (8)  |  Loss (62)  |  Museum (22)  |  Noble (41)  |  Poor (46)  |  Rare (31)  |  Remain (77)  |  Science (1699)

The observer is never entirely replaced by instruments; for if he were, he could obviously obtain no knowledge whatsoever ... They must be read! The observer’s senses have to step in eventuality. The most careful record, when not inspected, tells us nothing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (12)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Eventuality (2)  |  Inspect (2)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Observer (33)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Read (83)  |  Replace (16)  |  Sense (240)  |  Step (67)  |  Tell (67)  |  Whatsoever (6)

The psychiatric interviewer is supposed to be doing three things: considering what the patient could mean by what he says; considering how he himself can best phrase what he wishes to communicate to the patient; and, at the same time, observing the general pattern of the events being communicated. In addition to that, to make notes which will be of more than evocative value, or come anywhere near being a verbatim record of what is said, in my opinion is beyond the capacity of most human beings.
From The Psychiatric Interview (1954, 1970), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Communication (58)  |  Considering (6)  |  Doing (36)  |  Event (97)  |  General (92)  |  Human (445)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Note (22)  |  Observation (418)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Patient (116)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Supposition (33)  |  Value (180)  |  Verbatim (2)  |  Wish (62)

There is a moral or metaphysical part of nature as well as a physical. A man who denies this is deep in the mire of folly. ’Tis the crown and glory of organic science that it does through final cause, link material and moral; and yet does not allow us to mingle them in our first conception of laws, and our classification of such laws, whether we consider one side of nature or the other. You have ignored this link; and, if I do not mistake your meaning, you have done your best in one or two pregnant cases to break it. Were it possible (which, thank God, it is not) to break it, humanity, in my mind, would suffer a damage that might brutalize it, and sink the human race into a lower grade of degradation than any into which it has fallen since its written records tell us of its history.
Letter to Charles Darwin (Nov 1859). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Classification (79)  |  Crown (19)  |  Degradation (12)  |  Folly (27)  |  Glory (44)  |  History (302)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Ignore (22)  |  Law (418)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Metaphysical (5)  |  Mingle (6)  |  Mire (2)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Organic (48)  |  Science (1699)

These two orders of mountains [Secondary and Tertiary] offer the most ancient chronicle of our globe, least liable to falsifications and at the same time more legible than the writing of the primitive ranges. They are Nature's archives, prior to even the most remote records and traditions that have been preserved for our observant century to investigate, comment on and bring to the light of day, and which will not be exhausted for several centuries after our own.
Observations sur la Formation des Montagnes', Acta Academiae Scientiarum Imperialis Petropolitanae (1777) [1778], 46. Trans. Albert Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Archive (5)  |  Century (94)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Comment (8)  |  Exhaustion (13)  |  Falsification (7)  |  Globe (39)  |  Least (43)  |  Legibility (2)  |  Liability (5)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Range (38)  |  Remote (27)  |  Secondary (11)  |  Tertiary (3)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Writing (72)

This car of mine, I am tickled to death with it. The machine is nearly everything, its power, stability and balance. The driver, allowing for his experience and courage, is much less.
[Referring to the Bluebird racing car in which he broke the speed record on 5 Feb 1931.]
Quoted in 'Campbell Drive Auto 245 Miles an Hour, Four Miles a Minute, a World Speed Record', New York Times (6 Feb 1931), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (43)  |  Car (20)  |  Courage (39)  |  Driver (4)  |  Everything (120)  |  Experience (268)  |  Less (54)  |  Machine (133)  |  Power (273)  |  Race (76)  |  Speed (27)  |  Stability (17)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (6)  |  Available (18)  |  Book (181)  |  Darwin (12)  |  Data (100)  |  Descent (14)  |  Directly (15)  |  Discuss (14)  |  Effect (133)  |  Exemplify (2)  |  First (174)  |  Historical (10)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Increase (107)  |  Little (126)  |  Middle (10)  |  Object (110)  |  Observe (48)  |  Orchid (2)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Process (201)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Render (17)  |  Several (14)  |  Single (72)  |  Stage (39)  |  Sum Up (2)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Work (457)  |  Worm (25)

Very little comes easily to our poor, benighted species (the first creature, after all, to experiment with the novel evolutionary inventions of self-conscious philosophy and art). Even the most ‘obvious,’ ‘accurate,’ and ‘natural’ style of thinking or drawing must be regulated by history and won by struggle. Solutions must therefore arise within a social context and record the complex interactions of mind and environment that define the possibility of human improvement.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Arise (32)  |  Art (205)  |  Benighted (2)  |  Complex (78)  |  Context (17)  |  Creature (127)  |  Define (29)  |  Draw (25)  |  Easily (16)  |  Environment (138)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Experiment (543)  |  First (174)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Interaction (28)  |  Invention (283)  |  Little (126)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural (128)  |  Novel (16)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Poor (46)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Regulate (4)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Solution (168)  |  Species (181)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Style (15)  |  Think (205)  |  Win (25)

We do live in a conceptual trough that encourages such yearning for unknown and romanticized greener pastures of other times. The future doesn’t seem promising, if only because we can extrapolate some disquieting present trends in to further deterioration: pollution, nationalism, environmental destruction, and aluminum bats. Therefore, we tend to take refuge in a rose-colored past ... I do not doubt the salutary, even the essential, properties of this curiously adaptive human trait, but we must also record the down side. Legends of past golden ages become impediments when we try to negotiate our current dilemma.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptive (2)  |  Aluminum (3)  |  Bat (8)  |  Become (100)  |  Conceptual (8)  |  Current (43)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Deterioration (8)  |  Dilemma (6)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Down (44)  |  Encourage (16)  |  Environmental (8)  |  Essential (87)  |  Far (77)  |  Future (229)  |  Green (23)  |  Human (445)  |  Impediment (7)  |  Legend (8)  |  Live (186)  |  Nationalism (5)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  Past (109)  |  Pasture (11)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Present (103)  |  Promise (27)  |  Property (96)  |  Refuge (12)  |  Romanticize (2)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Seem (89)  |  Side (36)  |  Tend (23)  |  Time (439)  |  Trait (19)  |  Trend (16)  |  Try (103)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Yearn (8)

We have before us the restoration of that ancient land whose name was a synonym for abundance, prosperity, and grandeur for many generations. Records as old as those of Egypt and as well attested tell of fertile lands and teeming populations, mighty kings and warriors, sages and wise men, over periods of thousands of years. ... A land such as this is worth resuscitating. Once we have apprehended the true cause of its present desolate and abandoned condition, we are on our way to restoring it to its ancient fertility. A land which so readily responded to ancient science, and gave a return which sufficed for the maintenance of a Persian Court in all its splendor, will surely respond to the efforts of modern science and return manifold the money and talent spent on its regeneration.
From The Restoration of the Ancient Irrigation Works on the Tigris: or, The Re-creation of Chaldea (1903), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Abundance (15)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Apprehend (2)  |  Attest (2)  |  Cause (231)  |  Condition (119)  |  Court (16)  |  Desolation (3)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Fertility (11)  |  Generation (111)  |  Grandeur (15)  |  King (23)  |  Land (83)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Manifold (7)  |  Mighty (7)  |  Modern (104)  |  Money (125)  |  Name (118)  |  Population (71)  |  Prosperity (15)  |  Regeneration (4)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Return (35)  |  Sage (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Splendor (8)  |  Suffice (3)  |  Synonym (2)  |  Talent (49)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Warrior (5)  |  Wise (43)  |  Year (214)

We might expect that as we come close upon living nature the characters of our old records would grow legible and clear; but just when we begin to enter on the history of the physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us: a leaf has been torn out from Nature’s book, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes. [On gaps in the Pleistocene fossil record.]
As quoted by Hugh Miller in Lecture First, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Character (82)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Event (97)  |  Expectation (46)  |  Fail (34)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Gap (20)  |  Hidden (34)  |  History (302)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Legibility (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Ourself (9)  |  Physical Change (4)  |  Pleistocene (3)  |  Succession (39)  |  Torn (4)

Year after year, the slow sure records grow.
Awaiting their interpreter.
In Watchers of the Sky (1922), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Awaiting (2)  |  Growing (15)  |  Interpreter (6)  |  Slow (36)  |  Year (214)

… the embryological record, as it is usually presented to us, is both imperfect and misleading. It may be compared to an ancient manuscript, with many of the sheets lost, others displaced, and with spurious passages interpolated by a later hand. … Like the scholar with his manuscript, the embryologist has by a process of careful and critical examination to determine where the gaps are present, to detect the later insertions, and to place in order what has been misplaced.
A Treatise on Comparative Embryology (1885), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Careful (12)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Critical (34)  |  Detection (12)  |  Determine (45)  |  Displace (3)  |  Embryologist (2)  |  Embryology (16)  |  Examination (60)  |  Gap (20)  |  Imperfect (10)  |  Insertion (2)  |  Lost (28)  |  Manuscript (7)  |  Misleading (12)  |  Order (167)  |  Passage (14)  |  Process (201)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Sheet (6)  |  Spurious (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.