Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Variety

Variety Quotes (53 quotes)

Le premier regard de l’homme jeté sur l’univers n’y découvre que variété, diversité, multiplicité des phénomènes. Que ce regard soit illuminé par la science,—par la science qui rapproche l’homme de Dieu,—et la simplicité et l’unité brillent de toutes parts.
Man’s first glance at the universe discovers only variety, diversity, multiplicity of phenomena. Let that glance be illuminated by science—by the science which brings man closer to God,—and simplicity and unity shine on all sides.
Original French quoted in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1901), 209. Translation by Google translate, tweaked by Webmaster. The English version of the book, omits this passage, except for “Science, which brings man nearer to God.” In The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 1, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Closer (6)  |  Discover (115)  |  Diversity (46)  |  First (174)  |  Glance (8)  |  God (454)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Multiplicity (6)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Shine (22)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Unity (43)  |  Universe (563)

Quelquefois, par exemple, je me figure que je suis suspendu en l’air, et que j’y demeure sans mouvement, pendant que la Terre tourne sous moi en vingt-quatre heures. Je vois passer sous mes yeux tous ces visages différents, les uns blancs, les autres noirs, les autres basanés, les autres olivâtres. D’abord ce sont des chapeaux et puis des turbans, et puis des têtes chevelues, et puis des têtes rasées; tantôt des villes à clochers, tantôt des villes à longues aiguilles qui ont des croissants, tantôt des villes à tours de porcelaine, tantôt de grands pays qui n’ont que des cabanes; ici de vastes mers, là des déserts épouvantables; enfin, toute cette variété infinie qui est sur la surface de la Terre.
Sometimes, for instance, I imagine that I am suspended in the air, and remain there motionless, while the earth turns under me in four-and-twenty hours. I see pass beneath me all these different countenances, some white, others black, others tawny, others olive-colored. At first they wear hats, and then turbans, then heads with long hair, then heads shaven; sometimes towns with steeples, sometimes towns with long spires, which have crescents, sometimes towns with porcelain towers, sometimes extensive countries that have only huts; here wide seas; there frightful deserts; in short, all this infinite variety on the surface of the earth.
In 'Premier Soir', Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (1686, 1863), 43. French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 117-118.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (27)  |  Country (121)  |  Crescent (2)  |  Desert (27)  |  Earth (487)  |  Face (69)  |  Hair (19)  |  Hat (8)  |  Hut (2)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Porcelain (4)  |  Sea (143)  |  Space Flight (21)  |  Spire (4)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Surface (74)  |  Tawny (2)  |  Tower (12)  |  White (38)

A good theoretical physicist today might find it useful to have a wide range of physical viewpoints and mathematical expressions of the same theory (for example, of quantum electrodynamics) available to him. This may be asking too much of one man. Then new students should as a class have this. If every individual student follows the same current fashion in expressing and thinking about electrodynamics or field theory, then the variety of hypotheses being generated to understand strong interactions, say, is limited. Perhaps rightly so, for possibly the chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction—a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory—who will find it?
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Class (64)  |  Current (43)  |  Direction (56)  |  Expression (82)  |  Fashionable (6)  |  Field (119)  |  Generate (11)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Individual (177)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Range (38)  |  Theoretical Physicist (12)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understand (189)  |  View (115)  |  Viewpoint (6)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Atomic Theory (13)  |  Niels Bohr (50)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Integral (6)  |  Interior (13)  |  Language (155)  |  Music Of The Spheres (2)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nucleus (30)  |  Order (167)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Max Planck (62)  |  Problem (362)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Research (517)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (7)  |  Solution (168)  |  Spectral Analysis (2)  |  Spectral Line (3)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (23)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theory (582)  |  Understanding (317)

All of us Hellenes tell lies … about those great Gods, the Sun and the Moon… . We say that they, and diverse other stars, do not keep the same path, and we call them planets or wanderers. … Each of them moves in the same path-not in many paths, but in one only, which is circular, and the varieties are only apparent.
Plato
In Plato and B. Jowett (trans.), The Dialogues of Plato: Laws (3rd ed., 1892), Vol. 5, 204-205.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (26)  |  Call (68)  |  Circular (3)  |  Diverse (6)  |  God (454)  |  Lie (80)  |  Moon (132)  |  Move (58)  |  Path (59)  |  Planet (199)  |  Same (92)  |  Star (251)  |  Sun (211)

All the species recognized by Botanists came forth from the Almighty Creator's hand, and the number of these is now and always will be exactly the same, while every day new and different florists' species arise from the true species so-called by Botanists, and when they have arisen they finally revert to the original forms. Accordingly to the former have been assigned by Nature fixed limits, beyond which they cannot go: while the latter display without end the infinite sport of Nature.
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 310. Trans. Frans A. Stafleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Botanist (16)  |  Creator (40)  |  Species (181)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (20)  |  Accept (37)  |  Belief (400)  |  Corner (24)  |  Defense (15)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Disrespect (2)  |  Drive (38)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Excellence (28)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Failure (118)  |  Former (18)  |  Full (38)  |  Help (68)  |  House (36)  |  Imply (12)  |  Impose (17)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Lamentable (3)  |  Local (15)  |  Location (5)  |  Material (124)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (64)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Range (38)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Raw (10)  |  Reality (140)  |  Reason (330)  |  Representative (9)  |  Rich (48)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (17)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (188)  |  Spot (11)  |  Stem (11)  |  Struggle (60)  |  System (141)  |  Teach (102)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Tide (18)  |  Tough (8)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Unconsciously (3)  |  Understand (189)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Variation (50)  |  Vary (14)

At the beginning of its existence as a science, biology was forced to take cognizance of the seemingly boundless variety of living things, for no exact study of life phenomena was possible until the apparent chaos of the distinct kinds of organisms had been reduced to a rational system. Systematics and morphology, two predominantly descriptive and observational disciplines, took precedence among biological sciences during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. More recently physiology has come to the foreground, accompanied by the introduction of quantitative methods and by a shift from the observationalism of the past to a predominance of experimentation.
In Genetics and the Origin of Species (1937, 1982), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  19th Century (22)  |  Biology (150)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Description (72)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Foreground (3)  |  Introduction (31)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Observation (418)  |  Organism (126)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Precedence (2)  |  Predominance (2)  |  Rational (42)  |  Shift (21)  |  Systematic (25)

But who can say that the vapour engine has not a kind of consciousness? Where does consciousness begin, and where end? Who can draw the line? Who can draw any line? Is not everything interwoven with everything? Is not machinery linked with animal life in an infinite variety of ways?
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Engine (25)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Interwoven (6)  |  Life (917)  |  Link (29)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Vapour (9)

Combining in our survey then, the whole range of deposits from the most recent to the most ancient group, how striking a succession do they present:– so various yet so uniform–so vast yet so connected. In thus tracing back to the most remote periods in the physical history of our continents, one system of operations, as the means by which many complex formations have been successively produced, the mind becomes impressed with the singleness of nature's laws; and in this respect, at least, geology is hardly inferior in simplicity to astronomy.
The Silurian System (1839), 574.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Combination (69)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Connection (86)  |  Continent (39)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Formation (54)  |  History (302)  |  Impression (51)  |  Law (418)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Operation (96)  |  Production (105)  |  Range (38)  |  Recent (23)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Succession (39)  |  Survey (14)  |  System (141)  |  Trace (39)  |  Uniformity (17)  |  Vast (56)

Da Vinci was as great a mechanic and inventor as were Newton and his friends. Yet a glance at his notebooks shows us that what fascinated him about nature was its variety, its infinite adaptability, the fitness and the individuality of all its parts. By contrast what made astronomy a pleasure to Newton was its unity, its singleness, its model of a nature in which the diversified parts were mere disguises for the same blank atoms.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (4)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Atom (251)  |  Blank (11)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (34)  |  Disguise (8)  |  Diversified (2)  |  Fascinated (2)  |  Fitness (7)  |  Friend (63)  |  Glance (8)  |  Individuality (12)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Inventor (49)  |  Mechanic (13)  |  Model (64)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Notebook (4)  |  Part (146)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Unity (43)

Domesticated biotechnology, once it gets into the hands of housewives and children, will give us an explosion of diversity of new living creatures … New lineages will proliferate to replace those that monoculture farming and deforestation have destroyed. Designing genomes will be a personal thing, a new art form as creative as painting or sculpture. Few of the new creations will be masterpieces, but a great many will bring joy to their creators and variety to our fauna and flora.
In 'Our Biotech Future', The New York Review of Books (2007). As quoted and cited in Kenneth Brower, 'The Danger of Cosmic Genius', The Atlantic (Dec 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Biotechnology (6)  |  Child (189)  |  Creation (211)  |  Creator (40)  |  Creature (127)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Design (92)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Farming (7)  |  Fauna (10)  |  Flora (6)  |  Genome (6)  |  Housewife (2)  |  Joy (61)  |  Masterpiece (4)  |  Monoculture (2)  |  New (340)  |  Painting (24)  |  Personal (49)  |  Replace (16)  |  Sculpture (8)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Branch (61)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Communication (58)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (31)  |  Improbability (7)  |  Level (51)  |  Principal (15)  |  River (68)  |  Run (33)  |  Size (47)  |  System (141)  |  Trunk (10)  |  Valley (16)  |  Work (457)

Every writer must reconcile, as best he may, the conflicting claims of consistency and variety, of rigour in detail and elegance in the whole. The present author humbly confesses that, to him, geometry is nothing at all, if not a branch of art.
Concluding remark in preface to Treatise on Algebraic Plane Curves (1931), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Author (39)  |  Branch (61)  |  Claim (52)  |  Conflicting (3)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Detail (65)  |  Elegance (20)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Reconcile (10)  |  Rigour (10)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Whole (122)  |  Writer (35)

Extinction has only separated groups: it has by no means made them; for if every form which has ever lived on this earth were suddenly to reappear, though it would be quite impossible to give definitions by which each group could be distinguished from other groups, as all would blend together by steps as fine as those between the finest existing varieties, nevertheless a natural classification, or at least a natural arrangement, would be possible.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1860), 431.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (45)  |  Blend (6)  |  Classification (79)  |  Definition (152)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Earth (487)  |  Existing (9)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Fine (24)  |  Form (210)  |  Group (52)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Live (186)  |  Natural (128)  |  Possible (100)  |  Reappear (2)  |  Separate (46)  |  Step (67)  |  Tree Of Life (4)

Geology is part of that remarkable dynamic process of the human mind which is generally called science and to which man is driven by an inquisitive urge. By noticing relationships in the results of his observations, he attempts to order and to explain the infinite variety of phenomena that at first sight may appear to be chaotic. In the history of civilization this type of progressive scientist has been characterized by Prometheus stealing the heavenly fire, by Adam eating from the tree of knowledge, by the Faustian ache for wisdom.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (6)  |  Adam (6)  |  Appear (55)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Characterize (9)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Eating (21)  |  Explain (61)  |  Faustian (2)  |  Fire (117)  |  First Sight (3)  |  Geology (187)  |  Heavenly (5)  |  History (302)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Inquisitive (3)  |  Observation (418)  |  Order (167)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Process (201)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Prometheus (5)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Result (250)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (7)  |  Urge (10)  |  Wisdom (151)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Carry (35)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (79)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deposit (9)  |  Depth (32)  |  Design (92)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Earth (487)  |  Field (119)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Functional (5)  |  Granite (6)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Matter (270)  |  Opponent (10)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Process (201)  |  Raise (20)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Rock (107)  |  Satisfactory (9)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sea (143)  |  Study (331)  |  Suppose (29)  |  System (141)  |  Abraham Werner (4)  |  Working (20)

Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations whereas species were formerly thus connected.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (13)  |  Belief (400)  |  Compel (14)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Gradation (4)  |  Hereafter (2)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Present (103)  |  Species (181)

I decided that life rationally considered seemed pointless and futile, but it is still interesting in a variety of ways, including the study of science. So why not carry on, following the path of scientific hedonism? Besides, I did not have the courage for the more rational procedure of suicide.
Life of a Scientist (1989), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Courage (39)  |  Decision (58)  |  Futile (4)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Pointless (3)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Rational (42)  |  Science (1699)  |  Study (331)  |  Suicide (16)

I have long recognized the theory and aesthetic of such comprehensive display: show everything and incite wonder by sheer variety. But I had never realized how power fully the decor of a cabinet museum can promote this goal until I saw the Dublin [Natural History Museum] fixtures redone right ... The exuberance is all of one piece–organic and architectural. I write this essay to offer my warmest congratulations to the Dublin Museum for choosing preservation–a decision not only scientifically right, but also ethically sound and decidedly courageous. The avant-garde is not an exclusive locus of courage; a principled stand within a reconstituted rear unit may call down just as much ridicule and demand equal fortitude. Crowds do not always rush off in admirable or defendable directions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Call (68)  |  Choose (35)  |  Comprehensive (7)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Courage (39)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Decision (58)  |  Demand (52)  |  Direction (56)  |  Display (22)  |  Down (44)  |  Dublin (2)  |  Equal (53)  |  Essay (9)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Fixture (2)  |  Fully (11)  |  Goal (81)  |  Incite (2)  |  Locus (3)  |  Long (95)  |  Museum (22)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Offer (16)  |  Organic (48)  |  Piece (32)  |  Power (273)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Principle (228)  |  Promote (14)  |  Realize (43)  |  Rear (6)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Right (144)  |  Rush (12)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  See (197)  |  Sheer (6)  |  Show (55)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stand (60)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unit (25)  |  Warm (20)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Write (87)

I hope that in 50 years we will know the answer to this challenging question: are the laws of physics unique and was our big bang the only one? … According to some speculations the number of distinct varieties of space—each the arena for a universe with its own laws—could exceed the total number of atoms in all the galaxies we see. … So do we live in the aftermath of one big bang among many, just as our solar system is merely one of many planetary systems in our galaxy? (2006)
In 'Martin Rees Forecasts the Future', New Scientist (18 Nov 2006), No. 2578.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Arena (3)  |  Atom (251)  |  Big Bang (38)  |  Challenging (3)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Galaxy (38)  |  Law (418)  |  Physics (301)  |  Planet (199)  |  Question (315)  |  Solar System (48)  |  Space (154)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Unique (24)  |  Universe (563)

I kind of like scientists, in a funny way. … I'm kind of interested in genetics though. I think I would have liked to have met Gregor Mendel. Because he was a monk who just sort of figured this stuff out on his own. That's a higher mind, that’s a mind that's connected. … But I would like to know about Mendel, because I remember going to the Philippines and thinking “this is like Mendel’s garden” because it had been invaded by so many different countries over the years, and you could see the children shared the genetic traits of all their invaders over the years, and it made for this beautiful varietal garden.
Answering question: “If you could go back in time and have a conversation with one person, who would it be and why?” by Anniedog03 during an Internet Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) online session (17 Jan 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Child (189)  |  Country (121)  |  Garden (23)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Interest (170)  |  Invasion (7)  |  Like (18)  |  Meeting (14)  |  Gregor Mendel (20)  |  Mind (544)  |  Monk (4)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Share (30)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Trait (19)

If there be an order in which the human race has mastered its various kinds of knowledge, there will arise in every child an aptitude to acquire these kinds of knowledge in the same order. So that even were the order intrinsically indifferent, it would facilitate education to lead the individual mind through the steps traversed by the general mind. But the order is not intrinsically indifferent; and hence the fundamental reason why education should be a repetition of civilization in little.
Education: Intellectual, Moral and Physical (1861), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Aptitude (10)  |  Child (189)  |  Education (280)  |  Facilitation (2)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Indifference (12)  |  Individual (177)  |  Intrinsic (10)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mastery (20)  |  Mind (544)  |  Order (167)  |  Reason (330)  |  Repetition (21)  |  Step (67)  |  Traverse (4)

If we assume that there is only one enzyme present to act as an oxidizing agent, we must assume for it as many different degrees of activity as are required to explain the occurrence of the various colors known to mendelize (three in mice, yellow, brown, and black). If we assume that a different enzyme or group of enzymes is responsible for the production of each pigment we must suppose that in mice at least three such enzymes or groups of enzymes exist. To determine which of these conditions occurs in mice is not a problem for the biologist, but for the chemist. The biologist must confine his attention to determining the number of distinct agencies at work in pigment formation irrespective of their chemical nature. These agencies, because of their physiological behavior, the biologist chooses to call 'factors,' and attempts to learn what he can about their functions in the evolution of color varieties.
Experimental Studies of the Inheritance of Color in Mice (1913), 17-18.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (78)  |  Enzyme (14)  |  Factor (34)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Mouse (24)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Pigment (7)

If we look round the world, there seem to be not above six distinct varieties in the human species, each of which is strongly marked, and speaks the kind seldom to have mixed with any other. But there is nothing in the shape, nothing in the faculties, that shows their coming from different originals; and the varieties of climate, of nourishment, and custom, are sufficient to produce every change.
In History of the Earth and Animated Nature (1774, 1812), Vol. 2, 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Change (291)  |  Climate (38)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Human (445)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Origin (77)  |  Species (181)  |  World (667)

In every living being there exists a capacity for endless diversity of form; each possesses the power of adapting its organization to the variations of the external world, and it is this power, called into activity by cosmic changes, which has enabled the simple zoophytes of the primitive world to climb to higher and higher stages of organization, and has brought endless variety into nature.
From Gottfried Reinold Treviranus, Biologie, oder Philosophie der lebenden Natur [Biology, or Philosophy of Animate Nature], quoted in Lecture 1, August Weismann (1904, 2nd German ed.) as translated in August Weismann, Margaret R. Thomson (trans.), The Evolution Theory, Vol 1., 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Adapt (18)  |  Being (39)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Change (291)  |  Climb (14)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Enable (25)  |  Endless (20)  |  Exist (89)  |  External (45)  |  Form (210)  |  Higher (28)  |  Living (44)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Organism (126)  |  Organization (79)  |  Possess (19)  |  Power (273)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Simple (111)  |  Stage (39)  |  Variation (50)  |  World (667)  |  Zoophyte (4)

In the beginning was the book of Nature. For eon after eon, the pages of the book turned with no human to read them. No eye wondered at the ignition of the sun, the coagulation of the earth, the birth of the moon, the solidification of a terrestrial continent, or the filling of the seas. Yet when the first primitive algae evolved to float on the waters of this ocean, a promise was born—a hope that someday all the richness and variety of the phenomena of the universe would be read with appreciative eyes.
Opening paragraph in Gary G. Tibbetts, How the Great Scientists Reasoned: The Scientific Method in Action (2012), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Algae (5)  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Birth (81)  |  Book (181)  |  Book Of Nature (6)  |  Born (14)  |  Coagulation (3)  |  Continent (39)  |  Eon (8)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Eye (159)  |  Filling (6)  |  Float (12)  |  Hope (129)  |  Human (445)  |  Ignition (2)  |  Moon (132)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Page (18)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Promise (27)  |  Read (83)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sea (143)  |  Someday (4)  |  Sun (211)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Turn (72)  |  Universe (563)  |  Water (244)  |  Wonder (134)

It follows from the supreme perfection of God, that in creating the universe has chosen the best possible plan, in which there is the greatest variety together with the greatest order; the best arranged ground, place, time; the most results produced in the most simple ways; the most of power, knowledge, happiness and goodness the creatures that the universe could permit. For since all the possibles in I understanding of God laid claim to existence in proportion to their perfections, the actual world, as the resultant of all these claims, must be the most perfect possible. And without this it would not be possible to give a reason why things have turned out so rather than otherwise.
The Principles of Nature and Grace (1714), The Philosophical Works of Leibnitz (1890), ed. G. M. Duncan, 213-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Creature (127)  |  Existence (254)  |  God (454)  |  Happiness (82)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Plan (69)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Author (39)  |  Being (39)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Delight (51)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Earth (487)  |  Employment (22)  |  Equality (21)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (254)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (159)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Fly (65)  |  Gratification (14)  |  Happy (22)  |  Insect (57)  |  Intent (5)  |  Joy (61)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (9)  |  Motion (127)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Nature (1029)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (6)  |  Office (14)  |  Probability (83)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (36)  |  Sport (9)  |  Spring (47)  |  Summer (26)  |  Swarm (11)  |  Teeming (2)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (10)  |  Try (103)  |  View (115)  |  Water (244)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wing (36)  |  World (667)  |  Youth (57)

It is strange that the immense variety in nature can be resolved into a series of numbers.
Lecture (Christmas 1923), 'The Atoms of Which Things Are Made'. Collected in Concerning the Nature of Things: Six Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution (1925, 1954), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Immense (28)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Number (179)  |  Resolve (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Strange (61)

It is, I find, in zoology as it is in botany: all nature is so full, that that district produces the greatest variety which is the most examined.
Letter XX to Thomas Pennant (8 Oct 1768), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (47)  |  District (7)  |  Examination (60)  |  Full (38)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Most (2)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Production (105)  |  Zoology (28)

My profession often gets bad press for a variety of sins, both actual and imagined: arrogance, venality, insensitivity to moral issues about the use of knowledge, pandering to sources of funding with insufficient worry about attendant degradation of values. As an advocate for science, I plead ‘mildly guilty now and then’ to all these charges. Scientists are human beings subject to all the foibles and temptations of ordinary life. Some of us are moral rocks; others are reeds. I like to think (though I have no proof) that we are better, on average, than members of many other callings on a variety of issues central to the practice of good science: willingness to alter received opinion in the face of uncomfortable data, dedication to discovering and publicizing our best and most honest account of nature’s factuality, judgment of colleagues on the might of their ideas rather than the power of their positions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Actual (34)  |  Advocate (10)  |  Alter (19)  |  Arrogance (12)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Average (31)  |  Bad (78)  |  Best (129)  |  Better (131)  |  Both (52)  |  Central (23)  |  Charge (29)  |  Colleague (19)  |  Data (100)  |  Dedication (10)  |  Degradation (12)  |  Discover (115)  |  Face (69)  |  Factuality (2)  |  Foible (2)  |  Fund (12)  |  Good (228)  |  Guilty (4)  |  Honest (26)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Idea (440)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Insufficient (6)  |  Issue (37)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Member (27)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Often (69)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Pander (2)  |  Plead (3)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Practice (67)  |  Press (16)  |  Profession (54)  |  Proof (192)  |  Receive (39)  |  Reed (5)  |  Rock (107)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sin (27)  |  Source (71)  |  Subject (129)  |  Temptation (9)  |  Think (205)  |  Uncomfortable (3)  |  Value (180)  |  Willingness (9)  |  Worry (27)

Scientists and Drapers. Why should the botanist, geologist or other-ist give himself such airs over the draper’s assistant? Is it because he names his plants or specimens with Latin names and divides them into genera and species, whereas the draper does not formulate his classifications, or at any rate only uses his mother tongue when he does? Yet how like the sub-divisions of textile life are to those of the animal and vegetable kingdoms! A few great families—cotton, linen, hempen, woollen, silk, mohair, alpaca—into what an infinite variety of genera and species do not these great families subdivide themselves? And does it take less labour, with less intelligence, to master all these and to acquire familiarity with their various habits, habitats and prices than it does to master the details of any other great branch of science? I do not know. But when I think of Shoolbred’s on the one hand and, say, the ornithological collections of the British Museum upon the other, I feel as though it would take me less trouble to master the second than the first.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Assistant (4)  |  Botanist (16)  |  Branch (61)  |  Classification (79)  |  Collection (38)  |  Cotton (6)  |  Detail (65)  |  Divide (24)  |  Familiarity (12)  |  Family (37)  |  Genus (16)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Habit (78)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Latin (20)  |  Linen (4)  |  Master (55)  |  Mother Tongue (2)  |  Name (118)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Ornithology (16)  |  Plant (173)  |  Price (26)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Silk (5)  |  Species (181)  |  Specimen (12)  |  Textile (2)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Wool (2)

Scientists come in two varieties, hedgehogs and foxes. I borrow this terminology from Isaiah Berlin (1953), who borrowed it from the ancient Greek poet Archilochus. Archilochus told us that foxes know many tricks, hedgehogs only one. Foxes are broad, hedgehogs are deep. Foxes are interested in everything and move easily from one problem to another. Hedgehogs are only interested in a few problems that they consider fundamental, and stick with the same problems for years or decades. Most of the great discoveries are made by hedgehogs, most of the little discoveries by foxes. Science needs both hedgehogs and foxes for its healthy growth, hedgehogs to dig deep into the nature of things, foxes to explore the complicated details of our marvelous universe. Albert Einstein and Edwin Hubble were hedgehogs. Charley Townes, who invented the laser, and Enrico Fermi, who built the first nuclear reactor in Chicago, were foxes.
In 'The Future of Biotechnology', A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2007), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Archilochus (3)  |  Broad (18)  |  Complication (20)  |  Deep (81)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Albert Einstein (535)  |  Enrico Fermi (17)  |  Fox (8)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Hedgehog (2)  |  Edwin Powell Hubble (17)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Laser (4)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Problem (362)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Charles Townes (3)  |  Trick (19)  |  Universe (563)

Sir Isaac Newton and Dr. Bentley met accidentally in London, and on Sir Isaac’s inquiring what philosophical pursuits were carrying on at Cambridge, the doctor replied—None—for when you go a hunting Sir Isaac, you kill all the game; you have left us nothing to pursue.—Not so, said the philosopher, you may start a variety of game in every bush if you will but take the trouble to beat for it.
From Richard Watson, Chemical Essays (1786, 1806), Vol. 4, 257-258. No citation given, so—assuming it is more or less authentic—Webmaster offers this outright guess. Watson was the source of another anecdote about Newton (see “I find more sure marks…”). Thus, one might by pure speculation wonder if this quote was passed along in the same way. Was this another anecdote relayed to Watson by his former teacher, Dr. Robert Smith (Master of Trinity House), who might have been told this by Newton himself? Perhaps we’ll never know, but if you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidentally (2)  |  Beat (15)  |  Richard Bentley (3)  |  Bush (8)  |  Cambridge (11)  |  Game (45)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Inquiring (4)  |  Kill (37)  |  London (12)  |  Met (2)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Philosophical (14)  |  Pursue (10)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Replied (2)  |  Start (68)  |  Trouble (55)

The species and the genus are always the work of nature [i.e. specially created]; the variety mostly that of circumstance; the class and the order are the work of nature and art.
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 162. Trans. Frans A. Statfleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Class (64)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Genus (16)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Species (181)

The greater part of it, I shall show, is nonsense, tricked out with a variety of tedious metaphysical conceits, and its author can be excused of dishonesty only on the grounds that before deceiving others he has taken great pains to deceive himself. … it is the style that creates the illusion of content, and which is a cause as well as merely a symptom of Teilhard's alarming apocalyptic seizures.
Medawar’s acerbic book review of The Phenomenon of Man by Teilhard de Chardin first appeared as 'Critical Notice' in the journal Mind (1961), 70, No. 277, 99. The book review was reprinted in The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 71. Medawar thus strongly contradicted other reviewers of the book, which he said was “widely held to be of the utmost profundity and significance; it created something like a sensation upon its publication in France, and some reviewers hereabouts called it the Book of the Year—one, the Book of the Century.”
Science quotes on:  |  Author (39)  |  Conceit (9)  |  Deceiving (2)  |  Dishonesty (7)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Himself (10)  |  Metaphysics (30)  |  Nonsense (32)  |  Pain (82)  |  Tedious (6)  |  Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (28)  |  Trick (19)

The natural world in which we live is nothing short of entrancing—wondrous really. Personally, I take great joy in sharing a world with the shimmering variety of life on earth. Nor can I believe any of us really want a planet which is a lonely wasteland.
In Reith Lecture, 'Biodiversity', BBC Radio 4 (19 Apr 2000). Audio on BBC website.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (487)  |  Entrancing (2)  |  Joy (61)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Lonely (7)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Planet (199)  |  Sharing (7)  |  Wondrous (7)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (8)  |  Ash (16)  |  Atrophy (5)  |  Balance (43)  |  Blood (95)  |  Body (193)  |  Bone (57)  |  Brain (181)  |  Break (33)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Composition (52)  |  Condition (119)  |  Constant (40)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Determined (8)  |  Environment (138)  |  Exaggeration (7)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fire (117)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gland (7)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Incidental (8)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Internal (18)  |  Keep (47)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Loaf (2)  |  Major (24)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Master (55)  |  Mouth (16)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Operation (96)  |  Performance (27)  |  Proper (27)  |  Removal (10)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Sleep (42)  |  State (96)  |  Substance (73)  |  Survival (49)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Task (68)  |  Tract (3)

There is no “pure” science itself divorced from human values. The importance of science to the humanities and the humanities to science in their complementary contribution to the variety of human life grows daily. The need for men familiar with both is imperative.
In 'Abstract' The Impurity of Science (19 Apr 1962), the printed version of the Robbins Lecture (27 Feb 1962) given at Pomona College, Claremont, California, as published by Ernest O. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  Complementary (8)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Grow (66)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Humanities (14)  |  Imperative (8)  |  Importance (183)  |  Need (211)  |  Pure (62)  |  Pure Science (18)  |  Science (1699)  |  Value (180)

There was yet another disadvantage attaching to the whole of Newton’s physical inquiries, ... the want of an appropriate notation for expressing the conditions of a dynamical problem, and the general principles by which its solution must be obtained. By the labours of LaGrange, the motions of a disturbed planet are reduced with all their complication and variety to a purely mathematical question. It then ceases to be a physical problem; the disturbed and disturbing planet are alike vanished: the ideas of time and force are at an end; the very elements of the orbit have disappeared, or only exist as arbitrary characters in a mathematical formula
Address to the Mechanics Institute, 'An Address on the Genius and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton' (1835), excerpted in paper by Luis M. Laita, Luis de Ledesma, Eugenio Roanes-Lozano and Alberto Brunori, 'George Boole, a Forerunner of Symbolic Computation', collected in John A. Campbell and Eugenio Roanes-Lozano (eds.), Artificial Intelligence and Symbolic Computation: International Conference AISC 2000 (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Character (82)  |  Complication (20)  |  Condition (119)  |  Disadvantage (8)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Dynamics (6)  |  Expression (82)  |  Force (194)  |  Formula (51)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (11)  |  Motion (127)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Notation (9)  |  Orbit (58)  |  Planet (199)  |  Problem (362)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Question (315)  |  Solution (168)  |  Time (439)  |  Vanishing (8)

These microscopic organisms form an entire world composed of species, families and varieties whose history, which has barely begun to be written, is already fertile in prospects and findings of the highest importance. The names of these organisms are very numerous and will have to be defined and in part discarded. The word microbe which has the advantage of being shorter and carrying a more general meaning, and of having been approved by my illustrious friend, M. Littré, the most competent linguist in France, is one we will adopt.
In paper read to the Académie de Medecine (Mar 1878). In Charles-Emile Sedillot, 'Influence de M. Pasteur sur les progres de la chirurgie' [Influence of Pasteur on the progress of surgery].
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (6)  |  Approval (6)  |  Composition (52)  |  Definition (152)  |  Family (37)  |  Fertile (10)  |  Finding (30)  |  France (21)  |  History (302)  |  Importance (183)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Microbe (17)  |  Name (118)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Organism (126)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Shortness (2)  |  Species (181)

To be always poring over the same Object, dulls the Intellects and tires the Mind, which is delighted and improved by a Variety: and therefore it ought, at times, to be relaxed from the more severe mathematical Contemplations, and to be employed upon something more light and agreeable, as Poetry, Physic, History, &c
In Dr. Boerhaave's Academical Lectures on the Theory of Physic (1746), Vol. 6, 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (6)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Delight (51)  |  Dull (26)  |  Employed (3)  |  Health (136)  |  History (302)  |  Improve (39)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Light (246)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Severe (7)  |  Time (439)  |  Tire (5)

Ultra-modern physicists [are tempted to believe] that Nature in all her infinite variety needs nothing but mathematical clothing [and are] strangely reluctant to contemplate Nature unclad. Clothing she must have. At the least she must wear a matrix, with here and there a tensor to hold the queer garment together.
As quoted by Stephen T. Keith and Pierre Quédec, in 'Magnetism and Magnetic Materials', an article collected in Out of the Crystal Maze: Chapters from The History of Solid State Physics (1992), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Clothing (8)  |  Contemplate (8)  |  Garment (6)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Matrix (5)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Queer (4)  |  Reluctant (3)  |  Strangely (2)  |  Tensor (3)  |  Together (48)  |  Wear (12)

Understanding a theory has, indeed, much in common with understanding a human personality. We may know or understand a man's system of dispositions pretty well; that is to say, we may be able to predict how he would act in a number of different situations. But since there are infinitely many possible situations, of infinite variety, a full understanding of a man's dispositions does not seem to be possible.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Disposition (14)  |  Human (445)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Personality (40)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Situation (41)  |  Solution (168)  |  Theory (582)  |  Understanding (317)

Very few people, including authors willing to commit to paper, ever really read primary sources–certainly not in necessary depth and contemplation, and often not at all ... When writers close themselves off to the documents of scholarship, and then rely only on seeing or asking, they become conduits and sieves rather than thinkers. When, on the other hand, you study the great works of predecessors engaged in the same struggle, you enter a dialogue with human history and the rich variety of our own intellectual traditions. You insert yourself, and your own organizing powers, into this history–and you become an active agent, not merely a ‘reporter.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Active (17)  |  Agent (27)  |  Ask (99)  |  Author (39)  |  Become (100)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conduit (2)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Depth (32)  |  Dialogue (7)  |  Document (5)  |  Engage (11)  |  Enter (20)  |  Great (300)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Include (27)  |  Insert (2)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Merely (35)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Often (69)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Organize (14)  |  Paper (52)  |  People (269)  |  Power (273)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Primary (29)  |  Read (83)  |  Really (50)  |  Rely (6)  |  Reporter (3)  |  Rich (48)  |  Same (92)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  See (197)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Source (71)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Study (331)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Work (457)  |  Writer (35)

We have also here an acting cause to account for that balance so often observed in nature,—a deficiency in one set of organs always being compensated by an increased development of some others—powerful wings accompanying weak feet, or great velocity making up for the absence of defensive weapons; for it has been shown that all varieties in which an unbalanced deficiency occurred could not long continue their existen The action of this principle is exactly like that of the centrifugal governor of the steam engine, which checks and corrects any irregularities almost before they become evident; and in like manner no unbalanced deficiency in the animal kingdom can ever reach any conspicuous magnitude, because it would make itself felt at the very first step, by rendering existence difficult and extinction almost sure soon to follow.
In 'On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type', Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society, Zoology (1858), 3, 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Balance (43)  |  Centrifugal (3)  |  Compensation (6)  |  Continue (38)  |  Correct (53)  |  Defense (15)  |  Deficiency (8)  |  Development (228)  |  Difficulty (113)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Foot (39)  |  Governor (7)  |  Increased (3)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Organ (60)  |  Other (25)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Steam Engine (41)  |  Step (67)  |  Velocity (14)  |  Weak (36)  |  Weapon (57)  |  Wing (36)

When not protected by law, by popular favor or superstition, or by other special circumstances, [birds] yield very readily to the influences of civilization, and, though the first operations of the settler are favorable to the increase of many species, the great extension of rural and of mechanical industry is, in a variety of ways, destructive even to tribes not directly warred upon by man.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 93-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (62)  |  Bird (96)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Extension (20)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Favor (22)  |  Favorable (7)  |  First (174)  |  Great (300)  |  Increase (107)  |  Industry (91)  |  Influence (110)  |  Law (418)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Operation (96)  |  Popular (21)  |  Protection (23)  |  Rural (5)  |  Special (51)  |  Species (181)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Tribe (10)  |  War (144)  |  Way (36)  |  Yield (23)

When ultra-violet light acts on a mixture of water, carbon dioxide, and ammonia, a vast variety of organic substances are made, including sugars and apparently some of the materials from which proteins are built up…. But before the origin of life they must have accumulated till the primitive oceans reached the consistency of hot dilute soup…. The first living or half-living things were probably large molecules synthesized under the influence of the sun’s radiation, and only capable of reproduction in the particularly favorable medium in which they originated….
In 'The Origin of Life', The Inequality of Man: And Other Essays (1932, 1937), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (18)  |  Act (80)  |  Ammonia (11)  |  Carbon Dioxide (20)  |  Compound (53)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Favorable (7)  |  First (174)  |  Hot (17)  |  Influence (110)  |  Life (917)  |  Light (246)  |  Medium (12)  |  Mixture (22)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Organic (48)  |  Origin Of Life (32)  |  Originate (14)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Protein (43)  |  Radiation (22)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reproduction (57)  |  Soup (4)  |  Sugar (13)  |  Sun (211)  |  Synthesize (2)  |  Water (244)

Your remarks upon chemical notation with the variety of systems which have arisen, &c., &c., had almost stirred me up to regret publicly that such hindrances to the progress of science should exist. I cannot help thinking it a most unfortunate thing that men who as experimentalists & philosophers are the most fitted to advance the general cause of science & knowledge should by promulgation of their own theoretical views under the form of nomenclature, notation, or scale, actually retard its progress.
Letter to William Whewell (21 Feb 1831). In Isaac Todhunter, William Whewell, An Account of his Writings (1876), Vol. 1., 307. Faraday may have been referring to a paper by Whewell published in the Journal of the Royal Institution of England (1831), 437-453.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Cause (231)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Experimentalist (11)  |  Hindrance (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Notation (9)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Progress (317)  |  Progress Of Science (20)  |  Promulgation (3)  |  Regret (16)  |  Remark (14)  |  Retardation (4)  |  Scale (49)  |  Stir (11)  |  System (141)  |  Theory (582)  |  View (115)

[On suburbia] We’re bringing up our children in one-class areas. When they grow up and move to a city or go abroad, they’re not accustomed to variety and they get uncertain and insecure. We should bring up our children where they’re exposed to all types of people.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (5)  |  Accustom (7)  |  Child (189)  |  City (37)  |  Class (64)  |  Expose (9)  |  Grow (66)  |  Insecure (3)  |  Move (58)  |  Person (114)  |  Type (34)  |  Uncertain (11)

[Science is] the search for unity in the variety of our experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Experience (268)  |  Science (1699)  |  Search (85)  |  Unity (43)

… our “Physick” and “Anatomy” have embraced such infinite varieties of being, have laid open such new worlds in time and space, have grappled, not unsuccessfully, with such complex problems, that the eyes of Vesalius and of Harvey might be dazzled by the sight of the tree that has grown out of their grain of mustard seed.
A Lay Sermon, delivered at St. Martin's Hall (7 Jan 1866), 'On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', published in The Fortnightly Review (1866), Vol. 3, 629.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Dazzling (11)  |  Grain (24)  |  Grappling (2)  |  William Harvey (27)  |  Problem (362)  |  Seed (52)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Tree (143)  |  Andreas Vesalius (14)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.