Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Variety

Variety Quotes (132 quotes)

...He cannot conclude however, without observing, that from the contemplation of so great a variety of extraneous fossils discovered in the cliffs which were evidently the produce of very different climates, he thinks himself rationally induced to believe that nothing short of an universal deluge could be a cause adequate to this effect.
Plantae Favershamiensis, Appendix, 'Establishing a short view of the fossil bodies of the adjacent island of Sheppey.' Quoted in David Beerling, The Emerald Planet: How Plants Changed Earth's History (2007), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Climate (97)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Extraneous (6)  |  Flood (50)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Short (197)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universal (189)

Le premier regard de l’homme jeté sur l’univers n’y découvre que variété, diversité, multiplicité des phénomènes. Que ce regard soit illuminé par la science,—par la science qui rapproche l’homme de Dieu,—et la simplicité et l’unité brillent de toutes parts.
Man’s first glance at the universe discovers only variety, diversity, multiplicity of phenomena. Let that glance be illuminated by science—by the science which brings man closer to God,—and simplicity and unity shine on all sides.
Original French quoted in René Vallery-Radot, La Vie de Pasteur (1901), 209. Translation by Google translate, tweaked by Webmaster. The English version of the book, omits this passage, except for “Science, which brings man nearer to God.” In The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 1, 194.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Closer (43)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diversity (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Glance (34)  |  God (757)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shine (45)  |  Side (233)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)

Quelquefois, par exemple, je me figure que je suis suspendu en l’air, et que j’y demeure sans mouvement, pendant que la Terre tourne sous moi en vingt-quatre heures. Je vois passer sous mes yeux tous ces visages différents, les uns blancs, les autres noirs, les autres basanés, les autres olivâtres. D’abord ce sont des chapeaux et puis des turbans, et puis des têtes chevelues, et puis des têtes rasées; tantôt des villes à clochers, tantôt des villes à longues aiguilles qui ont des croissants, tantôt des villes à tours de porcelaine, tantôt de grands pays qui n’ont que des cabanes; ici de vastes mers, là des déserts épouvantables; enfin, toute cette variété infinie qui est sur la surface de la Terre.
Sometimes, for instance, I imagine that I am suspended in the air, and remain there motionless, while the earth turns under me in four-and-twenty hours. I see pass beneath me all these different countenances, some white, others black, others tawny, others olive-colored. At first they wear hats, and then turbans, then heads with long hair, then heads shaven; sometimes towns with steeples, sometimes towns with long spires, which have crescents, sometimes towns with porcelain towers, sometimes extensive countries that have only huts; here wide seas; there frightful deserts; in short, all this infinite variety on the surface of the earth.
In 'Premier Soir', Entretiens Sur La Pluralité Des Mondes (1686, 1863), 43. French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 117-118.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Black (42)  |  Color (137)  |  Countenance (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Crescent (4)  |  Desert (56)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Hair (25)  |  Hat (9)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hut (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Porcelain (4)  |  Remain (349)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Spire (5)  |  Steeple (3)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Tawny (3)  |  Tower (42)  |  Turban (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  White (127)  |  Wide (96)

The Charms of Statistics.—It is difficult to understand why statisticians commonly limit their inquiries to Averages, and do not revel in more comprehensive views. Their souls seem as dull to the charm of variety as that of the native of one of our flat English counties, whose retrospect of Switzerland was that, if its mountains could be thrown into its lakes, two nuisances would be got rid of at once. An Average is but a solitary fact, whereas if a single other fact be added to it, an entire Normal Scheme, which nearly corresponds to the observed one, starts potentially into existence. Some people hate the very name of statistics, but I find them full of beauty and interest. Whenever they are not brutalised, but delicately handled by the higher methods, and are warily interpreted, their power of dealing with complicated phenomena is extraordinary. They are the only tools by which an opening can be cut through the formidable thicket of difficulties that bars the path of those who pursue the Science of man.
Natural Inheritance (1889), 62-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Charm (51)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dull (54)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Flat (33)  |  Hate (64)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lake (32)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Name (333)  |  Native (38)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Soul (226)  |  Start (221)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  View (488)  |  Warily (2)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Why (491)

A comparatively small variety of species is found in the older rocks, although of some particular ones the remains are very abundant; ... Ascending to the next group of rocks, we find the traces of life become more abundant, the number of species extended.
Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (1844), 60-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Become (815)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Find (998)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rock (161)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Trace (103)

A good theoretical physicist today might find it useful to have a wide range of physical viewpoints and mathematical expressions of the same theory (for example, of quantum electrodynamics) available to him. This may be asking too much of one man. Then new students should as a class have this. If every individual student follows the same current fashion in expressing and thinking about electrodynamics or field theory, then the variety of hypotheses being generated to understand strong interactions, say, is limited. Perhaps rightly so, for possibly the chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction—a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory—who will find it?
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Class (164)  |  Current (118)  |  Direction (175)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Range (99)  |  Say (984)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Today (314)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unfashionable (2)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (32)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (120)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spite (55)  |  Spring (133)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

All children are curious and I wonder by what process this trait becomes developed in some and suppressed in others. I suspect again that schools and colleges help in the suppression insofar as they meet curiosity by giving the answers, rather than by some method that leads from narrower questions to broader questions. It is hard to satisfy the curiosity of a child, and even harder to satisfy the curiosity of a scientist, and methods that meet curiosity with satisfaction are thus not apt to foster the development of the child into the scientist. I don't advocate turning all children into professional scientists, although I think there would be advantages if all adults retained something of the questioning attitude, if their curiosity were less easily satisfied by dogma, of whatever variety.
The Nature of Natural History (1950, 1990), 256-257.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Advocate (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Become (815)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  College (66)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Foster (12)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lead (384)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Process (423)  |  Professional (70)  |  Question (621)  |  Retain (56)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Suppression (9)  |  Think (1086)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wonder (236)

All of us Hellenes tell lies … about those great Gods, the Sun and the Moon… . We say that they, and diverse other stars, do not keep the same path, and we call them planets or wanderers. … Each of them moves in the same path-not in many paths, but in one only, which is circular, and the varieties are only apparent.
Plato
In Plato and B. Jowett (trans.), The Dialogues of Plato: Laws (3rd ed., 1892), Vol. 5, 204-205.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Call (769)  |  Circular (19)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lie (364)  |  Moon (237)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Planet (356)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)

All the species recognized by Botanists came forth from the Almighty Creator's hand, and the number of these is now and always will be exactly the same, while every day new and different florists' species arise from the true species so-called by Botanists, and when they have arisen they finally revert to the original forms. Accordingly to the former have been assigned by Nature fixed limits, beyond which they cannot go: while the latter display without end the infinite sport of Nature.
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 310. Trans. Frans A. Stafleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 90.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Creator (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Display (56)  |  End (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Species (401)  |  Sport (22)  |  Will (2355)

All the work of the crystallographers serves only to demonstrate that there is only variety everywhere where they suppose uniformity … that in nature there is nothing absolute, nothing perfectly regular.
In Histoire Naturelle des Minéraux (1783-88), Vol. 3, 433.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  All (4108)  |  Crystallographer (4)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Regular (46)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Work (1351)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defense (23)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Disrespect (3)  |  Drive (55)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Failure (161)  |  Former (137)  |  Full (66)  |  Help (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imply (17)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Local (19)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (353)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Range (99)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rich (62)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (58)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (326)  |  Spot (17)  |  Stem (31)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tide (34)  |  Tough (19)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vary (27)

As a matter of fact, an ordinary desert supports a much greater variety of plants than does either a forest or a prairie.
The Red Man's Continent: A Chronicle of Aboriginal America (1919), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Desert (56)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forest (150)  |  Greater (288)  |  Matter (798)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prairie (3)  |  Support (147)

At the beginning of its existence as a science, biology was forced to take cognizance of the seemingly boundless variety of living things, for no exact study of life phenomena was possible until the apparent chaos of the distinct kinds of organisms had been reduced to a rational system. Systematics and morphology, two predominantly descriptive and observational disciplines, took precedence among biological sciences during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. More recently physiology has come to the foreground, accompanied by the introduction of quantitative methods and by a shift from the observationalism of the past to a predominance of experimentation.
In Genetics and the Origin of Species (1937, 1982), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  19th Century (33)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Description (84)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Foreground (3)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observational (15)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Rational (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Shift (44)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Systematics (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Country (251)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Example (94)  |  Face (212)  |  Figure (160)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (757)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (143)  |  Heap (14)  |  Hill (20)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Isle (6)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Objection (32)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Protuberance (2)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sight (132)  |  Termination (4)  |  Valley (32)

But if any skillful minister of nature shall apply force to matter, and by design torture and vex it, in order to [effect] its annihilation, it, on the contrary being brought under this necessity, changes and transforms itself into a strange variety of shapes and appearances; for nothing but the power of the Creator can annihilate, or truly destroy it.
As quoted in M.J. Gorton, 'The Weather', Popular Science News (1889), 23, No. 8, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creator (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Effect (393)  |  Force (487)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Strange (157)  |  Torture (29)  |  Transform (73)  |  Truly (116)  |  Vex (9)

But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight; sometimes for ornament and reputation; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction; and most times for lucre and profession; and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of men...
The First Book of Francis Bacon of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning (1605). In Francis Bacon and Basil Montagu, The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England (1852), 174
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Delight (108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Gift (104)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Profession (99)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Victory (39)  |  Wit (59)

But who can say that the vapour engine has not a kind of consciousness? Where does consciousness begin, and where end? Who can draw the line? Who can draw any line? Is not everything interwoven with everything? Is not machinery linked with animal life in an infinite variety of ways?
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Begin (260)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Draw (137)  |  End (590)  |  Engine (98)  |  Everything (476)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Interwoven (10)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Say (984)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Way (1217)

Combining in our survey then, the whole range of deposits from the most recent to the most ancient group, how striking a succession do they present:– so various yet so uniform–so vast yet so connected. In thus tracing back to the most remote periods in the physical history of our continents, one system of operations, as the means by which many complex formations have been successively produced, the mind becomes impressed with the singleness of nature's laws; and in this respect, at least, geology is hardly inferior in simplicity to astronomy.
The Silurian System (1839), 574.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Continent (76)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Do (1908)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Range (99)  |  Recent (77)  |  Remote (83)  |  Respect (207)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Striking (48)  |  Succession (77)  |  Survey (33)  |  System (537)  |  Trace (103)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Various (200)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)

Cuvier had even in his address & manner the character of a superior Man, much general power & eloquence in conversation & great variety of information on scientific as well as popular subjects. I should say of him that he is the most distinguished man of talents I have ever known on the continent: but I doubt if He be entitled to the appellation of a Man of Genius.
J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Character (243)  |  Continent (76)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doubt (304)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Information (166)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Power (746)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superior (81)  |  Talent (94)

Da Vinci was as great a mechanic and inventor as were Newton and his friends. Yet a glance at his notebooks shows us that what fascinated him about nature was its variety, its infinite adaptability, the fitness and the individuality of all its parts. By contrast what made astronomy a pleasure to Newton was its unity, its singleness, its model of a nature in which the diversified parts were mere disguises for the same blank atoms.
From The Common Sense of Science (1951), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptability (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Atom (355)  |  Blank (11)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Leonardo da Vinci (87)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Diversified (3)  |  Fascinated (2)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Friend (168)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Model (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notebook (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Show (346)  |  Singleness (2)  |  Unity (78)

Domesticated biotechnology, once it gets into the hands of housewives and children, will give us an explosion of diversity of new living creatures … New lineages will proliferate to replace those that monoculture farming and deforestation have destroyed. Designing genomes will be a personal thing, a new art form as creative as painting or sculpture. Few of the new creations will be masterpieces, but a great many will bring joy to their creators and variety to our fauna and flora.
In 'Our Biotech Future', The New York Review of Books (2007). As quoted and cited in Kenneth Brower, 'The Danger of Cosmic Genius', The Atlantic (Dec 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Biotechnology (6)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creator (91)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Design (195)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Farming (8)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Flora (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Genome (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  Housewife (2)  |  Joy (107)  |  Living (491)  |  Masterpiece (9)  |  Monoculture (2)  |  New (1216)  |  Painting (44)  |  Personal (67)  |  Replace (31)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

Enhydros is a variety of geode. The name comes from the water it contains. It is always round, smooth, and very white but will sway back and forth when moved. Inside it is a liquid just as in an egg, as Pliny, our Albertus, and others believed, and it may even drip water. Liquid bitumen, sometimes with a pleasant odor, is found enclosed in rock just as in a vase.
As translated by Mark Chance Bandy and Jean A. Bandy from the first Latin Edition of 1546 in De Natura Fossilium: (Textbook of Mineralogy) (2004), 104. Originally published by Geological Society of America as a Special Paper (1955). There are other translations with different wording.
Science quotes on:  |  Saint Magnus Albertus (11)  |  Back (390)  |  Belief (578)  |  Contain (68)  |  Drip (2)  |  Egg (69)  |  Enclose (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Minerology (4)  |  Name (333)  |  Odor (10)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Pliny the Elder (17)  |  Rock (161)  |  Round (26)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Sway (4)  |  Water (481)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

Every chemical substance, every plant, every animal in its growth, teaches the unity of the cause, the variety of appearance.
In 'History,' Essays: First Series (1841).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Growth (187)  |  Plant (294)  |  Substance (248)  |  Unity (78)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Branch (150)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consist (223)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forming (42)  |  High (362)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Level (67)  |  Low (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Size (60)  |  Stream (81)  |  System (537)  |  Together (387)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Valley (32)  |  Work (1351)

Every variety of philosophical and theological opinion was represented there [The Metaphysical Society], and expressed itself with entire openness; most of my colleagues were -ists of one sort or another; and, however kind and friendly they might be, I, the man without a rag of a label to cover himself with, could not fail to have some of the uneasy feelings which must have beset the historical fox when, after leaving the trap in which his tail remained, he presented himself to his normally elongated companions. So I took thought, and invented what I conceived to be the appropriate title of “agnostic” .
'Agnosticism' (1889). In Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 5, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (9)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Companion (19)  |  Express (186)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Himself (461)  |  Historical (70)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Openness (7)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Society (326)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thought (953)

Every word carries its own surprises and offers its own rewards to the reflective mind. Their amazing variety is a constant delight. I do not believe that I am alone in this—a fascination with words is shared by people in all countries and all walks of life.
The Science of Words (1991), preface, vii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Constant (144)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Offer (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Reward (68)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Walk (124)  |  Word (619)

Every writer must reconcile, as best he may, the conflicting claims of consistency and variety, of rigour in detail and elegance in the whole. The present author humbly confesses that, to him, geometry is nothing at all, if not a branch of art.
Concluding remark in preface to Treatise on Algebraic Plane Curves (1931), x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Author (167)  |  Best (459)  |  Branch (150)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Detail (146)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Whole (738)  |  Writer (86)

Extinction has only separated groups: it has by no means made them; for if every form which has ever lived on this earth were suddenly to reappear, though it would be quite impossible to give definitions by which each group could be distinguished from other groups, as all would blend together by steps as fine as those between the finest existing varieties, nevertheless a natural classification, or at least a natural arrangement, would be possible.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1860), 431.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Blend (9)  |  Classification (97)  |  Definition (221)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Earth (996)  |  Existing (10)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fine (33)  |  Form (959)  |  Group (78)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reappear (4)  |  Separate (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree Of Life (10)

Fertilization of mammalian eggs is followed by successive cell divisions and progressive differentiation, first into the early embryo and subsequently into all of the cell types that make up the adult animal. Transfer of a single nucleus at a specific stage of development, to an enucleated unfertilized egg, provided an opportunity to investigate whether cellular differentiation to that stage involved irreversible genetic modification. The first offspring to develop from a differentiated cell were born after nuclear transfer from an embryo-derived cell line that had been induced to became quiescent. Using the same procedure, we now report the birth of live lambs from three new cell populations established from adult mammary gland, fetus and embryo. The fact that a lamb was derived from an adult cell confirms that differentiation of that cell did not involve the irreversible modification of genetic material required far development to term. The birth of lambs from differentiated fetal and adult cells also reinforces previous speculation that by inducing donor cells to became quiescent it will be possible to obtain normal development from a wide variety of differentiated cells.
[Co-author of paper announcing the cloned sheep, ‘Dolly’.]
In I. Wilmut, A. E. Schnieke, J. McWhir, et al., 'Viable Offspring Derived from Petal and Adult Mammalian Cells', Nature (1997), 385, 810.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Author (167)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Clone (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Division (65)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Early (185)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Gland (14)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Modification (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Reinforce (5)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Type (167)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Geology is part of that remarkable dynamic process of the human mind which is generally called science and to which man is driven by an inquisitive urge. By noticing relationships in the results of his observations, he attempts to order and to explain the infinite variety of phenomena that at first sight may appear to be chaotic. In the history of civilization this type of progressive scientist has been characterized by Prometheus stealing the heavenly fire, by Adam eating from the tree of knowledge, by the Faustian ache for wisdom.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Adam (7)  |  Appear (118)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Call (769)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Eating (45)  |  Explain (322)  |  Faustian (2)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Geology (220)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Process (423)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (8)  |  Type (167)  |  Urge (17)  |  Wisdom (221)

Groups do not have experiences except insofar as all their members do. And there are no experiences... that all the members of a scientific community must share in the course of a [scientific] revolution. Revolutions should be described not in terms of group experience but in terms of the varied experiences of individual group members. Indeed, that variety itself turns out to play an essential role in the evolution of scientific knowledge.
Thomas S. Kuhn's Foreword to Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S Kuhn's Philosophy of Science (1993), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Community (104)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Group (78)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Role (86)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Share (75)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Turn (447)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Accept (191)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Course (409)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Former (137)  |  Functional (10)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Granite (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Open (274)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Process (423)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rock (161)  |  Romanticist (2)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sea (308)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Abraham Werner (5)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Working (20)

Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations whereas species were formerly thus connected.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Belief (578)  |  Compel (30)  |  Connect (125)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Hereafter (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Known (454)  |  Marked (55)  |  Present (619)  |  Species (401)

Homologue. The same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function.
'Glossary', Lectures on the Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of the Invertebrate Animals Delivered at the Royal College of Surgeons in 1843 (1843), 379.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Organ (115)  |  Same (157)  |  Variation (90)

I complained to Mr. Johnson that I was much afflicted with melancholy, which was hereditary in our family. He said that he himself had been greatly distressed with it, and for that reason had been obliged to fly from study and meditation to the dissipating variety of life. He advised me to have constant occupation of mind, to take a great deal of exercise, and to live moderately; especially to shun drinking at night. “Melancholy people,” said he, are apt to fly to intemperance, which gives a momentary relief but sinks the soul much lower in misery.” He observed that laboring men who work much and live sparingly are seldom or never troubled with low spirits.
Science quotes on:  |  Constant (144)  |  Deal (188)  |  Distress (9)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Family (94)  |  Fly (146)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hereditary (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Low (80)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misery (30)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Occupation (48)  |  People (1005)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relief (30)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Sink (37)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Work (1351)

I could almost wish, at this point, that I were in the habit of expressing myself in theological terms, for if I were, I might be able to compress my entire thesis into a sentence. All knowledge of every variety (I might say) is in the mind of God—and the human intellect, even the best, in trying to pluck it forth can but “see through a glass, darkly.”
In Asimov on Physics (1976), 146. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Darkly (2)  |  Glass (92)  |  God (757)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Point (580)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Trying (144)  |  Wish (212)

I decided that life rationally considered seemed pointless and futile, but it is still interesting in a variety of ways, including the study of science. So why not carry on, following the path of scientific hedonism? Besides, I did not have the courage for the more rational procedure of suicide.
Life of a Scientist (1989), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Consider (416)  |  Courage (69)  |  Decision (91)  |  Futile (11)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Path (144)  |  Pointless (6)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Rational (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Suicide (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

I have long recognized the theory and aesthetic of such comprehensive display: show everything and incite wonder by sheer variety. But I had never realized how power fully the decor of a cabinet museum can promote this goal until I saw the Dublin [Natural History Museum] fixtures redone right ... The exuberance is all of one piece–organic and architectural. I write this essay to offer my warmest congratulations to the Dublin Museum for choosing preservation–a decision not only scientifically right, but also ethically sound and decidedly courageous. The avant-garde is not an exclusive locus of courage; a principled stand within a reconstituted rear unit may call down just as much ridicule and demand equal fortitude. Crowds do not always rush off in admirable or defendable directions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Call (769)  |  Choose (112)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Congratulation (5)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Courage (69)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Decision (91)  |  Demand (123)  |  Direction (175)  |  Display (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dublin (3)  |  Equal (83)  |  Essay (27)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Exuberance (2)  |  Fixture (2)  |  Fortitude (2)  |  Fully (21)  |  Goal (145)  |  History (673)  |  Incite (3)  |  Locus (5)  |  Long (790)  |  Museum (31)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Never (1087)  |  Offer (141)  |  Organic (158)  |  Piece (38)  |  Power (746)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Principle (507)  |  Promote (29)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rear (7)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Rush (18)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Show (346)  |  Sound (183)  |  Stand (274)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unit (33)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Write (230)

I hope that in 50 years we will know the answer to this challenging question: are the laws of physics unique and was our big bang the only one? … According to some speculations the number of distinct varieties of space—each the arena for a universe with its own laws—could exceed the total number of atoms in all the galaxies we see. … So do we live in the aftermath of one big bang among many, just as our solar system is merely one of many planetary systems in our galaxy? (2006)
In 'Martin Rees Forecasts the Future', New Scientist (18 Nov 2006), No. 2578.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arena (4)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Challenging (3)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Hope (299)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Merely (316)  |  Number (699)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Question (621)  |  See (1081)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  System (537)  |  Total (94)  |  Unique (67)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I kind of like scientists, in a funny way. … I'm kind of interested in genetics though. I think I would have liked to have met Gregor Mendel. Because he was a monk who just sort of figured this stuff out on his own. That's a higher mind, that’s a mind that's connected. … But I would like to know about Mendel, because I remember going to the Philippines and thinking “this is like Mendel’s garden” because it had been invaded by so many different countries over the years, and you could see the children shared the genetic traits of all their invaders over the years, and it made for this beautiful varietal garden.
Answering question: “If you could go back in time and have a conversation with one person, who would it be and why?” by Anniedog03 during an Internet Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) online session (17 Jan 2014).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Connect (125)  |  Country (251)  |  Different (577)  |  Garden (60)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Like (22)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monk (5)  |  Philippines (3)  |  Remember (179)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Trait (22)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

I observed on most collected stones the imprints of innumerable plant fragments which were so different from those which are growing in the Lyonnais, in the nearby provinces, and even in the rest of France, that I felt like collecting plants in a new world… The number of these leaves, the way they separated easily, and the great variety of plants whose imprints I saw, appeared to me just as many volumes of botany representing in the same quarry the oldest library of the world.
In 'Examen des causes des Impressions des Plantes marquees sur certaines Pierres des environs de Saint-Chaumont dans le Lionnais', Memoires de l’ Academie Royale des Sciences (1718), 364, as trans. by Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Botany (57)  |  Different (577)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Library (48)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Observed (149)  |  Plant (294)  |  Province (35)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Saw (160)  |  Stone (162)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

I shall conclude, for the time being, by saying that until Philosophers make observations (especially of mountains) that are longer, more attentive, orderly, and interconnected, and while they fail to recognize the two great agents, fire and water, in their distinct affects, they will not be able to understand the causes of the great natural variety in the disposition, structure, and other matter that can be observed in the terrestrial globe in a manner that truly corresponds to the facts and to the phenomena of Nature.
'Aleune Osservazioni Orittologiche fatte nei Monti del Vicentino', Giomale d’Italia, 1769, 5, 411, trans. Ezio Vaccari.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fire (189)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Structure (344)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

I should like to draw attention to the inexhaustible variety of the problems and exercises which it [mathematics] furnishes; these may be graduated to precisely the amount of attainment which may be possessed, while yet retaining an interest and value. It seems to me that no other branch of study at all compares with mathematics in this. When we propose a deduction to a beginner we give him an exercise in many cases that would have been admired in the vigorous days of Greek geometry. Although grammatical exercises are well suited to insure the great benefits connected with the study of languages, yet these exercises seem to me stiff and artificial in comparison with the problems of mathematics. It is not absurd to maintain that Euclid and Apollonius would have regarded with interest many of the elegant deductions which are invented for the use of our students in geometry; but it seems scarcely conceivable that the great masters in any other line of study could condescend to give a moment’s attention to the elementary books of the beginner.
In Conflict of Studies (1873), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Admire (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginner (11)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Book (392)  |  Branch (150)  |  Case (99)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Condescend (2)  |  Connect (125)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Draw (137)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Grammatical (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greek (107)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Insure (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invent (51)  |  Language (293)  |  Line (91)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moment (253)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Problem (676)  |  Propose (23)  |  Regard (305)  |  Retain (56)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Seem (145)  |  Stiff (3)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Suit (11)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Vigorous (20)

I trust ... I have succeeded in convincing you that modern chemistry is not, as it has so long appeared, an ever-growing accumulation of isolated facts, as impossible for a single intellect to co-ordinate as for a single memory to grasp.
The intricate formulae that hang upon these walls, and the boundless variety of phenomena they illustrate, are beginning to be for us as a labyrinth once impassable, but to which we have at length discovered the clue. A sense of mastery and power succeeds in our minds to the sort of weary despair with which we at first contemplated their formidable array. For now, by the aid of a few general principles, we find ourselves able to unravel the complexities of these formulae, to marshal the compounds which they represent in orderly series; nay, even to multiply their numbers at our will, and in a great measure to forecast their nature ere we have called them into existence. It is the great movement of modern chemistry that we have thus, for an hour, seen passing before us. It is a movement as of light spreading itself over a waste of obscurity, as of law diffusing order throughout a wilderness of confusion, and there is surely in its contemplation something of the pleasure which attends the spectacle of a beautiful daybreak, something of the grandeur belonging to the conception of a world created out of chaos.
Concluding remark for paper presented at the Friday Discourse of the the Royal Institution (7 Apr 1865). 'On the Combining Power of Atoms', Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1865), 4, No. 42, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Aid (97)  |  Attend (65)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clue (17)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discover (553)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hang (45)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Measure (232)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passing (76)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Represent (155)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Surely (101)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trust (66)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Wall (67)  |  Waste (101)  |  Weary (11)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

If a man will comprehend the richness and variety of the universe, and inspire his mind with a due measure of wonder and awe, he must contemplate the human intellect not only on its heights of genius but in its abysses of ineptitude...
M. Manilii Astronomicon. Liber Primus Recensuit et enarravit A.E. Housman. Editio Altera (1937), i, xix. Quoted in David Womersley, 'Dulness and Pope', British Academy, 2004 Lectures, (2005), 233.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Due (141)  |  Genius (284)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Ineptitude (2)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)

If one of these people, in whom the chance-worship of our remoter ancestors thus strangely survives, should be within reach of the sea when a heavy gale is blowing, let him betake himself to the shore and watch the scene. Let him note the infinite variety of form and size of the tossing waves out at sea; or against the curves of their foam-crested breakers, as they dash against the rocks; let him listen to the roar and scream of the shingle as it is cast up and torn down the beach; or look at the flakes of foam as they drive hither and thither before the wind: or note the play of colours, which answers a gleam of sunshine as it falls upon their myriad bubbles. Surely here, if anywhere, he will say that chance is supreme, and bend the knee as one who has entered the very penetralia of his divinity. But the man of science knows that here, as everywhere, perfect order is manifested; that there is not a curve of the waves, not a note in the howling chorus, not a rainbow-glint on a bubble, which is other than a necessary consequence of the ascertained laws of nature; and that with a sufficient knowledge of the conditions, competent physico-mathematical skill could account for, and indeed predict, every one of these 'chance' events.
In 'On the Reception of the Origin of Species'. In Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter (1888), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Beach (21)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Cast (66)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Curve (49)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Down (456)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fall (230)  |  Form (959)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Predict (79)  |  Rainbow (16)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rock (161)  |  Say (984)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Skill (109)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Surely (101)  |  Survive (79)  |  Torn (17)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worship (32)

If there be an order in which the human race has mastered its various kinds of knowledge, there will arise in every child an aptitude to acquire these kinds of knowledge in the same order. So that even were the order intrinsically indifferent, it would facilitate education to lead the individual mind through the steps traversed by the general mind. But the order is not intrinsically indifferent; and hence the fundamental reason why education should be a repetition of civilization in little.
Education: Intellectual, Moral and Physical (1861), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Arise (158)  |  Child (307)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Facilitation (2)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Master (178)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Order (632)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Various (200)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

If we assume that there is only one enzyme present to act as an oxidizing agent, we must assume for it as many different degrees of activity as are required to explain the occurrence of the various colors known to mendelize (three in mice, yellow, brown, and black). If we assume that a different enzyme or group of enzymes is responsible for the production of each pigment we must suppose that in mice at least three such enzymes or groups of enzymes exist. To determine which of these conditions occurs in mice is not a problem for the biologist, but for the chemist. The biologist must confine his attention to determining the number of distinct agencies at work in pigment formation irrespective of their chemical nature. These agencies, because of their physiological behavior, the biologist chooses to call 'factors,' and attempts to learn what he can about their functions in the evolution of color varieties.
Experimental Studies of the Inheritance of Color in Mice (1913), 17-18.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agent (70)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Choose (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Factor (46)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Pigment (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Required (108)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yellow (30)

If we look round the world, there seem to be not above six distinct varieties in the human species, each of which is strongly marked, and speaks the kind seldom to have mixed with any other. But there is nothing in the shape, nothing in the faculties, that shows their coming from different originals; and the varieties of climate, of nourishment, and custom, are sufficient to produce every change.
In History of the Earth and Animated Nature (1774, 1812), Vol. 2, 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Coming (114)  |  Custom (42)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kind (557)  |  Look (582)  |  Marked (55)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Show (346)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  World (1774)

If we sink to the biochemical level, then the human being has lost a great many synthetic abilities possessed by other species and, in particular, by plants and microorganisms. Our loss of ability to manufacture a variety of vitamins makes us dependent on our diet and, therefore, on the greater synthetic versatility of other creatures. This is as much a “degenerative” change as the tapeworm’s abandonment of a stomach it no longer needs, but since we are prejudiced in our own favor, we don’t mention it.
In 'The Modern Demonology' (Jan 1962). Collected in Asimov on Physics (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Ability (152)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Change (593)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degenerative (2)  |  Diet (54)  |  Favor (63)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Loss (110)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mention (82)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Sink (37)  |  Species (401)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Tapeworm (2)  |  Versatility (5)  |  Vitamin (13)

In every living being there exists a capacity for endless diversity of form; each possesses the power of adapting its organization to the variations of the external world, and it is this power, called into activity by cosmic changes, which has enabled the simple zoophytes of the primitive world to climb to higher and higher stages of organization, and has brought endless variety into nature.
From Gottfried Reinold Treviranus, Biologie, oder Philosophie der lebenden Natur [Biology, or Philosophy of Animate Nature], quoted in Lecture 1, August Weismann (1904, 2nd German ed.) as translated in August Weismann, Margaret R. Thomson (trans.), The Evolution Theory, Vol 1., 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Change (593)  |  Climb (35)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Enable (119)  |  Endless (56)  |  Exist (443)  |  External (57)  |  Form (959)  |  Higher (37)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Variation (90)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoophyte (4)

In formal logic a contradiction is the signal of a defeat, but in the evolution of real knowledge it marks the first step in progress toward a victory. This is one great reason for the utmost toleration of variety of opinion. Once and forever, this duty of toleration has been summed up in the words, “Let both grow together until the harvest.”
In 'Religion and Science', The Atlantic (Aug 1925).
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Forever (103)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Signal (27)  |  Step (231)  |  Together (387)  |  Victory (39)  |  Word (619)

In Pure Mathematics, where all the various truths are necessarily connected with each other, (being all necessarily connected with those hypotheses which are the principles of the science), an arrangement is beautiful in proportion as the principles are few; and what we admire perhaps chiefly in the science, is the astonishing variety of consequences which may be demonstrably deduced from so small a number of premises.
In Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind (1827), Vol. 3, Chap. 1, Sec. 8, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Premise (37)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)

In the beginning was the book of Nature. For eon after eon, the pages of the book turned with no human to read them. No eye wondered at the ignition of the sun, the coagulation of the earth, the birth of the moon, the solidification of a terrestrial continent, or the filling of the seas. Yet when the first primitive algae evolved to float on the waters of this ocean, a promise was born—a hope that someday all the richness and variety of the phenomena of the universe would be read with appreciative eyes.
Opening paragraph in Gary G. Tibbetts, How the Great Scientists Reasoned: The Scientific Method in Action (2012), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Algae (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Book Of Nature (12)  |  Born (33)  |  Coagulation (5)  |  Continent (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eon (11)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Filling (6)  |  First (1283)  |  Float (30)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignition (3)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Page (30)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Promise (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sea (308)  |  Solidification (2)  |  Someday (14)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Water (481)  |  Wonder (236)

In things to be seen at once, much variety makes confusion, another vice of beauty. In things that are not seen at once, and have no respect one to another, great variety is commendable, provided this variety transgress not the rules of optics and geometry.
Quoted from the Parentalia in Charles Henry Bellenden Ker, Sir Christopher Wren (1828), 30. Published as a booklet in the series Lives of Eminent Persons (1833) by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Also in W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Optics (23)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vice (40)

It follows from the supreme perfection of God, that in creating the universe has chosen the best possible plan, in which there is the greatest variety together with the greatest order; the best arranged ground, place, time; the most results produced in the most simple ways; the most of power, knowledge, happiness and goodness the creatures that the universe could permit. For since all the possibles in I understanding of God laid claim to existence in proportion to their perfections, the actual world, as the resultant of all these claims, must be the most perfect possible. And without this it would not be possible to give a reason why things have turned out so rather than otherwise.
The Principles of Nature and Grace (1714), The Philosophical Works of Leibnitz (1890), ed. G. M. Duncan, 213-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creature (233)  |  Existence (456)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (14)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Spring (133)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

It is important to go into work you would like to do. Then it doesn't seem like work. You sometimes feel it's almost too good to be true that someone will pay you for enjoying yourself. I've been very fortunate that my work led to useful drugs for a variety of serious illnesses. The thrill of seeing people get well who might otherwise have died of diseases like leukemia, kidney failure, and herpes virus encephalitis cannot be described in words.
From her lecture notes.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drug (57)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Good (889)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Leukemia (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Serious (91)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Useful (250)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Application (242)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (33)  |  Attain (125)  |  Author (167)  |  Balance (77)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chair (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Classic (11)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (65)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (56)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (228)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (511)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Group (78)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Histology (3)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peer (12)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Probability (130)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recess (8)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Relate (21)  |  Render (93)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Single (353)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Survey (33)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Unfit (12)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  War (225)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It is strange that the immense variety in nature can be resolved into a series of numbers.
Lecture (Christmas 1923), 'The Atoms of Which Things Are Made'. Collected in Concerning the Nature of Things: Six Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution (1925, 1954), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Immense (86)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Series (149)  |  Strange (157)

It is tautological to say that an organism is adapted to its environment. It is even tautological to say that an organism is physiologically adapted to its environment. However, just as in the case of many morphological characters, it is unwarranted to conclude that all aspects of the physiology of an organism have evolved in reference to a specific milieu. It is equally gratuitous to assume that an organism will inevitably show physiological specializations in its adaptation to a particular set of conditions. All that can be concluded is that the functional capacities of an organism are sufficient to have allowed persistence within its environment. On one hand, the history of an evolutionary line may place serious constraints upon the types of further physiological changes that are readily feasible. Some changes might require excessive restructuring of the genome or might involve maladaptive changes in related functions. On the other hand, a taxon which is successful in occupying a variety of environments may be less impressive in individual physiological capacities than one with a far more limited distribution.
In W.R. Dawson, G.A. Bartholomew, and A.F. Bennett, 'A Reappraisal of the Aquatic Specializations of the Galapagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)', Evolution (1977), 31, 891.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Hand (143)  |  History (673)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Occupy (26)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Place (177)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specific (95)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Type (167)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Will (2355)

It is, I find, in zoology as it is in botany: all nature is so full, that that district produces the greatest variety which is the most examined.
Letter XX to Thomas Pennant (8 Oct 1768), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Botany (57)  |  District (9)  |  Examination (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Full (66)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Production (183)  |  Zoology (36)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (36)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (212)  |  Type (167)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

It’s not quite as exhilarating a feeling as orbiting the earth, but it’s close. In addition, it has an exotic, bizarre quality due entirely to the nature of the surface below. The earth from orbit is a delight - offering visual variety and an emotional feeling of belonging “down there.” Not so with this withered, sun-seared peach pit out of my window. There is no comfort to it; it is too stark and barren; its invitation is monotonous and meant for geologists only.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  Barren (30)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Below (24)  |  Bizarre (6)  |  Close (69)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Delight (108)  |  Down (456)  |  Due (141)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Exhilarating (3)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Peach (3)  |  Pit (19)  |  Quality (135)  |  Sear (2)  |  Stark (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Visual (15)  |  Window (58)  |  Wither (8)

Let us then suppose the Mind to be, as we say, white Paper, void of all Characters, without any Ideas; How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store, which the busy and boundless Fancy of Man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of Reason and Knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from Experience: In that, all our Knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives it self. Our Observation employ’d either about external, sensible Objects; or about the internal Operations of our Minds, perceived and reflected on by our selves, is that, which supplies our Understandings with all the materials of thinking.
In 'Of Ideas in general, and their Original', An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Book 2, Chap. 1, Sec. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Character (243)  |  Derive (65)  |  Employ (113)  |  Endless (56)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Internal (66)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Paper (182)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Store (48)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vast (177)  |  Void (31)  |  White (127)  |  Word (619)

Look round this universe. What an immense profusion of beings, animated and organized, sensible and active! You admire this prodigious variety and fecundity. But inspect a little more narrowly these living existences, the only beings worth regarding. How hostile and destructive to each other! How insufficient all of them for their own happiness! How contemptible or odious to the spectator! The whole presents nothing but the idea of a blind Nature, inpregnated by a great vivifying principle, and pouring forth from her lap, without discernment or parental care, her maimed and abortive children.
In Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779), 219-220.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Care (186)  |  Children (200)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Existence (456)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Lap (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)

Mathematical science is in my opinion an indivisible whole, an organism whose vitality is conditioned upon the connection of its parts. For with all the variety of mathematical knowledge, we are still clearly conscious of the similarity of the logical devices, the relationship of the ideas in mathematics as a whole and the numerous analogies in its different departments.
In 'Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 478.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Department (92)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organism (220)  |  Part (222)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Still (613)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Whole (738)

Mathematics make the mind attentive to the objects which it considers. This they do by entertaining it with a great variety of truths, which are delightful and evident, but not obvious. Truth is the same thing to the understanding as music to the ear and beauty to the eye. The pursuit of it does really as much gratify a natural faculty implanted in us by our wise Creator as the pleasing of our senses: only in the former case, as the object and faculty are more spiritual, the delight is more pure, free from regret, turpitude, lassitude, and intemperance that commonly attend sensual pleasures.
In An Essay on the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning (1701), 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creator (91)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ear (68)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Evident (91)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Former (137)  |  Free (232)  |  Gratify (3)  |  Great (1574)  |  Implant (4)  |  Intemperance (3)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Natural (796)  |  Object (422)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Please (65)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Regret (30)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensual (2)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turpitude (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wise (131)

Mineral substances vary greatly in color, transparency, luster, brilliance, odor, taste, and other properties which are shown by their strength and weakness, shape, and form. They do not have the variety of origins that we find not only in living matter but also in original matter. Moreover they have not been classified like the latter on the basis of the place where they pass their life since mineral substances lack life and with rare exceptions are found only within the earth. They do not have the differences in characters and actions which nature has given to living things alone. Great differences are not the essential features of minerals as they are of living and original matter.
De Natura Fossilium (1546), trans. M. C. and J. A. Bandy (1955), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Alone (311)  |  Basis (173)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Character (243)  |  Color (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exception (73)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lack (119)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Odor (10)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Rare (89)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transparency (7)  |  Weakness (48)

My aim is to say that the machinery of the heavens is not like a divine animal but like a clock (and anyone who believes a clock has a soul gives the work the honour due to its maker) and that in it almost all the variety of motions is from one very simple magnetic force acting on bodies, as in the clock all motions are from a very simple weight.
Letter to J. G. Herwart von Hohenburg (16 Feb 1605). Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 15, letter 325, l. 57-61, p. 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Clock (47)  |  Divine (112)  |  Due (141)  |  Force (487)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Honour (56)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Maker (34)  |  Motion (310)  |  Say (984)  |  Simple (406)  |  Soul (226)  |  Weight (134)  |  Work (1351)

My profession often gets bad press for a variety of sins, both actual and imagined: arrogance, venality, insensitivity to moral issues about the use of knowledge, pandering to sources of funding with insufficient worry about attendant degradation of values. As an advocate for science, I plead ‘mildly guilty now and then’ to all these charges. Scientists are human beings subject to all the foibles and temptations of ordinary life. Some of us are moral rocks; others are reeds. I like to think (though I have no proof) that we are better, on average, than members of many other callings on a variety of issues central to the practice of good science: willingness to alter received opinion in the face of uncomfortable data, dedication to discovering and publicizing our best and most honest account of nature’s factuality, judgment of colleagues on the might of their ideas rather than the power of their positions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advocate (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Average (82)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Both (493)  |  Central (80)  |  Charge (59)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Discover (553)  |  Face (212)  |  Factuality (2)  |  Foible (2)  |  Fund (18)  |  Funding (19)  |  Good (889)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Honest (50)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Insufficient (9)  |  Issue (42)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Member (41)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Often (106)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pander (3)  |  Plead (3)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Press (21)  |  Profession (99)  |  Proof (287)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reed (8)  |  Rock (161)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sin (42)  |  Source (93)  |  Subject (521)  |  Temptation (11)  |  Think (1086)  |  Uncomfortable (6)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Willingness (10)  |  Worry (33)

Nature is not a partisan, but out of her ample treasue house she produces children in infinite variety, of which she is equally the mother, and disowns none of them…
Thomas Carlyle: A History of His Life in London, 1834-1881 (1884), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Children (200)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Equally (130)  |  House (140)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Partisan (5)

Nature, the parent of all things, designed the human backbone to be like a keel or foundation. It is because we have a backbone that we can walk upright and stand erect. But this was not the only purpose for which Nature provided it; here, as elsewhere, she displayed great skill in turning the construction of a single member to a variety of different uses.
It Provides a Path for the Spinal Marrow, Yet is Flexible.
Firstly, she bored a hole through the posterior region of the bodies of all the vertebrae, thus fashioning a suitable pathway for the spinal marrow which would descend through them.
Secondly, she did not make the backbone out of one single bone with no joints. Such a unified construction would have afforded greater stability and a safer seat for the spinal marrow since, not having joints, the column could not have suffered dislocations, displacements, or distortions. If the Creator of the world had paid such attention to resistance to injury and had subordinated the value and importance of all other aims in the fabric of parts of the body to this one, he would certainly have made a single backbone with no joints, as when someone constructing an animal of wood or stone forms the backbone of one single and continuous component. Even if man were destined only to bend and straighten his back, it would not have been appropriate to construct the whole from one single bone. And in fact, since it was necessary that man, by virtue of his backbone, be able to perform a great variety of movements, it was better that it be constructed from many bones, even though as a result of this it was rendered more liable to injury.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 57-58, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature’s Skill in Creating a Backbone to Hold Us Erect', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Attention (190)  |  Back (390)  |  Backbone (9)  |  Bend (12)  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Bored (4)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Column (15)  |  Component (48)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Creator (91)  |  Descend (47)  |  Design (195)  |  Destined (42)  |  Different (577)  |  Dislocation (2)  |  Displacement (9)  |  Display (56)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Importance (286)  |  Injury (36)  |  Joint (31)  |  Keel (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marrow (5)  |  Member (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Perform (121)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Render (93)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Single (353)  |  Skill (109)  |  Someone (22)  |  Stability (25)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stone (162)  |  Straight (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Unified (10)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Walk (124)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wood (92)  |  World (1774)

Of Science generally we can remark, first, that it is the most perfect embodiment of Truth, and of the ways of getting at Truth. More than anything else does it impress the mind with the nature of Evidence, with the labour and precautions necessary to prove a thing. It is the grand corrective of the laxness of the natural man in receiving unaccredited facts and conclusions. It exemplifies the devices for establishing a fact, or a law, under every variety of circumstances; it saps the credit of everything that is affirmed without being properly attested.
In Education as a Science (1879), 147-148.
Science quotes on:  |  Affirmation (7)  |  Being (1278)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Corrective (2)  |  Device (70)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Impress (64)  |  Labour (98)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)

Only a few years ago, it was generally supposed that by crossing two somewhat different species or varieties a mongrel might be produced which might, or more likely might not, surpass its parents. The fact that crossing was only the first step and that selection from the numerous variations secured in the second and a few succeeding generations was the real work of new plant creation had never been appreciated; and to-day its significance is not fully understood either by breeders or even by many scientific investigators along these very lines.
From Paper read at the Annual Meeting of the American Breeders’ Association, at Columbia, Mo. (5-8 January 1909). In 'Another Mode of Species Forming', Popular Science Monthly (Sep 1909), 75, 264-265.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Breeder (2)  |  Creation (327)  |  Cross (16)  |  Different (577)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  First Step (3)  |  Generation (242)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Investigator (67)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Parent (76)  |  Plant (294)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Selection (128)  |  Significance (113)  |  Species (401)  |  Step (231)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Variation (90)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Our great mistake in education is ... the worship of book-learning—the confusion of instruction and education. We strain the memory instead of cultivating the mind. … We ought to follow exactly the opposite course with children—to give them a wholesome variety of mental food, and endeavour to cultivate their tastes, rather than to fill their minds with dry facts.
The Pleasures of Life (Appleton, 1887), 183-184, or (2007), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Course (409)  |  Dry (57)  |  Education (378)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Follow (378)  |  Food (199)  |  Great (1574)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Learning (274)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Taste (90)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Worship (32)

Our methods of communication with our fellow men take many forms. We share with other animals the ability to transmit information by such diverse means as the posture of our bodies, by the movements of our eyes, head, arms, and hands, and by our utterances of non-specific sounds. But we go far beyond any other species on earth in that we have evolved sophisticated forms of pictorial representation, elaborate spoken and written languages, ingenious methods of recording music and language on discs, on magnetic tape and in a variety of other kinds of code.
As quoted in epigraph before title page in John Wolfenden, Hermann Bondi, et al., The Languages of Science: A Survey of Techniques of Communication (1963), i.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Code (31)  |  Communication (94)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Form (959)  |  Hand (143)  |  Head (81)  |  Information (166)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Kind (557)  |  Language (293)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Movement (155)  |  Music (129)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Posture (7)  |  Record (154)  |  Recording (13)  |  Representation (53)  |  Share (75)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Sound (183)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Spoken (3)  |  Tape (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Written (6)

People say the effect is only on the mind. It is no such thing. The effect is on the body, too. Little as we know about the way in which we are affected by form, by color, and light, we do know this, that they have an actual physical effect. Variety of form and brilliancy of color in the objects presented to patients, are actual means of recovery.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Air (347)  |  Body (537)  |  Color (137)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Form (959)  |  Health (193)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

Plants, again, inasmuch as they are without locomotion, present no great variety in their heterogeneous pacts. For, when the functions are but few, few also are the organs required to effect them. ... Animals, however, that not only live but perceive, present a great multiformity of pacts, and this diversity is greater in some animals than in others, being most varied in those to whose share has fallen not mere life but life of high degree. Now such an animal is man.
Aristotle
Parts of Animals, 655b, 37-656a, 7. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. I, 1021-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Degree (276)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Effect (393)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Present (619)  |  Required (108)  |  Share (75)

Plasticity is a double-edged sword; the more flexible an organism is the greater the variety of maladaptive, as well as adaptive, behaviors it can develop; the more teachable it is the more fully it can profit from the experiences of its ancestors and associates and the more it risks being exploited by its ancestors and associates.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Associate (25)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Develop (268)  |  Experience (467)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Flexibility (6)  |  Greater (288)  |  Learning (274)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Profit (52)  |  Risk (61)  |  Teachable (2)

Science is uncertain. Theories are subject to revision; observations are open to a variety of interpretations, and scientists quarrel amongst themselves. This is disillusioning for those untrained in the scientific method, who thus turn to the rigid certainty of the Bible instead. There is something comfortable about a view that allows for no deviation and that spares you the painful necessity of having to think.
The 'Threat' of Creationism. In Ashley Montagu (ed.), Science and Creationism (1984), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Bible (91)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Disillusionment (2)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Method (505)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Quarrel (10)  |  Religion (361)  |  Revision (6)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Turn (447)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Untrained (2)  |  View (488)

Scientists and Drapers. Why should the botanist, geologist or other-ist give himself such airs over the draper’s assistant? Is it because he names his plants or specimens with Latin names and divides them into genera and species, whereas the draper does not formulate his classifications, or at any rate only uses his mother tongue when he does? Yet how like the sub-divisions of textile life are to those of the animal and vegetable kingdoms! A few great families—cotton, linen, hempen, woollen, silk, mohair, alpaca—into what an infinite variety of genera and species do not these great families subdivide themselves? And does it take less labour, with less intelligence, to master all these and to acquire familiarity with their various habits, habitats and prices than it does to master the details of any other great branch of science? I do not know. But when I think of Shoolbred’s on the one hand and, say, the ornithological collections of the British Museum upon the other, I feel as though it would take me less trouble to master the second than the first.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 218.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assistant (6)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Branch (150)  |  British (41)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Detail (146)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Family (94)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Genus (25)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Himself (461)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labour (98)  |  Latin (38)  |  Life (1795)  |  Linen (8)  |  Master (178)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Price (51)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Silk (13)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Textile (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Why (491)  |  Wool (4)

Scientists come in two varieties, hedgehogs and foxes. I borrow this terminology from Isaiah Berlin (1953), who borrowed it from the ancient Greek poet Archilochus. Archilochus told us that foxes know many tricks, hedgehogs only one. Foxes are broad, hedgehogs are deep. Foxes are interested in everything and move easily from one problem to another. Hedgehogs are only interested in a few problems that they consider fundamental, and stick with the same problems for years or decades. Most of the great discoveries are made by hedgehogs, most of the little discoveries by foxes. Science needs both hedgehogs and foxes for its healthy growth, hedgehogs to dig deep into the nature of things, foxes to explore the complicated details of our marvelous universe. Albert Einstein and Edwin Hubble were hedgehogs. Charley Townes, who invented the laser, and Enrico Fermi, who built the first nuclear reactor in Chicago, were foxes.
In 'The Future of Biotechnology', A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2007), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archilochus (3)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Both (493)  |  Broad (27)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decade (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dig (21)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Everything (476)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Fox (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greek (107)  |  Growth (187)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Hedgehog (4)  |  Edwin Powell Hubble (20)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laser (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Charles Townes (3)  |  Trick (35)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

Seeing therefore the variety of Motion which we find in the World is always decreasing, there is a necessity of conserving and recruiting it by active Principles, such as are the cause of Gravity, by which Planets and Comets keep their Motions in their Orbs, and Bodies acquire great Motion in falling; and the cause of Fermentation, by which the Heart and Blood of Animals are kept in perpetual Motion and Heat; the inward Parts of the Earth are constantly warm'd, and in some places grow very hot; Bodies burn and shine, Mountains take fire, the Caverns of the Earth are blown up, and the Sun continues violently hot and lucid, and warms all things by his Light. For we meet with very little Motion in the World, besides what is owing to these active Principles.
From Opticks, (1704, 2nd ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 31, 375.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Blood (134)  |  Burn (87)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Comet (54)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Continue (165)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inward (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Orb (20)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Owing (39)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Warm (69)  |  World (1774)

Sheppey hath long been noted for producing large quantities of Sheep (whence probably its name is derived) as well as Corn; and exhibits to the Curious Naturalist a most desirable Spot, by affording many rare Plants, and more especially in the of its Northern Cliffs, so great a Quantity and Variety of Fossils, both native and extraneous are scarcely to be paralleled. These Cliffs length about six miles; Minster, Shurland and Warden are the Manors to which they appertain, the more elevated parts whereof reach about thirds of their extension, and are at the very highest of them not less than fifty yards perpendicular height above the Beach and Shore.
Quoted in Augustus A. Daly, History of the Isle of Sheppey (1975), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Beach (21)  |  Both (493)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Corn (19)  |  Curious (91)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extraneous (6)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Great (1574)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Native (38)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Plant (294)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Rare (89)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scarcely (74)

Since natural selection demands only adequacy, elegance of design is not relevant; any combination of behavioural adjustment, physiological regulation, or anatomical accommodation that allows survival and reproduction may be favoured by selection. Since all animals are caught in a phylogenetic trap by the nature of past evolutionary adjustments, it is to be expected that a given environmental challenge will be met in a variety of ways by different animals. The delineation of the patterns of the accommodations of diverse types of organisms to the environment contributes much of the fascination of ecologically relevant physiology.
In 'The roles of physiology and behaviour in the maintenance of homeostasis in the desert environment.', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology (1964), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Anatomical (3)  |  Animal (617)  |  Catch (31)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Demand (123)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Favor (63)  |  Give (202)  |  Meet (31)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Survival (94)  |  Trap (6)  |  Type (167)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Sir Isaac Newton and Dr. Bentley met accidentally in London, and on Sir Isaac’s inquiring what philosophical pursuits were carrying on at Cambridge, the doctor replied—None—for when you go a hunting Sir Isaac, you kill all the game; you have left us nothing to pursue.—Not so, said the philosopher, you may start a variety of game in every bush if you will but take the trouble to beat for it.
From Richard Watson, Chemical Essays (1786, 1806), Vol. 4, 257-258. No citation given, so—assuming it is more or less authentic—Webmaster offers this outright guess. Watson was the source of another anecdote about Newton (see “I find more sure marks…”). Thus, one might by pure speculation wonder if this quote was passed along in the same way. Was this another anecdote relayed to Watson by his former teacher, Dr. Robert Smith (Master of Trinity House), who might have been told this by Newton himself? Perhaps we’ll never know, but if you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidentally (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Beat (41)  |  Richard Bentley (3)  |  Bush (9)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Game (101)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Inquiring (4)  |  Kill (100)  |  London (12)  |  Met (2)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Replied (2)  |  Start (221)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Will (2355)

So highly did the ancients esteem the power of figures and numbers, that Democritus ascribed to the figures of atoms the first principles of the variety of things; and Pythagoras asserted that the nature of things consisted of numbers.
In De Augmentis, Bk. 3; Advancement of Learning, Bk. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Assert (66)  |  Atom (355)  |  Consist (223)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Figure (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Highly (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Thing (1915)

The species and the genus are always the work of nature [i.e. specially created]; the variety mostly that of circumstance; the class and the order are the work of nature and art.
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 162. Trans. Frans A. Statfleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Class (164)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Genus (25)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Species (401)  |  Work (1351)

The absolute extent of land in the Archipelago is not greater than that contained by Western Europe from Hungary to Spain; but, owing to the manner in which the land is broken up and divided, the variety of its productions is rather in proportion to the immense surface over which the islands are spread, than to the quantity of land which they contain.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Archipelago (7)  |  Break (99)  |  Broken (56)  |  Contain (68)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Europe (43)  |  Extent (139)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Immense (86)  |  Island (46)  |  Land (115)  |  Manner (58)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Production (183)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Spain (4)  |  Spread (83)  |  Surface (209)  |  Western (45)

The admirable perfection of the adaptations of organisms and of their parts to the functions they perform has detracted attention from the fact that adaptedness does not consist of perfect fit, but capacity to fit or to adapt in a variety of ways: only in this sense is adaptedness a guarantee of further survival and evolutionary progress, for too perfect a fit is fatal to the species if not to the individual. This, I think, sets phylogeny and ontogeny in the correct perspective. It is the genotype which bears the marks of past experience of the species and defines the range of possible fits. What fit is actually chosen, what phenotype is actually evolved, is determined by the ever renewed individual history.
'The Interplay of Heredity and Environment in the Synthesis of Respiratory Enzymes in Yeast', The Harvey Lectures: Delivered under the auspices of The Harvey Society of New York 1950-1951, 1951, 156, 45-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Consist (223)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fit (134)  |  Function (228)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Heredity (60)  |  History (673)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ontogeny (10)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perform (121)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Phenotype (5)  |  Phylogeny (10)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Range (99)  |  Renew (19)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Species (401)  |  Survival (94)  |  Think (1086)  |  Way (1217)

Rufus Porter quote Animalculae…hideous forms…with malignant and voracious propensities
From paragraph in Scientific American (1846) urging the use of water filters. (source)
The fact is generally known that nearly all liquids contain a variety of minute living animals, though in some they are too small for observation, even with a microscope. In others, especially in water that has been long stagnant, these animals appear not only in hideous forms, but with malignant and voracious propensities. … we cheerfully and heartily recommend the adoption of filters by all who use this water, from either the public or private hydrants.
In 'Animalculae in Water', Scientific American (10 Oct 1846), 2, No. 3, 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Filter (9)  |  Form (959)  |  Hideous (5)  |  Known (454)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Malignant (2)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Minute (125)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Private (23)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Public (96)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Small (477)  |  Stagnant (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)

The first fundamental rule of historical science and research, when by these is sought a knowledge of the general destinies of mankind, is to keep these and every object connected with them steadily in view, without losing ourselves in the details of special inquiries and particular facts, for the multitude and variety of these subjects is absolutely boundless; and on the ocean of historical science the main subject easily vanishes from the eye.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Boundless (26)  |  Connect (125)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Detail (146)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Historical (70)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Object (422)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Research (664)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Special (184)  |  Subject (521)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  View (488)

The greater part of it, I shall show, is nonsense, tricked out with a variety of tedious metaphysical conceits, and its author can be excused of dishonesty only on the grounds that before deceiving others he has taken great pains to deceive himself. … it is the style that creates the illusion of content, and which is a cause as well as merely a symptom of Teilhard's alarming apocalyptic seizures.
Medawar’s acerbic book review of The Phenomenon of Man by Teilhard de Chardin first appeared as 'Critical Notice' in the journal Mind (1961), 70, No. 277, 99. The book review was reprinted in The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 71. Medawar thus strongly contradicted other reviewers of the book, which he said was “widely held to be of the utmost profundity and significance; it created something like a sensation upon its publication in France, and some reviewers hereabouts called it the Book of the Year—one, the Book of the Century.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Author (167)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Create (235)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Show (346)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (29)  |  Trick (35)

The instinct for collecting, which began as in other animals as an adaptive property, could always in man spread beyond reason; it could become a hoarding mania. But in its normal form it provides a means of livelihood at the hunting and collecting stage of human evolution. It is then attached to a variety of rational aptitudes, above all in observing, classifying, and naming plants, animals and minerals, skills diversely displayed by primitive peoples. These skills with an instinctive beginning were the foundation of most of the civilised arts and sciences. Attached to other skills in advanced societies they promote the formation of museums and libraries; detached, they lead to acquisition and classification by eccentric individuals, often without any purpose or value at all.
As quoted in Richard Fifield, 'Cytologist Supreme', New Scientist (16 Apr 1981), 90, No. 1249, 179; citing C.D. Darlington, The Little Universe of Man (1978).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Art (657)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Classification (97)  |  Collection (64)  |  Display (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Lead (384)  |  Library (48)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mania (3)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Most (1731)  |  Museum (31)  |  Name (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Plant (294)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Promote (29)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Skill (109)  |  Spread (83)  |  Stage (143)  |  Value (365)

The intensity and quantity of polemical literature on scientific problems frequently varies inversely as the number of direct observations on which the discussions are based: the number and variety of theories concerning a subject thus often form a coefficient of our ignorance. Beyond the superficial observations, direct and indirect, made by geologists, not extending below about one two-hundredth of the Earth's radius, we have to trust to the deductions of mathematicians for our ideas regarding the interior of the Earth; and they have provided us successively with every permutation and combination possible of the three physical states of matter—solid, liquid, and gaseous.
'Address delivered by the President of Section [Geology] at Sydney (Friday, Aug 21), Report of the Eighty-Fourth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science: Australia 1914, 1915, 345.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Coefficient (5)  |  Combination (144)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interior (32)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publication (101)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solid (116)  |  State (491)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)  |  Trust (66)  |  Two (937)

The more we study Art, the less we care for Nature. What Art really reveals to us is Nature’s lack of design, her curious crudities, her extraordinary monotony, her absolutely unfinished condition. … It is fortunate for us, however, that Nature is so imperfect, as otherwise we should have had no art at all. Art is our spirited protest, our gallant attempt to teach Nature her proper place. As for the infinite variety of Nature, that is a pure myth. It is not to be found in Nature herself. It resides in the imagination, or fancy, or cultivated blindness of the man who looks at her.
In 'Decay of Lying', The Writings of Oscar Wilde: Epigrams, Phrases and Philosophies For the Use of the Young (1907), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Care (186)  |  Condition (356)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Curious (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Lack (119)  |  Less (103)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monotony (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Myth (56)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Place (177)  |  Proper (144)  |  Protest (9)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reside (25)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Unfinished (4)

The natural world in which we live is nothing short of entrancing—wondrous really. Personally, I take great joy in sharing a world with the shimmering variety of life on earth. Nor can I believe any of us really want a planet which is a lonely wasteland.
In Reith Lecture, 'Biodiversity', BBC Radio 4 (19 Apr 2000). Audio on BBC website.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (996)  |  Entrancing (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Shimmering (2)  |  Short (197)  |  Want (497)  |  Wasteland (2)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  World (1774)

The next care to be taken, in respect of the Senses, is a supplying of their infirmities with Instruments, and, as it were, the adding of artificial Organs to the natural; this in one of them has been of late years accomplisht with prodigious benefit to all sorts of useful knowledge, by the invention of Optical Glasses. By the means of Telescopes, there is nothing so far distant but may be represented to our view; and by the help of Microscopes, there is nothing so small, as to escape our inquiry; hence there is a new visible World discovered to the understanding. By this means the Heavens are open'd, and a vast number of new Stars, and new Motions, and new Productions appear in them, to which all the ancient Astronomers were utterly Strangers. By this the Earth it self, which lyes so neer us, under our feet, shews quite a new thing to us, and in every little particle of its matter, we now behold almost as great a variety of creatures as we were able before to reckon up on the whole Universe it self.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), preface, sig. A2V.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Care (186)  |  Creature (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Optical (11)  |  Organ (115)  |  Particle (194)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Production (183)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Represent (155)  |  Respect (207)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vast (177)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determined (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gland (14)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Major (84)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Proper (144)  |  Removal (11)  |  Remove (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Survival (94)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Tract (5)  |  Work (1351)

The science of optics, like every other physical science, has two different directions of progress, which have been called the ascending and the descending scale, the inductive and the deductive method, the way of analysis and of synthesis. In every physical science, we must ascend from facts to laws, by the way of induction and analysis; and we must descend from laws to consequences, by the deductive and synthetic way. We must gather and group appearances, until the scientific imagination discerns their hidden law, and unity arises from variety; and then from unity must reduce variety, and force the discovered law to utter its revelations of the future.
In On a General Method of Expressing the Paths of Light, & of the Planets, by the Coefficients of a Characteristic Function (1833), 7-8. [The spelling as “groupe” in the original text, has her been corrected to “group” to avoid an intrusive “sic”.]
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Arise (158)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Descend (47)  |  Different (577)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discover (553)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  Gather (72)  |  Group (78)  |  Hide (69)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  Optics (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Two (937)  |  Unity (78)  |  Utter (7)  |  Way (1217)

The Struggle for Existence amongst all organic beings throughout the world, which inevitably follows from their high geometrical powers of increase ... This is the doctrine of Malthus, applied to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms. As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected. From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Applied (177)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condition (356)  |  Existence (456)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Life (1795)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  New (1216)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Select (44)  |  Species (401)  |  Strong (174)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survive (79)  |  Tend (124)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The varieties of chemical substances actually found in living things are vastly more restricted than the possible varieties. A striking illustration is that if one molecule each of all the possible types of proteins were made, they would together weigh more than the observable universe. Obviously there are a fantastically large number of protein types that are not made by living cells.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Observable (21)  |  Possible (552)  |  Protein (54)  |  Restricted (2)  |  Striking (48)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Type (167)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)

The variety of minds served the economy of nature in many ways. The Creator, who designed the human brain for activity, had insured the restlessness of all minds by enabling no single one to envisage all the qualities of the creation. Since no one by himself could aspire to a serene knowledge of the whole truth, all men had been drawn into an active, exploratory and cooperative attitude.
In The Lost World of Thomas Jefferson (1948, 1993), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Brain (270)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Single (353)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

There is no “pure” science itself divorced from human values. The importance of science to the humanities and the humanities to science in their complementary contribution to the variety of human life grows daily. The need for men familiar with both is imperative.
In 'Abstract' The Impurity of Science (19 Apr 1962), the printed version of the Robbins Lecture (27 Feb 1962) given at Pomona College, Claremont, California, as published by Ernest O. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Daily (87)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Grow (238)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Humanities (20)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Need (290)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Value (365)

There is not perhaps another object in the heavens that presents us with such a variety of extraordinary phenomena as the planet Saturn: a magnificent globe, encompassed by a stupendous double ring: attended by seven satellites: ornamented with equatorial belts: compressed at the poles: turning upon its axis: mutually eclipsing its ring and satellites, and eclipsed by them: the most distant of the rings also turning upon its axis, and the same taking place with the farthest of the satellites: all the parts of the system of Saturn occasionally reflecting light to each other: the rings and moons illuminating the nights of the Saturnian: the globe and satellites enlightening the dark parts of the rings: and the planet and rings throwing back the sun's beams upon the moons, when they are deprived of them at the time of their conjunctions. (1805)
Quoted in John Vose, A System of Astronomy: On the Principles of Copernicus (1827), 66-67.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attend (65)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Dark (140)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Moon (237)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pole (46)  |  Present (619)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  Sun (385)  |  System (537)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)

There was yet another disadvantage attaching to the whole of Newton’s physical inquiries, ... the want of an appropriate notation for expressing the conditions of a dynamical problem, and the general principles by which its solution must be obtained. By the labours of LaGrange, the motions of a disturbed planet are reduced with all their complication and variety to a purely mathematical question. It then ceases to be a physical problem; the disturbed and disturbing planet are alike vanished: the ideas of time and force are at an end; the very elements of the orbit have disappeared, or only exist as arbitrary characters in a mathematical formula
Address to the Mechanics Institute, 'An Address on the Genius and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton' (1835), excerpted in paper by Luis M. Laita, Luis de Ledesma, Eugenio Roanes-Lozano and Alberto Brunori, 'George Boole, a Forerunner of Symbolic Computation', collected in John A. Campbell and Eugenio Roanes-Lozano (eds.), Artificial Intelligence and Symbolic Computation: International Conference AISC 2000 (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Cease (79)  |  Character (243)  |  Complication (29)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notation (27)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)

These microscopic organisms form an entire world composed of species, families and varieties whose history, which has barely begun to be written, is already fertile in prospects and findings of the highest importance. The names of these organisms are very numerous and will have to be defined and in part discarded. The word microbe which has the advantage of being shorter and carrying a more general meaning, and of having been approved by my illustrious friend, M. Littré, the most competent linguist in France, is one we will adopt.
In paper read to the Académie de Medecine (Mar 1878). In Charles-Emile Sedillot, 'Influence de M. Pasteur sur les progres de la chirurgie' [Influence of Pasteur on the progress of surgery].
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Already (222)  |  Approval (10)  |  Being (1278)  |  Composition (84)  |  Definition (221)  |  Discard (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  France (27)  |  Friend (168)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Importance (286)  |  Linguist (2)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Organism (220)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Shortness (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

This guy's not an ordinary, garden-variety drunk. Far from it. Last year he donated his body to science, and he's preserving it in alcohol until they can use it.
Anonymous
In Ashton Applewhite, William R. Evans and Andrew Frothingham, And I Quote (2003), 182.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Alcoholic (2)  |  Body (537)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Garden (60)  |  Last (426)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Science (3879)  |  Use (766)  |  Year (933)

Thus a eukaryotic cell may be thought of as an empire directed by a republic of sovereign chromosomes in the nucleus. The chromosomes preside over the outlying cytoplasm in which formerly independent but now subject and degenerate prokaryotes carry out a variety of specialized service functions.
Molecular Genetics: An Introductory Narrative (1971), 622. Cell;Empire;Republic;Sovereign;Chromosome;Nucleus;Cytoplasm;Eukaryote;Prokaryote;Specialization;Service;Function
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Cytoplasm (6)  |  Direct (225)  |  Function (228)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Republic (15)  |  Service (110)  |  Sovereign (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)

To be always poring over the same Object, dulls the Intellects and tires the Mind, which is delighted and improved by a Variety: and therefore it ought, at times, to be relaxed from the more severe mathematical Contemplations, and to be employed upon something more light and agreeable, as Poetry, Physic, History, &c
In Dr. Boerhaave's Academical Lectures on the Theory of Physic (1746), Vol. 6, 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Delight (108)  |  Dull (54)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employed (3)  |  Health (193)  |  History (673)  |  Improve (58)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Light (607)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Object (422)  |  Physic (517)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Severe (16)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tire (7)

To the exact descriptions he gave of the crystalline forms, he added the measure of their angles, and, which was essential, showed that these angles were constant for each variety. In one word, his crystallography was the fruit of an immense work, almost entirely new and most precious in its usefulness.<[About Jean-Baptiste Romé de l’Isle.]
(1795). As quoted in André Authier, Early Days of X-ray Crystallography (2013), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Constant (144)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Description (84)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Immense (86)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Precious (41)  |  Jean-Baptiste Louis Romé de l’lsle (2)  |  Show (346)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

Ultra-modern physicists [are tempted to believe] that Nature in all her infinite variety needs nothing but mathematical clothing [and are] strangely reluctant to contemplate Nature unclad. Clothing she must have. At the least she must wear a matrix, with here and there a tensor to hold the queer garment together.
As quoted by Stephen T. Keith and Pierre Quédec, in 'Magnetism and Magnetic Materials', an article collected in Out of the Crystal Maze: Chapters from The History of Solid State Physics (1992), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Clothing (10)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Garment (13)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Queer (9)  |  Reluctant (4)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Tensor (3)  |  Together (387)  |  Wear (18)

Unanimity of opinion may be fitting for a church, for the frightened or greedy victims of some (ancient, or modern) myth, or for the weak and willing followers of some tyrant. Variety of opinion is necessary for objective knowledge. And a method that encourages variety is also the only method that is comparable with a humanitarian outlook.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975, 1993), 31-32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Church (56)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Humanitarian (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Myth (56)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objective (91)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Unanimity (4)  |  Victim (35)  |  Weak (71)  |  Willing (44)

Understanding a theory has, indeed, much in common with understanding a human personality. We may know or understand a man's system of dispositions pretty well; that is to say, we may be able to predict how he would act in a number of different situations. But since there are infinitely many possible situations, of infinite variety, a full understanding of a man's dispositions does not seem to be possible.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 299.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Common (436)  |  Different (577)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Number (699)  |  Personality (62)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Say (984)  |  Situation (113)  |  Solution (267)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Very few people, including authors willing to commit to paper, ever really read primary sources–certainly not in necessary depth and contemplation, and often not at all ... When writers close themselves off to the documents of scholarship, and then rely only on seeing or asking, they become conduits and sieves rather than thinkers. When, on the other hand, you study the great works of predecessors engaged in the same struggle, you enter a dialogue with human history and the rich variety of our own intellectual traditions. You insert yourself, and your own organizing powers, into this history–and you become an active agent, not merely a ‘reporter.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Author (167)  |  Become (815)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conduit (3)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Depth (94)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Document (7)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Insert (3)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Merely (316)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Often (106)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Primary (80)  |  Read (287)  |  Really (78)  |  Rely (11)  |  Reporter (4)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Source (93)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

We have also here an acting cause to account for that balance so often observed in nature,—a deficiency in one set of organs always being compensated by an increased development of some others—powerful wings accompanying weak feet, or great velocity making up for the absence of defensive weapons; for it has been shown that all varieties in which an unbalanced deficiency occurred could not long continue their existen The action of this principle is exactly like that of the centrifugal governor of the steam engine, which checks and corrects any irregularities almost before they become evident; and in like manner no unbalanced deficiency in the animal kingdom can ever reach any conspicuous magnitude, because it would make itself felt at the very first step, by rendering existence difficult and extinction almost sure soon to follow.
In 'On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type', Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society, Zoology (1858), 3, 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Balance (77)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Centrifugal (3)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Conspicuous (12)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correct (86)  |  Defense (23)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Engine (98)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinction (74)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Foot (60)  |  Governor (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Increased (3)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Set (394)  |  Soon (186)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wing (75)

We’ll get to the details of what’s around here, but it looks like a collection of just about every variety of shape - angularity, granularity, about every variety of rock. The colors - well, there doesn’t appear to be too much of a general color at all; however, it looks as though some of the rocks and boulders [are] going to have some interesting colors to them. Over.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Collection (64)  |  Color (137)  |  Detail (146)  |  General (511)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Look (582)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shape (72)

What is the use of this history, what the use of all this minute research? I well know that it will not produce a fall in the price of pepper, a rise in that of crates of rotten cabbages, or other serious events of this kind, which cause fleets to be manned and set people face to face intent upon one another's extermination. The insect does not aim at so much glory. It confines itself to showing us life in the inexhaustible variety of its manifestations; it helps us to decipher in some small measure the obscurest book of all, the book of ourselves.
Introducing the natural history and his study of the insect Minotaurus typhoeus. In Jean-Henri Fabre and Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (trans.), The Life and Love of the Insect (1918), 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Cabbage (5)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Event (216)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Fall (230)  |  History (673)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Measure (232)  |  Minute (125)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  People (1005)  |  Pepper (2)  |  Price (51)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rotten (3)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

Whatever be the detail with which you cram your student, the chance of his meeting in after life exactly that detail is almost infinitesimal; and if he does meet it, he will probably have forgotten what you taught him about it. The really useful training yields a comprehension of a few general principles with a thorough grounding in the way they apply to a variety of concrete details. In subsequent practice the men will have forgotten your particular details; but they will remember by an unconscious common sense how to apply principles to immediate circumstances. Your learning is useless to you till you have lost your textbooks, burnt your lecture notes, and forgotten the minutiae which you learned by heart for the examination. What, in the way of detail, you continually require will stick in your memory as obvious facts like the sun and the moon; and what you casually require can be looked up in any work of reference. The function of a University is to enable you to shed details in favor of principles. When I speak of principles I am hardly even thinking of verbal formulations. A principle which has thoroughly soaked into you is rather a mental habit than a formal statement. It becomes the way the mind reacts to the appropriate stimulus in the form of illustrative circumstances. Nobody goes about with his knowledge clearly and consciously before him. Mental cultivation is nothing else than the satisfactory way in which the mind will function when it is poked up into activity.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Apply (160)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Cram (5)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Education (378)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Favor (63)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Habit (168)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minutiae (7)  |  Moon (237)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remember (179)  |  Require (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Student (300)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Sun (385)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Training (80)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yield (81)

When not protected by law, by popular favor or superstition, or by other special circumstances, [birds] yield very readily to the influences of civilization, and, though the first operations of the settler are favorable to the increase of many species, the great extension of rural and of mechanical industry is, in a variety of ways, destructive even to tribes not directly warred upon by man.
In Man and Nature, (1864), 93-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Bird (149)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Destructiveness (2)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Favor (63)  |  Favorable (24)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Increase (210)  |  Industry (137)  |  Influence (222)  |  Law (894)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Popular (29)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Rural (6)  |  Settler (2)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Tribe (22)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  Yield (81)

When ultra-violet light acts on a mixture of water, carbon dioxide, and ammonia, a vast variety of organic substances are made, including sugars and apparently some of the materials from which proteins are built up…. But before the origin of life they must have accumulated till the primitive oceans reached the consistency of hot dilute soup…. The first living or half-living things were probably large molecules synthesized under the influence of the sun’s radiation, and only capable of reproduction in the particularly favorable medium in which they originated….
In 'The Origin of Life', The Inequality of Man: And Other Essays (1932, 1937), 152.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Act (272)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Capable (168)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Favorable (24)  |  First (1283)  |  Hot (60)  |  Influence (222)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Medium (12)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Originate (36)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Protein (54)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Soup (9)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Sun (385)  |  Synthesize (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vast (177)  |  Violet (11)  |  Water (481)

Whereas history, literature, art, and even religion, all have national characters and local attachments, science alone of man’s major intellectual interests has no frontiers and no national varieties; that science, like peace, is one and indivisible.
From Pilgrim Trust Lecture (22 Oct 1946) delivered at National Academy of Science Washington, DC. Published in 'The Freedom of Science', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (25 Feb 1947), 91, No. 1, 72.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Art (657)  |  Attachment (6)  |  Character (243)  |  Frontier (38)  |  History (673)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Literature (103)  |  Local (19)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nation (193)  |  Peace (108)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Science And Religion (307)

Without undervaluing any other human agency, it may be safely affirmed that the Common School, improved and energized, as it can easily be, may become the most effective and benignant of all the forces of civilization. Two reasons sustain this position. In the first place, there is a universality in its operation, which can be affirmed of no other institution whatever... And, in the second place, the materials upon which it operates are so pliant and ductile as to be susceptible of assuming a greater variety of forms than any other earthly work of the Creator.
Twelfth Report of the Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education (1948). Life and Works of Horace Mann (1891), Vol. 4, 232-233.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Creator (91)  |  Effective (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Greater (288)  |  Human (1468)  |  Institution (69)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Operation (213)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  School (219)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Two (937)  |  Universality (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

Your remarks upon chemical notation with the variety of systems which have arisen, &c., &c., had almost stirred me up to regret publicly that such hindrances to the progress of science should exist. I cannot help thinking it a most unfortunate thing that men who as experimentalists & philosophers are the most fitted to advance the general cause of science & knowledge should by promulgation of their own theoretical views under the form of nomenclature, notation, or scale, actually retard its progress.
Letter to William Whewell (21 Feb 1831). In Isaac Todhunter, William Whewell, An Account of his Writings (1876), Vol. 1., 307. Faraday may have been referring to a paper by Whewell published in the Journal of the Royal Institution of England (1831), 437-453.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Hindrance (6)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Notation (27)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remark (28)  |  Retardation (5)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stir (21)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  View (488)

[Is the Loch Ness Monster] a magnified newt, a long‐necked variety of giant seal, an unextinct Elasmosaurus?
In 'Pieces of the Frame', The Atlantic (1970), collected in Pieces of the Frame (1975), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Extinct (21)  |  Giant (67)  |  Loch Ness Monster (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnify (4)  |  Monster (31)  |  Neck (15)  |  Newt (2)  |  Seal (18)

[On gold, silver, mercury, platinum, palladium, rhodium, iridium, osmium:] As in their physical properties so in their chemical properties. Their affinities being weaker, (the noble metals) do not present that variety of combinations, belonging to the more common metals, which renders them so extensively useful in the arts; nor are they, in consequence, so necessary and important in the operations of nature. They do not assist in her hands in breaking down rocks and strata into soil, nor do they help man to make that soil productive or to collect for him its products.
From 13th Lecture in 1818, in Bence Jones, The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Breaking (3)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Gold (97)  |  Important (209)  |  Iridium (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Metal (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Noble (90)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Osmium (3)  |  Palladium (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Platinum (6)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Productive (32)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Property (168)  |  Render (93)  |  Rhodium (2)  |  Rock (161)  |  Silver (46)  |  Soil (86)  |  Strata (35)  |  Useful (250)

[On suburbia] We’re bringing up our children in one-class areas. When they grow up and move to a city or go abroad, they’re not accustomed to variety and they get uncertain and insecure. We should bring up our children where they’re exposed to all types of people.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  City (78)  |  Class (164)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Grow (238)  |  Insecure (5)  |  Move (216)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Type (167)  |  Uncertain (44)

[Science is] the search for unity in the variety of our experience.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Experience (467)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Unity (78)

… our “Physick” and “Anatomy” have embraced such infinite varieties of being, have laid open such new worlds in time and space, have grappled, not unsuccessfully, with such complex problems, that the eyes of Vesalius and of Harvey might be dazzled by the sight of the tree that has grown out of their grain of mustard seed.
A Lay Sermon, delivered at St. Martin's Hall (7 Jan 1866), 'On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', published in The Fortnightly Review (1866), Vol. 3, 629.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Being (1278)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Eye (419)  |  Grain (50)  |  Grappling (2)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mustard (2)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Problem (676)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sight (132)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Tree (246)  |  Andreas Vesalius (15)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.