Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Noon

Noon Quotes (14 quotes)

1104 … In this year the first day of Whitsuntide was on 5 June, and on the following Tuesday at noon there appeared four intersecting halos around the sun, white in color, and looking as if they had been painted. All who saw it were astonished, for they did not remember seeing anything like it before.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 239. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Color (137)  |  First (1283)  |  Halo (7)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Looking (189)  |  Remember (179)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sun (385)  |  White (127)  |  Year (933)

A fox looked at his shadow at sunrise and said, “I will have a camel for lunch today.” And all morning he went about looking for camels. But at noon he saw his shadow again - and he said, “A mouse will do.”
In Kahlil Gibran: The Collected Works (207), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Camel (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fox (9)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)

And it shall come to pass in that day, saith the Lord God, that I will cause the sun to go down at noon, and I will darken the earth in the clear day.
Bible
Amos 8:9. As in The Holy Bible, Or Divine Treasury (1804), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Dark (140)  |  Day (42)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  God (757)  |  Lord (93)  |  Pass (238)  |  Sun (385)  |  Will (2355)

In discussing the state of the atmosphere following a nuclear exchange, we point especially to the effects of the many fires that would be ignited by the thousands of nuclear explosions in cities, forests, agricultural fields, and oil and gas fields. As a result of these fires, the loading of the atmosphere with strongly light absorbing particles in the submicron size range (1 micron = 10-6 m) would increase so much that at noon solar radiation at the ground would be reduced by at least a factor of two and possibly a factor of greater than one hundred.
Paul J. Crutzen -and John W. Birks (1946-, American chemist), 'The Atmosphere after a Nuclear War: Twilight at Noon', Ambio, 1982, 11, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Fire (189)  |  Forest (150)  |  Gas (83)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Increase (210)  |  Light (607)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Oil (59)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Range (99)  |  Result (677)  |  State (491)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  War (225)

In the morning, we carry the world like Atlas; at noon, we stoop and bend beneath it; and at night, it crushes us flat to the ground.
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Atlas (3)  |  Bend (12)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Carry (127)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Crush (18)  |  Flat (33)  |  Ground (217)  |  Man (2251)  |  Morning (94)  |  Night (120)  |  Stoop (3)  |  World (1774)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Spring (133)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

Newton advanced, with one gigantic stride, from the regions of twilight into the noon day of science. A Boyle and a Hooke, who would otherwise have been deservedly the boast of their century, served but as obscure forerunners of Newton's glories.
A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts (1845), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Boast (22)  |  Robert Boyle (27)  |  Century (310)  |  Day (42)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Glory (58)  |  Robert Hooke (20)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Region (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stride (15)  |  Twilight (6)

Oh dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon,
Irrecoverably dark, total Eclipse
Without all hope of day!
Samson Agonistes (1671), lines 80-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Dark (140)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Hope (299)  |  Total (94)

Physicians get neither name nor fame by the pricking of wheals or the picking out thistles, or by laying of plaisters to the scratch of a pin; every old woman can do this. But if they would have a name and a fame, if they will have it quickly, they must do some great and desperate cures. Let them fetch one to life that was dead; let them recover one to his wits that was mad; let them make one that was born blind to see; or let them give ripe wits to a fool: these are notable cures, and he that can do thus, if he doth thus first, he shall have the name and fame he deserves; he may lie abed till noon.
In John Bunyan and Robert Philip (ed.), The Works of John Bunyan (1850), Vol. 1, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Blind (95)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Cure (122)  |  Death (388)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Fool (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Old (481)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pin (18)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Pricking (2)  |  Scratch (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)  |  Woman (151)

Sooner or later in every talk, [David] Brower describes the creation of the world. He invites his listeners to consider the six days of Genesis as a figure of speech for what has in fact been 4 billion years. On this scale, one day equals something like six hundred and sixty-six million years, and thus, all day Monday and until Tuesday noon, creation was busy getting the world going. Life began Tuesday noon, and the beautiful organic wholeness of it developed over the next four days. At 4 p.m. Saturday, the big reptiles came on. At three minutes before midnight on the last day, man appeared. At one-fourth of a second before midnight Christ arrived. At one-fortieth of a second before midnight, the Industrial Revolution began. We are surrounded with people who think that what we have been doing for that one-fortieth of a second can go on indefinitely. They are considered normal, but they are stark. raving mad.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 79-80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Begin (260)  |  Big (48)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brower (2)  |  Busy (28)  |  Christ (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  David (6)  |  Describe (128)  |  Develop (268)  |  Doing (280)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Figure (160)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Invite (9)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listener (7)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Million (114)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monday (3)  |  Next (236)  |  Normal (28)  |  Organic (158)  |  P (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Saturday (11)  |  Scale (121)  |  Second (62)  |  Something (719)  |  Sooner (6)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stark (3)  |  Surround (30)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tuesday (3)  |  Wholeness (9)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The canyon country does not always inspire love. To many it appears barren, hostile, repellent—a fearsome, mostly waterless land of rock and heat, sand dunes and quicksand. cactus, thornbush, scorpion, rattlesnake, and agoraphobic distances. To those who see our land in that manner, the best reply is, yes, you are right, it is a dangerous and terrible place. Enter at your own risk. Carry water. Avoid the noon-day sun. Try to ignore the vultures. Pray frequently.
The Journey Home
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Barren (30)  |  Best (459)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Canyon (9)  |  Carry (127)  |  Country (251)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Desert (56)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dune (4)  |  Enter (141)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Land (115)  |  Love (309)  |  Manner (58)  |  Place (177)  |  Pray (16)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Repellent (4)  |  Reply (56)  |  Right (452)  |  Risk (61)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sand (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thornbush (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Vulture (5)  |  Water (481)

The farthest Thunder that I heard
Was nearer than the Sky
And rumbles still, though torrid Noons
Have lain their missiles by-
The Lightning that preceded it
Struck no one but myself-
But I would not exchange the Bolt
For all the rest of Life-
Indebtedness to Oxygen
The Happy may repay,
But not the obligation
To Electricity-
It founds the Homes and decks the Days
And every clamor bright
Is but the gleam concomitant
Of that waylaying Light-
The Thought is quiet as a Flake-
A Crash without a Sound,
How Life’s reverberation
Is Explanation found-—
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bolt (9)  |  Bright (79)  |  Crash (9)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Happy (105)  |  Home (170)  |  Indebtedness (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Missile (5)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Rest (280)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sound (183)  |  Still (613)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thunder (20)

With us ther was a DOCTOUR OF PHISIK;
In al the world ne was ther noon hym lik,
To speak of phisik and of surgerye,
For he was grounded in astronomye.
He kepte his pacient a fuI greet deel
In houres by his magyk natureel.
Wel koude he fortunen the ascendent
Of his ymages for his pacient.
He knew the cause of everich maladye,
Were it of hoot, or cooled, or moyste, or drye,
And where they engendred, and of what humour.
Fragment I, General Prologue. In Larry D. Benson (ed.), The Riverside Chaucer (1988), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Ground (217)  |  Humour (116)  |  Speak (232)  |  World (1774)

[1665-07-22] I met this noon with Dr Burnett, who told me ... that his servant died of a Bubo on his right groine, and two Spots on his right thigh, which is the plague.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (22 Jul 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Plague (41)  |  Right (452)  |  Servant (39)  |  Two (937)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.