Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Think

Think Quotes (1086 quotes)

'Why do you think it is...', I asked Dr. Cook ... 'that brain surgery, above all else—even rocket science—gets singled out as the most challenging of human feats, the one demanding the utmost of human intelligence?'
[Dr. Cook answered,] 'No margin for error.'
Lucky Man (2002), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brain Surgery (2)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Feat (10)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Most (1731)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Rocket Science (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Why (491)

... I should think that anyone who considered it more reasonable for the whole universe to move in order to let the Earth remain fixed would be more irrational than one who should climb to the top of your cupola just to get a view of the city and its environs, and then demand that the whole countryside should revolve around him so that he would not have to take the trouble to turn his head.
In Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632).
Science quotes on:  |  City (78)  |  Consider (416)  |  Demand (123)  |  Earth (996)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Order (632)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Top (96)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

... I think the guys who are really controlling their emotions... are going to win; the guy who is controlling his emotions is going to win!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Control (167)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Guy (5)  |  Really (78)  |  Win (52)

...He cannot conclude however, without observing, that from the contemplation of so great a variety of extraneous fossils discovered in the cliffs which were evidently the produce of very different climates, he thinks himself rationally induced to believe that nothing short of an universal deluge could be a cause adequate to this effect.
Plantae Favershamiensis, Appendix, 'Establishing a short view of the fossil bodies of the adjacent island of Sheppey.' Quoted in David Beerling, The Emerald Planet: How Plants Changed Earth's History (2007), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Climate (97)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Extraneous (6)  |  Flood (50)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Short (197)  |  Universal (189)  |  Variety (132)

...I have always maintained that, excepting fools, men did not differ much in intellect, only in zeal and hard work; and I still think there is an eminently important difference.
letter cit. R. Pearson (1914-1930) in The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton
Science quotes on:  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fool (116)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Still (613)  |  Work (1351)

...I may perhaps venture a short word on the question much discussed in certain quarters, whether in the work of excavation it is a good thing to have cooperation between men and women ... Of a mixed dig ... I have seen something, and it is an experiment that I would be reluctant to try again. I would grant if need be that women are admirable fitted for the work, yet I would uphold that they should undertake it by themselves ... the work of an excavator on the dig and off it lays on those who share it a bond of closer daily intercourse than is conceivable ... between men and women, except in chance cases, I do not believe that such close and unavoidable companionship can ever be other than a source of irritation; at any rate, I believe that however it may affect women, the ordinary male at least cannot stand it ... A minor ... objection lies in one particular form of contraint ... moments will occur on the best regulated dig when you want to say just what you think without translation, which before the ladies, whatever their feelings about it, cannot be done.
Archaeological Excavation (1915), 63-64. In Getzel M. Cohen and Martha Sharp Joukowsky Breaking Ground (2006), 557-558. By (), 163-164.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Best (459)  |  Bond (45)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chance (239)  |  Closer (43)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Daily (87)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Lie (364)  |  Moment (253)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Share (75)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Translation (21)  |  Try (283)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Women Scientists (13)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

...the scientific cast of mind examines the world critically, as if many alternative worlds might exist, as if other things might be here which are not. Then we are forced to ask why what we see is present and not something else. Why are the Sun and moon and the planets spheres? Why not pyramids, or cubes, or dodecahedra? Why not irregular, jumbly shapes? Why so symmetrical, worlds? If you spend any time spinning hypotheses, checking to see whether they make sense, whether they conform to what else we know. Thinking of tests you can pose to substantiate or deflate hypotheses, you will find yourself doing science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cast (66)  |  Check (24)  |  Conform (13)  |  Critical (66)  |  Cube (13)  |  Deflate (2)  |  Doing (280)  |  Examine (78)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Irregular (6)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moon (237)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pose (9)  |  Present (619)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shape (72)  |  Something (719)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Sun (385)  |  Symmetrical (2)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

...time and space are modes by which we think and not conditions in which we live.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  Live (628)  |  Mode (41)  |  Space (500)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)

Air Force Chief of Staff: Doctor, what do you think of our new creation, the … Corporation?
von Kármán: Why, General, I think that corporation has already had an effect on the whole industry.
Air Force Chief of Staff: I’m delighted. What effect is that?
von Kármán: Why, they’ve upset the salary schedule of the whole industry.
As quoted by William R. Sears in 'Some Recollections of Theodore von Kármán', Address to the Symposium in Memory of Theodore von Kármán, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, National Meeting (13-14 May 1964), Washington, D.C. Printed in Journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Mar 1965), 13>, No. 1, 181. These are likely not verbatim words of Karman, but as recollected by Sears, giving an example of von Kármán’s willingness to speak truth to power.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Force (2)  |  Already (222)  |  Chief (97)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Creation (327)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Effect (393)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Industry (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Salary (7)  |  Upset (18)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

Alles Gescheite ist schon gedacht worden; man muss nur versuchen, es noch einmal zu denken.
Everything that is worth thinking has already been thought; one must only try to think it again.
As translated in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Everything (476)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Worth (169)

Bernard: Oh, you’re going to zap me with penicillin and pesticides. Spare me that and I’ll spare you the bomb and aerosols. But don’t confuse progress with perfectibility. A great poet is always timely. A great philosopher is an urgent need. There’s no rush for Isaac Newton. We were quite happy with Aristotle’s cosmos. Personally, I preferred it. Fifty-five crystal spheres geared to God’s crankshaft is my idea of a satisfying universe. I can’t think of anything more trivial than the speed of light. Quarks, quasars—big bangs, black holes—who [cares]? How did you people con us out of all that status? All that money? And why are you so pleased with yourselves?
Chloe: Are you against penicillin, Bernard?
Bernard: Don’t feed the animals.
In the play, Acadia (1993), Act 2, Scene 5, 61.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aerosol (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Care (186)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Feed (27)  |  Gear (4)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Idea (843)  |  Light (607)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfectibility (3)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poet (83)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quark (7)  |  Quasar (4)  |  Rush (18)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Sparing (2)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Status (35)  |  Timely (3)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Universe (857)  |  Urgency (12)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Why (491)

Copernicus, who rightly did condemn
This eldest systeme, form’d a wiser scheme;
In which he leaves the Sun at Rest, and rolls
The Orb Terrestial on its proper Poles;
Which makes the Night and Day by this Career,
And by its slow and crooked Course the Year.
The famous Dane, who oft the Modern guides,
To Earth and Sun their Provinces divides:
The Earth's Rotation makes the Night and Day,
The Sun revolving through th'Eccliptic Way
Effects the various seasons of the Year,
Which in their Turn for happy Ends appear.
This Scheme or that, which pleases best, embrace,
Still we the Fountain of their Motion trace.
Kepler asserts these Wonders may be done
By the Magnetic Vertue of the Sun,
Which he, to gain his End, thinks fit to place
Full in the Center of that mighty Space,
Which does the Spheres, where Planets roll, include,
And leaves him with Attractive Force endu'd.
The Sun, thus seated, by Mechanic Laws,
The Earth, and every distant Planet draws;
By which Attraction all the Planets found
Within his reach, are turn'd in Ether round.
In Creation: A Philosophical Poem in Seven Books (1712), book 2, l. 430-53, p.78-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Career (75)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Course (409)  |  Divide (75)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Embrace (46)  |  End (590)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fit (134)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Guide (97)  |  Happy (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Modern (385)  |  Motion (310)  |  Orb (20)  |  Planet (356)  |  Please (65)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Pole (46)  |  Proper (144)  |  Province (35)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Season (47)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Turn (447)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Year (933)

Daher ist die Aufgabe nicht sowohl, zu sehen, was noch keiner gesehen hat, als bei dem, was jeder sieht, zu denken, was noch keiner gedacht hat.
The task is, not so much to see what no one has seen yet; but to think what nobody has thought yet, about that which everybody sees.
English translation as given in an Epigraph by Ludwig von Bertalanffy, Problems of Life: An Evaluation of Modern Biological Thought (1952), Vol. 1, (1949, 1952). Original German, at least as early as Schopenhauer and Frauenstädt (ed.), Second Edition of Parerga and Paralipomena (1862), Vol. 2, 116. Quoted in Julius Frauenstädt (ed.) Schopenhauer-Lexikon: Ein philosophisches Wörterbuch, nach Arthur Schopenhauers sämmtlichen Schriften und handschriftlichem Nachlass (1871), 180. This quote has been widely (apparently) incorrectly attributed to Erwin Schrödinger, for example, in Alan L. Mackay (ed.), A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 219. Mackay cites Bertalanffy, without page number. Did Schrodinger ever use Schopenhauer’s quote? If you know a primary source for Schrödinger, please contact Webmaster. Prior to this revision on 15 Jun 2015, the quote appeared on this site on the Schrödinger page. This was independently researched by this Webmaster. If you use it elsewhere, first request the credit line and link to include.
Science quotes on:  |  Everybody (70)  |  Nobody (104)  |  See (1081)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)

Dilbert: And we know mass creates gravity because more dense planets have more gravity.
Dogbert: How do we know which planets are more dense?
Dilbert:They have more gravity.
Dogbert: That's circular reasoning.
Dilbert: I prefer to think of it as having no loose ends.
Dilbert cartoon strip (1 Mar 1999).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Circular (19)  |  Create (235)  |  Density (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loose End (3)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Planet (356)  |  Reasoning (207)

Dilbert: Maybe I’m unlucky in love because I’m so knowledgeable about science that I intimidate people. Their intimidation becomes low self-esteem, then they reject me to protect their egos.
Dogbert: Occam’s Razor.
Dilbert: What is “Occam's Razor”?
Dogbert: A guy named Occam had a rule about the world. Basically he said that when there are multiple explanations for something the simplest explanation is usually correct. The simplest explanation for your poor love life is that you’re immensely unattractive.
Dilbert: Maybe Occam had another rule that specifically exempted this situation, but his house burned down with all his notes. Then he forgot.
Dogbert: Occam’s Razor.
Dilbert: I’m an idiot.
Dogbert: I don’t think we can rule it out at this point.
Dilbert comic strip (11 Jul 1993).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Burn (87)  |  Correct (86)  |  Down (456)  |  Ego (17)  |  Exemption (3)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  House (140)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Intimidation (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Low (80)  |  Luck (42)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Note (34)  |  Occam’s Razor (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Poor (136)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Esteem (6)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Situation (113)  |  Something (719)  |  Unattractive (3)  |  Usually (176)  |  World (1774)

Dilbert: I’m obsessed with inventing a perpetual motion machine. Most scientists think it's impossible, but I have something they don’t.
Dogbert: A lot of spare time?
Dilbert: Exactly.
Dilbert cartoon strip (8 Aug 1991).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lot (151)  |  Machine (257)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Spare Time (3)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)

Dilbert: You joined the “Flat Earth Society?”
Dogbert: I believe the earth must be flat. There is no good evidence to support the so-called “round earth theory.”
Dilbert: I think Christopher Columbus would disagree.
Dogbert: How convenient that your best witness is dead.
Dilbert comic strip (9 Oct 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Flat (33)  |  Flat Earth (3)  |  Good (889)  |  Join (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Society (326)  |  Support (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Witness (54)

Ego cogito, ergo sum.
I think, therefore I am.
From the original Latin in Principia Philosophiæ (1644), Pars Prima, as collected in Charles Adam and Paul Tannery, Œuvres de Descartes (1905), Vol. 8, Proposition VII, 7. English version as given in John Veitch (trans.), The Method, Meditations, and Selections from the Principles of Descartes (1880), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Ego (17)  |  Exist (443)  |  Sum (102)

Interviewer: Is there any science that's not wrapped in politics?
Seitz: Oh, there are some things. The disappearance of the frog—as you know, the frog is dying worldwide. … I don't think that has had any political repercussions other than the fact that that is happening.
Interview on PBS Frontline website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Dying (2)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Frog (38)  |  Happening (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Other (2236)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Repercussion (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Worldwide (16)

La théorie des séries infinies en général est justqu’à présent très mal fondée. On applique aux séries infinies toutes les opérations, come si elles aient finies; mais cela est-il bien permis? Je crois que non. Où est-il démonstré qu/on ontient la différentielle dune série infinie en prenant la différentiaella de chaque terme. Rien n’est plus facile que de donner des exemples où cela n’est pas juste.
Until now the theory of infinite series in general has been very badly grounded. One applies all the operations to infinite series as if they were finite; but is that permissible? I think not. Where is it demonstrated that one obtains the differential of an infinite series by taking the differential of each term? Nothing is easier than to give instances where this is not so.
Quoted in Reinhold Remmert and Robert B. Burckel, Theory of Complex Functions: Readings in Mathematics (1991), 125.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Badly (32)  |  Differential (7)  |  Easier (53)  |  Facile (4)  |  Finite (59)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Permissible (8)  |  Plus (43)  |  Series (149)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)

Lepidoptera are for children to play with, pretty to look at, so some think. Give me the Coleoptera, and the kings of the Coleoptera are the beetles! Lepidoptera and Neuroptera for little folks; Coleoptera for men, sir!
In 'The Poet at the Breakfast Table: III', The Atlantic Monthly (Mar 1872), 29, 344.
Science quotes on:  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Entomology (9)  |  Fly (146)  |  Give (202)  |  King (35)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Play (112)  |  Pretty (20)

L’homme n’est qu’un roseau, le plus faible de la nature, mais c’est un roseau pensant. Il ne faut pas que l’univers entier s’arme pour l’écraser; une vapeur, une goutte d’eau suffit pour le tuer. Mais quand l’univers l’écraserait, l’homme serait encore plus noble que ce qui le tue, parce qu’il sait qu’il meurt et l’avantage que l’univers a sur lui; l’univers n'en sait rien.
Man is a reed, the feeblest thing in nature. But a reed that can think. The whole universe need not fly to arms to kill him ; for a little heat or a drop of water can slay a man. But, even then, man would be nobler than his destroyer, for he would know he died, while the whole universe would know nothing of its victory.
Pensées. As given and translated in Hugh Percy Jones (ed.), Dictionary of Foreign Phrases and Classical Quotations (1908), 292.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Death (388)  |  Drop (76)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Fly (146)  |  Heat (174)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plus (43)  |  Reed (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Victory (39)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Non cogitant, ergo non sunt.
[They do not think, therefore they are not.]
Aphorism 61 in Notebook J (1789-1793), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 140. (Compare René Descartes, “Cogito ergo sum”—I think, therefore I am (1637).]
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Existence (456)  |  Thinking (414)

Pour inventor il faut penser à côté.
To invent you must think aside
In Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao, Statistics and Truth (1997), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  C (3)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Eacute (2)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pour (10)

Question: Explain why pipes burst in cold weather.
Answer: People who have not studied acoustics think that Thor bursts the pipes, but we know that is nothing of the kind for Professor Tyndall has burst the mythologies and has taught us that it is the natural behaviour of water (and bismuth) without which all fish would die and the earth be held in an iron grip. (1881)
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1881), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 186-7, Question 10. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.) Webmaster notes that “fish would die” may refer to being taught that water's greatest density is at 4°C, and sinks below a frozen surface, so bodies of water can remain liquid underneath, to the benefit of the fish. The student was likely taught that bismuth, like water, expands when it freezes.
Science quotes on:  |  Acoustics (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Bismuth (7)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Burst (39)  |  Cold (112)  |  Death (388)  |  Earth (996)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fish (120)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Grip (9)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Pipe (7)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Study (653)  |  Teaching (188)  |  John Tyndall (48)  |  Water (481)  |  Weather (44)  |  Why (491)

Ron Hutcheson, a Knight-Ridder reporter: [Mr. President, what are your] personal views [about the theory of] intelligent design?
President George W. Bush: [Laughing. You're] doing a fine job of dragging me back to the past [days as governor of Texas]. ... Then, I said that, first of all, that decision should be made to local school districts, but I felt like both sides ought to be properly taught...”
Hutcheson: Both sides ought to be properly taught?
President: Yes ... so people can understand what the debate is about.
Hutcheson: So the answer accepts the validity of “intelligent design” as an alternative to evolution?
President: I think that part of education is to expose people to different schools of thought, and I'm not suggesting—you're asking me whether or not people ought to be exposed to different ideas, and the answer is yes.
Hutcheson: So we've got to give these groups—...
President: [interrupting] Very interesting question, Hutch. [Laughter from other reporters]
From conversation with reporters at the White House (1 Aug 2005), as quoted by Matthew Cooper in 'Fanning the Controversy Over “Intelligent Design”', Time (3 Aug 2005). The Time writer stated, “The president has gone farther in questioning the widely-taught theories of evolution and natural selection than any president since Ronald Reagan, who advocated teaching creationism in public schools alongside evolution.” Just a few months later, in the nation's first case on that point, on 20 Dec 2005, “a federal judge [John E. Jones] ruled it was unconstitutional for a Pennsylvania school district to present intelligent design as an alternative in high school biology courses, because it is a religious viewpoint,” as reported by Laurie Goodstein in 'Judge Rejects Teaching Intelligent Design', New York Times (21 Dec 2005). Goodstein also wrote “Judge Jones, a Republican appointed by President Bush, concluded that intelligent design was not science,” and that “the evidence in the trial proved that intelligent design was 'creationism relabeled.' The Supreme Court has already ruled that creationism ... cannot be taught as science in a public school.”
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Answer (366)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Both (493)  |  Debate (38)  |  Decision (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  District (9)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Governor (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Local (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Personal (67)  |  President (31)  |  Question (621)  |  School (219)  |  Side (233)  |  Teach (277)  |  Texas (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Validity (47)  |  View (488)

Sir Robert Chiltern: You think science cannot grapple with the problem of women?
Mrs. Cheveley: Science can never grapple with the irrational. That is why it has no future before it in this world.
In play, An Ideal Husband (1912, 2001), Act 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Future (429)  |  Grapple (10)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

Socrates: Shall we set down astronomy among the objects of study? Glaucon: I think so, to know something about the seasons, the months and the years is of use for military purposes, as well as for agriculture and for navigation. Socrates: It amuses me to see how afraid you are, lest the common herd of people should accuse you of recommending useless studies.
Socrates
As quoted by Plato. In Richard Garnett, Léon Vallée, Alois Brandl (eds.), The Universal Anthology: A Collection of the Best Literature (1899), Vol. 4, 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuse (4)  |  Afraid (21)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Amuse (2)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Common (436)  |  Down (456)  |  Know (1518)  |  Military (40)  |  Month (88)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Object (422)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Season (47)  |  See (1081)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Year (933)

Wenn sich für ein neues Fossil kein, auf eigenthümliche Eigenschaften desselben hinweisender, Name auffinden lassen Will; als in welchem Falle ich mich bei dem gegenwärtigen zu befinden gestehe; so halte ich es für besser, eine solche Benennung auszuwählen, die an sich gar nichts sagt, und folglich auch zu keinen unrichtigen Begriffen Anlass geben kann. Diesem zufolge will ich den Namen für die gegenwärtige metallische Substanz, gleichergestalt wie bei dem Uranium geschehen, aus der Mythologie, und zwar von den Ursöhnen der Erde, den Titanen, entlehnen, und benenne also dieses neue Metallgeschlecht: Titanium.
Wherefore no name can be found for a new fossil [element] which indicates its peculiar and characteristic properties (in which position I find myself at present), I think it is best to choose such a denomination as means nothing of itself and thus can give no rise to any erroneous ideas. In consequence of this, as I did in the case of Uranium, I shall borrow the name for this metallic substance from mythology, and in particular from the Titans, the first sons of the earth. I therefore call this metallic genus TITANIUM.
Martin Heinrich Klaproth. Original German edition, Beiträge Zur Chemischen Kenntniss Der Mineralkörper (1795), Vol. 1 , 244. English edition, translator not named, Analytical Essays Towards Promoting the Chemical Knowledge of Mineral Substances (1801), Vol. 1, 210. Klaproth's use of the term fossil associates his knowledge of the metal as from ore samples dug out of a mine.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Borrowing (4)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Denomination (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Genus (25)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metal (84)  |  Myself (212)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1216)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particular (76)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Rise (166)  |  Son (24)  |  Substance (248)  |  Titan (2)  |  Titanium (2)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Will (2355)

Wer kann was Dummes, wer was Kluges denken, Das nicht die Vorwelt schon gedacht?
What is there, wise or foolish, one can think, That former ages have not thought before?
Words of Mephistopheles written in Faust, Pt. 2, Act 2. As quoted and translated by the editor in in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Former (137)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wise (131)

[Elementary student, laying a cocoon on the teacher's desk:] That is serendipity. The caterpillar thinks it is dying but it is really being born.
Anonymous
As quoted, without citation, by Marcus Bach, 'Serendiptiy in the Business World', in The Rotarian (Oct 1981), 139, No. 4, 40.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Cocoon (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Desk (13)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Reality (261)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)

[Question: What do you think was the most important physics idea to emerge this year?]
We won't know for a few years.
Interview with Deborah Solomon, 'The Science of Second-Guessing', in New York Times Magazine (12 Dec 2004), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Year (933)

[When recording electrical impulses from a frog nerve-muscle preparation seemed to show a tiresomely oscillating electrical artefact—but only when the muscle was hanging unsupported.] The explanation suddenly dawned on me ... a muscle hanging under its own weight ought, if you come to think of it, to be sending sensory impulses up the nerves coming from the muscle spindles ... That particular day’s work, I think, had all the elements that one could wish for. The new apparatus seemed to be misbehaving very badly indeed, and I suddenly found it was behaving so well that it was opening up an entire new range of data ... it didn’t involve any particular hard work, or any particular intelligence on my part. It was just one of those things which sometimes happens in a laboratory if you stick apparatus together and see what results you get.
From 'Memorable experiences in research', Diabetes (1954), 3, 17-18. As cited in Alan McComa, Galvani's Spark: The Story of the Nerve Impulse (2011), 102-103.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Artefact (2)  |  Badly (32)  |  Behave (17)  |  Coming (114)  |  Data (156)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Element (310)  |  Entire (47)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Found (11)  |  Frog (38)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Involve (90)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nerve (79)  |  New (1216)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Range (99)  |  Recording (13)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Send (22)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Unsupported (3)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)

SIR TOBY: Does not our lives consist of the four elements?
SIR ANDREW: Faith, so they say; but I think it rather consists of eating and drinking.
SIR TOBY: Thou'rt a scholar; let us therefore eat and drink.
Twelfth Night (1601), II, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Consist (223)  |  Drink (53)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Element (310)  |  Faith (203)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Small (477)

A designer must always think about the unfortunate production engineer who will have to manufacture what you have designed; try to understand his problems.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (195)  |  Designer (6)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Will (2355)

A distinguished writer [Siméon Denis Poisson] has thus stated the fundamental definitions of the science:
“The probability of an event is the reason we have to believe that it has taken place, or that it will take place.”
“The measure of the probability of an event is the ratio of the number of cases favourable to that event, to the total number of cases favourable or contrary, and all equally possible” (equally like to happen).
From these definitions it follows that the word probability, in its mathematical acceptation, has reference to the state of our knowledge of the circumstances under which an event may happen or fail. With the degree of information which we possess concerning the circumstances of an event, the reason we have to think that it will occur, or, to use a single term, our expectation of it, will vary. Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. A perfect acquaintance with all the circumstances affecting the occurrence of an event would change expectation into certainty, and leave neither room nor demand for a theory of probabilities.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 243-244. The Poisson quote is footnoted as from Recherches sur la Probabilité des Jugemens.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Event (216)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Writer (86)

A fair number of people who go on to major in astronomy have decided on it certainly by the time they leave junior high, if not during junior high. I think it’s somewhat unusual that way. I think most children pick their field quite a bit later, but astronomy seems to catch early, and if it does, it sticks.
From interview by Rebecca Wright, 'Oral History Transcript' (15 Sep 2000), on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Career (75)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Decide (41)  |  Early (185)  |  Field (364)  |  High (362)  |  Junior (6)  |  Junior High (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Pick (16)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Way (1217)

A Frenchman who arrives in London, will find Philosophy, like every Thing else, very much chang’d there. He had left the World a plenum, and he now finds it a vacuum. At Paris the Universe is seen, compos’d of Vortices of subtile Matter; but nothing like it is seen in London. In France, ‘tis the Pressure of the Moon that causes the Tides; but in England ‘tis the Sea that gravitates towards the Moon; so what when you think that the Moon should make it flood with us, those Gentlemen fancy it should be Ebb, which, very unluckily, cannot be prov’d. For to be able to do this, ‘tis necessary the Moon and the Tides should have been enquir’d into, at the very instant of the Creation.
Letter XIV. 'On DesCartes and Sir Isaac Newton', in Letters Concerning the English Nation (1733), 109-110.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Creation (327)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ebb (3)  |  England (40)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Flood (50)  |  France (27)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Instant (45)  |  London (12)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moon (237)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Paris (11)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plenum (2)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prove (250)  |  Sea (308)  |  Subtile (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tide (34)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Vortex (9)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

A good theoretical physicist today might find it useful to have a wide range of physical viewpoints and mathematical expressions of the same theory (for example, of quantum electrodynamics) available to him. This may be asking too much of one man. Then new students should as a class have this. If every individual student follows the same current fashion in expressing and thinking about electrodynamics or field theory, then the variety of hypotheses being generated to understand strong interactions, say, is limited. Perhaps rightly so, for possibly the chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off-chance that it is in another direction—a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory—who will find it?
In his Nobel Prize Lecture (11 Dec 1965), 'The Development of the Space-Time View of Quantum Electrodynamics'. Collected in Stig Lundqvist, Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1963-1970 (1998), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chance (239)  |  Class (164)  |  Current (118)  |  Direction (175)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Field (364)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Electrodynamics (3)  |  Range (99)  |  Say (984)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Today (314)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unfashionable (2)  |  Useful (250)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1574)  |  Merely (316)  |  People (1005)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Thinking (414)

A hundred years ago … an engineer, Herbert Spencer, was willing to expound every aspect of life, with an effect on his admiring readers which has not worn off today.
Things do not happen quite in this way nowadays. This, we are told, is an age of specialists. The pursuit of knowledge has become a profession. The time when a man could master several sciences is past. He must now, they say, put all his efforts into one subject. And presumably, he must get all his ideas from this one subject. The world, to be sure, needs men who will follow such a rule with enthusiasm. It needs the greatest numbers of the ablest technicians. But apart from them it also needs men who will converse and think and even work in more than one science and know how to combine or connect them. Such men, I believe, are still to be found today. They are still as glad to exchange ideas as they have been in the past. But we cannot say that our way of life is well-fitted to help them. Why is this?
In 'The Unification of Biology', New Scientist (11 Jan 1962), 13, No. 269, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Combine (57)  |  Connect (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Follow (378)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Help (105)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Past (337)  |  Profession (99)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Several (32)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technician (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

A lot of people ask, “Do you think humans are parasites?” It’s an interesting idea and one worth thinking about. People casually refer to humanity as a virus spreading across the earth. In fact, we do look like some strange kind of bio-film spreading across the landscape. A good metaphor? If the biosphere is our host, we do use it up for our own benefit. We do manipulate it. We alter the flows and fluxes of elements like carbon and nitrogen to benefit ourselves—often at the expense of the biosphere as a whole. If you look at how coral reefs or tropical forests are faring these days, you’ll notice that our host is not doing that well right now. Parasites are very sophisticated; parasites are highly evolved; parasites are very successful, as reflected in their diversity. Humans are not very good parasites. Successful parasites do a very good job of balancing—using up their hosts and keeping them alive. It’s all a question of tuning the adaptation to your particular host. In our case, we have only one host, so we have to be particularly careful.
Talk at Columbia University, 'The Power of Parasites'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Ask (411)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forest (150)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Kind (557)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nitrogen Cycle (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Parasite (33)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Right (452)  |  Strange (157)  |  Successful (123)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)

A man has a very insecure tenure of a property which another can carry away with his eyes. A few months reduced me to the cruel necessity either of destroying my machine, or of giving it to the public. To destroy it, I could not think of; to give up that for which I had laboured so long, was cruel. I had no patent, nor the means of purchasing one. In preference to destroying, I gave it to the public.
[On his inability to keep for himself a profitable income from his invention of the Spinning Mule.]
As quoted in James Mason, The Great Triumphs of Great Men (1875), 579.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyes (2)  |  Give (202)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inability (10)  |  Income (17)  |  Insecure (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Labour (98)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Month (88)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Patent (33)  |  Preference (28)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Property (168)  |  Public (96)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Spinning Mule (2)  |  Tenure (7)

A man is like a fraction whose numerator is what he is and whose denominator is what he thinks of himself. The larger the denominator the smaller the fraction.
Quoted, without citation, in Howard Whitley Eves, Return to Mathematical Circles (1988), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Fraction (13)  |  Himself (461)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Small (477)

A man loses his fortune; he gains earnestness. His eyesight goes; it leads him to a spirituality... We think we are pushing our own way bravely, but there is a great Hand in ours all the time.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 20
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bravely (3)  |  Earnestness (3)  |  Eyesight (5)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Ours (4)  |  Push (62)  |  Spirituality (8)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)

A mathematician thinks that two points are enough to define a straight line, while a physicist wants more data.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Data (156)  |  Define (49)  |  Difference (337)  |  Enough (340)  |  Line (91)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Quip (80)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

A mathematician who can only generalise is like a monkey who can only climb UP a tree. ... And a mathematician who can only specialise is like a monkey who can only climb DOWN a tree. In fact neither the up monkey nor the down monkey is a viable creature. A real monkey must find food and escape his enemies and so must be able to incessantly climb up and down. A real mathematician must be able to generalise and specialise. ... There is, I think, a moral for the teacher. A teacher of traditional mathematics is in danger of becoming a down monkey, and a teacher of modern mathematics an up monkey. The down teacher dishing out one routine problem after another may never get off the ground, never attain any general idea. and the up teacher dishing out one definition after the other may never climb down from his verbiage, may never get down to solid ground, to something of tangible interest for his pupils.
From 'A Story With A Moral', Mathematical Gazette (Jun 1973), 57, No. 400, 86-87
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Climb (35)  |  Creature (233)  |  Danger (115)  |  Definition (221)  |  Down (456)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Escape (80)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Ground (217)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Real (149)  |  Routine (25)  |  Solid (116)  |  Something (719)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tree (246)  |  Up (5)  |  Verbiage (3)

A mile and a half from town, I came to a grove of tall cocoanut trees, with clean, branchless stems reaching straight up sixty or seventy feet and topped with a spray of green foliage sheltering clusters of cocoanuts—not more picturesque than a forest of colossal ragged parasols, with bunches of magnified grapes under them, would be. I once heard a grouty northern invalid say that a cocoanut tree might be poetical, possibly it was; but it looked like a feather-duster struck by lightning. I think that describes it better than a picture—and yet, without any question, there is something fascinating about a cocoanut tree—and graceful, too.
In Roughing It (1913), 184-85.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Clean (50)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Describe (128)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Feather (12)  |  Foliage (5)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grape (4)  |  Green (63)  |  Grove (5)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Look (582)  |  More (2559)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Say (984)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Something (719)  |  Spray (4)  |  Stem (31)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strike (68)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustable source of pure and exciting contemplations:— One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding
    “Tongues in trees—books in running brooks—
    Sermons in stones—and good in everything.”
Accustomed to trace the operations of general causes and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and uninquiring eye, perceives neither novelty nor beauty, he walks in the midst of wonders; every object which falls in his way elucidates some principle, affords some instruction and impresses him with a sense of harmony and order. Nor is it a mere passive pleasure which is thus communicated. A thousand questions are continually arising in his mind, a thousand objects of enquiry presenting themselves, which keep his faculties in constant exercise, and his thoughts perpetually on the wing, so that lassitude is excluded from his life, and that craving after artificial excitement and dissipation of the mind, which leads so many into frivolous, unworthy, and destructive pursuits, is altogether eradicated from his bosom.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arising (22)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Book (392)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Describe (128)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Running (61)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unworthy (18)  |  View (488)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wonder (236)

A parable: A man was examining the construction of a cathedral. He asked a stone mason what he was doing chipping the stones, and the mason replied, “I am making stones.” He asked a stone carver what he was doing. “I am carving a gargoyle.” And so it went, each person said in detail what they were doing. Finally he came to an old woman who was sweeping the ground. She said. “I am helping build a cathedral.”
...Most of the time each person is immersed in the details of one special part of the whole and does not think of how what they are doing relates to the larger picture.
[For example, in education, a teacher might say in the next class he was going to “explain Young's modulus and how to measure it,” rather than, “I am going to educate the students and prepare them for their future careers.”]
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Career (75)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Class (164)  |  Construction (112)  |  Detail (146)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Future (429)  |  Gargoyle (3)  |  Ground (217)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mason (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Parable (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Picture (143)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Relation (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Special (184)  |  Stone (162)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whole (738)  |  Woman (151)  |  Young (227)

A physician advised his patient that had sore eyes, that he should abstain from wine; but the patient said, “I think rather, sir, from wine and water; for I have often marked it in blue eyes, and I have seen water come forth, but never wine.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 52, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstain (7)  |  Advice (55)  |  Eye (419)  |  Marked (55)  |  Never (1087)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Sore (4)  |  Tear (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Wine (38)

A plain, reasonable working man supposes, in the old way which is also the common-sense way, that if there are people who spend their lives in study, whom he feeds and keeps while they think for him—then no doubt these men are engaged in studying things men need to know; and he expects of science that it will solve for him the questions on which his welfare, and that of all men, depends. He expects science to tell him how he ought to live: how to treat his family, his neighbours and the men of other tribes, how to restrain his passions, what to believe in and what not to believe in, and much else. And what does our science say to him on these matters?
It triumphantly tells him: how many million miles it is from the earth to the sun; at what rate light travels through space; how many million vibrations of ether per second are caused by light, and how many vibrations of air by sound; it tells of the chemical components of the Milky Way, of a new element—helium—of micro-organisms and their excrements, of the points on the hand at which electricity collects, of X rays, and similar things.
“But I don't want any of those things,” says a plain and reasonable man—“I want to know how to live.”
In 'Modern Science', Essays and Letters (1903), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Component (48)  |  Depend (228)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Ether (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Family (94)  |  Helium (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solve (130)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Sun (385)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Will (2355)  |  X-ray (37)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Build (204)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Continent (76)  |  Deep (233)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Far (154)  |  Horse (74)  |  Initial (17)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pack (5)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Ride (21)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sense (770)  |  Settle (19)  |  Space (500)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Travel (114)

A scientist reads many books in his lifetime, and knows he still has a lot to learn. A religious man barely reads one book, and thinks he knows everything.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Barely (5)  |  Book (392)  |  Everything (476)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Read (287)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Still (613)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (4)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cross (16)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  Door (93)  |  Down (456)  |  Five (16)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fully (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Pole (46)  |  Range (99)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roof (13)  |  Rose (34)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  Square (70)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stick (24)  |  Story (118)  |  Straight (73)  |  Strange (157)  |  Summer (54)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Tie (38)  |  Top (96)  |  Trail (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Yard (7)

A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is.
Essay, 'Mysticism and Logic' in Hibbert Journal (Jul 1914). Collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1919), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Eternal (110)  |  External (57)  |  Image (96)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Outside (141)  |  Regard (305)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Tyrant (9)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

A. R. Todd
Thinks he’s God.
N. F. Mott
Says he’s not.
Anonymous
Quoted by William Lord in The Times (22 Jan 1997), remarking on the competitiveness between the Physics and Chemistry Departments at the University of Cambridge.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Competitiveness (2)  |  Concern (228)  |  Department (92)  |  God (757)  |  Sir Nevill F. Mott (6)  |  Physics (533)  |  Say (984)  |  Lord Alexander R. Todd (5)  |  University (121)

About 85 per cent of my “thinking” time was spent getting into a position to think, to make a decision, to learn something I needed to know. Much more time went into finding or obtaining information than into digesting it. Hours went into the plotting of graphs... When the graphs were finished, the relations were obvious at once, but the plotting had to be done in order to make them so.
From article 'Man-Computer Symbiosis', in IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics (Mar 1960), Vol. HFE-1, 4-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (91)  |  Digesting (2)  |  Finding (30)  |  Finish (59)  |  Graph (7)  |  Hour (186)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Relation (157)  |  Something (719)  |  Spent (85)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)

About eight days ago I discovered that sulfur in burning, far from losing weight, on the contrary, gains it; it is the same with phosphorus; this increase of weight arises from a prodigious quantity of air that is fixed during combustion and combines with the vapors. This discovery, which I have established by experiments, that I regard as decisive, has led me to think that what is observed in the combustion of sulfur and phosphorus may well take place in the case of all substances that gain in weight by combustion and calcination; and I am persuaded that the increase in weight of metallic calxes is due to the same cause... This discovery seems to me one of the most interesting that has been made since Stahl and since it is difficult not to disclose something inadvertently in conversation with friends that could lead to the truth I have thought it necessary to make the present deposit to the Secretary of the Academy to await the time I make my experiments public.
Sealed note deposited with the Secretary of the French Academy 1 Nov 1772. Oeuvres de Lavoisier, Correspondance, Fasc. II. 1770-75 (1957), 389-90. Adapted from translation by A. N. Meldrum, The Eighteenth-Century Revolution in Science (1930), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Cause (541)  |  Combination (144)  |  Combine (57)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Due (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gain (145)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lead (384)  |  Letter (109)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Present (619)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Regard (305)  |  Something (719)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sulfur (5)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Weight (134)

About weak points [of the Origin] I agree. The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradations, my reason tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder.
Letter to Asa Gray, 8 or 9 February 1860. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1860 (1993), Vol. 8, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (112)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Known (454)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Reason (744)  |  Tell (340)  |  Weak (71)

Across the road from my cabin was a huge clear-cut—hundreds of acres of massive spruce stumps interspersed with tiny Douglas firs—products of what they call “Reforestation,” which I guess makes the spindly firs en masse a “Reforest,” which makes an individual spindly fir a “Refir,” which means you could say that Weyerhauser, who owns the joint, has Refir Madness, since they think that sawing down 200-foot-tall spruces and replacing them with puling 2-foot Refirs is no different from farming beans or corn or alfalfa. They even call the towering spires they wipe from the Earth's face forever a “crop”--as if they'd planted the virgin forest! But I'm just a fisherman and may be missing some deeper significance in their nomenclature and stranger treatment of primordial trees.
In David James Duncan, The River Why (1983), 71.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acre (12)  |  Bean (3)  |  Cabin (4)  |  Call (769)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Corn (19)  |  Crop (25)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deeper (4)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Douglas Fir (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Farming (8)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Forever (103)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Individual (404)  |  Joint (31)  |  Madness (33)  |  Massive (9)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missing (21)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Plant (294)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Product (160)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Road (64)  |  Sawing (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Significance (113)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Stump (3)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Towering (11)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Tree (246)  |  Virgin (9)

After that, I thought about what a proposition generally needs in order to be true and certain because, since I had just found one that I knew was such, I thought I should also know what this certainty consists in. Having noticed that there is nothing at all in the proposition “I think, therefore I am” [cogito ergo sum] which convinces me that I speak the truth, apart from the fact that I see very clearly that one has to exist in order to think, I judged that I could adopt as a general rule that those things we conceive very clearly and distinctly are all true. The only outstanding difficulty is in recognizing which ones we conceive distinctly.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convince (41)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sum (102)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)

After what has been premised, I think we may lay down the following Conclusions. First, It is plain Philosophers amuse themselves in vain, when they inquire for any natural efficient Cause, distinct from a Mind or Spirit. Secondly, Considering the whole Creation is the Workmanship of a wise and good Agent, it should seem to become Philosophers, to employ their Thoughts (contrary to what some hold) about the final Causes of Things: And I must confess, I see no reason, why pointing out the various Ends, to which natural Things are adapted and for which they were originally with unspeakable Wisdom contrived, should not be thought one good way of accounting for them, and altogether worthy a Philosopher.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [first published 1710], (1734), 126-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Agent (70)  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confess (42)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Creation (327)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Down (456)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vain (83)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Workmanship (7)

Again and again in reading even his [William Thomson] most abstract writings one is struck by the tenacity with which physical ideas control in him the mathematical form in which he expressed them. An instance of this is afforded by … an example of a mathematical result that is, in his own words, “not instantly obvious from the analytical form of my solution, but which we immediately see must be the case by thinking of the physical meaning of the result.”
As given in Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 1136. The ellipsis gives the reference to the quoted footnote, to a passage in his Mathematical and Physical Papers, Vol. 1, 457. [Note: William Thomson, later became Lord Kelvin. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Afford (17)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Control (167)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reading (133)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Understand (606)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

Alexander the king of the Macedonians, began like a wretch to learn geometry, that he might know how little the earth was, whereof he had possessed very little. Thus, I say, like a wretch for this, because he was to understand that he did bear a false surname. For who can be great in so small a thing? Those things that were delivered were subtile, and to be learned by diligent attention: not which that mad man could perceive, who sent his thoughts beyond the ocean sea. Teach me, saith he, easy things. To whom his master said: These things be the same, and alike difficult unto all. Think thou that the nature of things saith this. These things whereof thou complainest, they are the same unto all: more easy things can be given unto none; but whosoever will, shall make those things more easy unto himself. How? With uprightness of mind.
In Thomas Lodge (trans.), 'Epistle 91', The Workes of Lucius Annaeus Seneca: Both Morrall and Naturall (1614), 383. Also in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Alexander the Great (4)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Complain (8)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  False (100)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Possess (156)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Subtile (3)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Upright (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wretch (5)

All children are curious and I wonder by what process this trait becomes developed in some and suppressed in others. I suspect again that schools and colleges help in the suppression insofar as they meet curiosity by giving the answers, rather than by some method that leads from narrower questions to broader questions. It is hard to satisfy the curiosity of a child, and even harder to satisfy the curiosity of a scientist, and methods that meet curiosity with satisfaction are thus not apt to foster the development of the child into the scientist. I don't advocate turning all children into professional scientists, although I think there would be advantages if all adults retained something of the questioning attitude, if their curiosity were less easily satisfied by dogma, of whatever variety.
The Nature of Natural History (1950, 1990), 256-257.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Advocate (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Become (815)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  College (66)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Foster (12)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lead (384)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Process (423)  |  Professional (70)  |  Question (621)  |  Retain (56)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Suppression (9)  |  Variety (132)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wonder (236)

All that can accurately be said about a man who thinks he is a poached egg is that he is in the minority.
In Day the Universe Changed (1985), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Egg (69)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minority (21)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Thinking (414)

All the fifty years of conscious brooding have brought me no closer to answer the question, “What are light quanta?” Of course today every rascal thinks he knows the answer, but he is deluding himself.
(1951). Quoted in Raymond W. Lam, Seasonal Affective Disorder and Beyond (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Closer (43)  |  Course (409)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Photon (11)  |  Question (621)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Year (933)

All those who think it paradoxical that so great a weight as the earth should not waver or move anywhere seem to me to go astray by making their judgment with an eye to their own affects and not to the property of the whole. For it would not still appear so extraordinary to them, I believe, if they stopped to think that the earth's magnitude compared to the whole body surrounding it is in the ratio of a point to it. For thus it seems possible for that which is relatively least to be supported and pressed against from all sides equally and at the same angle by that which is absolutely greatest and homogeneous.
Ptolemy
'The Almagest 1', in Ptolemy: the Almagest; Nicolaus Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres; Johannes Kepler: Epitome of Copernican Astronomy: IV - V The Harmonies of the World: V, trans. R. Catesby Taliaferro (1952), 11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Astray (11)  |  Body (537)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equally (130)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Side (233)  |  Still (613)  |  Support (147)  |  Waver (2)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whole (738)

All you really need to know for the moment is that the universe is a lot more complicated than you might think, even if you start from a position of thinking it’s pretty damn complicated in the first place.
In Mostly Harmless (1992), 195.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Complicated (115)  |  First (1283)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Start (221)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Universe (857)

Almost all the world is natural chemicals, so it really makes you re-think everything. A cup of coffee is filled with chemicals. They've identified a thousand chemicals in a cup of coffee. But we only found 22 that have been tested in animal cancer tests out of this thousand. And of those, 17 are carcinogens. There are ten milligrams of known carcinogens in a cup of coffee and thats more carcinogens than youre likely to get from pesticide residues for a year!
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has delivered a similar statistic in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cup (7)  |  Everything (476)  |  Known (454)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Residue (9)  |  Test (211)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thousand (331)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Alphonse of Castile is reported to have said that if he had had the making of the universe he would have done it much better. And I think so too. Instead of making a man go through the degradation of faculties and death, he should continually improve with age, and then be translated from this world to a superior planet, where he should begin life with the knowledge gained here, and so on. That would be to my mind, as an old man, a more satisfactory way of conducting affairs
Address, in 'Report to the Chemical Society's Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, 493.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Continual (43)  |  Death (388)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Gain (145)  |  Improve (58)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Superior (81)  |  Through (849)  |  Translate (19)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Amazing that the human race has taken enough time out from thinking about food or sex to create the arts and sciences.
City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Create (235)  |  Enough (340)  |  Food (199)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)

Ampère was a mathematician of various resources & I think might rather be called excentric [sic] than original. He was as it were always mounted upon a hobby horse of a monstrous character pushing the most remote & distant analogies. This hobby horse was sometimes like that of a child ['s] made of heavy wood, at other times it resembled those [?] shapes [?] used in the theatre [?] & at other times it was like a hypogrif in a pantomime de imagie. He had a sort of faith in animal magnetism & has published some refined & ingenious memoirs to prove the identity of electricity & magnetism but even in these views he is rather as I said before excentric than original. He has always appeared to me to possess a very discursive imagination & but little accuracy of observation or acuteness of research.
'Davy’s Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 135-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Animal (617)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Child (307)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Faith (203)  |  Horse (74)  |  Identity (19)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Little (707)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Personality (62)  |  Possess (156)  |  Prove (250)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Wood (92)

An engineer [is] one of those people who make things work without even understanding how they function. … Today I would add: one of those people who are unable to make anything work, but think they know why it doesn’t function!
In 'Sundays in a Quantum Engineer’s Life', collected in Reinhold A. Bertlmann, A. Zeilinger (eds.),Quantum (Un)speakables: From Bell to Quantum Information (2002), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineer (121)  |  Function (228)  |  Functioning (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  People (1005)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

And above all things, never think that you’re not good enough yourself. A man should never think that. My belief is that in life people will take you at your own reckoning.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Enough (340)  |  Good (889)  |  Good Enough (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

And I believe there are many Species in Nature, which were never yet taken notice of by Man, and consequently of no use to him, which yet we are not to think were created in vain; but it’s likely … to partake of the overflowing Goodness of the Creator, and enjoy their own Beings. But though in this sense it be not true, that all things were made for Man; yet thus far it is, that all the Creatures in the World may be some way or other useful to us, at least to exercise our Wits and Understandings, in considering and contemplating of them, and so afford us Subject of Admiring and Glorifying their and our Maker. Seeing them, we do believe and assert that all things were in some sense made for us, we are thereby obliged to make use of them for those purposes for which they serve us, else we frustrate this End of their Creation.
John Ray
The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation (1691), 169-70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Creature (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Glorification (2)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notice (77)  |  Other (2236)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Vain (83)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)

And I do not take my medicines from the apothecaries; their shops are but foul sculleries, from which comes nothing but foul broths. As for you, you defend your kingdom with belly-crawling and flattery. How long do you think this will last? ... let me tell you this: every little hair on my neck knows more than you and all your scribes, and my shoebuckles are more learned than your Galen and Avicenna, and my beard has more experience than all your high colleges.
'Credo', in J. Jacobi (ed.), Paracelsus: Selected Writings (1951), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Avicenna (19)  |  Beard (7)  |  Broth (2)  |  College (66)  |  Defense (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experience (467)  |  Flattery (7)  |  Foul (15)  |  Galen (19)  |  Hair (25)  |  High (362)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Neck (15)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scribe (3)  |  Shop (11)  |  Tell (340)  |  Will (2355)

And so many think incorrectly that everything was created by the Creator in the beginning as it is seen, that not only the mountains, valleys, and waters, but also various types of minerals occurred together with the rest of the world, and therefore it is said that it is unnecessary to investigate the reasons why they differ in their internal properties and their locations. Such considerations are very dangerous for the growth of all the sciences, and hence for natural knowledge of the Earth, particularly the art of mining, though it is very easy for those clever people to be philosophers, having learnt by heart the three words 'God so created' and to give them in reply in place of all reasons.
About the Layers of the Earth and other Works on Geology (1757), trans. A. P. Lapov (1949), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Clever (38)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Differ (85)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  Geology (220)  |  God (757)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heart (229)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Location (15)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mining (18)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Together (387)  |  Type (167)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Valley (32)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

And we daily in our experiments electrise bodies plus or minus, as we think proper. [These terms we may use till your Philosophers give us better.] To electrise plus or minus, no more needs to be known than this, that the parts of the Tube or Sphere, that are rubb’d, do, in the Instant of Friction, attract the Electrical Fire, and therefore take it from the Thin rubbing; the same parts immediately, as the Friction upon them ceases, are disposed to give the fire they have received, to any Body that has less.
Letter 25 May 1747. Quoted in I. Bernard Cohen, Franklin and Newton: An Enquiry into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin’s Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof (1956), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Cease (79)  |  Daily (87)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Friction (14)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Known (454)  |  Minus (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plus (43)  |  Proper (144)  |  Spark (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defense (23)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Disrespect (3)  |  Drive (55)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Failure (161)  |  Former (137)  |  Full (66)  |  Help (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imply (17)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Local (19)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (353)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Range (99)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rich (62)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (58)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (326)  |  Spot (17)  |  Stem (31)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tide (34)  |  Tough (19)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Variation (90)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vary (27)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Forming (42)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Stream (81)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

Antiessentialist thinking forces us to view the world differently. We must accept shadings and continua as fundamental. We lose criteria for judgment by comparison to some ideal: short people, retarded people, people of other beliefs, colors, and religions are people of full status.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Belief (578)  |  Color (137)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Continua (3)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Differently (4)  |  Force (487)  |  Full (66)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Lose (159)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Religion (361)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Short (197)  |  Status (35)  |  Thinking (414)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

Anton Chekhov wrote that ‘one must not put a loaded rifle on stage if no one is thinking of firing it.’ Good drama requires spare and purposive action, sensible linking of potential causes with realized effects. Life is much messier; nothing happens most of the time. Millions of Americans (many hotheaded) own rifles (many loaded), but the great majority, thank God, do not go off most of the time. We spend most of real life waiting for Godot, not charging once more unto the breach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  American (46)  |  Breach (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Charge (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drama (21)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fire (189)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Load (11)  |  Majority (66)  |  Messy (6)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Potential (69)  |  Real Life (7)  |  Realize (147)  |  Require (219)  |  Rifle (2)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Spare (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Stage (143)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unto (8)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Write (230)

Anyone who thinks science is trying to make human life easier or more pleasant is utterly mistaken.
In 'Quotation Marks', New York Times (11 Oct 1931), XX2.
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easier (53)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mistaken (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Utterly (15)

Anyone who thinks we can continue to have world wars but make them nice polite affairs by outlawing this weapon or that should meditate upon the outlawing of the cross-bow by Papal authority. Setting up the machinery for international law and order must surely precede disarmament. The Wild West did not abandon its shooting irons till after sheriffs and courts were established.
Speech, American Library Assiciation Conference (3 Jul 1947), as quoted by Lawrence E. Davies in 'Army's Atomic Bid Viewed in Making', New York Times (4 Jul 1947), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Affair (29)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bow (14)  |  Continue (165)  |  Court (33)  |  Crossbow (2)  |  Disarmament (6)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Gun (9)  |  International (37)  |  Iron (96)  |  Law (894)  |  Law And Order (4)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nice (13)  |  Order (632)  |  Polite (9)  |  Pope (10)  |  Precede (23)  |  Setting (44)  |  Surely (101)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wild West (2)  |  World (1774)

Archimedes said Eureka,
Cos in English he weren't too aversed in,
when he discovered that the volume of a body in the bath,
is equal to the stuff it is immersed in,
That is the law of displacement,
Thats why ships don't sink,
Its a shame he weren't around in 1912,
The Titanic would have made him think.
From lyrics of song Sod’s Law.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (537)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Displacement (9)  |  English (35)  |  Equal (83)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Shame (14)  |  Ship (62)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Titanic (4)  |  Volume (19)  |  Why (491)

Are the humanistic and scientific approaches different? Scientists can calculate the torsion of a skyscraper at the wing-beat of a bird, or 155 motions of the Moon and 500 smaller ones in addition. They move in academic garb and sing logarithms. They say, “The sky is ours”, like priests in charge of heaven. We poor humanists cannot even think clearly, or write a sentence without a blunder, commoners of “common sense”. We never take a step without stumbling; they move solemnly, ever unerringly, never a step back, and carry bell, book, and candle.
Quoting himself in Stargazers and Gravediggers: Memoirs to Worlds in Collision (2012), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Addition (66)  |  Approach (108)  |  Back (390)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bell (35)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Candle (30)  |  Carry (127)  |  Charge (59)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Different (577)  |  Garb (6)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Humanist (7)  |  Humanistic (3)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Moon (237)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poor (136)  |  Priest (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Sing (26)  |  Sky (161)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Step (231)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Wing (75)  |  Write (230)

Aristotle’s opinion … that comets were nothing else than sublunary vapors or airy meteors … prevailed so far amongst the Greeks, that this sublimest part of astronomy lay altogether neglected; since none could think it worthwhile to observe, and to give an account of the wandering and uncertain paths of vapours floating in the Ether.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Comet (54)  |  Ether (35)  |  Greek (107)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Worthwhile (18)

As a net is made up of a series of ties, so everything in this world is connected by a series of ties. If anyone thinks that the mesh of a net is an independent, isolated thing, he is mistaken. It is called a net because it is made up of a series of a interconnected meshes, and each mesh has its place and responsibility in relation to other meshes.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 383.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Everything (476)  |  Independence (34)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Mesh (3)  |  Net (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Series (149)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tie (38)  |  Web Of Life (7)  |  World (1774)

As a scientist, I am not sure anymore that life can be reduced to a class struggle, to dialectical materialism, or any set of formulas. Life is spontaneous and it is unpredictable, it is magical. I think that we have struggled so hard with the tangible that we have forgotten the intangible.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anymore (5)  |  Class (164)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Formula (98)  |  Hard (243)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magic (86)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Unpredictable (17)

As a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.
From The Art of Living, Day by Day 91972), 77. Frequently misattributed to Henry David Thoreau.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Earth (996)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Path (144)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Physical (508)  |  Single (353)  |  Thought (953)  |  Walk (124)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

As agonizing a disease as cancer is, I do not think it can be said that our civilization is threatened by it. … But a very plausible case can be made that our civilization is fundamentally threatened by the lack of adequate fertility control. Exponential increases of population will dominate any arithmetic increases, even those brought about by heroic technological initiatives, in the availability of food and resources, as Malthus long ago realized.
From 'In Praise of Science and Technology', in Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science (1975, 2011), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Availability (10)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Control (167)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Domination (12)  |  Exponential (3)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Food (199)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Lack (119)  |  Long (790)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Population (110)  |  Realization (43)  |  Resource (63)  |  Technological (61)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Threat (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Will (2355)

As an empiricist I continue to think of the conceptual scheme of science as a tool, ultimately, for predicting future experience in the light of past experience. Physical objects are conceptually imported into the situation as convenient intermediaries—not by definition in terms of experience, but simply as irreducible posits comparable, epistemologically, to the gods of Homer. For my part I do, qua lay physicist, believe in physical objects and not in Homer's gods; and I consider it a scientific error to believe otherwise. But in point of epistemological footing the physical objects and the gods differ only in degree and not in kind. Both sorts of entities enter our conception only as cultural posits. The myth of physical objects is epistemologically superior to most in that it has proved more efficacious than other myths as a device for working a manageable structure into the flux of experience.
From A Logical Point of View (1953), 44. [Note: “qua” means “in the character or role of,” thus “qua lay physicist” means “in the role of lay physicist,” or perhaps even (?) “putting on my lay physicist hat.” —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continue (165)  |  Culture (143)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Device (70)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entity (35)  |  Epistemology (8)  |  Error (321)  |  Experience (467)  |  Flux (21)  |  Footing (2)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Homer (9)  |  Import (5)  |  Intermediary (2)  |  Kind (557)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myth (56)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Past (337)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Posit (2)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Situation (113)  |  Structure (344)  |  Superior (81)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Tool (117)  |  Ultimately (55)

As far as I see, such a theory [of the primeval atom] remains entirely outside any metaphysical or religious question. It leaves the materialist free to deny any transcendental Being. He may keep, for the bottom of space-time, the same attitude of mind he has been able to adopt for events occurring in non-singular places in space-time. For the believer, it removes any attempt to familiarity with God, as were Laplace’s chiquenaude or Jeans’ finger. It is consonant with the wording of Isaiah speaking of the “Hidden God” hidden even in the beginning of the universe … Science has not to surrender in face of the Universe and when Pascal tries to infer the existence of God from the supposed infinitude of Nature, we may think that he is looking in the wrong direction.
From 'The Primeval Atom Hypothesis and the Problem of Clusters of Galaxies', in R. Stoops (ed.), La Structure et l'Evolution de l'Univers (1958), 1-32. As translated in Helge Kragh, Cosmology and Controversy: The Historical Development of Two Theories of the Universe (1996), 60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bible (91)  |  Deny (66)  |  Direction (175)  |  Event (216)  |  Existence (456)  |  Face (212)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Sir James Jeans (33)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Looking (189)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outside (141)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remove (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Singular (23)  |  Space (500)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transcendental (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wrong (234)

As far as the meaning of life in general, or in the abstract, as far as I can see, there is none. If all of life were suddenly to disappear from earth and anywhere else it may exist, or if none had ever formed in the first place, I think the Universe would continue to exist without perceptible change. However, it is always possible for an individual to invest his own life with meaning that he can find significant. He can so order his life that he may find as much beauty and wisdom in it as he can, and spread as much of that to others as possible.
In a book proposal for The Meaning of Life edited by Hugh S. Moorhead, 1989.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Change (593)  |  Continue (165)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invest (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Significant (74)  |  Spread (83)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)

As regards religion, on the other hand, one is generally agreed that it deals with goals and evaluations and, in general, with the emotional foundation of human thinking and acting, as far as these are not predetermined by the inalterable hereditary disposition of the human species. Religion is concerned with man’s attitude toward nature at large, with the establishing of ideals for the individual and communal life, and with mutual human relationship. These ideals religion attempts to attain by exerting an educational influence on tradition and through the development and promulgation of certain easily accessible thoughts and narratives (epics and myths) which are apt to influence evaluation and action along the lines of the accepted ideals.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Agree (26)  |  Apt (9)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Certain (550)  |  Communal (7)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deal (188)  |  Development (422)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Easily (35)  |  Educational (7)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Epic (12)  |  Establish (57)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exert (39)  |  Far (154)  |  Foundation (171)  |  General (511)  |  Generally (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hereditary (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Species (9)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrative (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predetermined (3)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religion (361)  |  Species (401)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Toward (45)  |  Tradition (69)

As the brain of man is the speck of dust in the universe that thinks, so the leaves—the fern and the needled pine and the latticed frond and the seaweed ribbon—perceive the light in a fundamental and constructive sense. … Their leaves see the light, as my eyes can never do. … They impound its stellar energy, and with that force they make life out of the elements.
In Flowering Earth (1939), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fern (9)  |  Force (487)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pine (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speck (23)  |  Star (427)  |  Universe (857)

As to a perfect Science of natural Bodies … we are, I think, so far from being capable of any such thing that I conclude it lost labour to seek after it.
In 'Extent of Human Knowledge', An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1700), Book 4, 335.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Capable (168)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lost (34)  |  Natural (796)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physics (533)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Thing (1915)

As to the position of the earth, then, this is the view which some advance, and the views advanced concerning its rest or motion are similar. For here too there is no general agreement. All who deny that the earth lies at the centre think that it revolves about the centre, and not the earth only but, as we said before, the counter-earth as well. Some of them even consider it possible that there are several bodies so moving, which are invisible to us owing to the interposition of the earth. This, they say, accounts for the fact that eclipses of the moon are more frequent than eclipses of the sun; for in addition to the earth each of these moving bodies can obstruct it.
Aristotle
On the Heavens, 293b, 15-25. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 1, 483.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Addition (66)  |  Advance (280)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Consider (416)  |  Deny (66)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Lie (364)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Owing (39)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rest (280)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Say (984)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Sun (385)  |  View (488)

Ask a scientist what he conceives the scientific method to be, and he will adopt an expression that is at once solemn and shifty eyed: solemn because he feels he ought to declare an opinion; shifty eyed because he is wondering how to conceal the fact that he has no opinion to declare. If taunted he would probably mumble something about “Induction” and “Establishing the Laws of Nature”, but if anyone working in a laboratory professed to be trying to establish the Laws of Nature by induction, we should think he was overdue for leave.
From a Jayne Lecture (1968), 'Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought', printed in Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society (1969), Vol. 75. Lecture republished as Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (2009), 11. Also included in Peter Medawar, Pluto’s Republic (1984), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Declare (45)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Induction (77)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Profess (20)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Something (719)  |  Trying (144)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondering (3)

Astronomy was thus the cradle of the natural sciences and the starting point of geometrical theories. The stars themselves gave rise to the concept of a ‘point’; triangles, quadrangles and other geometrical figures appeared in the constellations; the circle was realized by the disc of the sun and the moon. Thus in an essentially intuitive fashion the elements of geometrical thinking came into existence.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Circle (110)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Disk (3)  |  Element (310)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Figure (160)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Give (202)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Moon (237)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Quadrangle (2)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Triangle (18)

At first it seems obvious, but the more you think about it the stranger the deductions from this axiom seem to become; in the end you cease to understand what is meant by it.
As quoted, without citation, in Stories about Sets (1968), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Become (815)  |  Cease (79)  |  Deduction (82)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strange (157)  |  Understand (606)

At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable. Heaven forfend me from Lamarck nonsense of a “tendency to progression”, “adaptations from the slow willing of animals”, &c! But the conclusions I am led to are not widely different from his; though the means of change are wholly so. I think I have found out (here’s presumption!) the simple way by which species become exquisitely adapted to various ends.
Letter to Sir Joseph Hooker (11 Jan 1844). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 173-174.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Progression (23)  |  Simple (406)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Start (221)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Willing (44)

At the age of three I began to look around my grandfather’s library. My first knowledge of astronomy came from reading and looking at pictures at that time. By the time I was six I remember him buying books for me. … I think I was eight, he bought me a three-inch telescope on a brass mounting. … So, as far back as I can remember, I had an early interest in science in general, astronomy in particular.
Oral History Transcript of interview with Dr. Jesse Greenstein by Paul Wright (31 Jul 1974), on website of American Institute of Physics.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Book (392)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Library (48)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Particular (76)  |  Picture (143)  |  Reading (133)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Time (1877)

At the beginning of this debate Stephen [Hawking] said that he thinks that he is a positivist, whereas I am a Platonist. I am happy with him being a positivist, but I think that the crucial point here is, rather, that I am a realist. Also, if one compares this debate with the famous debate of Bohr and Einstein, some seventy years ago, I should think that Stephen plays the role of Bohr, whereas I play Einstein's role! For Einstein argued that there should exist something like a real world, not necessarily represented by a wave function, whereas Bohr stressed that the wave function doesn't describe a 'real' microworld but only 'knowledge' that is useful for making predictions.
Debate at the Isaac Newton Institute of the Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University (1994), transcribed in Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose, The Nature of Space and Time (1996), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Compare (69)  |  Debate (38)  |  Describe (128)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Exist (443)  |  Function (228)  |  Happy (105)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Microworld (2)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Point (580)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Represent (155)  |  Role (86)  |  Something (719)  |  Stress (22)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wave (107)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Basic research at universities comes in two varieties: research that requires big bucks and research that requires small bucks. Big bucks research is much like government research and in fact usually is government research but done for the government under contract. Like other government research, big bucks academic research is done to understand the nature and structure of the universe or to understand life, which really means that it is either for blowing up the world or extending life, whichever comes first. Again, that's the government's motivation. The universities' motivation for conducting big bucks research is to bring money in to support professors and graduate students and to wax the floors of ivy-covered buildings. While we think they are busy teaching and learning, these folks are mainly doing big bucks basic research for a living, all the while priding themselves on their terrific summer vacations and lack of a dress code.
Smalls bucks research is the sort of thing that requires paper and pencil, and maybe a blackboard, and is aimed primarily at increasing knowledge in areas of study that don't usually attract big bucks - that is, areas that don't extend life or end it, or both. History, political science, and romance languages are typically small bucks areas of basic research. The real purpose of small bucks research to the universities is to provide a means of deciding, by the quality of their small bucks research, which professors in these areas should get tenure.
Accidental Empires (1992), 78.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Code (31)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Government (110)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  History (673)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Money (170)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Political (121)  |  Political Science (2)  |  Professor (128)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Romance (15)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Summer (54)  |  Support (147)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  University (121)  |  Usually (176)  |  Wax (13)  |  World (1774)

Basic research may seem very expensive. I am a well-paid scientist. My hourly wage is equal to that of a plumber, but sometimes my research remains barren of results for weeks, months or years and my conscience begins to bother me for wasting the taxpayer’s money. But in reviewing my life’s work, I have to think that the expense was not wasted.
Basic research, to which we owe everything, is relatively very cheap when compared with other outlays of modern society. The other day I made a rough calculation which led me to the conclusion that if one were to add up all the money ever spent by man on basic research, one would find it to be just about equal to the money spent by the Pentagon this past year.
In The Crazy Ape (1971).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Barren (30)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Begin (260)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modern (385)  |  Money (170)  |  Month (88)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Past (337)  |  Plumber (10)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  Spent (85)  |  Week (70)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Be of good cheer. Do not think of today’s failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow. You have set yourself a difficult task, but you will succeed if you persevere; and you will find a joy in overcoming obstacles.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Joy (107)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Persevere (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Task (147)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Will (2355)

Bees are not as busy as we think they are. They jest can’t buzz any slower.
As quoted in Henry Wysham Lanier, The Golden Book Magazine (1931), Vol. 13, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (40)  |  Busy (28)  |  Buzz (3)  |  Can’t (9)  |  Jest (4)  |  Slow (101)

Bees are not as busy as we think they are. They jest can’t buzz any slower.
As quoted in Henry Wysham Lanier, The Golden Book Magazine (1931), Vol. 13, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (40)

Bees are not as busy as we think they are. They jest can’t buzz any slower.
As quoted in Henry Wysham Lanier, The Golden Book Magazine (1931), Vol. 13, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (40)

Behold the mighty dinosaur,
Famous in prehistoric lore,
Not only for his power and strength
But for his intellectual length.
You will observe by these remains
The creature had two sets of brains—
One in his head (the usual place),
The other at his spinal base.
Thus he could reason 'A priori'
As well as 'A posteriori'.
No problem bothered him a bit
He made both head and tail of it.
So wise was he, so wise and solemn,
Each thought filled just a spinal column.
If one brain found the pressure strong
It passed a few ideas along.
If something slipped his forward mind
'Twas rescued by the one behind.
And if in error he was caught
He had a saving afterthought.
As he thought twice before he spoke
He had no judgment to revoke.
Thus he could think without congestion
Upon both sides of every question.
Oh, gaze upon this model beast
Defunct ten million years at least.
'The Dinosaur: A Poem' (1912). In E. H. Colbert (ed.), The Dinosaur Book (1951), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  A Posteriori (2)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Base (117)  |  Beast (55)  |  Behind (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Bother (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Congestion (2)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Error (321)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Head (81)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Power (746)  |  Prehistoric (10)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Solemnity (5)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Spinal Column (2)  |  Spine (9)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Tail (18)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Twice (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Year (933)

Being a fish out of water is tough, but that’s how you evolve. I think that’s scientifically accurate—I don’t know, I had a liberal arts education.
From Commencement Speech (22 May 2017) at Grinnell College, Iowa. As quoted in Jeff Charis-Carlson, 'Comedian Kumail Nanjiani offers advice for Grinnell grads, takes on Steve King', Des Moines Register (22 May 2017).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Education (378)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Know (1518)  |  Liberal Arts (5)  |  Tough (19)  |  Water (481)

Believe me, this planet has put up with much worse than us. It’s been through earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, solar flares, sun-spots, magnetic storms, pole reversals, planetary floods, worldwide fires, tidal waves, wind and water erosion, cosmic rays, ice ages, and hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets, asteroids, and meteors. And people think a few plastic bags and aluminum cans are going to make a difference?
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 97.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Bombardment (3)  |  Comet (54)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmic Ray (7)  |  Difference (337)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Environment (216)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Meteor (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Plastic Bag (2)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Pole (46)  |  Ray (114)  |  Solar Flare (2)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunspot (5)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tidal Wave (2)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wind (128)  |  Worldwide (16)  |  Worse (24)  |  Year (933)

BRAIN, n. An apparatus with which we think that we think. That which distinguishes the man who is content to be something from the man who wishes to do something. A man of great wealth, or one who has been pitchforked into high station, has commonly such a headful of brain that his neighbors cannot keep their hats on. In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, brain is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  41.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Brain (270)  |  Care (186)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exemption (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Honor (54)  |  Humour (116)  |  Man (2251)  |  Office (71)  |  Pitchfork (2)  |  Reward (68)  |  Something (719)  |  Station (29)  |  Wealth (94)

Building goes on briskly at the therapeutic Tower of Babel; what one recommends another condemns; what one gives in large doses another scarce dares to prescribe in small doses; and what one vaunts as a novelty another thinks not worth rescuing from merited oblivion. All is confusion, contradiction, inconceivable chaos. Every country, every place, almost every doctor, have their own pet remedies, without which they imagine their patients can not be cured; and all this changes every year, aye every mouth.
Weekly Medical Gazette, of Vienna
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Babel (3)  |  Briskly (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Cure (122)  |  Dare (50)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Dose (16)  |  Give (202)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Large (394)  |  Merit (50)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Patient (199)  |  Pet (8)  |  Place (177)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Small (477)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Tower (42)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

But as no two (theoreticians) agree on this (skin friction) or any other subject, some not agreeing today with what they wrote a year ago, I think we might put down all their results, add them together, and then divide by the number of mathematicians, and thus find the average coefficient of error. (1908)
In Artificial and Natural Flight (1908), 3. Quoted in John David Anderson, Jr., Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dynamics (2000), 335.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Average (82)  |  Coefficient (5)  |  Divide (75)  |  Down (456)  |  Error (321)  |  Find (998)  |  Friction (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Result (677)  |  Skin (47)  |  Subject (521)  |  Today (314)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

But by far the greatest obstacle to the progress of science and to the undertaking of new tasks and provinces therein is found in this—that men despair and think things impossible.
Translation of Novum Organum, CIX. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |  Despair (40)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  New (1216)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Province (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Approach (108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Daily (87)  |  Development (422)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genus (25)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Physical (508)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (89)  |  Recent (77)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Series (149)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  System (537)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  Word (619)

But the idea that any of the lower animals have been concerned in any way with the origin of man—is not this degrading? Degrading is a term, expressive of a notion of the human mind, and the human mind is liable to prejudices which prevent its notions from being invariably correct. Were we acquainted for the first time with the circumstances attending the production of an individual of our race, we might equally think them degrading, and be eager to deny them, and exclude them from the admitted truths of nature.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deny (66)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Expressive (6)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Lower (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Production (183)  |  Race (268)  |  Term (349)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)

But we have reason to think that the annihilation of work is no less a physical impossibility than its creation, that is, than perpetual motion.
'On the Change of Refrangibility of Light' (1852). In Mathematical and Physical Papers (1901), Vol. 3, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Creation (327)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Motion (310)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reason (744)  |  Work (1351)

But, but, but … if anybody says he can think about quantum theory without getting giddy it merely shows that he hasn’t understood the first thing about it!
Quoted in Otto R. Frisch, What Little I Remember (1979), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  First (1283)  |  Merely (316)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)

Can one think that because we are engineers, beauty does not preoccupy us or that we do not try to build beautiful, as well as solid and long lasting structures? Aren’t the genuine functions of strength always in keeping with unwritten conditions of harmony? … Besides, there is an attraction, a special charm in the colossal to which ordinary theories of art do not apply.
As translated in Henry Petroski, Remaking the World: Adventures in Engineering (1998), 173. From the original French in interview of Eiffel by Paul Bourde, in the newspaper Le Temps (14 Feb 1887). Quoted in 'Au Jour le Jour: Les Artistes Contre la Tour Eiffel', Gazette Anecdotique, Littéraire, Artistique et Bibliographique (Feb 1887), 126, and in Gustave Eiffel, Travaux Scientifiques Exécutés à la Tour de 300 Mètres de 1889 à 1900 (1900), 14. “Parce que nous sommes des ingénieurs, croit-on donc que la beauté ne nous préoccupe pas dans nos constructions et qu'en même temps que nous faisons solide et durable nous ne nous efforçons pas rletfaire élégant? Est-ce que les véritables conditions de la force ne sont pas toujours conformes aux conditions secrètes de l'harmonie?.… Il y a du reste dans le colossal une attraction, un charme propre auxquels les théories d'art ordinaires ne sont guère applicables.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Art (657)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Build (204)  |  Charm (51)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Condition (356)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eiffel Tower (12)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Function (228)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Long (790)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Preoccupy (4)  |  Solid (116)  |  Special (184)  |  Strength (126)  |  Structure (344)  |  Try (283)

Can the cultural evolution of higher ethical values gain a direction and momentum of its own and completely replace genetic evolution? I think not. The genes hold culture an a leash. The leash is very long, but inevitably values will be constrained in accordance with their effects in the human gene pool. The brain is a product of evolution. Human behaviour—like the deepest capacities for emotional response which drive and guide it—is the circuitous technique by which human genetic material has been and will be kept intact. Morality has no other demonstrable ultimate function.
In On Human Nature (1978), 167. In William Andrew Rottschaefer, The Biology and Psychology of Moral Agency (1998), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Brain (270)  |  Completely (135)  |  Culture (143)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effect (393)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Function (228)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intact (8)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Morality (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Product (160)  |  Response (53)  |  Technique (80)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

CARTESIAN, adj. Relating to Descartes, a famous philosopher, author of the celebrated dictum, Cogito, ergo sum—whereby he was pleased to suppose he demonstrated the reality of human existence. The dictum might be improved, however, thus: Cogito ergo cogito sum—'I think that I think, therefore I think that I am;' as close an approach to certainty as any philosopher has yet made.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  46-47.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Author (167)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Certainty (174)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Existence (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humour (116)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reality (261)  |  Sum (102)  |  Suppose (156)

Cavendish gave me once some bits of platinum for my experiments, and came to see my results on the decomposition of the alkalis, and seemed to take an interest in them; but he encouraged no intimacy with any one, and received nobody at his own house. … He was acute, sagacious, and profound, and, I think, the most accomplished British philosopher of his time.
As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acute (7)  |  Alkali (6)  |  British (41)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Give (202)  |  House (140)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Platinum (6)  |  Profound (104)  |  Receive (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Time (1877)

Cavendish was a great Man with extraordinary singularities—His voice was squeaking his manner nervous He was afraid of strangers & seemed when embarrassed to articulate with difficulty—He wore the costume of our grandfathers. Was enormously rich but made no use of his wealth... He Cavendish lived latterly the life of a solitary, came to the Club dinner & to the Royal Society: but received nobody at his home. He was acute sagacious & profound & I think the most accomplished British Philosopher of his time.
Quoted in J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 133.
Science quotes on:  |  British (41)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Great (1574)  |  Home (170)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Profound (104)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Wealth (94)

Charlie Holloway (human): “What we hoped to achieve was to meet our makers. To get answers. Why they even made us in the first place.”
David (AI robot): “Why do you think your people made me?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “We made you because we could.”
David (AI robot): “Can you imagine how disappointing it would be for you to hear the same thing from your creator?”
Charlie Holloway (human): “I guess it’s good you can’t be disappointed.”
Prometheus (2012)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Creator (91)  |  David (6)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Maker (34)  |  Meet (31)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Robot (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Why (491)

Children are told that an apple fell on Isaac Newton’s head and he was led to state the law of gravity. This, of course, is pure foolishness. What Newton discovered was that any two particles in the universe attract each other with a force that is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This is not learned from a falling apple, but by observing quantities of data and developing a mathematical theory that can be verified by additional data. Data gathered by Galileo on falling bodies and by Johannes Kepler on motions of the planets were invaluable aids to Newton. Unfortunately, such false impressions about science are not universally outgrown like the Santa Claus myth, and some people who don’t study much science go to their graves thinking that the human race took until the mid-seventeenth century to notice that objects fall.
In How to Tell the Liars from the Statisticians (1983), 127.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  17th Century (16)  |  Additional (6)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apple (40)  |  Attract (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Course (409)  |  Data (156)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  False (100)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Foolishness (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Gather (72)  |  Grave (52)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Impression (114)  |  Invaluable (11)  |  Inversely Proportional (7)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myth (56)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Product (160)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Race (268)  |  Santa Claus (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Square (70)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Universe (857)  |  Verify (23)

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.
In 'Education for Choice', Coming of Age in Samoa (1928, 1961), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Must (1526)  |  Teach (277)

Common Sense and Education: The more you think you have of one, the less you think you need of the other.
In The Well-Spoken Thesaurus (2011), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Education (378)  |  Less (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sense (770)

Conflicts between men are almost always a matter of frontiers. The astronauts now have destroyed what looked like an unsurmountable frontier. They have shown us that we cannot any longer think in limited terms. There are no limitations left. We can think in terms of the universe now.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Insurmountable (3)  |  Leave (130)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Limited (101)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Universe (857)

Cosmology does, I think, affect the way that we perceive humanity’s role in nature. One thing we’ve learnt from astronomy is that the future lying ahead is more prolonged than the past. Even our sun is less than halfway through its life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affect (19)  |  Ahead (19)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Future (429)  |  Halfway (2)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Learn (629)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lying (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Past (337)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prolonged (6)  |  Role (86)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Appear (118)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complication (29)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contour (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curve (49)  |  Defined (4)  |  Derivative (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Distance (161)  |  Draw (137)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (6)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Function (228)  |  Glass (92)  |  Hear (139)  |  Increase (210)  |  Involve (90)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Magnifying Glass (3)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Prohibit (3)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (267)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Tangent (6)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Use (766)  |  White (127)

Dad [Walter C. Alvarez] … advised me to sit every few months in my reading chair for an entire evening, close my eyes and try to think of new problems to solve. I took his advice very seriously and have been glad ever since that he did.
In Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Chair (24)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evening (12)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Gladness (5)  |  Month (88)  |  New (1216)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reading (133)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Try (283)

Debate is an art form. It is about the winning of arguments. It is not about the discovery of truth. There are certain rules and procedures to debate that really have nothing to do with establishing fact–which creationists have mastered. Some of those rules are: never say anything positive about your own position because it can be attacked, but chip away at what appear to be the weaknesses in your opponent’s position. They are good at that. I don’t think I could beat the creationists at debate. I can tie them. But in courtrooms they are terrible, because in courtrooms you cannot give speeches. In a courtroom you have to answer direct questions about the positive status of your belief. We destroyed them in Arkansas. On the second day of the two-week trial we had our victory party!
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appear (118)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Beat (41)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chip (4)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Debate (38)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Establish (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Master (178)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Party (18)  |  Position (77)  |  Positive (94)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Question (621)  |  Really (78)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Speech (61)  |  Status (35)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Tie (38)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Victory (39)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Week (70)  |  Win (52)  |  Winning (19)

Descartes said, “I think; therefore I am.” The philosophic evolutionist reverses and negatives the epigram. He says, “I am not; therefore I cannot think.”
In Orthodoxy (1918, 2008), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Negative (63)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)

Descartes' immortal conclusion cogito ergo sum was recently subjected to destruction testing by a group of graduate researchers at Princeton led by Professors Montjuic and Lauterbrunnen, and now reads, in the Shorter Harvard Orthodoxy:
(a) I think, therefore I am; or
(b) Perhaps I thought, therefore I was; but
(c) These days, I tend to leave that side of things to my wife.
Tom Holt
Ye Gods! (1992), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Logic (287)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  Professor (128)  |  Read (287)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wife (41)

Distrust even Mathematics; albeit so sublime and highly perfected, we have here a machine of such delicacy it can only work in vacuo, and one grain of sand in the wheels is enough to put everything out of gear. One shudders to think to what disaster such a grain of sand may bring a Mathematical brain. Remember Pascal.
The Garden of Epicurus (1894) translated by Alfred Allinson, in The Works of Anatole France in an English Translation (1920), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Distrust (10)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Grain (50)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Remember (179)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)

Do not enter upon research unless you can not help it. Ask yourself the “why” of every statement that is made and think out your own answer. If through your thoughtful work you get a worthwhile idea, it will get you. The force of the conviction will compel you to forsake all and seek the relief of your mind in research work.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted in J.B. Collip 'Frederick Grant Banting, Discoverer of Insulin', The Scientific Monthly (May 1941), 52, No. 5, 473.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Compel (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Force (487)  |  Forsake (4)  |  Help (105)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Relief (30)  |  Research (664)  |  Seek (213)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthwhile (18)

Doctors think a lot of patients are cured who have simply quit in disgust.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (122)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Lot (151)  |  Patient (199)  |  Quit (10)  |  Simply (53)

Does the harmony the human intelligence thinks it discovers in nature exist outside of this intelligence? No, beyond doubt, a reality completely independent of the mind which conceives it, sees or feels it, is an impossibility.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feel (367)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outside (141)  |  Reality (261)  |  See (1081)

Don’t think of organ donations as giving up part of yourself to keep a total stranger alive. It’s really a total stranger giving up almost all of themselves to keep part of you alive.
Anonymous
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Give (202)  |  Keep (101)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organ Donation (3)  |  Part (222)  |  Really (78)  |  Strange (157)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Total (94)

Doubly galling was the fact that at the same time my roommate was taking a history course … filled with excitement over a class discussion. … I was busy with Ampere’s law. We never had any fascinating class discussions about this law. No one, teacher or student, ever asked me what I thought about it.
In Understanding the Universe: An Inquiry Approach to Astronomy and the Nature of Scientific Research (2013), ix.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Class (164)  |  Course (409)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  History (673)  |  Law (894)  |  Never (1087)  |  Roommate (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fail (185)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Dr. Wallace, in his Darwinism, declares that he can find no ground for the existence of pure scientists, especially mathematicians, on the hypothesis of natural selection. If we put aside the fact that great power in theoretical science is correlated with other developments of increasing brain-activity, we may, I think, still account for the existence of pure scientists as Dr. Wallace would himself account for that of worker-bees. Their function may not fit them individually to survive in the struggle for existence, but they are a source of strength and efficiency to the society which produces them.
In Grammar of Science (1911), Part, 1, 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Activity (210)  |  Bee (40)  |  Brain (270)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Darwinism (3)  |  Declare (45)  |  Development (422)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Especially (31)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individually (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Produce (104)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Selection (128)  |  Society (326)  |  Source (93)  |  Still (613)  |  Strength (126)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survive (79)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Alfred Russel Wallace (40)

During my eighty-seven years I have witnessed a whole succession of technological revolutions. But none of them has done away with the need for character in the individual or the ability to think.
From My Own Story (1957), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Character (243)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Individual (404)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Succession (77)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Whole (738)  |  Witness (54)  |  Year (933)

D’you know how embarrassing it is to mention good and evil in a scientific laboratory? Have you any idea? One of the reasons l became a scientist was not to have to think about that kind of thing.
Spoken by character Dr. Malone in His Dark Materials Omnibus (2012), 370.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Evil (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Good And Evil (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mention (82)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)

Edward [Teller] isn’t the cloistered kind of scientist. He gets his ideas in conversation and develops them by trying them out on people. We were coming back from Europe on the Ile de France and I was standing in the ship’s nightclub when he came up and said, 'Freddie, I think I have an idea.’ It was something he’d just thought of about magnetohydrodynamics. I was a bachelor then and I’d located several good-looking girls on the ship, but I knew what I had to do, so I disappeared and started working on the calculations. I’d get something finished and start prowling on the deck again when Edward would turn up out of the night and we’d walk the deck together while he talked and I was the brick wall he was bouncing these things off of. By the end of the trip we had a paper. He’d had the ideas, and I’d done some solving of equations. But he insisted that we sign in alphabetical order, which put my name first.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Bounce (2)  |  Brick (18)  |  Brick Wall (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Equation (132)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insist (20)  |  Kind (557)  |  Looking (189)  |  Name (333)  |  Order (632)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Reclusive (2)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Ship (62)  |  Solve (130)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Edward Teller (44)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wall (67)

Egad, I think the interpreter is the hardest to be understood of the two!
In 'The Critic: Or, A Tragedy Rehearsed', Act 1, Scene 2, as collected in Thomas Moore (ed.), The Works of the Late Right Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1833), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

Einstein’s results again turned the tables and now very few philosophers or scientists still think that scientific knowledge is, or can be, proven knowledge.
In 'Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes', in I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave (eds.), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge: Proceedings of the International Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, London 1965 (1970), Vol. 4, 92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Prove (250)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Knowledge (9)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Still (613)  |  Table (104)  |  Turn (447)

Encryption...is a powerful defensive weapon for free people. It offers a technical guarantee of privacy, regardless of who is running the government... It’s hard to think of a more powerful, less dangerous tool for liberty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Defensive (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Government (110)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Hard (243)  |  Less (103)  |  Liberty (25)  |  More (2559)  |  Offer (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Privacy (7)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  Technical (43)  |  Tool (117)  |  Weapon (92)

Engineers think that equations approximate the real world.
Physicists think that the real world approximates equations.
Mathematicians are unable to make the connection.
Anonymous
In Jon Fripp, Michael Fripp and Deborah Fripp, Speaking of Science (2000), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Connection (162)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Equation (132)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Real World (14)  |  Unable (24)  |  World (1774)

Euclid always contemplates a straight line as drawn between two definite points, and is very careful to mention when it is to be produced beyond this segment. He never thinks of the line as an entity given once for all as a whole. This careful definition and limitation, so as to exclude an infinity not immediately apparent to the senses, was very characteristic of the Greeks in all their many activities. It is enshrined in the difference between Greek architecture and Gothic architecture, and between Greek religion and modern religion. The spire of a Gothic cathedral and the importance of the unbounded straight line in modern Geometry are both emblematic of the transformation of the modern world.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Definite (110)  |  Definition (221)  |  Difference (337)  |  Draw (137)  |  Enshrine (2)  |  Entity (35)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gothic (4)  |  Greek (107)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Importance (286)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Line (91)  |  Mention (82)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Modern World (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Religion (361)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spire (5)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Even if I could be Shakespeare I think that I should still choose to be Faraday.
In 1925, attributed. Walter M. Elsasser, Memoirs of a Physicist in the Atomic Age (1978), epigraph.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Still (613)

Even if only one in a hundred of the ten billion suitable planets has actually got life well under way, there would be more than 100 million such planets. No, it is presumptuous to think that we are alone.
In The View From a Distant Star: Man's Future in the Universe (1964), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Billion (95)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Life (1795)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Planet (356)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Way (1217)

Every good thought you think is contributing its share to the ultimate result of your life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Contribute (27)  |  Good (889)  |  Life (1795)  |  Result (677)  |  Share (75)  |  Thought (953)  |  Ultimate (144)

Every Man being conscious to himself, That he thinks, and that which his Mind is employ'd about whilst thinking, being the Ideas, that are there, 'tis past doubt, that Men have in their Minds several Ideas, such as are those expressed by the words, Whiteness, Hardness, Sweetness, Thinking, Motion, Man, Elephant, Army, Drunkenness, and others: It is in the first place then to be inquired, How he comes by them? I know it is a received Doctrine, That Men have native Ideas, and original Characters stamped upon their Minds, in their very first Being.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 1, Section 1, 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Employ (113)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Native (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Sweetness (12)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Word (619)

Every man has some forte something he can do better than he can do anything else. Many men, however, never find the job they are best fitted for. And often this is because they do not think enough. Too many men drift lazily into any job, suited or unsuited for them; and when they don’t get along well they blame everybody and everything except themselves.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Blame (30)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drift (13)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forte (3)  |  Job (82)  |  Lazy (9)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Something (719)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinking (414)

Every natural scientist who thinks with any degree of consistency at all will, I think, come to the view that all those capacities that we understand by the phrase psychic activities (Seelenthiitigkeiten) are but functions of the brain substance; or, to express myself a bit crudely here, that thoughts stand in the same relation to the brain as gall does to the liver or urine to the kidneys. To assume a soul that makes use of the brain as an instrument with which it can work as it pleases is pure nonsense; we would then be forced to assume a special soul for every function of the body as well.
Carl Vogt
In Physiologische Briefe für Gelbildete aIle Stünde (1845-1847), 3 parts, 206. as translated in Frederick Gregory, Scientific Materialism in Nineteenth Century Germany (1977), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Crude (31)  |  Degree (276)  |  Express (186)  |  Function (228)  |  Gall (3)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Liver (19)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Please (65)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soul (226)  |  Special (184)  |  Stand (274)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Every science thinks it is the science.
Anonymous
In Leonard and Thelma Spinrad, Speaker's Lifetime Library (1979), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Quip (80)  |  Science (3879)

Everyone believes in the law of errors, the experimenters because they think it is a mathematical theorem, and the mathematicians because they think it is an experimental fact.
Remark to Henri Poincaré about the Gaussian curve. From the original French, “Les expérimentateurs s’imaginent que c’est un théorème de mathématique, et les mathématiciens d’être un fait expérimental”, in Henri Poincaré, Calcul des Probabilités (1896), 149. Poincaré introduces it as, “me disait un jour M. Lippmann” (Mr. Lippman told me one day). Quote above as translated in F. Downton, 'Review: Nonparametric Methods in Statistics', The Mathematical Gazette (Feb 1959), 43, No. 343, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (321)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Normal (28)  |  Theorem (112)

Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Himself (461)  |  World (1774)

Expertise in one field does not carry over into other fields. But experts often think so. The narrower their field of knowledge the more likely they are to think so.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 367.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Expert (65)  |  Expertise (8)  |  Field (364)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrowness (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Thinking (414)

Faced with a new mutation in an organism, or a fundamental change in its living conditions, the biologist is frequently in no position whatever to predict its future prospects. He has to wait and see. For instance, the hairy mammoth seems to have been an admirable animal, intelligent and well-accoutered. Now that it is extinct, we try to understand why it failed. I doubt that any biologist thinks he could have predicted that failure. Fitness and survival are by nature estimates of past performance.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Hairy (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Performance (48)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Prospect (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Survival (94)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)

Faraday thinks from day to day, against a background of older thinking, and anticipating new facts of tomorrow. In other words, he thinks in three dimensions of time; past, present, and future.
In 'The Scientific Grammar of Michael Faraday’s Diaries', Part I, 'The Classic of Science', A Classic and a Founder (1937), collected in Rosenstock-Huessy Papers (1981), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Background (43)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Future (429)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Past Present and Future (2)  |  Present (619)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Word (619)

FAUSTUS: How many heavens or spheres are there?
MEPHASTOPHILIS: Nine: the seven planets, the firmament, and the empyreal heaven.
FAUSTUS: But is there not coelum igneum, et crystallinum?
MEPH.: No Faustus, they be but fables.
FAUSTUS: Resolve me then in this one question: Why are not conjunctions, oppositions, aspects, eclipses all at one time, but in some years we have more, in some less?
MEPH.: Per inaequalem motum respectu totius.
FAUSTUS: Well, I am answered. Now tell me who made the world.
MEPH.: I will not.
FAUSTUS: Sweet Mephastophilis, tell me.
MEPH.: Move me not, Faustus.
FAUSTUS: Villain, have I not bound thee to tell me any thing?
MEPH.: Ay, that is not against our kingdom.
This is. Thou are damn'd, think thou of hell.
FAUSTUS: Think, Faustus, upon God that made the world!
MEPH.: Remember this.
Doctor Faustus: A 1604-Version Edition, edited by Michael Keefer (1991), Act II, Scene iii, lines 60-77, 43-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bound (119)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Fable (12)  |  Firmament (18)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Maker (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Planet (356)  |  Question (621)  |  Remember (179)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Feeling weightless… it’s so many things together. A feeling of pride, of healthy solitude, of dignified freedom from everything that’s dirty, sticky. You feel exquisitely comfortable . . . and you feel you have so much energy, such an urge to do things, such an ability to do things. And you work well, yes, you think well, without sweat, without difficulty as if the biblical curse in the sweat of thy face and in sorrow no longer exists, As if you’ve been born again.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bible (91)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Curse (17)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exquisitely (2)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Long (790)  |  Pride (78)  |  Solitude (18)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thou (9)  |  Together (387)  |  Urge (17)  |  Work (1351)

Few people think more than two or three times a year. I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once or twice a week.
As given in 'Quotable Quotes', Reader’s Digest (May 1933). It does not appear in a work written by Shaw. It may have been contributed to the magazine as a personal recollection, though that is not specified in that source.
Science quotes on:  |  International (37)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  People (1005)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Twice (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)

Finally, from what we now know about the cosmos, to think that all this was created for just one species among the tens of millions of species who live on one planet circling one of a couple of hundred billion stars that are located in one galaxy among hundreds of billions of galaxies, all of which are in one universe among perhaps an infinite number of universes all nestled within a grand cosmic multiverse, is provincially insular and anthropocentrically blinkered. Which is more likely? That the universe was designed just for us, or that we see the universe as having been designed just for us?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropocentric (2)  |  Billion (95)  |  Billions (6)  |  Circle (110)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Couple (9)  |  Create (235)  |  Design (195)  |  Finally (26)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Grand (27)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Hundreds (6)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Likely (34)  |  Live (628)  |  Locate (7)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Planet (356)  |  Provincial (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Species (401)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Tens (3)  |  Universe (857)

Finally, since I thought that we could have all the same thoughts, while asleep, as we have while we are awake, although none of them is true at that time, I decided to pretend that nothing that ever entered my mind was any more true than the illusions of my dreams. But I noticed, immediately afterwards, that while I thus wished to think that everything was false, it was necessarily the case that I, who was thinking this, was something. When I noticed that this truth “I think, therefore I am” was so firm and certain that all the most extravagant assumptions of the sceptics were unable to shake it, I judged that I could accept it without scruple as the first principle of the philosophy for which I was searching. Then, when I was examining what I was, I realized that I could pretend that I had no body, and that there was no world nor any place in which I was present, but I could not pretend in the same way that I did not exist. On the contrary, from the very fact that I was thinking of doubting the truth of other things, it followed very evidently and very certainly that I existed; whereas if I merely ceased to think, even if all the rest of what I had ever imagined were true, I would have no reason to believe that I existed. I knew from this that I was a substance, the whole essence or nature of which was to think and which, in order to exist, has no need of any place and does not depend on anything material. Thus this self—that is, the soul by which I am what I am—is completely distinct from the body and is even easier to know than it, and even if the body did not exist the soul would still be everything that it is.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 24-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Awake (19)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Depend (228)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Dream (208)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enter (141)  |  Essence (82)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Self (267)  |  Shake (41)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (66)  |  Application (242)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (99)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decade (59)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Framework (31)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Harness (23)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Implant (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logic (287)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Middle (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  People (1005)  |  Permit (58)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Premise (37)  |  Proper (144)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rigid (24)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Solid (116)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Student (300)  |  Stunt (7)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Swing (11)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Transition (26)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

For a smart material to be able to send out a more complex signal it needs to be nonlinear. If you hit a tuning fork twice as hard it will ring twice as loud but still at the same frequency. That’s a linear response. If you hit a person twice as hard they’re unlikely just to shout twice as loud. That property lets you learn more about the person than the tuning fork. - When Things Start to Think, 1999.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Complex (188)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hit (20)  |  Learn (629)  |  Let (61)  |  Linear (13)  |  Loud (9)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Nonlinear (4)  |  Person (363)  |  Property (168)  |  Response (53)  |  Ring (16)  |  Same (157)  |  Send (22)  |  Shout (25)  |  Signal (27)  |  Smart (26)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Twice (17)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Will (2355)

For geologists ... the word 'plate' is in somewhat the same position as 'skyscraper'. It is a dead (or almost dead) metaphor. Geologists know (or they think they know) what plates are, almost as well as the commuter knows what a skyscraper is.
Thinking About the Earth (1996), 307.
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (59)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Plate (6)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Word (619)

For God's sake, stop researching for a while and begin to think.
The Crisis in the University (1949), 183.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  God (757)  |  Research (664)  |  Sake (58)  |  Thinking (414)

For it is obvious to everybody, I think, that this study [of astronomy] compels the soul to look upward and leads it away from things here to higher things.
Plato
The Republic 7 529a ((5th-4th century B.C.), trans. P. Shorey (1935), Vol. 2, Book 7, 179-81. Another translation gives: “For everyone, as I think, must see that astronomy compels the soul to look upwards and leads us from this world to another.”
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Compel (30)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Everybody (70)  |  High (362)  |  Lead (384)  |  Look (582)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Soul (226)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Upward (43)

For it is owing to their wonder that men now both begin and at first began to philosophize; they wondered originally at the obvious difficulties, then advanced little by little and stated difficulties about the greater matters, e.g. about the phenomena of the moon and those of the sun and the stars, and about the genesis of the universe. And a man who is puzzled and wonders thinks himself ignorant (whence even the lover of myth is in a sense a lover of wisdom, for myth is composed of wonders); therefore since they philosophized in order to escape from ignorance, evidently they were pursuing science in order to know, and not for any utilitarian end. And this is confirmed by the facts; for it was when almost all the necessities of life and the things that make for comfort and recreation were present, that such knowledge began to be sought. Evidently then we do not seek it for the sake of any advantage; but as the man is free, we say, who exists for himself and not for another, so we pursue this as the only free science, for it alone exists for itself.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 982b, 12-27. In Jonathan Baines (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1554.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moon (237)  |  Myth (56)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Owing (39)  |  Present (619)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Sake (58)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wonder (236)

For many of us, water simply flows from a faucet, and we think little about it beyond this point of contact. We have lost a sense of respect for the wild river, for the complex workings of a wetland, for the intricate web of life that water supports.
Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity (1997), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Contact (65)  |  Flow (83)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Point (580)  |  Respect (207)  |  River (119)  |  Sense (770)  |  Support (147)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Water (481)  |  Web Of Life (7)  |  Wetland (4)  |  Wild (87)  |  Working (20)

For me the most beautiful thing about Meccano is that it teaches you to think.
As quoted in by Hugh Schofield in web article 'Meccano Revives French Production' (23 Dec 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Toy (19)

For most scientists, I think the justification of their work is to be found in the pure joy of its creativeness; the spirit which moves them is closely akin to the imaginative vision which inspires an artist.
In Modern Science and Modern Man (1951), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Joy (107)  |  Justification (48)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Vision (123)  |  Work (1351)

For the notion of matter I do not think [of] its permanence, but only its presence in space as filling it.
In Immanuel Kant and James Hutchison Sterling (ed.), Text-Book to Kant: The Critique of Pure Reason (1881), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Do (1908)  |  Matter (798)  |  Notion (113)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Presence (63)  |  Space (500)

For those who do not think, it is best at least to rearrange their prejudices once in a while.
As quoted in Forbes (1948). 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Rearrange (5)

For, dear me, why abandon a belief
Merely because it ceases to be true.
Cling to it long enough, and not a doubt
It will turn true again, for so it goes.
Most of the change we think we see in life
Is due to truths being in and out of favour.
'The Black Cottage'. In Edward Connery Latham (ed.), The Poetry of Robert Frost (1971), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cease (79)  |  Change (593)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  See (1081)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

From this fountain (the free will of God) it is those laws, which we call the laws of nature, have flowed, in which there appear many traces of the most wise contrivance, but not the least shadow of necessity. These therefore we must not seek from uncertain conjectures, but learn them from observations and experimental. He who is presumptuous enough to think that he can find the true principles of physics and the laws of natural things by the force alone of his own mind, and the internal light of his reason, must either suppose the world exists by necessity, and by the same necessity follows the law proposed; or if the order of Nature was established by the will of God, the [man] himself, a miserable reptile, can tell what was fittest to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Enough (340)  |  Establish (57)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flow (83)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Internal (66)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Least (75)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Presumptuous (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  True (212)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

Geometrical axioms are neither synthetic a priori conclusions nor experimental facts. They are conventions: our choice, amongst all possible conventions, is guided by experimental facts; but it remains free, and is only limited by the necessity of avoiding all contradiction. ... In other words, axioms of geometry are only definitions in disguise.
That being so what ought one to think of this question: Is the Euclidean Geometry true?
The question is nonsense. One might as well ask whether the metric system is true and the old measures false; whether Cartesian co-ordinates are true and polar co-ordinates false.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Among (3)  |  Ask (411)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Choice (110)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Convention (14)  |  Definition (221)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  False (100)  |  Free (232)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Guide (97)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Measure (232)  |  Metric System (6)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polar (12)  |  Possible (552)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  System (537)  |  True (212)  |  Word (619)

Good sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed ; for every one thinks himself so abundantly provided with it, that those even who are the most difficult to satisfy in everything else, do not usually desire a larger measure of this quality than they already possess.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), Part 1. English version as given in John Veitch (trans.), The Method, Meditations, and Selections from the Principles of Descartes (1880), 3. Also seen translated as “Of all things, good sense is the most fairly distributed: everyone thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those who are the hardest to satisfy in every other respect never desire more of it than they already have,” or “Good sense is of all things in the world the most equally distributed, for everybody thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those most difficult to please in all other matters never desire more of it than they already possess.” From the original French, “Le bon sens est la chose du monde la mieux partagée; car chacun pense en être si bien pourvu, que ceux même qui sont les plus difficiles à contenter en toute autre chose n'ont point coutume d'en désirer plus qu'ils en ont.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equally (130)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (476)  |  Good (889)  |  Good Sense (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possess (156)  |  Quality (135)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Sense (770)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Both (493)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Harder (6)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humble (50)  |  Importance (286)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Professor (128)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Right (452)  |  Shut (41)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

Governments and parliaments must find that astronomy is one of the sciences which cost most dear: the least instrument costs hundreds of thousands of dollars, the least observatory costs millions; each eclipse carries with it supplementary appropriations. And all that for stars which are so far away, which are complete strangers to our electoral contests, and in all probability will never take any part in them. It must be that our politicians have retained a remnant of idealism, a vague instinct for what is grand; truly, I think they have been calumniated; they should be encouraged and shown that this instinct does not deceive them, that they are not dupes of that idealism.
In Henri Poincaré and George Bruce Halsted (trans.), The Value of Science: Essential Writings of Henri Poincare (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriation (5)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cost (86)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Dupe (5)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Election (7)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grand (27)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idealism (4)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Millions (17)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Parliament (7)  |  Politician (38)  |  Probability (130)  |  Remnant (7)  |  Retain (56)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Supplementary (4)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Truly (116)  |  Vague (47)  |  Will (2355)

Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. You have neither solicited nor received ours. We did not invite you. You do not know us, nor do you know our world. Cyberspace does not lie within your borders. Do not think that you can build it, as though it were a public construction project. You cannot. It is an act of nature and it grows itself through our collective actions.
In 'A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace' (8 Feb 1996). Published on Electronic Frontier Foundation website. Reproduced in Lawrence Lessig, Code: Version 2.0) (2008), 303.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Border (9)  |  Build (204)  |  Collective (24)  |  Consent (14)  |  Construction (112)  |  Cyberspace (3)  |  Derive (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Govern (64)  |  Government (110)  |  Grow (238)  |  Invite (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lie (364)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Project (73)  |  Public (96)  |  Through (849)  |  World (1774)

Great discoveries are made accidentally less often than the populace likes to think.
Referring to the accidental discovery of X-rays, in A History of Science and Its Relations with Philosophy and Religion (1931), 382.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  X-ray (37)

Great minds don't think alike. If they did, the Patent Office would only have about fifty inventions.
From Dilbert comic strip (10 Mar 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Fifty (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Office (71)  |  Patent (33)  |  Patent Office (3)  |  Thinking (414)

Haldane could have made a success of any one of half a dozen careers—as mathematician, classical scholar, philosopher, scientist, journalist or imaginative writer. On his life’s showing he could not have been a politician, administrator (heavens, no!), jurist or, I think, a critic of any kind. In the outcome he became one of the three or four most influential biologists of his generation.
Essay, 'J.B.S.', in Pluto’s Republic: Incorporating The Art of the Soluble and Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1982), collected in The Strange Case of the Spotted Mice and Other Classic Essays on Science (1996), 87.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Career (75)  |  Classical (45)  |  Critic (20)  |  Generation (242)  |  J.B.S. Haldane (50)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Influential (4)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Jurist (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Politician (38)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Success (302)  |  Writer (86)

Has Matter more than Motion? Has it Thought,
Judgment, and Genius? Is it deeply learn’d
In Mathematics? Has it fram’d such Laws,
Which, but to guess, a Newton made immortal?—
If so, how each sage Atom laughs at me,
Who think a Clod inferior to a Man!
The Complaint: or, Night-Thoughts on Life, Death, and Immortality (1742, 1750), Night 9, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Clod (3)  |  Genius (284)  |  Guess (61)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Sage (23)  |  Thought (953)

He who would know what geometry is, must venture boldly into its depths and learn to think and feel as a geometer. I believe that it is impossible to do this, and to study geometry as it admits of being studied and am conscious it can be taught, without finding the reason invigorated, the invention quickened, the sentiment of the orderly and beautiful awakened and enhanced, and reverence for truth, the foundation of all integrity of character, converted into a fixed principle of the mental and moral constitution, according to the old and expressive adage “abeunt studia in mores”.
In 'A probationary Lecture on Geometry, in Collected Mathematical Papers (1908), Vol. 2, 9. [The Latin phrase, “abeunt studia in mores” translates as “studies pass on into character”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Adage (4)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Convert (22)  |  Depth (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fix (25)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invigorate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Venture (18)

Here I most violently want you to
Avoid one fearful error, a vicious flaw.
Don’t think that our bright eyes were made that we
Might look ahead; that hips and knees and ankles
So intricately bend that we might take
Big strides, and the arms are strapped to the sturdy shoulders
And hands are given for servants to each side
That we might use them to support our lives.
All other explanations of this sort
Are twisted, topsy-turvy logic, for
Nothing what is born produces its own use.
Sight was not born before the light of the eyes,
Nor were words and pleas created before the tongue
Rather the tongue's appearance long preceded
Speech, and the ears were formed far earlier than
The sound first heard. To sum up, all the members Existed, I should think, before their use, So use has not caused them to have grown.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 4, lines 820-8, 145.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Bright (79)  |  Ear (68)  |  Error (321)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Servant (39)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Side (233)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stride (15)  |  Sum (102)  |  Support (147)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Twist (8)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round heads in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. You can quote them. Disagree with them. Glorify or vilify them. But the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.
In Apple Computer newspaper advertisement (1997) as quoted and cited in Tad Lathrop and Jim Pettigrew, This Business of Music Marketing and Promotion (1999), 55.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Differently (4)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fond (12)  |  Forward (102)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Head (81)  |  Hole (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Misfit (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Push (62)  |  Quote (42)  |  Race (268)  |  Rebel (7)  |  Round (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Square (70)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Troublemaker (2)  |  Vilify (2)  |  World (1774)

Herrmann Pidoux and Armand Trousseau stated 'Disease exists within us, because of us, and through us', Pasteur did not entirely disagree, 'This is true for certain diseases', he wrote cautiously, only to add immediately: 'I do not think that it is true for all of them'.
Pasteur Vallery-Radot (ed.), Oeuvres de Pasteur (1922-1939), Vol. 6, 167. Quoted in Patrice Debré, Louis Pasteur, trans. Elborg Forster (1994), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Caution (24)  |  Certain (550)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Statement (142)  |  Through (849)  |  Armand Trousseau (11)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Within (7)

How can a modern anthropologist embark upon a generalization with any hope of arriving at a satisfactory conclusion? By thinking of the organizational ideas that are present in any society as a mathematical pattern.
In Rethinking Anthropology (1961), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropologist (6)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Embark (7)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Organization (114)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Present (619)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Society (326)  |  Thinking (414)

How I hate the man who talks about the “brute creation”, with an ugly emphasis on Brute. Only Christians are capable of it. As for me, I am proud of my close kinship with other animals. I take a jealous pride in my Simian ancestry. I like to think that I was once a magnificent hairy fellow living in the trees and that my frame has come down through geological time via sea jelly and worms and Amphioxus, Fish, Dinosaurs, and Apes. Who would exchange these for the pallid couple in the Garden of Eden?
In W.N.P. Barbellion, The Journal of a Disappointed Man (1919), 27-28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Brute (28)  |  Capable (168)  |  Christian (43)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Down (456)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fish (120)  |  Garden (60)  |  God (757)  |  Hate (64)  |  Jelly (6)  |  Living (491)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pride (78)  |  Sea (308)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Worm (42)

How often people speak of art and science as though they were two entirely different things, with no interconnection. An artist is emotional, they think, and uses only his intuition; he sees all at once and has no need of reason. A scientist is cold, they think, and uses only his reason; he argues carefully step by step, and needs no imagination. That is all wrong. The true artist is quite rational as well as imaginative and knows what he is doing; if he does not, his art suffers. The true scientist is quite imaginative as well as rational, and sometimes leaps to solutions where reason can follow only slowly; if he does not, his science suffers.
'Prometheus.' The Roving Mind (1983), Chap 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cold (112)  |  Different (577)  |  Doing (280)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Follow (378)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leap (53)  |  People (1005)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speak (232)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Wrong (234)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brief (36)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Exert (39)  |  Exist (443)  |  First (1283)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Inner (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remind (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Wholly (88)

However, before we come to [special] creation, which puts an end to all discussion: I think we should try everything else.
De Stella Nova, On the New Star (1606), Chapter 22, in Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937-), Vol. 1, 257, ll. 23-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discussion (72)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Special (184)  |  Try (283)

Human civilization is but a few thousand years long. Imagine having the audacity to think that we can devise a program to store lethal radioactive materials for a period of time that is longer than all of human culture to date.
In Jeremy Rifkin and Ted Howard, Entropy: Into the Greenhouse World (1980), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Audacity (7)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Culture (143)  |  Devise (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Lethal (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Period (198)  |  Program (52)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Store (48)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

Human consciousness is just about the last surviving mystery. A mystery is a phenomenon that people don't know how to think about—yet. There have been other great mysteries: the mystery of the origin of the universe, the mystery of life and reproduction, the mystery of the design to be found in nature, the mysteries of time, space, and gravity. These were not just areas of scientific ignorance, but of utter bafflement and wonder. We do not yet have the final answers to any of the questions of cosmology and particle physics, molecular genetics and evolutionary theory, but we do know how to think about them. The mysteries haven't vanished, but they have been tamed. They no longer overwhelm our efforts to think about the phenomena, because now we know how to tell the misbegotten questions from the right questions, and even if we turn out to be dead wrong about some of the currently accepted answers, we know how to go about looking for better answers. With consciousness, however, we are still in a terrible muddle. Consciousness stands alone today as a topic that often leaves even the most sophisticated thinkers tongue-tied and confused. And, as with all the earlier mysteries, there are many who insist—and hope—that there will never be a demystification of consciousness.
Consciousness Explained (1991), 21-22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bafflement (3)  |  Better (486)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Final (118)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Looking (189)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Topic (21)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wrong (234)

Human societies increased the abundance and distribution of useful species. This can also be used to preserve the forest, I think. We can use this as an opportunity to reduce the impacts of deforestation. Now we have huge plantations of soybeans that are destroying the Amazon—while in the forest we have lots of plants that can be used while maintaining the forest as it is.
As quoted in Robinson Meyer, 'The Amazon Rainforest Was Profoundly Changed by Ancient Humans', The Atlantic (2 Mar 2017).
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Amazon (9)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Forest (150)  |  Huge (25)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impact (42)  |  Increase (210)  |  Lot (151)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plantation (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)

Humans are not by nature the fact-driven, rational beings we like to think we are. We get the facts wrong more often than we think we do. And we do so in predictable ways: we engage in wishful thinking. We embrace information that supports our beliefs and reject evidence that challenges them. Our minds tend to take shortcuts, which require some effort to avoid … [and] more often than most of us would imagine, the human mind operates in ways that defy logic.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Defy (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Engage (39)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Information (166)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reject (63)  |  Require (219)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Support (147)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wishful (6)  |  Wrong (234)

I almost think it is the ultimate destiny of science to exterminate the human race.
Written for fictional character, the Rev. Dr. Opimian, in Gryll Grange (1861), collected in Sir Henry Cole (ed.) The Works of Thomas Love Peacock(1875), Vol. 2, 382. [Hans Øersted discovered electromagnetism in 1820. Presumably the next reference to magnetism refers to a compass needle for navigation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Destiny (50)  |  Exterminate (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Ultimate (144)

I always tried to live up to Leo Szilard's commandment, “don't lie if you don't have to.” I had to. I filled up pages with words and plans I knew I would not follow. When I go home from my laboratory in the late afternoon, I often do not know what I am going to do the next day. I expect to think that up during the night. How could I tell them what I would do a year hence?
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Filling (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Late (118)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Page (30)  |  Plan (117)  |  Leo Szilard (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Try (283)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

I am a believer in unconscious cerebration. The brain is working all the time, though we do not know it. At night it follows up what we think in the daytime. When I have worked a long time on one thing, I make it a point to bring all the facts regarding it together before I retire; I have often been surprised at the results… We are thinking all the time; it is impossible not to think.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Brain (270)  |  Daytime (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Follow (378)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Night (120)  |  Point (580)  |  Result (677)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Work (1351)

I am a firm believer in the theory that you can do or be anything that you wish in this world, within reason, if you are prepared to make the sacrifices, think and work hard enough and long enough.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted and cited in Editorial Section, 'Sir Frederick Banting', Canadian Public Health Journal (May 1941), 32, No. 5, 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |  Believer (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Firm (47)  |  Hard (243)  |  Long (790)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)  |  World (1774)

I am always surprised when a young man tells me he wants to work at cosmology. I think of cosmology as something that happens to one, not something one can choose.
In Presidential Address (8 Feb 1963), Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society (Mar 1963), 4, 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Man (2251)  |  Something (719)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Want (497)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. We should not allow it to be believed that all scientific progress can be reduced to mechanisms, machines, gearings, even though such machinery has its own beauty.
During a debate in Madrid, ',The Future of Culture' (1933). In Eve Curie Labouisse, Eve Curie and Vincent Sheean, Madame Curie (1937), 341
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Child (307)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impress (64)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Natural (796)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Scientist (820)

I am an experimenter, or rather I used to be one. Then I stopped working, and since then people think I am a theoretician.
Quoted in Otto Frisch, What Little I Remember (1979), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  People (1005)  |  Stop (80)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Work (1351)

I am astonished that in the United States a scientist gets into such trouble because of his scientific beliefs; that your activity in 1957 and 1958 in relation to the petition to the United Nations asking for a bomb-test agreement causes you now to be called before the authorities and ordered to give the names of the scientists who have the same opinions that you have and who have helped you to gather signatures to the petition. I think that I must be dreaming!
Letter to Linus Pauling (23 Jul 1960). As quoted on the Linus Pauling and the International Peace Movement website at scarc.library.oregonstate.edu.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Asking (73)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Authority (95)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Dreaming (3)  |  Gather (72)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Nation (193)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Petition (4)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Signature (4)  |  State (491)  |  Test (211)  |  Trouble (107)  |  United Nations (3)

I am busy just now again on Electro-Magnetism and think I have got hold of a good thing but can't say; it may be a weed instead of a fish that after all my labour I may at last pull up.
Letter to Richard Phillips, 23 Sep 1831. In Michael Faraday, Bence Jones (ed.), The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Fish (120)  |  Good (889)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Pull (43)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weed (18)

I am further inclined to think, that when our views are sufficiently extended, to enable us to reason with precision concerning the proportions of elementary atoms, we shall find the arithmetical relation alone will not be sufficient to explain their mutual action, and that we shall be obliged to acquire a geometric conception of their relative arrangement in all three dimensions of solid extension.
Paper. Read to the Royal Society (28 Jan 1808), in 'On Super-acid and Sub-acid salts', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, (1808), 98, 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Conception (154)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Enable (119)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Precision (68)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reason (744)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

I am inclined to think I shall owe ten years of my life to the good effects of the gas, for I inhale about 20 gallons every day in showing patients how to commence. The gas is just like air, only containing a little more oxygen. Oxygen is what gives life and vitality to the blood. We live on oxygen.
Quoted in The Electrical Review (11 Aug 1893), Vol. 33, 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Blood (134)  |  Effect (393)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Nitrous Oxide (4)  |  Owe (71)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Patient (199)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Year (933)

I am not unmindful of the journalist’s quip that yesterday’s paper wraps today’s garbage. I am also not unmindful of the outrages visited upon our forests to publish redundant and incoherent collections of essays; for, like Dr. Seuss’ Lorax, I like to think that I speak for the trees. Beyond vanity, my only excuses for a collection of these essays lie in the observation that many people like (and as many people despise) them, and that they seem to cohere about a common theme–Darwin’s evolutionary perspective as an antidote to our cosmic arrogance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antidote (9)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Collection (64)  |  Common (436)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Despise (13)  |  Essay (27)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Forest (150)  |  Garbage (8)  |  Incoherent (7)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Lie (364)  |  Observation (555)  |  Outrage (3)  |  Paper (182)  |  People (1005)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Publish (36)  |  Quip (80)  |  Seem (145)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theme (17)  |  Today (314)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Visit (26)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Yesterday (36)

I am one of those who think, like Nobel, that humanity will draw more good than evil from new discoveries.
In Pierre Biquard, Frédéric Joliot-Curie: the Man and his Theories (1966), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Draw (137)  |  Evil (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Humanity (169)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Alfred Bernhard Nobel (16)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Will (2355)

I am opposed to looking upon logic as a kind of game. … One might think that it is a matter of choice or convention which logic one adopts. I disagree with this view.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Adoption (7)  |  Choice (110)  |  Convention (14)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Game (101)  |  Kind (557)  |  Logic (287)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  View (488)

I approached the bulk of my schoolwork as a chore rather than an intellectual adventure. The tedium was relieved by a few courses that seem to be qualitatively different. Geometry was the first exciting course I remember. Instead of memorizing facts, we were asked to think in clear, logical steps. Beginning from a few intuitive postulates, far reaching consequences could be derived, and I took immediately to the sport of proving theorems.
Autobiography in Gösta Ekspong (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1996-2000 (2002), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Different (577)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Logic (287)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Proof (287)  |  Remember (179)  |  School (219)  |  Sport (22)  |  Step (231)  |  Theorem (112)

I believe that the Dayton trial marked the beginning of the decline of fundamentalism. … I feel that restrictive legislation on academic freedom is forever a thing of the past, that religion and science may now address one another in an atmosphere of mutual respect and of a common quest for truth. I like to think that the Dayton trial had some part in bringing to birth this new era.
From 'Reflections—Forty Years After', in Jerry R. Tompkins (ed.), D-Days at Dayton: Reflections on the Scopes Trial(1965), 31. As quoted in Stephen Jay Gould, Hen’s Teeth and Horse’s Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1983), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Birth (147)  |  Common (436)  |  Decline (26)  |  Era (51)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fundamentalism (4)  |  Legislation (10)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mutual (52)  |  New (1216)  |  Past (337)  |  Quest (39)  |  Religion (361)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scopes Monkey Trial (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Omit (11)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I beseech you in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be mistaken.
Letter, to General Assembly of the Church of Scotland (1650). In The Parliamentary or Constitutional History of England (1763), Vol. 19, 322.
Science quotes on:  |  Beseech (3)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Christ (17)  |  Error (321)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Thinking (414)

I came by the horror naturally. Surgery is the one branch of medicine that is the most violent. After all, it’s violent to take up a knife and cut open a person’s body and rummage around with your hands. I think I was attracted to the horrific.
As quoted in Randy Hutter Epstein, 'Richard Selzer, Who Fictionalized Medicine’s Absurdity and Gore, Dies at 87', New York Times (15 Jun 2016). Explaining why his first fiction writing was horror stories.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attracted (3)  |  Body (537)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cut (114)  |  Hand (143)  |  Horror (14)  |  Knife (23)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Open (274)  |  Person (363)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Violent (17)

I can live with doubt and uncertainty. I think it’s much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong.
From transcript of a BBC television program, 'The Pleasure of Finding Things Out' (1981). In Richard Phillips Feynman and Jeffrey Robbins (ed.), The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: the Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman (2000), 24.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Wrong (234)

I can remember … starting to gather all sorts of things like rocks and beetles when I was about nine years old. There was no parental encouragement—nor discouragement either—nor any outside influence that I can remember in these early stages. By about the age of twelve, I had settled pretty definitely on butterflies, largely I think because the rocks around my home were limited to limestone, while the butterflies were varied, exciting, and fairly easy to preserve with household moth-balls. … I was fourteen, I remember, when … I decided to be scientific, caught in some net of emulation, and resolutely threw away all of my “childish” specimens, mounted haphazard on “common pins” and without “proper labels.” The purge cost me a great inward struggle, still one of my most vivid memories, and must have been forced by a conflict between a love of my specimens and a love for orderliness, for having everything just exactly right according to what happened to be my current standards.
In The Nature of Natural History (1950, 1990), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Cost (86)  |  Current (118)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easy (204)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fourteen (2)  |  Gather (72)  |  Great (1574)  |  Haphazard (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Home (170)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inward (6)  |  Label (11)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Love (309)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Outside (141)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pin (18)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purge (9)  |  Remember (179)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Rock (161)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Settled (34)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standard (57)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Year (933)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I can think of a few microorganisms, possibly the tubercle bacillus, the syphilis spirochete, the malarial parasite, and a few others, that have a selective advantage in their ability to infect human beings, but there is nothing to be gained, in an evolutionary sense, by the capacity to cause illness or death. Pathogenicity may be something of a disadvantage for most microbes…
In 'Germs', The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Cause (541)  |  Death (388)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Gain (145)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Illness (34)  |  Infect (2)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Pathogen (5)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Spirochete (2)  |  Syphilis (6)

I cannot think of a single field in biology or medicine in which we can claim genuine understanding, and it seems to me the more we learn about living creatures, especially ourselves, the stranger life becomes.
In 'On Science and Certainty', Discover Magazine (Oct 1980).
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cannot (8)  |  Claim (146)  |  Creature (233)  |  Especially (31)  |  Field (364)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Seeming (9)  |  Single (353)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Understanding (513)

I cannot, however, but think that the world would be better and brighter if our teachers would dwell on the Duty of Happiness as well as the Happiness of Duty; for we ought to be as cheerful as we can, if only because to be happy ourselves is a most effectual contribution to the happiness of others.
The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Teacher (143)  |  World (1774)

I can’t recall a single problem in my life, of any sort, that I ever started on that I didn't solve, or prove that I couldn’t solve it. I never let up, until I had done everything that I could think of, no matter how absurd it might seem as a means to the end I was after.
As quoted in French Strother, 'The Modern Profession of Inventing', World's Work and Play (Jul 1905), 6, No. 32, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prove (250)  |  Recall (10)  |  Seem (145)  |  Single (353)  |  Solve (130)  |  Start (221)

I can’t think of any definition of the words mathematician or scientist that would apply to me. I think of myself as a journalist who knows just enough about mathematics to be able to take low-level math and make it clear and interesting to nonmathematicians. Let me say that I think not knowing too much about a subject is an asset for a journalist, not a liability. The great secret of my column is that I know so little about mathematics that I have to work hard to understand the subject myself. Maybe I can explain things more clearly than a professional mathematician can.
In Scot Morris, 'Interview: Martin Gardner', Omni, 4, No. 4 (Jan 1982), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Asset (6)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Column (15)  |  Definition (221)  |  Enough (340)  |  Explain (322)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Liability (6)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Professional (70)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Secret (194)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.
In 'The Science Of Deduction', A Study In Scarlet (1887, 1904), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Attic (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Brain (270)  |  Choose (112)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elastic (2)  |  Empty (80)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fool (116)  |  Forget (115)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jumble (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Useful (250)  |  Useless (33)  |  Wall (67)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

I do ... humbly conceive (tho' some possibly may think there is too much notice taken of such a trivial thing as a rotten Shell, yet) that Men do generally rally too much slight and pass over without regard these Records of Antiquity which Nature have left as Monuments and Hieroglyphick Characters of preceding Transactions in the like duration or Transactions of the Body of the Earth, which are infinitely more evident and certain tokens than any thing of Antiquity that can be fetched out of Coins or Medals, or any other way yet known, since the best of those ways may be counterfeited or made by Art and Design, as may also Books, Manuscripts and Inscriptions, as all the Learned are now sufficiently satisfied, has often been actually practised; but those Characters are not to be Counterfeited by all the Craft in the World, nor can they be doubted to be, what they appear, by anyone that will impartially examine the true appearances of them: And tho' it must be granted, that it is very difficult to read them, and to raise a Chronology out of them, and to state the intervalls of the Times wherein such, or such Catastrophies and Mutations have happened; yet 'tis not impossible, but that, by the help of those joined to ' other means and assistances of Information, much may be done even in that part of Information also.
Lectures and Discourses of Earthquakes (1668). In The Posthumous Works of Robert Hooke, containing his Cutlerian Lectures and other Discourses read at the Meetings of the Illustrious Royal Society (1705), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Design (195)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evident (91)  |  Examine (78)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notice (77)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shell (63)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Token (9)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I do not believe that science per se is an adequate source of happiness, nor do I think that my own scientific outlook has contributed very greatly to my own happiness, which I attribute to defecating twice a day with unfailing regularity. Science in itself appears to me neutral, that is to say, it increases men’s power whether for good or for evil. An appreciation of the ends of life is something which must be superadded to science if it is to bring happiness, but only the kind of society to which science is apt to give rise. I am afraid you may be disappointed that I am not more of an apostle of science, but as I grow older, and no doubt—as a result of the decay of my tissues, I begin to see the good life more and more as a matter of balance and to dread all over-emphasis upon anyone ingredient.
Letter to W. W. Norton, Publisher (27 Jan 1931). In The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell, 1914-1944 (1968), Vol. 2, 200.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Apostle (3)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belief (578)  |  Decay (53)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dread (13)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  End (590)  |  Evil (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Increase (210)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Power (746)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Source (93)  |  Tissue (45)

I do not conceive of any manifestation of culture, of science, of art, as purposes in themselves. I think the purpose of science and culture is man.
In G. Barry Golson (ed.) The Playboy Interview (1981), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Themselves (433)

I do not know whether my distrust of men of science is congenital or acquired, but I think I should have transmitted it to descendants.
Samuel Butler, edited by Geoffrey Keynes and Brian Hill, Samuel Butler’s Notebooks (1951), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Congenital (4)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Distrust (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Know (1518)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Transmission (34)

I do not like to see all the fine boys turning to the study of law, instead of to the study of science or technology. … Japan wants no more lawyers now; and I think the professions of literature and of teaching give small promise. What Japan needs are scientific men; and she will need more and more of them every year.
In letter to Masanobu Ōtani (1894), collected in Elizabeth Bisland The Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (1922), Vol. 14, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Boy (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Japan (8)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Literature (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Profession (99)  |  Promise (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Technology (257)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I do not maintain that the chief value of the study of arithmetic consists in the lessons of morality that arise from this study. I claim only that, to be impressed from day to day, that there is something that is right as an answer to the questions with which one is able to grapple, and that there is a wrong answer—that there are ways in which the right answer can be established as right, that these ways automatically reject error and slovenliness, and that the learner is able himself to manipulate these ways and to arrive at the establishment of the true as opposed to the untrue, this relentless hewing to the line and stopping at the line, must color distinctly the thought life of the pupil with more than a tinge of morality. … To be neighborly with truth, to feel one’s self somewhat facile in ways of recognizing and establishing what is right, what is correct, to find the wrong persistently and unfailingly rejected as of no value, to feel that one can apply these ways for himself, that one can think and work independently, have a real, a positive, and a purifying effect upon moral character. They are the quiet, steady undertones of the work that always appeal to the learner for the sanction of his best judgment, and these are the really significant matters in school work. It is not the noise and bluster, not even the dramatics or the polemics from the teacher’s desk, that abide longest and leave the deepest and stablest imprint upon character. It is these still, small voices that speak unmistakably for the right and against the wrong and the erroneous that really form human character. When the school subjects are arranged on the basis of the degree to which they contribute to the moral upbuilding of human character good arithmetic will be well up the list.
In Arithmetic in Public Education (1909), 18. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 69.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Basis (173)  |  Best (459)  |  Bluster (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Character (243)  |  Chief (97)  |  Claim (146)  |  Color (137)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desk (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dramatic (17)  |  Effect (393)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Establish (57)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Facile (4)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Grapple (10)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Imprint (4)  |  Independently (24)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  List (10)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noise (37)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Polemic (3)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Question (621)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Right (452)  |  Sanction (7)  |  School (219)  |  Self (267)  |  Significant (74)  |  Slovenliness (2)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stable (30)  |  Steady (44)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undertone (2)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Voice (52)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

I do not mind if you think slowly. But I do object when you publish more quickly than you think.
As quoted, without citation, in William H. Cropper, Great Physicists: The Life and Times of Leading Physicists from Galileo to Hawking (2001), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Object (422)  |  Publish (36)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Slowly (18)

I do not see any reason to assume that the heuristic significance of the principle of general relativity is restricted to gravitation and that the rest of physics can be dealt with separately on the basis of special relativity, with the hope that later on the whole may be fitted consistently into a general relativistic scheme. I do not think that such an attitude, although historically understandable, can be objectively justified. The comparative smallness of what we know today as gravitational effects is not a conclusive reason for ignoring the principle of general relativity in theoretical investigations of a fundamental character. In other words, I do not believe that it is justifiable to ask: What would physics look like without gravitation?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Assume (38)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Basis (173)  |  Belief (578)  |  Character (243)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Conclusive (11)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Heuristic (5)  |  Historically (3)  |  Hope (299)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Ignoring (11)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Justifiable (3)  |  Justify (24)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Look (582)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relativistic (2)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Scheme (57)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Relativity (5)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Today (314)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

I do not think evolution is supremely important because it is my specialty. On the contrary, it is my specialty because I think it is supremely important.
This View of Life: the World of an Evolutionist (1964), 27-28.
Science quotes on:  |  Contrary (141)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Important (209)  |  Specialty (12)

I do not think it is possible really to understand the successes of science without understanding how hard it is—how easy it is to be led astray, how difficult it is to know at any time what is the next thing to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astray (11)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easy (204)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Next (236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Really (78)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

I do not think that G. H. Hardy was talking nonsense when he insisted that the mathematician was discovering rather than creating, nor was it wholly nonsense for Kepler to exult that he was thinking God's thoughts after him. The world for me is a necessary system, and in the degree to which the thinker can surrender his thought to that system and follow it, he is in a sense participating in that which is timeless or eternal.
'Reply to Lewis Edwin Hahn', The Philosophy of Brand Blanshard (1980), 901.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Follow (378)  |