Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sufficient

Sufficient Quotes (24 quotes)

But when science, passing beyond its own limits, assumes to take the place of theology, and sets up its own conception of the order of nature as a sufficient account of its cause, it is invading a province of thought to which it has no claim, and not unreasonably provokes the hostility of its best friends.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Assume (19)  |  Best (129)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Cause (231)  |  Claim (52)  |  Conception (63)  |  Friend (63)  |  Hostility (10)  |  Invade (4)  |  Limit (86)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Order (167)  |  Pass (60)  |  Place (111)  |  Province (11)  |  Provoke (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Theology (35)  |  Thought (374)

Doesn’t it strike you as odd
That a commonplace fellow like Todd Should spell if you please,
His name with two Ds.
When one is sufficient for God.
Anonymous
Quoted by M. G. De St. V. Atkins, The Times (22 Jan 1997), from memory of a conversation with 'an American tribiologist' who recalled it as current when he was an undergraduate at Christ's College.
Science quotes on:  |  Commonplace (10)  |  Fellow (29)  |  God (454)  |  Name (118)  |  Odd (12)  |  Spell (7)  |  Lord Alexander R. Todd (5)

In Cairo, I secured a few grains of wheat that had slumbered for more than thirty centuries in an Egyptian tomb. As I looked at them this thought came into my mind: If one of those grains had been planted on the banks of the Nile the year after it grew, and all its lineal descendants had been planted and replanted from that time until now, its progeny would to-day be sufficiently numerous to feed the teeming millions of the world. An unbroken chain of life connects the earliest grains of wheat with the grains that we sow and reap. There is in the grain of wheat an invisible something which has power to discard the body that we see, and from earth and air fashion a new body so much like the old one that we cannot tell the one from the other.…This invisible germ of life can thus pass through three thousand resurrections.
In In His Image (1922), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Bank (8)  |  Body (193)  |  Century (94)  |  Chain (38)  |  Descendant (12)  |  Discard (14)  |  DNA (67)  |  Earth (487)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Fashion (24)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Germ (27)  |  Grain (24)  |  Growth (111)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Life (917)  |  Million (89)  |  New (340)  |  Nile (4)  |  Old (104)  |  Pass (60)  |  Planting (4)  |  Power (273)  |  Progeny (6)  |  Reap (6)  |  Resurrection (3)  |  Slumber (3)  |  Sow (10)  |  Teeming (2)  |  Thought (374)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Time (439)  |  Today (86)  |  Tomb (7)  |  Unbroken (9)  |  Wheat (8)  |  World (667)

I’m sick of people thinking that efficiency is going to be sufficient. I’m sick of seeing people say, “I’m going to reduce my carbon footprint,” and think that being less bad is being good. … I want healthy, safe things in closed cycles, not just being less bad.
In interview with Kerry A. Dolan, 'William McDonough On Cradle-to-Cradle Design', Forbes (4 Aug 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (78)  |  Carbon Footprint (2)  |  Closed (9)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Efficiency (25)  |  Good (228)  |  Health (136)  |  Less (54)  |  Person (114)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Safety (39)  |  Sick (23)  |  Thinking (222)

Logic does not pretend to teach the surgeon what are the symptoms which indicate a violent death. This he must learn from his own experience and observation, or from that of others, his predecessors in his peculiar science. But logic sits in judgment on the sufficiency of that observation and experience to justify his rules, and on the sufficiency of his rules to justify his conduct. It does not give him proofs, but teaches him what makes them proofs, and how he is to judge of them.
In A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence, and the Methods of Scientific Investigation (1843), Vol. 1, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Conduct (23)  |  Death (270)  |  Experience (268)  |  Indicate (10)  |  Judge (43)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Justify (19)  |  Learn (160)  |  Logic (187)  |  Make (23)  |  Observation (418)  |  Peculiar (24)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Proof (192)  |  Rule (135)  |  Science (1699)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Symptom (16)  |  Teach (102)  |  Violent (15)

Nature abhors a vacuum, and if I can only walk with sufficient carelessness I am sure to be filled.
Early Spring, 52. Excerpt in H.G.O. Blake (ed.), Thoreau's Thoughts: Selections From the Writings of Henry David Thoreau (1890,2005), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Carelessness (4)  |  Filled (3)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sure (13)  |  Vacuum (29)  |  Walk (56)

Order is not sufficient. What is required, is something much more complex. It is order entering upon novelty; so that the massiveness of order does not degenerate into mere repetition; and so that the novelty is always reflected upon a background of system.
Alfred North Whitehead, David Ray Griffin (ed.), Donald W. Sherburne (ed.), Process and Reality: an Essay in Cosmology (2nd Ed.,1979), 339.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (63)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Degenerate (8)  |  Novelty (19)  |  Order (167)  |  Repetition (21)  |  Requirement (45)  |  System (141)

Our belief is not a belief. Our principles are not a faith. We do not rely solely upon science and reason, because these are necessary rather than sufficient factors, but we distrust anything that contradicts science or outrages reason.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Contradict (7)  |  Distrust (7)  |  Factor (34)  |  Faith (131)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Outrage (3)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rely (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solely (6)

Remarkably, only a handful of fundamental physical principles are sufficient to summarize most of modern physics.
In 'Conclusion', Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension (1995), 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Handful (6)  |  Modern Physics (12)  |  Physical (94)  |  Principle (228)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Summarize (7)

Several very eminent living paleontologists frequently emphasise the abruptness of some of the major changes that have occurred, and seek for an external cause. This is a heady wine and has intoxicated palaeontologists since the days when they could blame it all on Noah's flood. In fact, books are still being published by the lunatic fringe with the same explanation. In case this book should be read by some fundamentalist searching for straws to prop up his prejudices, let me state categorically that all my experience (such as it is) has led me to an unqualified acceptance of evolution by natural selection as a sufficient explanation for what I have seen in the fossil record
In The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record (1973), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Abruptness (2)  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Blame (17)  |  Book (181)  |  Cause (231)  |  Change (291)  |  Eminent (6)  |  Emphasis (14)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Experience (268)  |  Explanation (161)  |  External (45)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Fundamentalist (4)  |  Heady (2)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Major (24)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Paleontologist (15)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Prop (6)  |  Publish (18)  |  Reading (51)  |  Record (56)  |  Search (85)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Straw (5)  |  Wine (23)

Sometimes a hunch, right or wrong, is sufficient theory to lead to a useful observation.
In On the Management of Statistical Techniques for Quality and Productivity (1981), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Hunch (4)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Lead (101)  |  Observation (418)  |  Right (144)  |  Theory (582)  |  Useful (66)  |  Wrong (116)

Sufficient for us is the testimony of things produced in the salt waters and now found again in the high mountains, sometimes far from the sea.
Manuscript held by the Earl of Leicester, 31 a [R984]. In Edward McCurdy (ed.), Leonardo da Vinci's note-books: arranged and rendered into English with introductions (1908), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Far (77)  |  Find (248)  |  High (78)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Salt (23)  |  Sea (143)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Water (244)

The bushels of rings taken from the fingers of the slain at the battle of Cannζ, above two thousand years ago, are recorded; … but the bushels of corn produced in England at this day, or the number of the inhabitants of the country, are unknown, at the very time that we are debating that most important question, whether or not there is sufficient substance for those who live in the kingdom.
In The Statistical Breviary: Shewing, on a Principle Entirely New, the Resources of Every State and Kingdom in Europe (1801), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (30)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Corn (10)  |  Country (121)  |  Debate (19)  |  England (31)  |  Importance (183)  |  Inhabitant (19)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Number (179)  |  Produce (63)  |  Question (315)  |  Record (56)  |  Ring (14)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Substance (73)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Year (214)

The evidence from both approaches, statistical and experimental, does not appear sufficiently significant to me to warrant forsaking the pleasure of smoking. As a matter of fact, if the investigations had been pointed toward some material that I thoroughly dislike, such as parsnips, I still would not feel that evidence of the type presented constituted a reasonable excuse for eliminating the things from my diet. I will still continue to smoke, and if the tobacco companies cease manufacturing their product, I will revert to sweet fern and grape leaves.
Introduction in Eric Northrup, Science Looks at Smoking (1957), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (33)  |  Continuation (17)  |  Diet (41)  |  Dislike (11)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Grape (3)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Manufacturer (10)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Revert (4)  |  Significance (60)  |  Smoking (22)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Tobacco (16)

The only level of the hierarchy [of biological communities] that is both necessary and sufficient to meet all objectives is the ecosystem or some higher-level approach. The strategy selected should not only ensure the conservation of spotted owls, but all the intricate linkages that are associated with natural populations of spotted owls in naturally functioning ecosystems. Many of these are as yet unknown.
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Associate (9)  |  Biology (150)  |  Community (65)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Ecosystem (21)  |  Ensure (8)  |  Functioning (3)  |  Hierarchy (11)  |  Intricate (14)  |  Linkage (4)  |  Natural (128)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Objective (49)  |  Owl (2)  |  Population (71)  |  Strategy (8)  |  Unknown (87)

The President shall then, through the Isthmian Canal Commission … cause to be excavated, constructed and completed, utilizing to that end, as far as practicable, the work heretofore done by the New Panama Canal Company, of France, and its predecessor company, a ship canal from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. Such canal shall he of sufficient capacity and depth as shall afford convenient passage for vessels of the largest tonnage and greatest draft now in use, and such as may reasonably be anticipated, and shall be supplied with all necessary locks and other appliances to meet the necessities of vessels passing through the same from ocean to ocean.
Written by John Coit Spooner in the first Spooner Act (also known as the Panama Canal Act (1902), Ch. 1302, 32 Stat. 481), 'An Act To provide for the construction of a canal connecting the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans' (28 Jun 1902), Congressional Record, 57th Congress, Sess. 1, Chap. 1302, Sect. 3, 482. It was signed by President Roosevelt the next day.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (42)  |  Caribbean Sea (2)  |  Commission (3)  |  Company (28)  |  Construct (25)  |  Depth (32)  |  Draft (5)  |  Excavate (3)  |  France (21)  |  Large (82)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Pacific Ocean (3)  |  Panama Canal (3)  |  Passage (14)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  President (11)  |  Ship (33)  |  Vessel (21)

The question of the origin of the hypothesis belongs to a domain in which no very general rules can be given; experiment, analogy and constructive intuition play their part here. But once the correct hypothesis is formulated, the principle of mathematical induction is often sufficient to provide the proof.
As co-author with Herbert Robbins, in What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods (1941, 1996), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (46)  |  Constructive (3)  |  Correct (53)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Formulate (10)  |  General (92)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Induction (45)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Origin (77)  |  Principle (228)  |  Proof (192)  |  Provide (48)  |  Question (315)  |  Rule (135)

There are a thousand thousand reasons to live this life, everyone of them sufficient.
Gilead. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 24
Science quotes on:  |  Everyone (20)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Reason (330)  |  Thousand (106)

There are few enough people with sufficient independence to see the weaknesses and follies of their contemporaries and remain themselves untouched by them. And these isolated few usually soon lose their zeal for putting things to rights when they have come face to face with human obduracy. Only to a tiny minority is it given to fascinate their generation by subtle humour and grace and to hold the mirror up to it by the impersonal agency of art. To-day I salute with sincere emotion the supreme master of this method, who has delighted–and educated–us all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (13)  |  Art (205)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Delight (51)  |  Educate (7)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Face To Face (2)  |  Fascinate (5)  |  Folly (27)  |  Generation (111)  |  Give (117)  |  Grace (13)  |  Hold (56)  |  Human (445)  |  Humour (101)  |  Impersonal (4)  |  Independence (32)  |  Isolate (10)  |  Lose (53)  |  Master (55)  |  Method (154)  |  Minority (16)  |  Mirror (21)  |  People (269)  |  Remain (77)  |  Right (144)  |  Salute (2)  |  See (197)  |  Sincere (2)  |  Soon (17)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Supreme (24)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Tiny (25)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Untouched (2)  |  Usually (20)  |  Weakness (31)  |  Zeal (7)

There exists for every liquid a temperature at which no amount of pressure is sufficient to retain it in the liquid form.
[These words are NOT by Thomas Andrews. See below.]
This is NOT a quote by Andrews. It is only included here to provide this caution, because at least one book attributes it incorrectly to Andrews, as in John Daintith, Biographical Encyclopedia of Scientists (3rd. ed., 2008), 19. Webmaster has determined that these words are those of William Allen Miller, in Elements of Chemistry (1855), Vol. 1, 257. In the article on Thomas Andrews in Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 161, the later, third edition (1863) of Miller's textbook is named as the first printed account of Andrews' work. (Andrews had furnished his experimental results to Miller by letter.) After stating Miller's description of Andrews' results, the article in DSB refers ambiguously to “his” summary and gives the quote above. No quotation marks are present in Miller's book. Specifically, in fact, the words in the summary are by Miller. This is seen in the original textbook, because Miller prefaced the quote with “From these experiments it is obvious that...” and is summarizing the related work of several scientists, not just Andrews. Miller described the earlier experiments of those other researchers in the immediately preceding pages. It is clear that the quote does not come from Andrews when comparing Miller's first edition (1855), which had not yet included the work by Andrews. Thus, the same summary words (as quoted above) in the earliest edition refer to the experiments of only the other researchers, not including Andrews. Furthermore, the quote is not present in the Bakerian Lecture by Andrews on his work, later published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (1869). Webmaster speculates Daintith's book was written relying on a misreading of the ambiguous sentence in DSB.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Existence (254)  |  Form (210)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Retention (3)  |  Temperature (42)

To mean understandings, it is sufficient honour to be numbered amongst the lowest labourers of learning; but different abilities must find different tasks. To hew stone, would have been unworthy of Palladio; and to have rambled in search of shells and flowers, had but ill suited with the capacity of Newton.
From 'Numb. 83, Tuesday, January 1, 1750', The Rambler (1756), Vol. 2, 154. (Italian architect Palladio, 1509-80, is widely considered the most influential in the history of Western architecture.)
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Different (110)  |  Find (248)  |  Flower (65)  |  Genius (186)  |  Honour (23)  |  Laborer (6)  |  Learning (174)  |  Lowest (7)  |  Mean (63)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Search (85)  |  Shell (35)  |  Stone (57)  |  Suited (2)  |  Task (68)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Unworthy (8)

We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances.
From Isaac Newton, Rules of Reasoning in Philosophy, Rule 1, as translated by Andrew Motte in The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1803), Vol. 2, 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Cause (231)  |  Explain (61)  |  Natural (128)  |  Thing (37)  |  True (120)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial Intelligence (8)  |  Automatic (13)  |  Class (64)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Definition (152)  |  Effective (20)  |  Experience (268)  |  Human (445)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Make (23)  |  Objective (49)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Wide (14)

When experimental results are found to be in conflict with those of an earlier investigator, the matter is often taken too easily and disposed of for an instance by pointing out a possible source of error in the experiments of the predessessor, but without enquiring whether the error, if present, would be quantitatively sufficient to explain the discrepancy. I think that disagreement with former results should never be taken easily, but every effort should be made to find a true explanation. This can be done in many more cases than it actually is; and as a result, it can be done more easily by the man “on the spot” who is already familiar with the essential details. But it may require a great deal of imagination, and very often it will require supplementary experiments.
From 'August Krogh' in Festkrift Kψbenhavns Universitet 1950 (1950), 18, as cited by E. Snorrason, 'Krogh, Schack August Steenberg', in Charles Coulton Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol 7, 501. The DSB quote is introduced, “All his life Krogh was more interested in physical than in chemiical problems in biology, and he explained his critical attitude thus.”
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (49)  |  Detail (65)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Discrepancy (5)  |  Dispose (7)  |  Earlier (8)  |  Ease (29)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Essential (87)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Familiarity (12)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Point (72)  |  Possible (100)  |  Quantitative (15)  |  Require (33)  |  Result (250)  |  Supplementary (2)  |  Truth (750)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.