Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Nucleic Acid

Nucleic Acid Quotes (23 quotes)

Chance alone is at the source of every innovaton, of all creation in the biosphere. Pure chance, only chance, absolute but blind liberty is at the root of the prodigious edifice that is evolution... It today is the sole conceivable hypothesis, the only one that squares with observed and tested fact.
Stating life began by the chance collision of particles of nucleic acid in the “prebiotic soup.”
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Blind (95)  |  Chance (239)  |  Collision (15)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Creation (327)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Life (1795)  |  Observed (149)  |  Particle (194)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Pure (291)  |  Root (120)  |  Sole (49)  |  Soup (9)  |  Square (70)  |  Test (211)  |  Today (314)

Few scientists acquainted with the chemistry of biological systems at the molecular level can avoid being inspired. Evolution has produced chemical compounds exquisitely organized to accomplish the most complicated and delicate of tasks. Many organic chemists viewing crystal structures of enzyme systems or nucleic acids and knowing the marvels of specificity of the immune systems must dream of designing and synthesizing simpler organic compounds that imitate working features of these naturally occurring compounds.
In 'The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes', Nobel Lecture, 8 December 1987. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 419.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biological (137)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Compound (113)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Dream (208)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Immune System (3)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Compound (3)  |  Produced (187)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Task (147)

If the results of the present study on the chemical nature of the transforming principle are confirmed, then nucleic acids must be regarded as possessing biological specificity the chemical basis of which is as yet undetermined.
Oswald T. Avery (1877-1955), Colin Macleod (1909-72) and Maclyn McCarty (1911-2005), ‘Studies in the Chemical Nature of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types', Journal of Experimental Medicine 1944, 79, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Basis (173)  |  Biological (137)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Confirm (57)  |  DNA (77)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Study (653)

It has been found experimentally that the ratio of the amounts of adenine to thymine, and the ratio of guanine to cytosine, are always very close to unity for deoxyribose nucleic acid.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In 'Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids', Nature (1953), 171, 737.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Adenine (5)  |  Amount (151)  |  Author (167)  |  Cytosine (5)  |  Deoxyribonucleic Acid (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  DNA (77)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Guanine (4)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Thymine (5)  |  Unity (78)

It is, I believe, justifiable to make the generalization that anything an organic chemist can synthesize can be made without him. All he does is increase the probability that given reactions will “go”. So it is quite reasonable to assume that given sufficient time and proper conditions, nucleotides, amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids will arise by reactions that, though less probable, are as inevitable as those by which the organic chemist fulfills his predictions. So why not self-duplicating virus-like systems capable of further evolution?
The Place of Genetics in Modern Biology (1959),18.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Arise (158)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Condition (356)  |  DNA (77)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Organic (158)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Protein (54)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Self (267)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virus (27)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Knowing what we know from X-ray and related studies of the fibrous proteins, how they are built from long polypeptide chains with linear patterns drawn to a grand scale, how these chains can contract and take up different configurations by intramolecular folding, how the chain- groups are penetrated by, and their sidechains react with, smaller co-operating molecules, and finally how they can combine so readily with nucleic acid molecules and still maintain the fibrous configuration, it is but natural to assume, as a first working hypothesis at least, that they form the long scroll on which is written the pattern of life. No other molecules satisfy so many requirements.
William Thomas Astbury and Florence O. Bell. 'Some Recent Developments in the X-Ray Study of Proteins and Related Structures', Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology, 1938, 6, 1144.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Combine (57)  |  Different (577)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Life (1795)  |  Linear (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Protein (54)  |  Ray (114)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Scale (121)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  X-ray (37)

My own thinking (and that of many of my colleagues) is based on two general principles, which I shall call the Sequence Hypothesis and the Central Dogma. The direct evidence for both of them is negligible, but I have found them to be of great help in getting to grips with these very complex problems. I present them here in the hope that others can make similar use of them. Their speculative nature is emphasized by their names. It is an instructive exercise to attempt to build a useful theory without using them. One generally ends in the wilderness.
The Sequence Hypothesis
This has already been referred to a number of times. In its simplest form it assumes that the specificity of a piece of nucleic acid is expressed solely by the sequence of its bases, and that this sequence is a (simple) code for the amino acid sequence of a particular protein...
The Central Dogma
This states that once 'information' has passed into protein it cannot get out again. In more detail, the transfer of information from nucleic acid to nucleic acid, or from nucleic acid to protein may be possible, but transfer from protein to protein, or from protein to nucleic acid is impossible. Information means here the precise determination of sequence, either of bases in the nucleic acid or of amino acid residues in the protein. This is by no means universally held—Sir Macfarlane Burnet, for example, does not subscribe to it—but many workers now think along these lines. As far as I know it has not been explicitly stated before.
'On Protein Synthesis', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology: The Biological Replication of Macromolecules, 1958, 12, 152-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Already (222)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (493)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Central (80)  |  Code (31)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complex (188)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Direct (225)  |  DNA (77)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negligible (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Protein (54)  |  Residue (9)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wilderness (45)

One can say, looking at the papers in this symposium, that the elucidation of the genetic code is indeed a great achievement. It is, in a sense, the key to molecular biology because it shows how the great polymer languages, the nucleic acid language and the protein language, are linked together.
'The Genetic Code: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow', Cold Spring Harbour Symposium on Quantitative Biology, 1966, 31, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Acid (83)  |  Biology (216)  |  Code (31)  |  DNA (77)  |  Elucidation (7)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Language (293)  |  Looking (189)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Paper (182)  |  Polymer (4)  |  Protein (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Show (346)  |  Together (387)

Possibly the most pregnant recent development in molecular biology is the realization that the beginnings of life are closely associated with the interactions of proteins and nucleic acids.
'X-ray and Related Studies of the Structure of the Proteins and Nucleic Acids', PhD Thesis, University of Leeds (1939), 63. As quoted in Robert Cecil Olby, The Path to the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (1974), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biology (216)  |  Development (422)  |  DNA (77)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Life (1795)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Protein (54)  |  Realization (43)  |  Recent (77)

Recently, we’ve reported that we have made all five bases, the compounds that spell out the instructions for all life and are a part of the nucleic acids, RNA and DNA. Not only did we make all five bases but we found them in a meteorite! So that these two things coming together really assure us that the molecules necessary for life can be found in the absence of life. This was the biggest stumbling block.
In Space World (1985), 5, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compound (113)  |  DNA (77)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meteorite (9)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  RNA (4)  |  Stumbling Block (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)

Sodium thymonucleate fibres give two distinct types of X-ray diagram … [structures A and B]. The X-ray diagram of structure B (see photograph) shows in striking manner the features characteristic of helical structures, first worked out in this laboratory by Stokes (unpublished) and by Crick, Cochran and Vand2. Stokes and Wilkins were the first to propose such structures for nucleic acid as a result of direct studies of nucleic acid fibres, although a helical structure had been previously suggested by Furberg (thesis, London, 1949) on the basis of X-ray studies of nucleosides and nucleotides.
While the X-ray evidence cannot, at present, be taken as direct proof that the structure is helical, other considerations discussed below make the existence of a helical structure highly probable.
From Rosalind Franklin and R. G. Gosling,'Molecular Configuration in Sodium Thymonucleate', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 740.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Basis (173)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Helix (10)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proof (287)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Striking (48)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

The inducing substance, on the basis of its chemical and physical properties, appears to be a highly polymerized and viscous form of sodium desoxyribonucleate. On the other hand, the Type m capsular substance, the synthesis of which is evoked by this transforming agent, consists chiefly of a non-nitrogenous polysaccharide constituted of glucose-glucuronic acid units linked in glycosidic union. The presence of the newly formed capsule containing this type-specific polysaccharide confers on the transformed cells all the distinguishing characteristics of Pneumococcus Type III. Thus, it is evident that the inducing substance and the substance produced in turn are chemically distinct and biologically specific in their action and that both are requisite in determining the type of specificity of the cell of which they form a part. The experimental data presented in this paper strongly suggest that nucleic acids, at least those of the desoxyribose type, possess different specificities as evidenced by the selective action of the transforming principle.
Oswald T. Avery (1877-1955), Colin Macleod (1909-72) and Maclyn McCarty (1911-2005), ‘Studies in the Chemical Nature of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types', Journal of Experimental Medicine 1944, 79, 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Action (327)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Both (493)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Consist (223)  |  Data (156)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  DNA (77)  |  Evident (91)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Produced (187)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Transform (73)  |  Turn (447)  |  Type (167)  |  Union (51)

The nucleic acids, as constituents of living organisms, are comparable In importance to proteins. There is evidence that they are Involved In the processes of cell division and growth, that they participate In the transmission of hereditary characters, and that they are important constituents of viruses. An understanding of the molecular structure of the nucleic acids should be of value In the effort to understand the fundamental phenomena of life.
[Co-author with American chemist, B. Corey (1897-1971)]
'A Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), 39, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Division (65)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Importance (286)  |  Involved (90)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Organism (220)  |  Participation (15)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Protein (54)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Virus (27)

The possibility that the infective agent may not contain nucleic acid and consist only of a peptide or peptide-polysaccharide complex which has replication properties within susceptible cells is intriguing. If peptides, short-chain proteins, or peptide/fatty-acid/ polysaccharide complexes activate nucleic-acid template activity in the host genes to produce identical infective particles, this would invalidate the accepted dogma of present-day molecular biology in which D.N.A. and R.N.A. templates control all biological activity.
'Scrapie: An Infective Peptide?', The Lancet (1972), i, 748.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acid (83)  |  Activate (3)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consist (223)  |  Control (167)  |  DNA (77)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Gene (98)  |  Identical (53)  |  Infection (27)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Particle (194)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Present (619)  |  Protein (54)  |  Replication (9)  |  Short (197)

The precise equivalence of the chromosomes contributed by the two sexes is a physical correlative of the fact that the two sexes play, on the whole, equal parts in hereditary transmission, and it seems to show that the chromosomal substance, the chromatin, is to be regarded as the physical basis of inheritance. Now, chromatin is known to be closely similar to, if not identical with, a substance known as nuclein (C29H49N9O22, according to Miescher), which analysis shows to be a tolerably definite chemical compased of nucleic acid (a complex organic acid rich in phosphorus) and albumin. And thus we reach the remarkable conclusion that inheritance may, perhaps, be effected by the physical transmission of a particular chemical compound from parent to offspring.
In An Atlas of the Fertilization and Karyokinesis of the Ovum (1895), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Acid (83)  |  Albumin (2)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Basis (173)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chromatin (4)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Definite (110)  |  Effect (393)  |  Equivalence (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Identical (53)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Known (454)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Organic (158)  |  Parent (76)  |  Phosphorus (16)  |  Physical (508)  |  Precise (68)  |  Reach (281)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sex (69)  |  Show (346)  |  Substance (248)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)

The results serve to disprove the tetranucleotide hypothesis. It is, however, noteworthy—whether this is more than accidental, cannot yet be said—that in all desoxypentose nucleic acids examined thus far the molar ratios of total purines to total pyrimidines, and also of adenine to thymine and of guanine to cytosine, were not far from 1.
'Chemical Specificity of Nucleic Acids and Mechanism of their Enzymatic Degradation', Experientia, 1950, 6, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (27)  |  Acid (83)  |  Adenine (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Cytosine (5)  |  Disprove (23)  |  DNA (77)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  More (2559)  |  Pyrimidine (2)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Result (677)  |  Thymine (5)  |  Total (94)

The results suggest a helical structure (which must be very closely packed) containing probably 2, 3 or 4 coaxial nucleic acid chains per helical unit and having the phosphate groups near the outside.
Official Report, submitted in Feb 1952. In Anne Sayre, Rosalind Franklin and DNA (2000), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  DNA (77)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Must (1526)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phosphate (5)  |  Result (677)  |  Structure (344)

The skein of human continuity must often become this tenuous across the centuries (hanging by a thread, in the old cliche’), but the circle remains unbroken if I can touch the ink of Lavoisier’s own name, written by his own hand. A candle of light, nurtured by the oxygen of his greatest discovery, never burns out if we cherish the intellectual heritage of such unfractured filiation across the ages. We may also wish to contemplate the genuine physical thread of nucleic acid that ties each of us to the common bacterial ancestor of all living creatures, born on Lavoisier’s ancienne terre more than 3.5 billion years ago– and never since disrupted, not for one moment, not for one generation. Such a legacy must be worth preserving from all the guillotines of our folly.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acid (83)  |  Across (32)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Billion (95)  |  Burn (87)  |  Candle (30)  |  Century (310)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Circle (110)  |  Cliche (7)  |  Common (436)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Creature (233)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disrupt (2)  |  Folly (43)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Guillotine (5)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hang (45)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ink (10)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Often (106)  |  Old (481)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Physical (508)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Remain (349)  |  Skein (2)  |  Tenuous (3)  |  Thread (32)  |  Tie (38)  |  Touch (141)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Wish (212)  |  Worth (169)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

We are now witnessing, after the slow fermentation of fifty years, a concentration of technical power aimed at the essential determinants of heredity, development and disease. This concentration is made possible by the common function of nucleic acids as the molecular midwife of all reproductive particles. Indeed it is the nucleic acids which, in spite of their chemical obscurity, are giving to biology a unity which has so far been lacking, a chemical unity.
Nucleic Acid (1947), 266-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Biology (216)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Development (422)  |  Disease (328)  |  DNA (77)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Particle (194)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Slow (101)  |  Spite (55)  |  Unity (78)  |  Year (933)

We wish to discuss a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid. (D.N.A.). This structure has novel features which are of considerable biological interest. [Co-author with Francis Crick]
From James Watson and Francis Crick, 'Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 737. (Note: in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter (eds.), Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (2005), 226, this quote is listed under Rosalind Elsie Franklin and cited, incorrectly, as from “Rosalind Franklin and R. G. Gosling, 'Molecular Structures of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid', Nature, 1953, 171, 737.” However, the actual Franklin and Gosling article in that issue, is on pp.740-741, and titled 'Molecular Configuration in Sodium Thymonucleate'.)
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Biological (137)  |  Considerable (75)  |  DNA (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Novel (32)  |  Salt (46)  |  Structure (344)  |  Wish (212)

We wish to put forward a radically different structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid. This structure has two helical chains each coiled round the same axis (see diagram).
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
From James Watson and Francis Crick, 'Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 737.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Axis (9)  |  Chain (50)  |  Coil (3)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  DNA (77)  |  Forward (102)  |  Radical (25)  |  Salt (46)  |  See (1081)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)

We wish to suggest a structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). This structure has novel features which are of considerable biological interest.
[Opening remark in the paper by Watson and Crick announcing discovery of the structure of DNA.]
In J.D. Watson and F.H.C. Crick, 'A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid,' Letter in Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, 737. Quoted in Diane Dowdey, The Researching Reader: Source-based Writings Across the Disciplines (1990), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Biological (137)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Discovery (780)  |  DNA (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Novel (32)  |  Paper (182)  |  Salt (46)  |  Structure (344)  |  Structure Of DNA (5)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Wish (212)

While the biological properties of deoxypentose nucleic acid suggest a molecular structure containing great complexity, X-ray diffraction studies described here … show the basic molecular configuration has great simplicity. [Co-author with A.R. Stokes, H.R. Wilson. Thanks include to “… our colleagues R.E. Franklin, R.G. Gosling … for discussion.”]
From 'Molecular Structure of Deoxypentose Nucleic Acids', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 738. (Note: in W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter (eds.), Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (2005), 226, this quote is listed under Rosalind Elsie Franklin and cited, incorrectly, as from “Rosalind Franklin and R. G. Gosling, 'Molecular Structures of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid', Nature, 1953, 171, 741.” However, the Franklin and Gosling article on p.741 is the second of two pages titled 'Molecular Configuration in Sodium Thymonucleate'.)
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Basic (138)  |  Biological (137)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Discussion (72)  |  DNA (77)  |  Rosalind Franklin (17)  |  Great (1574)  |  Include (90)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Ray (114)  |  Show (346)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)  |  X-ray Diffraction (3)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.