Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Evident

Evident Quotes (14 quotes)


L’analyse mathématique … dans l’étude de tous les phénomènes; elle les interprète par le même langage, comme pour attester l’unité et la simplicité du plan de l’univers, et rendre encore plus manifeste cet ordre immuable qui préside à toutes les causes naturelles.
Mathematical analysis … in the study of all phenomena, interprets them by the same language, as if to attest the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make still more evident that unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), xv, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Attest (2)  |  Cause (231)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Language (155)  |  Mathematical Analysis (5)  |  Natural (128)  |  Order (167)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Same (92)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Study (331)  |  Unchangeable (7)  |  Unity (43)  |  Universe (563)

The Word Reason in the English Language has different Significances: sometimes it is taken for true, and clear Principles: Sometimes for clear, and fair deductions from those Principles: and sometimes for Cause, and particularly the final Cause: but the Consideration I shall have of it here, is in a Signification different from all these; and that is, as it stands for a Faculty of Man, That Faculty, whereby Man is supposed to be distinguished from Beasts; and wherein it is evident he much surpasses them.
In 'Of Reason', Essay Concerning Humane Understanding (1690), Book 4, Ch. 17, Sec. 1, 341.
Science quotes on:  |  Beast (32)  |  Cause (231)  |  Clear (52)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Definition (152)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  English (23)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Final (33)  |  Language (155)  |  Man (345)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Significance (60)  |  Surpass (12)  |  Truth (750)  |  Word (221)

As a graduate student at Columbia University, I remember the a priori derision of my distinguished stratigraphy professor toward a visiting Australian drifter ... Today my own students would dismiss with even more derision anyone who denied the evident truth of continental drift–a prophetic madman is at least amusing; a superannuated fuddy-duddy is merely pitiful.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (16)  |  Amusing (2)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Columbia (2)  |  Continental Drift (9)  |  Deny (29)  |  Derision (6)  |  Dismiss (6)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Graduate Student (2)  |  Least (43)  |  Madman (3)  |  Merely (35)  |  Pitiful (2)  |  Professor (39)  |  Prophetic (3)  |  Remember (53)  |  Stratigraphy (6)  |  Student (131)  |  Today (86)  |  Toward (29)  |  Truth (750)  |  University (51)  |  Visit (15)

But the real glory of science is that we can find a way of thinking such that the law is evident.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1965), Vol. 1, 26-3. In Carver A. Mead, Collective Electrodynamics: Quantum Foundations of Electromagnetism (2002), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Glory (44)  |  Law (418)  |  Science (1699)  |  Thinking (222)

It is the constant attempt in this country [Canada] to make fundamental science responsive to the marketplace. Because technology needs science, it is tempting to require that scientific projects be justified in terms of the worth of the technology they can be expected to generate. The effect of applying this criterion is, however, to restrict science to developed fields where the links to technology are most evident. By continually looking for a short-term payoff we disqualify the sort of science that … attempts to answer fundamental questions, and, having answered them, suggests fundamentally new approaches in the realm of applications.
'A Scientist and the World He Lives In', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (27 Nov 1986) in C. Frank Turner and Tim Dickson (eds.), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1986-1987 (1987), 149-161.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Application (117)  |  Approach (33)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Criterion (10)  |  Effect (133)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Marketplace (2)  |  New (340)  |  Payoff (2)  |  Project (22)  |  Question (315)  |  Realm (40)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Restriction (6)  |  Short-Term (2)  |  Technology (199)

Like Molière’s M. Jourdain, who spoke prose all his life without knowing it, mathematicians have been reasoning for at least two millennia without being aware of all the principles underlying what they were doing. The real nature of the tools of their craft has become evident only within recent times A renaissance of logical studies in modern times begins with the publication in 1847 of George Boole’s The Mathematical Analysis of Logic.
Co-authored with James R. Newman in Gödel's Proof (1986, 2005), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Aware (18)  |  Begin (52)  |  George Boole (9)  |  Craft (7)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Modern (104)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Principle (228)  |  Prose (6)  |  Publication (83)  |  Real (95)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Recent (23)  |  Renaissance (8)  |  Study (331)  |  Time (439)  |  Tool (70)

No science doth make known the first principles whereon it buildeth; but they are always taken as plain and manifest in themselves, or as proved and granted already, some former knowledge having made them evident.
In The of Mr. Richard Hooker in Eight Books Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (1723), Book 3, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (80)  |  Former (18)  |  Grant (21)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Manifest (11)  |  Plain (24)  |  Principle (228)  |  Prove (60)  |  Science (1699)

Obvious facts are apt to be over-rated. System-makers see the gravitation of history, and fail to observe its chemistry, of greater though less evident power.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fail (34)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Greater (36)  |  History (302)  |  Less (54)  |  Observe (48)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Power (273)  |  System (141)

Pure mathematics and physics are becoming ever more closely connected, though their methods remain different. One may describe the situation by saying that the mathematician plays a game in which he himself invents the rules while the while the physicist plays a game in which the rules are provided by Nature, but as time goes on it becomes increasingly evident that the rules which the mathematician finds interesting are the same as those which Nature has chosen. … Possibly, the two subjects will ultimately unify, every branch of pure mathematics then having its physical application, its importance in physics being proportional to its interest in mathematics.
From Lecture delivered on presentation of the James Scott prize, (6 Feb 1939), 'The Relation Between Mathematics And Physics', printed in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1938-1939), 59, Part 2, 124.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Branch (61)  |  Closely (8)  |  Connected (7)  |  Describe (38)  |  Different (110)  |  Game (45)  |  Importance (183)  |  Interest (170)  |  Invent (30)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Method (154)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Play (60)  |  Pure (62)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Rule (135)  |  Situation (41)  |  Subject (129)  |  Ultimately (11)  |  Unify (4)

Science is knowledge certain and evident in itself, or by the principles from which it is deducted, or with which it is certainly connected. It is subjective, as existing in the mind; objective, as embodied in truths; speculative, as leading to do something, as in practical science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (84)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Connect (15)  |  Embody (13)  |  Exist (89)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Lead (101)  |  Mind (544)  |  Objective (49)  |  Practical (93)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Speculative (4)  |  Subjective (9)  |  Truth (750)

The gods love what is mysterious, and dislike what is evident.
4.2.2. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 119
Science quotes on:  |  Dislike (11)  |  God (454)  |  Love (164)  |  Mysterious (21)

There are pessimists who hold that such a state of affairs is necessarily inherent in human nature; it is those who propound such views that are the enemies of true religion, for they imply thereby that religious teachings are utopian ideals and unsuited to afford guidance in human affairs. The study of the social patterns in certain so-called primitive cultures, however, seems to have made it sufficiently evident that such a defeatist view is wholly unwarranted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (11)  |  Certain (84)  |  Culture (85)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Guidance (12)  |  Hold (56)  |  Human Affairs (5)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Imply (12)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Pessimist (5)  |  Primitive (37)  |  Propound (2)  |  Religion (210)  |  Religious (44)  |  Seem (89)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Study (331)  |  Sufficiently (6)  |  Teachings (2)  |  Thereby (4)  |  True (120)  |  Utopian (3)  |  View (115)  |  Wholly (7)

These duplicates in those parts of the body, without which a man might have very well subsisted, though not so well as with them, are a plain demonstration of an all-wise Contriver, as those more numerous copyings which are found among the vessels of the same body are evident demonstrations that they could not be the work of chance. This argument receives additional strength if we apply it to every animal and insect within our knowledge, as well as to those numberless living creatures that are objects too minute for a human eye: and if we consider how the several species in this whole world of life resemble one another in very many particulars, so far as is convenient for their respective states of existence, it is much more probable that a hundred millions of dice should be casually thrown a hundred millions of times in the same number than that the body of any single animal should be produced by the fortuitous concourse of matter.
In The Spectator (22 Nov 1712), No. 543, as collected in Vol. 4 (1721, 10th ed.), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (4)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apply (38)  |  Argument (59)  |  Body (193)  |  Chance (122)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Consider (45)  |  Contriver (2)  |  Creature (127)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dice (13)  |  Duplicate (4)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fortuitous (7)  |  Human Eye (2)  |  Insect (57)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Matter (270)  |  Million (89)  |  Minute (25)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Object (110)  |  Particular (54)  |  Probability (83)  |  Probable (14)  |  Produce (63)  |  Receive (39)  |  Resemble (16)  |  Species (181)  |  Strength (63)  |  Subsist (3)  |  Throw (31)  |  Vessel (21)  |  Wisdom (151)

What happened to those Ice Age beasts? What caused the mammoth and mastodon and wooly rhinoceros to pay the ultimate Darwinian penalty, while bison and musk ox survived? Why didn't the fauna of Africa suffer the kinds of losses evident in other regions of the world? And if something like climatic change caused the extinction of North America's Pleistocene horse, how have feral horses managed to reestablish themselves on the western range?
(1986)
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (15)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Fauna (10)  |  Horse (40)  |  Ice Age (7)  |  Loss (62)  |  Mammoth (7)  |  Mastodon (3)  |  Musk (2)  |  North America (4)  |  Ox (3)  |  Penalty (5)  |  Pleistocene (3)  |  Rhinoceros (2)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Survive (28)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.