Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Lose

Lose Quotes (93 quotes)

'Tis a short sight to limit our faith in laws to those of gravity, of chemistry, of botany, and so forth. Those laws do not stop where our eyes lose them, but push the same geometry and chemistry up into the invisible plane of social and rational life, so that, look where we will, in a boy's game, or in the strifes of races, a perfect reaction, a perpetual judgment keeps watch and ward.
From 'Worship', The Conduct of Life (1860) collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1866), Vol.2, 401.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (51)  |  Boy (46)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Eye (218)  |  Faith (157)  |  Game (61)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Judgment (98)  |  Law (513)  |  Life (1124)  |  Limit (123)  |  Look (52)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Perpetual (20)  |  Plane (17)  |  Race (103)  |  Rational (56)  |  Reaction (61)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Life (3)  |  Stop (75)  |  Strife (9)  |  Ward (4)  |  Watch (64)

04.23 To lose by caution is rare indeed.
Confucius
As translated by David Hinton in Analects (2014), Chap 4, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (21)  |  Rare (47)

Steckt keine Poesie in der Lokomotive, die brausend durch die Nacht zieht und über die zitternde Erde hintobt, als wollte sie Raum und Zeit zermalmen, in dem hastigen, aber wohl geregelten Zucken und Zerren ihrer gewaltigen Glieder, in dem stieren, nur auf ein Ziel losstürmenden Blick ihrer roten Augen, in dem emsigen, willenlosen Gefolge der Wagen, die kreischend und klappernd, aber mit unfehlbarer Sicherheit dem verkörperten Willen aus Eisen und Stahl folge leisten?
Is there no poetry in the locomotive roaring through the night and charging over the quivering earth as if it wanted to crush time and space? Is there no poetry in the hasty but regular jerking and tugging of its powerful limbs, in the stare of its red eyes that never lose sight of their goal? Is there no poetry in the bustling, will-less retinue of cars that follow, screeching and clattering with unmistakable surety, the steel and iron embodiment of will?
Max Eyth
From 'Poesie und Technik' (1904) (Poetry and Technology), in Schweizerische Techniker-Zeitung (1907), Vol 4, 306, as translated in Paul A. Youngman, Black Devil and Iron Angel: The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism (2005), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (27)  |  Crush (7)  |  Earth (635)  |  Embodiment (6)  |  Eye (218)  |  Follow (123)  |  Goal (100)  |  Hasty (6)  |  Iron (65)  |  Limb (7)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Night (117)  |  Poetry (120)  |  Powerful (66)  |  Quivering (2)  |  Red (35)  |  Regular (13)  |  Retinue (2)  |  Sight (47)  |  Space (257)  |  Stare (9)  |  Steel (17)  |  Time (594)  |  Unmistakable (5)  |  Wanted (4)  |  Will (31)

A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Candle (23)  |  Light (345)  |  Nothing (385)

A committee is a group that keeps minutes and loses hours.
In Bernard S. Raskas, Living Thoughts: Inspiration, Insight, and Wisdom from Sources Throughout the Ages (1976), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Committee (15)  |  Group (72)  |  Hour (71)  |  Keep (100)  |  Minute (43)

A man loses his fortune; he gains earnestness. His eyesight goes; it leads him to a spirituality... We think we are pushing our own way bravely, but there is a great Hand in ours all the time.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 20
Science quotes on:  |  Bravely (3)  |  Earnestness (2)  |  Eyesight (4)  |  Fortune (27)  |  Gain (67)  |  Lead (158)  |  Ours (4)  |  Push (29)  |  Spirituality (8)  |  Think (341)  |  Time (594)

Antiessentialist thinking forces us to view the world differently. We must accept shadings and continua as fundamental. We lose criteria for judgment by comparison to some ideal: short people, retarded people, people of other beliefs, colors, and religions are people of full status.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Belief (503)  |  Color (99)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Continua (3)  |  Criterion (18)  |  Differently (4)  |  Force (249)  |  Full (63)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Ideal (69)  |  Judgment (98)  |  People (388)  |  Religion (239)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Short (49)  |  Status (20)  |  Think (341)  |  View (171)  |  World (892)

Arithmetic is where you have to multiply—and you carry the multiplication table in your head and hope you won’t lose it.
From 'Arithmetic', Harvest Poems, 1910-1960 (1960), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Carry (59)  |  Head (80)  |  Hope (174)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Table (35)

Arithmetic tells you how many you lose or win if you know how many you had before you lost or won.
From 'Arithmetic', Harvest Poems, 1910-1960 (1960), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Know (547)  |  Tell (110)  |  Win (38)

Before a complex of sensations becomes a recollection placeable in time, it has ceased to be actual. We must lose our awareness of its infinite complexity, or it is still actual ... It is only after a memory has lost all life that it can be classed in time, just as only dissected flowers find their way into the herbarium of a botanist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (47)  |  Awareness (27)  |  Become (172)  |  Botanist (17)  |  Cease (37)  |  Class (83)  |  Complex (94)  |  Complexity (90)  |  Dissection (28)  |  Find (405)  |  Flower (76)  |  Herbarium (2)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Life (1124)  |  Memory (105)  |  Recollection (11)  |  Sensation (28)  |  Time (594)

Chief Seattle, of the Indians that inhabited the Seattle area, wrote a wonderful paper that has to do with putting oneself in tune with the universe. He said, “Why should I lament the disappearance of my people! All things end, and the white man will find this out also.” And this goes for the universe. One can be at peace with that. This doesn’t mean that one shouldn’t participate in efforts to correct the situation. But underlying the effort to change must be an “at peace.” To win a dog sled race is great. To lose is okay too.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Area (29)  |  Change (363)  |  Correct (83)  |  Disappearance (22)  |  Dog (44)  |  Effort (143)  |  End (195)  |  Find (405)  |  Great (524)  |  Indian (20)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Lament (9)  |  Mean (101)  |  Oneself (5)  |  Paper (82)  |  Participate (8)  |  Peace (84)  |  People (388)  |  Race (103)  |  Say (228)  |  Situation (52)  |  Sled (2)  |  Tune (14)  |  Underlying (18)  |  Universe (683)  |  White (56)  |  Win (38)  |  Wonderful (59)  |  Write (153)

Despite the vision and the far-seeing wisdom of our wartime heads of state, the physicists felt a peculiarly intimate responsibility for suggesting, for supporting, and in the end, in large measure, for achieving the realization of atomic weapons. Nor can we forget that these weapons, as they were in fact used, dramatized so mercilessly the inhumanity and evil of modern war. In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose.
In Arthur Dehon Little Memorial Lecture (25 Nov 1947) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 'Physics in the Contemporary World'. Collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, The Open Mind (1955), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (107)  |  Crude (17)  |  Evil (78)  |  Humour (103)  |  Inhumanity (3)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Merciless (3)  |  Modern (159)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Realization (37)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Sense (315)  |  Suggestion (30)  |  Support (77)  |  Vision (94)  |  Vulgarity (2)  |  War (161)  |  Weapon (66)  |  Wisdom (180)

Each species has evolved a special set of solutions to the general problems that all organisms must face. By the fact of its existence, a species demonstrates that its members are able to carry out adequately a series of general functions. … These general functions offer a framework within which one can integrate one’s view of biology and focus one’s research. Such a view helps one to avoid becoming lost in a morass of unstructured detail—even though the ways in which different species perform these functions may differ widely. A few obvious examples will suffice. Organisms must remain functionally integrated. They must obtain materials from their environments, and process and release energy from these materials. … They must differentiate and grow, and they must reproduce. By focusing one’s questions on one or another of these obligatory and universal capacities, one can ensure that one’s research will not be trivial and that it will have some chance of achieving broad general applicability.
In 'Integrative Biology: An Organismic Biologist’s Point of View', Integrative and Comparative Biology (2005), 45, 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Adequately (3)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Avoid (52)  |  Become (172)  |  Biology (168)  |  Broad (27)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Carry (59)  |  Chance (159)  |  Demonstrate (50)  |  Detail (85)  |  Differ (22)  |  Different (178)  |  Differentiate (12)  |  Energy (214)  |  Ensure (10)  |  Environment (180)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Example (92)  |  Existence (296)  |  Face (108)  |  Fact (725)  |  Focus (27)  |  Framework (20)  |  Function (128)  |  General (156)  |  Grow (98)  |  Help (101)  |  Integrate (5)  |  Material (154)  |  Member (39)  |  Morass (2)  |  Obligatory (3)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Obvious (79)  |  Offer (43)  |  Organism (150)  |  Perform (34)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Question (404)  |  Release (21)  |  Remain (111)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Research (589)  |  Series (50)  |  Set (97)  |  Solution (211)  |  Special (74)  |  Species (220)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Trivial (41)  |  Universal (100)  |  View (171)  |  Widely (8)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (103)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (52)  |  Best (172)  |  Both (81)  |  Circle (55)  |  Computation (18)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (80)  |  Consist (45)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Design (113)  |  Determine (72)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Division (33)  |  Draw (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elegance (29)  |  Equal (77)  |  Equation (93)  |  Expression (104)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (405)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Industrious (8)  |  Introduce (41)  |  Invent (50)  |  Line (89)  |  Modern (159)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Place (174)  |  Problem (490)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Reckon (14)  |  Right (196)  |  Science (2043)  |  Simple (172)  |  Simplicity (146)  |  Solid (50)  |  Sort (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Tedious (9)  |  Term (120)  |  Truly (33)  |  Wherefore (2)

Every hour a scientist spends trying to raise funds is an hour lost from important thought and research.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 287.
Science quotes on:  |  Funding (13)  |  Hour (71)  |  Important (202)  |  Research (589)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Thought (536)

Every lecture should state one main point and repeat it over and over, like a theme with variations. An audience is like a herd of cows, moving slowly in the direction they are being driven towards. If we make one point, we have a good chance that the audience will take the right direction; if we make several points, then the cows will scatter all over the field. The audience will lose interest and everyone will go back to the thoughts they interrupted in order to come to our lecture.
In 'Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Audience (17)  |  Chance (159)  |  Cow (30)  |  Direction (74)  |  Drive (55)  |  Field (170)  |  Herd (14)  |  Interest (235)  |  Interrupt (5)  |  Lecture (67)  |  Main (27)  |  Move (94)  |  Point (122)  |  Repeat (40)  |  Right (196)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Slowly (18)  |  State (136)  |  Theme (12)  |  Thought (536)  |  Toward (45)  |  Variation (61)

Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.
In 'Reflection on the Atomic Bomb', Yale Poetry Review (Dec 1947). Reprinted in Robert Bartlett Haas (Ed.), Reflection on the Atomic Bomb: Volume One of the Previously Uncollected Writings of Gertrude Stein (1973), Vol. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Everybody (27)  |  Information (121)

First, as concerns the success of teaching mathematics. No instruction in the high schools is as difficult as that of mathematics, since the large majority of students are at first decidedly disinclined to be harnessed into the rigid framework of logical conclusions. The interest of young people is won much more easily, if sense-objects are made the starting point and the transition to abstract formulation is brought about gradually. For this reason it is psychologically quite correct to follow this course.
Not less to be recommended is this course if we inquire into the essential purpose of mathematical instruction. Formerly it was too exclusively held that this purpose is to sharpen the understanding. Surely another important end is to implant in the student the conviction that correct thinking based on true premises secures mastery over the outer world. To accomplish this the outer world must receive its share of attention from the very beginning.
Doubtless this is true but there is a danger which needs pointing out. It is as in the case of language teaching where the modern tendency is to secure in addition to grammar also an understanding of the authors. The danger lies in grammar being completely set aside leaving the subject without its indispensable solid basis. Just so in Teaching of Mathematics it is possible to accumulate interesting applications to such an extent as to stunt the essential logical development. This should in no wise be permitted, for thus the kernel of the whole matter is lost. Therefore: We do want throughout a quickening of mathematical instruction by the introduction of applications, but we do not want that the pendulum, which in former decades may have inclined too much toward the abstract side, should now swing to the other extreme; we would rather pursue the proper middle course.
In Ueber den Mathematischen Unterricht an den hoheren Schulen; Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung, Bd. 11, 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (79)  |  Accomplishment (79)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Addition (29)  |  Application (166)  |  Attention (115)  |  Author (61)  |  Base (71)  |  Basis (89)  |  Begin (106)  |  Bring (90)  |  Case (98)  |  Completely (32)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Correct (83)  |  Course (83)  |  Danger (78)  |  Decade (32)  |  Development (276)  |  Difficult (116)  |  End (195)  |  Essential (115)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Extent (49)  |  Extreme (54)  |  Follow (123)  |  Former (25)  |  Formerly (5)  |  Formulation (25)  |  Framework (20)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Grammar (13)  |  Harness (19)  |  High School (11)  |  Hold (92)  |  Implant (3)  |  Important (202)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Inquire (9)  |  Instruction (72)  |  Interest (235)  |  Introduction (34)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Language (217)  |  Leave (127)  |  Logic (247)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mastery (27)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Matter (340)  |  Middle (15)  |  Modern (159)  |  Need (283)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pendulum (15)  |  Permit (30)  |  Point (122)  |  Possible (155)  |  Premise (25)  |  Proper (36)  |  Psychological (12)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Pursue (21)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (454)  |  Receive (59)  |  Recommend (7)  |  Rigid (12)  |  Secure (20)  |  Sense (315)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Share (49)  |  Sharpen (15)  |  Side (51)  |  Solid (50)  |  Starting Point (13)  |  Student (201)  |  Stunt (3)  |  Subject (235)  |  Success (248)  |  Swing (10)  |  Teach (179)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Tendency (54)  |  Think (341)  |  Transition (18)  |  True (201)  |  Understand (326)  |  Want (175)  |  Whole (189)  |  Wise (60)  |  World (892)  |  Young (98)

For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?
Bible
Mark 8:36. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 17
Science quotes on:  |  Gain (67)  |  Profit (38)  |  Soul (163)  |  Whole (189)  |  World (892)

Given angel’s wings, where might you fly?
In what sweet heaven might you find your love?
Unwilling to be bound, where might you move,
Lost between the wonder and the why?...
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (30)  |  Bind (25)  |  Find (405)  |  Fly (99)  |  Give (200)  |  Heaven (151)  |  Love (221)  |  Move (94)  |  Sweet (14)  |  Unwilling (9)  |  Wing (48)  |  Wonder (169)

Goethe said that he who cannot draw on 3,000 years of learning is living hand to mouth. It could just as well be said that individuals who do tap deeply into this rich cultural legacy are wealthy indeed. Yet the paradox is that much of this wisdom is buried in a sea of lesser books or like lost treasure beneath an ocean of online ignorance and trivia. That doesn’t mean that with a little bit of diligence you can’t tap into it. Yet many people, perhaps most, never take advantage of all this human experience. They aren’t obtaining knowledge beyond what they need to know for work or to get by. As a result, their view of our amazing world is diminished and their lives greatly circumscribed.
In An Embarrassment of Riches: Tapping Into the World's Greatest Legacy of Wealth (2013), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (73)  |  Amazing (21)  |  Arent (5)  |  Beneath (16)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Bit (22)  |  Book (257)  |  Bury (16)  |  Circumscribe (2)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Diligence (16)  |  Diminish (16)  |  Draw (55)  |  Experience (338)  |  Goethe (2)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hand (141)  |  Human (548)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Individual (215)  |  Know (547)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learn (281)  |  Legacy (11)  |  Lesser (5)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mouth (21)  |  Need (283)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Online (4)  |  Paradox (43)  |  People (388)  |  Result (376)  |  Rich (61)  |  Say (228)  |  Sea (187)  |  Tap (10)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Trivia (2)  |  View (171)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Work (626)  |  World (892)  |  Year (299)

Great thinkers build their edifices with subtle consistency. We do our intellectual forebears an enormous disservice when we dismember their visions and scan their systems in order to extract a few disembodied ‘gems’–thoughts or claims still accepted as true. These disarticulated pieces then become the entire legacy of our ancestors, and we lose the beauty and coherence of older systems that might enlighten us by their unfamiliarity–and their consequent challenge in our fallible (and complacent) modern world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Ancestor (40)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Become (172)  |  Build (117)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Claim (70)  |  Coherence (10)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Consequent (4)  |  Consistency (23)  |  Disembodied (6)  |  Disservice (4)  |  Edifice (15)  |  Enlighten (4)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Entire (46)  |  Extract (17)  |  Gem (13)  |  Great (524)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Legacy (11)  |  Modern World (3)  |  Old (147)  |  Order (239)  |  Piece (38)  |  Scan (3)  |  Subtle (33)  |  System (191)  |  Thinker (18)  |  Thought (536)  |  True (201)  |  Unfamiliarity (4)  |  Vision (94)

Guido was as much enchanted by the rudiments of algebra as he would have been if I had given him an engine worked by steam, with a methylated spirit lamp to heat the boiler; more enchanted, perhaps for the engine would have got broken, and, remaining always itself, would in any case have lost its charm, while the rudiments of algebra continued to grow and blossom in his mind with an unfailing luxuriance. Every day he made the discovery of something which seemed to him exquisitely beautiful; the new toy was inexhaustible in its potentialities.
In Young Archimedes: And Other Stories (1924), 299. The fictional character, Guido, is a seven year old boy. Methylated spirit is an alcohol fuel.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (18)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Blossom (13)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Break (54)  |  Charm (26)  |  Continue (63)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Enchanted (2)  |  Exquisite (14)  |  Give (200)  |  Grow (98)  |  Inexhaustible (13)  |  Mind (743)  |  New (483)  |  Potential (39)  |  Remain (111)  |  Rudiment (4)  |  Steam Engine (42)  |  Toy (15)  |  Unfailing (4)

He saw virus particles shaped like snakes, in negative images. They were white cobras tangled among themselves, like the hair of Medusa. They were the face of nature herself, the obscene goddess revealed naked. This life form thing was breathtakingly beautiful. As he stared at it, he found himself being pulled out of the human world into a world where moral boundaries blur and finally dissolve completely. He was lost in wonder and admiration, even though he knew that he was the prey.
The Hot Zone
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Blur (6)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Cobra (2)  |  Completely (32)  |  Dissolve (13)  |  Face (108)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (405)  |  Goddess (5)  |  Hair (25)  |  Human (548)  |  Image (55)  |  Know (547)  |  Life Form (6)  |  Moral (123)  |  Naked (9)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Negative (33)  |  Obscene (3)  |  Particle (99)  |  Prey (12)  |  Pull (22)  |  Reveal (50)  |  See (369)  |  Shape (69)  |  Snake (16)  |  Stare (9)  |  Tangle (5)  |  Virus (23)  |  White (56)  |  Wonder (169)  |  World (892)

He who neglects learning in his youth loses the past and is dead for the future
Euripides
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (57)  |  Future (284)  |  Learn (281)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Past (150)  |  Youth (75)

Heavy dependence on direct observation is essential to biology not only because of the complexity of biological phenomena, but because of the intervention of natural selection with its criterion of adequacy rather than perfection. In a system shaped by natural selection it is inevitable that logic will lose its way.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Biological (35)  |  Biology (168)  |  Complexity (90)  |  Criterion (18)  |  Dependence (37)  |  Direct (82)  |  Essential (115)  |  Heavy (22)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Intervention (12)  |  Logic (247)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Observation (445)  |  Perfection (88)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Shape (69)  |  System (191)

Humanity has the stars in its future, and that future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition.
In 'The Deadly Information', Introduction written by Asimov for James Randi, Flim-Flam (1982), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Burden (27)  |  Folly (32)  |  Future (284)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Important (202)  |  Juvenile (3)  |  Star (336)  |  Superstition (56)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (144)  |  Distance (76)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (45)  |  Friend (85)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (83)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Lone (2)  |  Need (283)  |  Sense (315)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (23)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Truly (33)  |  Whole (189)

I ask any one who has adopted the calling of an engineer, how much time he lost when he left school, because he had to devote himself to pursuits which were absolutely novel and strange, and of which he had not obtained the remotest conception from his instructors? He had to familiarize himself with ideas of the course and powers of Nature, to which his attention had never been directed during his school-life, and to learn, for the first time, that a world of facts lies outside and beyond the world of words.
From After-Dinner Speech (Apr 1869) delivered before the Liverpool Philomathic Society, 'Scientific Education', collected in Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 63. Previously published in Macmillan’s Magazine.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (115)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Conception (88)  |  Course (83)  |  Directed (2)  |  Engineering (141)  |  Fact (725)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  First (313)  |  Idea (577)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Learn (281)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Novel (19)  |  Outside (48)  |  Power (358)  |  School (117)  |  Strange (94)  |  Time (594)  |  Word (299)  |  World (892)

I do not believe in freedom of the will. Schopenhauer’s words: ‘Man can do what he wants, but he cannot will what he wills’ accompany me in all situations throughout my life and reconcile me with the actions of others even if they are rather painful to me. This awareness of the lack of freedom of will preserves me from taking too seriously myself and my fellow men as acting and deciding individuals and from losing my temper.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (21)  |  Act (115)  |  Action (184)  |  Awareness (27)  |  Belief (503)  |  Decide (40)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Freedom (101)  |  Individual (215)  |  Lack (77)  |  Life (1124)  |  Myself (36)  |  Painful (10)  |  Preserve (51)  |  Reconcile (12)  |  Schopenhauers (2)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Situation (52)  |  Temper (9)  |  Want (175)  |  Word (299)

I do not think that, practically or morally, we can defend a policy of saving every distinctive local population of organisms. I can cite a good rationale for the preservation of species, for each species is a unique and separate natural object that, once lost, can never be reconstituted. But subspecies are distinctive local populations of species with broader geographic range. Subspecies are dynamic, interbreedable, and constantly changing: what then are we saving by declaring them all inviolate?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Change (363)  |  Cite (6)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Declare (27)  |  Defend (29)  |  Distinctive (14)  |  Dynamic (13)  |  Geographic (2)  |  Good (345)  |  Local (19)  |  Morally (2)  |  Natural (167)  |  Object (169)  |  Organism (150)  |  Policy (24)  |  Population (78)  |  Practically (10)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Range (57)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Save (56)  |  Separate (69)  |  Species (220)  |  Subspecies (2)  |  Think (341)  |  Unique (41)

I gang my own gait and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties I have never lost an obstinate sense of detachment, of the need for solitude–a feeling which increases with the years.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Country (144)  |  Detachment (7)  |  Face (108)  |  Family (45)  |  Feel (165)  |  Friend (85)  |  Gang (4)  |  Heart (139)  |  Home (83)  |  Immediate (43)  |  Increase (145)  |  Need (283)  |  Obstinate (5)  |  Sense (315)  |  Solitude (11)  |  Tie (23)  |  Whole (189)  |  Year (299)

I think every child born on this planet up to the age of about four or five is fascinated by the natural world. If they aren’t it’s because we deprive them of the opportunity. Over half the world’s population is urbanised and the thought that some children may grow up not looking at a pond or knowing how plants grow is a terrible thing. If you lose that delight and joy and intoxication, you’ve lost something hugely precious.
From interview with Alice Roberts, 'Attenborough: My Life on Earth', The Biologist (Aug 2015), 62, No. 4, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (245)  |  Delight (64)  |  Fascinated (2)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Joy (88)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Plant (199)  |  Pond (11)  |  Precious (31)  |  Urban (7)

In a hundred and fifty years the United States has lost one third of its topsoil. And I think about two hundred fifty million acres are turning into desert because of overgrazing and other mismanagement.
From interview collected in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (7)  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Desert (38)  |  Million (111)  |  Turn (118)  |  United States (31)

In mathematics as in other fields, to find one self lost in wonder at some manifestation is frequently the half of a new discovery.
In Werke, Bd. 8 (1897), 233.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (676)  |  Field (170)  |  Find (405)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Half (56)  |  Manifestation (33)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  New (483)  |  Self (47)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Wonder (169)

It is easy to overlook this thought that life just is. As humans we are inclined to feel that life must have a point. We have plans and aspirations and desires. We want to take constant advantage of the intoxicating existence we’ve been endowed with. But what’s life to a lichen? Yet its impulse to exist, to be, is every bit as strong as ours-arguably even stronger. If I were told that I had to spend decades being a furry growth on a rock in the woods, I believe I would lose the will to go on. Lichens don’t. Like virtually all living things, they will suffer any hardship; endure any insult, for a moment’s additions existence. Life, in short just wants to be.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (29)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Aspiration (27)  |  Belief (503)  |  Bit (22)  |  Constant (56)  |  Decade (32)  |  Desire (140)  |  Easy (98)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endure (20)  |  Exist (147)  |  Existence (296)  |  Feel (165)  |  Growth (122)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Human (548)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Insult (10)  |  Intoxicating (2)  |  Life (1124)  |  Living Things (5)  |  Moment (106)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Plan (87)  |  Point (122)  |  Rock (125)  |  Short (49)  |  Spend (43)  |  Strong (72)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Tell (110)  |  Thought (536)  |  Virtually (6)  |  Want (175)  |  Weve (13)  |  Wood (49)

It’s a case of many oceans around the world being degraded by negligence. The ocean is the lifeblood of our world. If we were to lose our fish that we appreciate so much by overfishing; or if we were to lose some of our favorite beaches to overbuilding and pollution, then how would we feel? It’s become a case of not knowing what you’ve got until it’s gone. But by no means is it too late.
From transcript of interview, 'Olympic swimmer: Oceans need our help', NBC News Today web site (14 Nov 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (29)  |  Beach (16)  |  Degrade (8)  |  Favorite (24)  |  Fish (95)  |  Know (547)  |  Late (52)  |  Lifeblood (3)  |  Negligence (2)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Pollution (43)  |  World (892)

I’ve lost my faith in science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Faith (157)  |  Science (2043)

Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous.
Confucius
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Labor (71)  |  Learn (281)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Thought (536)

Let us weigh the gain and the loss in wagering that God is. Let us consider the two chances. If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager then without hesitation that He is.
In Pensées (1670), Section 10. From Blaise Pascal and W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 85. Also seen translated as, “…consider the two possibilities…”. From the French, “Pesons le gain et la perte, en prenant croix, que Dieu est. Estimons ces deux cas: si vous gagnez, vous gagnez tout; si vous perdez, vous ne perdez rien. Gagez donc qu’il est, sans hésiter,” in Oeuvres Complètes de Blaise Pascal (1864), Vol. 1, 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (159)  |  Consider (80)  |  Gain (67)  |  God (535)  |  Hesitate (6)  |  Loss (73)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Wager (3)

Life’s greatest tragedy is to lose God and not to miss him.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 153
Science quotes on:  |  God (535)  |  Great (524)  |  Life (1124)  |  Miss (27)  |  Tragedy (22)

Lise Meitner: a physicist who never lost her humanity.
Epitaph
Tombstone inscription, St. James' Church, Bramley, Hampshire. In Ruth Sime, Lise Meitner: A Life in Physics (1996), 380.
Science quotes on:  |  Epitaph (19)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Physicist (160)

Logic, like whiskey, loses its beneficial effect when taken in too large quantities.
In 'Weeds and Moss', My Ireland (1937), Chap. 19, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (72)  |  Effect (165)  |  Large (130)  |  Logic (247)  |  Quantity (64)

Looking down on this great metropolis, the ingenuity with which we continue to reshape our planet is very striking. It’s also sobering. It reminds me of just how easy it is for us to lose our connection with the natural world. Yet it is on this connection that the future of both humanity and the natural world will depend.
From BBC TV series Planet Earth II, while at London from the top of a skyscraper. As quoted in interview with Joe Shute, 'David Attenborough at 90: ‘I think about my mortality every day’', The Telegraph (29 Oct 2016).
Science quotes on:  |  Connection (107)  |  Depend (87)  |  Future (284)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Look (52)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Planet (262)  |  Reshape (4)

Lost in the milky way,
Smile at the empty sky
And wait for the moment
When a million chances may all collide.
Song lyrics
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (159)  |  Empty (40)  |  Milky Way (24)  |  Million (111)  |  Moment (106)  |  Sky (124)  |  Smile (19)  |  Wait (57)

Men who have had a great deal of experience learn not to lose their tempers.
Quoted without citation in Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations (1891), 565. Webmaster invites help pinpointing the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Experience (338)  |  Great (524)  |  Learn (281)  |  Temper (9)

Money lost—nothing lost, Health lost—little lost, Spirit lost—everything lost.
In The Story of the Winged-S: The Autobiography of Igor I. Sikorsky (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (180)  |  Health (153)  |  Little (184)  |  Money (142)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Spirit (152)

Mssr. Fermat—what have you done?
Your simple conjecture has everyone
Churning out proofs,
Which are nothing but goofs!
Could it be that your statement’s an erudite spoof?
A marginal hoax
That you’ve played on us folks?
But then you’re really not known for your practical jokes.
Or is it then true
That you knew what to do
When n was an integer greater than two?
Oh then why can’t we find
That same proof…are we blind?
You must be reproved, for I’m losing my mind.
In 'Fermat's Last Theorem', Mathematics Magazine (Apr 1986), 59, No. 2, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Blind (47)  |  Churn (3)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Erudite (2)  |  Fermat’s Last Theorem (3)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Find (405)  |  Folk (8)  |  Greater (42)  |  Hoax (5)  |  Integer (9)  |  Joke (73)  |  Know (547)  |  Marginal (3)  |  Mind (743)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Parody (4)  |  Play (110)  |  Practical (129)  |  Proof (243)  |  Really (78)  |  Simple (172)  |  Statement (72)  |  True (201)

Nature never wears a mean appearance. Neither does the wisest man extort her secret, and lose his curiosity by finding out all her perfection.
In Emerson’s Complete Works: Volume 1, Nature, Addresses and Lectures (1855, 1889), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (85)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Extort (2)  |  Finding (30)  |  Mean (101)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Perfection (88)  |  Secret (130)  |  Wear (18)

Never lose a holy curiosity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Holy (17)

Now I will have less distraction.
Quoted as said upon losing the use of his right eye. In Howard Eves, Mathematical Circles (1969). Webmaster has not yet found a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Distraction (6)  |  Eye (218)  |  Less (102)  |  Quote (18)  |  Right (196)  |  Say (228)

Old mathematicians never die; they just lose some of their functions.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Die (81)  |  Function (128)  |  Joke (73)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Old (147)

On graduating from school, a studious young man who would withstand the tedium and monotony of his duties has no choice but to lose himself in some branch of science or literature completely irrelevant to his assignment.
From memorandum 'Mémoire sur le service des officiers du Corps du Génie' (1776) to the minister of war, the comte de Saint-Germain. Reproduced as Appendix C in C. Stewart Gillmor, Coulomb and the Evolution of Physics and Engineering in Eighteenth Century France (1971), 255-261. Coulomb proposed (unsuccessfully) that the corps of military engineers in peacetime engage their skills in construction of public works. As cited in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Science and Polity in France: The End of the Old Regime (1980, 2004), 530.
Science quotes on:  |  Assignment (10)  |  Branch (102)  |  Duty (68)  |  Graduate (13)  |  Irrelevance (3)  |  Literature (79)  |  Monotony (3)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Studious (2)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Withstand (3)  |  Young (98)

One doesn’t discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.
In The Counterfeiters: A Novel (1951, 2012), 353. As translated by Dorothy Bussy from the original French, “On ne découvre pas de terre nouvelle sans consentir à perdre de vue, d'abord et longtemps, tout rivage”, in Les Faux Monnayeurs (1925).
Science quotes on:  |  Consent (10)  |  Discover (196)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (172)  |  New (483)  |  Shore (24)  |  Sight (47)  |  Time (594)

Pauli … asked me to tell him what was happening in America. I told him that Mrs. Wu is trying to measure whether parity is conserved. He answered me: “Mrs. Wu is wasting her time. I would bet you a large sum that parity is conserved.” When this letter came I already knew that parity is violated. I could have sent a telegram to Pauli that the bet was accepted. But I wrote him a letter. He said: “I could never let it out that this is possible. I am glad that we did not actually do the bet because I can risk to lose my reputation, but I cannot risk losing my capital.”
In Discussion after paper presented by Chien-Shiung Wu to the International Conference on the History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries, Erice, Sicily (27 Jul-4 Aug 1994), 'Parity Violation' collected in Harvey B. Newman, Thomas Ypsilantis (eds.), History of Original Ideas and Basic Discoveries in Particle Physics (1996), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Bet (10)  |  Conservation (143)  |  Measure (102)  |  Money (142)  |  Parity (2)  |  Wolfgang Pauli (16)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Time (594)  |  Waste (64)  |  Chien-Shiung Wu (6)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (162)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Already (28)  |  Approach (53)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (121)  |  Available (25)  |  Avenue (6)  |  Badly (15)  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Benefit (72)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Branch (102)  |  George Chrystal (7)  |  Close (66)  |  Compass (24)  |  Competent (18)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (67)  |  Country (144)  |  Department (47)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Example (92)  |  Excellent (26)  |  Expose (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (165)  |  Find (405)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Give (200)  |  Great (524)  |  High (152)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (368)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (34)  |  Journal (19)  |  Kind (138)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (115)  |  Literature (79)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Means (171)  |  Memoir (11)  |  Mention (23)  |  Merely (82)  |  Nature (1211)  |  New (483)  |  Notice (34)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Original (57)  |  Part (220)  |  Peril (9)  |  Person (153)  |  Possible (155)  |  Practical (129)  |  Present (174)  |  Problem (490)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (33)  |  Question (404)  |  Reach (119)  |  Real (148)  |  Reality (188)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (93)  |  Regret (20)  |  Render (30)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Result (376)  |  Science (2043)  |  Second (59)  |  Short (49)  |  Small (161)  |  State (136)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (201)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Subject (235)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Technical (40)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theory (690)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Useful (98)  |  Value (240)  |  Various (46)  |  Want (175)  |  Whole (189)  |  Write (153)  |  Year (299)

Rulers and generals muster their troops. Magnates muster the sums of money which give them power. The fascist dictators muster the irrational human reactions which make it possible for them to attain and maintain their power over the masses. The scientists muster knowledge and means of research. But, thus far, no organization fighting for freedom has ever mustered the biological arsenal where the weapons are to be found for the establishment and the maintenance of human freedom. All precision of our social existence notwithstanding, there is as yet no definition of the word freedom which would be in keeping with natural science. No word is more misused and misunderstood. To define freedom is the same as to define sexual health. But nobody will openly admit this. The advocacy of personal and social freedom is connected with anxiety and guilt feelings. As if to be free were a sin or at least not quite as it should be. Sex-economy makes this guilt feeling comprehensible: freedom without sexual self-determination is in itself a contradiction. But to be sexual means—according to the prevailing human structure—to be sinful or guilty. There are very few people who experience sexual love without guilt feeling. “Free love” has acquired a degrading meaning: it lost the meaning given it by the old fighters for freedom. In films and in books, to be genital and to be criminal are presented as the same thing.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Acquire (38)  |  Admit (44)  |  Anxiety (19)  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Attain (42)  |  Biological (35)  |  Book (257)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Connect (30)  |  Contradiction (54)  |  Criminal (15)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (191)  |  Degrade (8)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Establishment (34)  |  Existence (296)  |  Experience (338)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascist (2)  |  Feel (165)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Film (10)  |  Find (405)  |  Free (90)  |  Freedom (101)  |  General (156)  |  Give (200)  |  Guilt (9)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Health (153)  |  Human (548)  |  Irrational (12)  |  Keep (100)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Least (74)  |  Love (221)  |  Maintain (32)  |  Maintenance (14)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (171)  |  Misunderstand (4)  |  Misuse (10)  |  Money (142)  |  Muster (2)  |  Natural Science (89)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Old (147)  |  Openly (2)  |  Organization (84)  |  People (388)  |  Personal (66)  |  Possible (155)  |  Power (358)  |  Precision (50)  |  Present (174)  |  Prevail (16)  |  Reaction (61)  |  Research (589)  |  Ruler (15)  |  Same (155)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Sexual (4)  |  Sin (30)  |  Sinful (2)  |  Social (108)  |  Structure (221)  |  Sum (41)  |  Troop (5)  |  Weapon (66)  |  Word (299)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (47)  |  Assure (15)  |  Beard (7)  |  Beauty (239)  |  Broad (27)  |  Care (95)  |  Certain (125)  |  Channel (21)  |  Class (83)  |  Compose (17)  |  Confirmation (19)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (144)  |  Cross (14)  |  Cruelty (16)  |  Daughter (16)  |  Deed (21)  |  Delight (64)  |  Destined (11)  |  Detail (85)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (34)  |  Event (115)  |  Eventually (15)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Faith (157)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascination (28)  |  Fossil (111)  |  Fret (2)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (524)  |  Grow (98)  |  Happen (82)  |  Holy (17)  |  Include (40)  |  Know (547)  |  Live (269)  |  London (12)  |  Love (221)  |  Manner (57)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (151)  |  Nearly (26)  |  Particular (75)  |  Passage (20)  |  Realm (54)  |  Reason (454)  |  Record (67)  |  Same (155)  |  Say (228)  |  Scribe (3)  |  South (10)  |  Taxonomy (17)  |  Time (594)  |  Travel (61)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Trillion (2)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Underly (2)  |  Unspeakably (3)  |  Upper (4)  |  Version (7)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  White (56)  |  World (892)  |  Write (153)  |  Youth (75)

Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  People (388)  |  Seduce (4)  |  Smart (18)  |  Success (248)  |  Teacher (119)  |  Think (341)

Thanks to the freedom of our press and the electronic media, the voices of cranks are often louder and clearer than the voices of genuine scientists. Crank books—on how to lose weight without cutting down on calories, on how to talk to plants, on how to cure your ailments by rubbing your feet, on how to apply horoscopes to your pets, on how to use ESP in making business decisions, on how to sharpen razor blades by putting them under little models of the great Pyramid of Egypt—far outsell many books… I reserve the right of moral indignation.
As quoted, without citation, in obituary by Morton Schatzman, 'Martin Gardner: Scientific and Philosophical Writer Celebrated for his Ingenious Mathematical Puzzles and Games', Independent (28 May 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Ailment (6)  |  Apply (76)  |  Blade (9)  |  Book (257)  |  Business (84)  |  Calorie (2)  |  Clear (97)  |  Crank (13)  |  Cure (96)  |  Cut (39)  |  Decision (72)  |  Down (86)  |  Egypt (22)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Extrasensory Perception (2)  |  Foot (60)  |  Genuine (26)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Loud (9)  |  Media (9)  |  Model (80)  |  Moral (123)  |  Pet (8)  |  Plant (199)  |  Razor (4)  |  Right (196)  |  Rub (4)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Sharpen (15)  |  Talk (99)  |  Thank (12)  |  Voice (50)  |  Weight (75)

That a shutdown of existing reactors would be catastrophic I believe is self-evident. It is not only the energy that we would lose, it is the $100 billion investment whose write-off would cause a violent shock to our financial institutions.
(1980). As quoted in Isaac Asimov, Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1990), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (62)  |  Catastrophic (3)  |  Energy (214)  |  Investment (11)  |  Nuclear Power (11)  |  Reactor (3)

The advantage is that mathematics is a field in which one’s blunders tend to show very clearly and can be corrected or erased with a stroke of the pencil. It is a field which has often been compared with chess, but differs from the latter in that it is only one’s best moments that count and not one’s worst. A single inattention may lose a chess game, whereas a single successful approach to a problem, among many which have been relegated to the wastebasket, will make a mathematician’s reputation.
In Ex-Prodigy: My Childhood and Youth (1953), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (73)  |  Approach (53)  |  Bad (99)  |  Best (172)  |  Blunder (17)  |  Chess (23)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Compare (37)  |  Correct (83)  |  Count (48)  |  Differ (22)  |  Erase (5)  |  Field (170)  |  Game (61)  |  Inattention (4)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Moment (106)  |  Pencil (17)  |  Problem (490)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Show (90)  |  Single (119)  |  Stroke (8)  |  Successful (39)  |  Wastebasket (2)

The big political doings of our time are so disheartening that in our generation one feels quite alone. It is as if people had lost the passion for justice and dignity and no longer treasure what better generations have won by extraordinary sacrifices.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (101)  |  Better (190)  |  Big (48)  |  Dignity (23)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Doings (2)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Feel (165)  |  Generation (137)  |  Justice (27)  |  Long (172)  |  Passion (70)  |  People (388)  |  Political (36)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Time (594)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Win (38)

The essential unity of ecclesiastical and secular institutions was lost during the 19th century, to the point of senseless hostility. Yet there was never any doubt as to the striving for culture. No one doubted the sacredness of the goal. It was the approach that was disputed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (53)  |  Century (130)  |  Culture (102)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Ecclesiastical (3)  |  Essential (115)  |  Goal (100)  |  Hostility (11)  |  Institution (39)  |  Nineteenth (6)  |  Point (122)  |  Secular (9)  |  Senseless (3)  |  Strive (43)  |  Unity (53)

The fundamental essence of science, which I think we've lost in our education system, is poking something with a stick and seeing what happens. Embrace that process of inquiry.
Science quotes on:  |  Education (333)  |  Embrace (32)  |  Essence (54)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Happen (82)  |  Inquiry (40)  |  Poke (5)  |  Process (261)  |  Science (2043)  |  See (369)  |  Stick (24)  |  System (191)  |  Think (341)

The influence of the leaders is due in very small measure to the arguments they employ, but in a large degree to their prestige. The best proof of this is that, should they by any circumstance lose their prestige, their influence disappears.
From Psychologie des Foules (1895), 175. English text in The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (1897), Book 2, Chap. 5, 197-198. Original French text: “Les meneurs agissent très peu par leurs raisonnements, beaucoup par leur prestige. Et la meilleure preuve, c'est que si une circonstance quelconque les en dépouille, ils n’ont plus d’influence.”
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (81)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Disappear (29)  |  Influence (137)  |  Leader (28)  |  Prestige (11)  |  Proof (243)

The losses of the natural world are our loss, their silence silences something within the human mind. Human language is lit with animal life: we play cats-cradle or have hare-brained ideas; we speak of badgering, or outfoxing someone; to squirrel something away and to ferret it out. … When our experience of the wild world shrinks, we no longer fathom the depths of our own words; language loses its lustre and vividness.
In 'Fifty Years On, the Silence of Rachel Carson’s Spring Consumes Us', The Guardian (25 Sep 2012),
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Life (5)  |  Badger (2)  |  Cat (36)  |  Depth (50)  |  Experience (338)  |  Fathom (8)  |  Fox (9)  |  Hare (3)  |  Human Mind (80)  |  Idea (577)  |  Language (217)  |  Loss (73)  |  Lustre (3)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Play (110)  |  Shrink (15)  |  Silence (43)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Wild (48)  |  Word (299)

The peculiar character of mathematical truth is, that it is necessarily and inevitably true; and one of the most important lessons which we learn from our mathematical studies is a knowledge that there are such truths, and a familiarity with their form and character.
This lesson is not only lost, but read backward, if the student is taught that there is no such difference, and that mathematical truths themselves are learned by experience.
In Thoughts on the Study of Mathematics. Principles of English University Education (1838).
Science quotes on:  |  Backward (9)  |  Character (115)  |  Difference (246)  |  Experience (338)  |  Familiarity (16)  |  Form (308)  |  Important (202)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Peculiar (43)  |  Read (144)  |  Student (201)  |  Study (461)  |  Teach (179)  |  True (201)  |  Truth (914)

The problem of modern democracy is not that the people have lost their power, but that they have lost their appreciation for the extraordinary power they wield. Consider one astonishing truth: Famine has never struck a democracy.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (25)  |  Astonishing (9)  |  Democracy (26)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Famine (10)  |  Modern (159)  |  People (388)  |  Power (358)  |  Problem (490)  |  Strike (39)  |  Truth (914)

The robot is going to lose. Not by much. But when the final score is tallied, flesh and blood is going to beat the damn monster.
In The Money Game (1967), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (23)  |  Blood (104)  |  Damn (12)  |  Final (49)  |  Flesh (26)  |  Monster (24)  |  Robot (12)  |  Score (7)

The science of metaphysics promises more than it performs. The study of … metaphysics begins with a torrent of tropes, and a copious current of words, yet loses itself at last, in obscurity and conjecture, like the Niger in his barren deserts of sand.
Reflection 342, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Barren (15)  |  Begin (106)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Copious (2)  |  Current (54)  |  Desert (38)  |  Metaphysic (6)  |  Obscurity (25)  |  Perform (34)  |  Promise (38)  |  Sand (34)  |  Science (2043)  |  Study (461)  |  Torrent (5)  |  Word (299)

The sciences are like a beautiful river, of which the course is easy to follow, when it has acquired a certain regularity; but if one wants to go back to the source, one will find it nowhere, because it is everywhere; it is spread so much [as to be] over all the surface of the earth; it is the same if one wants to go back to the origin of the sciences, one will find only obscurity, vague ideas, vicious circles; and one loses oneself in the primitive ideas.
In Essai sur les machines en général (1783), conclusion, as translated in Ivor Grattan-Guinness, Convolutions in French Mathematics, 1800-1840 (1990), Vol. 1, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (138)  |  Course (83)  |  Earth (635)  |  Easy (98)  |  Everywhere (24)  |  Find (405)  |  Follow (123)  |  Idea (577)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Obscurity (25)  |  Origin (86)  |  Primitive (41)  |  Regularity (29)  |  River (79)  |  Science (2043)  |  Source (90)  |  Spread (33)  |  Surface (101)  |  Vague (25)  |  Vicious Circle (2)

The Scientific Revolution turns us away from the older sayings to discover the lost authorization in Nature. What we have been through in these last four millennia is the slow inexorable profaning of our species. And in the last part of the second millennium A.D., that process is apparently becoming complete. It is the Great Human Irony of our noblest and greatest endeavor on this planet that in the quest for authorization, in our reading of the language of God in Nature, we should read there so clearly that we have been so mistaken.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (19)  |  Authorization (3)  |  Become (172)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Complete (84)  |  Discover (196)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  God (535)  |  Great (524)  |  Human (548)  |  Inexorable (6)  |  Irony (8)  |  Language (217)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Millennium (3)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Old (147)  |  Part (220)  |  Planet (262)  |  Process (261)  |  Profane (6)  |  Quest (32)  |  Read (144)  |  Sayings (2)  |  Scientific Revolution (9)  |  Second (59)  |  Slow (55)  |  Species (220)  |  Turn (118)

The story of a theory’s failure often strikes readers as sad and unsatisfying. Since science thrives on self-correction, we who practice this most challenging of human arts do not share such a feeling. We may be unhappy if a favored hypothesis loses or chagrined if theories that we proposed prove inadequate. But refutation almost always contains positive lessons that overwhelm disappointment, even when no new and comprehensive theory has yet filled the void.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Comprehensive (16)  |  Contain (67)  |  Disappointment (12)  |  Failure (138)  |  Favored (5)  |  Feel (165)  |  Fill (61)  |  Human (548)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Inadequate (14)  |  Lesson (41)  |  New (483)  |  Often (106)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Positive (43)  |  Practice (92)  |  Propose (23)  |  Prove (108)  |  Reader (38)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Sadness (34)  |  Science (2043)  |  Self-Correction (2)  |  Share (49)  |  Story (72)  |  Strike (39)  |  Theory (690)  |  Thrive (12)  |  Unhappy (8)  |  Unsatisfying (3)  |  Void (20)

The student should not lose any opportunity of exercising himself in numerical calculation and particularly in the use of logarithmic tables. His power of applying mathematics to questions of practical utility is in direct proportion to the facility which he possesses in computation.
In Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1902), chap. 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (76)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Computation (18)  |  Direct (82)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Facility (11)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Numerical (13)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Possess (53)  |  Power (358)  |  Practical (129)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Question (404)  |  Student (201)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Table (35)  |  Utility (33)

The tragedy of life is not that man loses, but that he almost wins.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Life (1124)  |  Tragedy (22)  |  Win (38)

There are children playing in the street who could solve some of my top problems in physics, because they have modes of sensory perception that I lost long ago.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Child (245)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Mode (40)  |  Perception (61)  |  Physics (346)  |  Play (110)  |  Problem (490)  |  Sensory (2)  |  Solve (76)  |  Street (23)  |  Top (34)

There are few enough people with sufficient independence to see the weaknesses and follies of their contemporaries and remain themselves untouched by them. And these isolated few usually soon lose their zeal for putting things to rights when they have come face to face with human obduracy. Only to a tiny minority is it given to fascinate their generation by subtle humour and grace and to hold the mirror up to it by the impersonal agency of art. To-day I salute with sincere emotion the supreme master of this method, who has delighted–and educated–us all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (14)  |  Art (284)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Delight (64)  |  Educate (12)  |  Emotion (78)  |  Face To Face (3)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Folly (32)  |  Generation (137)  |  Give (200)  |  Grace (17)  |  Hold (92)  |  Human (548)  |  Humour (103)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Independence (34)  |  Isolate (21)  |  Master (93)  |  Method (230)  |  Minority (16)  |  Mirror (29)  |  People (388)  |  Remain (111)  |  Right (196)  |  Salute (2)  |  See (369)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Soon (34)  |  Subtle (33)  |  Sufficient (40)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Tiny (36)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Untouched (3)  |  Usually (31)  |  Weakness (35)  |  Zeal (11)

There is a huge disconnect. Those living in the most urbanised areas don’t see a wild thing from one day to the next—unless it’s a pigeon or a rat. If you lose the connection with nature, you lose a source of great pleasure.
Lamenting Britain’s urbanized population is increasingly separated from the natural world. As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Connection (107)  |  Disconnect (3)  |  Huge (25)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Pigeon (4)  |  Pleasure (130)  |  Rat (21)  |  Source (90)  |  Suburb (6)  |  Urban (7)  |  Wild (48)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that... or: There is capitalism in so far as... The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills. [p.222]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Abstract (79)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Accord (36)  |  Act (115)  |  Action (184)  |  Actual (47)  |  Age (174)  |  Apply (76)  |  Area (29)  |  Authority (65)  |  Battle (34)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Casual (7)  |  Change (363)  |  Communism (10)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Complex (94)  |  Concrete (31)  |  Condition (160)  |  Contain (67)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (37)  |  Degree (81)  |  Democracy (26)  |  Device (28)  |  Element (162)  |  Elementary (45)  |  End (195)  |  Entire (46)  |  Entity (31)  |  Evil (78)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Expression (104)  |  Extent (49)  |  External (55)  |  Fact (725)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascism (3)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fix (25)  |  Greek (71)  |  Idea (577)  |  Illustrate (9)  |  Incapable (17)  |  Independent (65)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interrelation (7)  |  Invade (5)  |  Isolate (21)  |  Keep (100)  |  Know (547)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (123)  |  Live (269)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (171)  |  Measure (102)  |  Method (230)  |  Mind (743)  |  Modify (15)  |  Monster (24)  |  Myth (48)  |  Mythology (13)  |  Nation (132)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Objective (63)  |  Order (239)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  P (2)  |  People (388)  |  Phrase (28)  |  Play (110)  |  Political (36)  |  Possibly (19)  |  Principle (285)  |  Problem (490)  |  Property (123)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Rational (56)  |  Reality (188)  |  Realm (54)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (19)  |  Relation (149)  |  Represent (41)  |  Reserve (15)  |  Revenge (7)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Security (33)  |  Seem (143)  |  Simultaneous (17)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Solve (76)  |  Specific (35)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Store (21)  |  Strive (43)  |  Subject (235)  |  Subtle (33)  |  Superstition (56)  |  Technician (8)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Unaffected (4)  |  Universe (683)  |  Vary (25)  |  Vocabulary (5)  |  Whatsoever (9)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (299)

Those who lose dreaming are lost.
Aboriginal Proverb
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (165)

To suppose that so perfect a system as that of Euclid’s Elements was produced by one man, without any preceding model or materials, would be to suppose that Euclid was more than man. We ascribe to him as much as the weakness of human understanding will permit, if we suppose that the inventions in geometry, which had been made in a tract of preceding ages, were by him not only carried much further, but digested into so admirable a system, that his work obscured all that went before it, and made them be forgot and lost.
In Essay on the Powers of the Human Mind (1812), Vol. 2, 368.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Age (174)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Carry (59)  |  Digest (8)  |  Element (162)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Far (154)  |  Forget (63)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Human (548)  |  Invention (318)  |  Material (154)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Model (80)  |  Obscure (31)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Permit (30)  |  Precede (20)  |  Produce (100)  |  Suppose (49)  |  System (191)  |  Tract (5)  |  Understand (326)  |  Weakness (35)  |  Work (626)

To us, men of the West, a very strange thing happened at the turn of the century; without noticing it, we lost science, or at least the thing that had been called by that name for the last four centuries. What we now have in place of it is something different, radically different, and we don’t know what it is. Nobody knows what it is.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (127)  |  Century (130)  |  Different (178)  |  Happen (82)  |  Know (547)  |  Least (74)  |  Name (165)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Notice (34)  |  Place (174)  |  Radically (5)  |  Science (2043)  |  Strange (94)  |  Turn (118)  |  West (17)

Traveling is a brutality. It forces you to trust strangers and to lose sight of all that familiar comfort of home and friends. You are constantly off balance. Nothing is yours except the essential things - air, sleep, dreams, the sea, the sky - all things tending towards the eternal or what we imagine of it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (188)  |  Balance (54)  |  Brutality (4)  |  Comfort (49)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Dream (165)  |  Essential (115)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Familiar (42)  |  Force (249)  |  Friend (85)  |  Home (83)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Sea (187)  |  Sight (47)  |  Sky (124)  |  Sleep (57)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Tend (36)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trust (49)

Two lights for guidance. The first, our little glowing atom of community, with all that it signifies. The second, the cold light of the stars, symbol of the hypercosmical reality, with its crystal ecstasy. Strange that in this light, in which even the dearest love is frostily asserted, and even the possible defeat of our half-waking world is contemplated without remission of praise, the human crisis does not lose but gains significance. Strange, that it seems more, not less, urgent to play some part in this struggle, this brief effort of animalcules striving to win for their race some increase of lucidity before the ultimate darkness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animalcule (11)  |  Assert (21)  |  Atom (280)  |  Brief (19)  |  Cold (58)  |  Community (81)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Crisis (19)  |  Crystal (53)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Defeat (18)  |  Ecstasy (8)  |  Effort (143)  |  First (313)  |  Gain (67)  |  Glow (14)  |  Guidance (20)  |  Human (548)  |  Increase (145)  |  Less (102)  |  Light (345)  |  Little (184)  |  Love (221)  |  Lucidity (5)  |  Part (220)  |  Play (110)  |  Possible (155)  |  Praise (25)  |  Race (103)  |  Reality (188)  |  Remission (3)  |  Second (59)  |  Seem (143)  |  Significance (71)  |  Signify (7)  |  Star (336)  |  Strange (94)  |  Strive (43)  |  Struggle (77)  |  Symbol (65)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Urgent (9)  |  Win (38)  |  World (892)

Very great charm of shadow and light is to be found in the faces of those who sit in the doors of dark houses. The eye of the spectator sees that part of the face which is in shadow lost in the darkness of the house, and that part of the face which is lit draws its brilliancy from the splendor of the sky. From this intensification of light and shade the face gains greatly in relief and beauty by showing the subtlest shadows in the light part and the subtlest lights in the dark part.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (239)  |  Brilliancy (3)  |  Charm (26)  |  Dark (76)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Door (38)  |  Draw (55)  |  Eye (218)  |  Face (108)  |  Find (405)  |  Gain (67)  |  Great (524)  |  Greatly (12)  |  House (43)  |  Intensification (2)  |  Light (345)  |  Part (220)  |  Relief (18)  |  See (369)  |  Shade (22)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Show (90)  |  Sit (47)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spectator (9)  |  Splendor (12)  |  Subtl (2)

We consider species to be like a brick in the foundation of a building. You can probably lose one or two or a dozen bricks and still have a standing house. But by the time you’ve lost twenty percent of species, you’re going to destabilize the entire structure. That’s the way ecosystems work.
The Christian Science Monitor (26 May 1989)
Science quotes on:  |  Brick (13)  |  Build (117)  |  Consider (80)  |  Dozen (10)  |  Ecosystem (21)  |  Entire (46)  |  Foundation (105)  |  House (43)  |  Percent (5)  |  Probably (47)  |  Species (220)  |  Stand (107)  |  Structure (221)  |  Time (594)  |  Work (626)

We have one of his [Newton’s] college memorandum-books, which is highly interesting. The following are some of the entries: “Drills, gravers, a hone, a hammer, and a mandril, 5s.;” “a magnet, 16s.;” “compasses, 2s.;” “glass bubbles, 4s.;” “at the tavern several other times, £1;” “spent on my cousin, 12s.;” “on other acquaintances, 10s.;” “Philosophical Intelligences, 9s. 6d.;” “lost at cards twice, 15s.;” “at the tavern twice, 3s. 6d.;” “to three prisms, £3;” “four ounces of putty, 1s. 4d.;” “Bacon’s Miscellanies, 1s. 6d.;” “a bible binding, 3s.;” “for oranges to my sister, 4s. 2d.;” “for aquafortis, sublimate, oyle pink, fine silver, antimony, vinegar, spirit of wine, white lead, salt of tartar, £2;” “Theatrum chemicum, £1 8s.”
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 255.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (22)  |  Antimony (6)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Bible (91)  |  Binding (9)  |  Book (257)  |  Bubble (15)  |  Card (4)  |  College (35)  |  Compass (24)  |  Cousin (4)  |  Drill (10)  |  Glass (44)  |  Hammer (21)  |  Hone (3)  |  Intelligence (165)  |  Interesting (48)  |  Lead (158)  |  Magnet (10)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Orange (11)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Pound (13)  |  Prism (6)  |  Putty (2)  |  Salt (26)  |  Silver (33)  |  Sister (6)  |  Spend (43)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Sublimate (4)  |  Vinegar (6)  |  Wine (28)

What binds us to space-time is our rest mass, which prevents us from flying at the speed of light, when time stops and space loses meaning. In a world of light there are neither points nor moments of time; beings woven from light would live “nowhere” and “nowhen”; only poetry and mathematics are capable of speaking meaningfully about such things.
In 'Mathematics and Physics', collected in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bind (25)  |  Capability (37)  |  Flying (20)  |  Light (345)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Meaning (111)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Moment (106)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Poetry (120)  |  Point (122)  |  Prevent (40)  |  Rest (92)  |  Space (257)  |  Space-Time (14)  |  Speaking (37)  |  Speed Of Light (14)  |  Stop (75)  |  Time (594)  |  World (892)

What humanity owes to personalities like Buddha, Moses, and Jesus ranks for me higher than all the achievements of the enquiring and constructive mind. What these blessed men have given us we must guard and try to keep alive with all our strength if humanity is not to lose its dignity, the security of its existence, and its joy in living.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Alive (49)  |  Bless (9)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Constructive (3)  |  Dignity (23)  |  Enquire (4)  |  Existence (296)  |  Give (200)  |  Guard (18)  |  High (152)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Jesus (9)  |  Joy (88)  |  Keep (100)  |  Live (269)  |  Mind (743)  |  Moses (6)  |  Owe (23)  |  Personality (47)  |  Rank (32)  |  Security (33)  |  Strength (79)  |  Try (141)

What is it to see, in an Eagle glide
Which fills a human heart with so much pride?
Is it that it soars effortless above the Earth
That steals us from our own limits & dearth?
Trapped in our seas of befuddling sludge
We try and try but cannot budge.
And then to see a mortal; with such ease take wing
Up in a breeze that makes our failing spirits sing?
Do we, vicarious birds, search in it our childishness -
When we too were young & yearned in heart to fly?
Taking flights of fancy through adolescent nights
Listening little, heeding less, knowing not why?
From its highest perch in the forest of snow
Majestic - the Eagle soars alone.
Riding thermals, lording clouds
Till dropping silent from the sky as a stone
But we, so quick and ready to fold
Give up our wings at the whiff of age
Losing years, cursing time, wasting spirit
Living out entire lives in futile rage!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adolescent (4)  |  Age (174)  |  Alone (101)  |  Bird (119)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Curse (15)  |  Dearth (2)  |  Drop (39)  |  Eagle (13)  |  Earth (635)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effortless (3)  |  Entire (46)  |  Fail (58)  |  Fancy (24)  |  Fill (61)  |  Flight (63)  |  Fly (99)  |  Fold (8)  |  Forest (107)  |  Futile (5)  |  Give Up (6)  |  Glide (4)  |  Heart (139)  |  Heed (8)  |  High (152)  |  Human (548)  |  Know (547)  |  Less (102)  |  Limit (123)  |  Listen (39)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Lord (16)  |  Majestic (15)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Night (117)  |  Perch (4)  |  Pride (64)  |  Quick (13)  |  Rage (9)  |  Ready (37)  |  Ride (11)  |  Sea (187)  |  Search (104)  |  See (369)  |  Silent (28)  |  Sing (25)  |  Sky (124)  |  Sludge (3)  |  Snow (24)  |  Soar (15)  |  Spirit (152)  |  Steal (13)  |  Stone (76)  |  Thermal (7)  |  Time (594)  |  Trap (6)  |  Try (141)  |  Vicarious (2)  |  Waste (64)  |  Whiff (2)  |  Wing (48)  |  Year (299)  |  Yearn (10)  |  Young (98)

What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Breath (32)  |  Buffalo (4)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Flash (34)  |  Grass (35)  |  Life (1124)  |  Little (184)  |  Night (117)  |  Run (57)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Sunset (22)

When the sun is covered by clouds, objects are less conspicuous, because there is little difference between the light and shade of the trees and the buildings being illuminated by the brightness of the atmosphere which surrounds the objects in such a way that the shadows are few, and these few fade away so that their outline is lost in haze.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (79)  |  Brightness (9)  |  Buildings (4)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Conspicuous (7)  |  Cover (37)  |  Difference (246)  |  Fade (9)  |  Haze (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Less (102)  |  Light (345)  |  Little (184)  |  Object (169)  |  Outline (11)  |  Shade (22)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Sun (276)  |  Surround (29)  |  Tree (170)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.