Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Effective

Effective Quotes (20 quotes)

A fact is a simple statement that everyone believes. It is innocent, unless found guilty. A hypothesis is a novel suggestion that no one wants to believe. It is guilty until found effective.
Edward Teller, Wendy Teller, Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2002), Footnote, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Fact (609)  |  Guilt (8)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Innocence (10)  |  Nobody (38)  |  Novel (16)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Statement (56)  |  Suggestion (24)  |  Want (120)

Art is the beautiful way of doing things. Science is the effective way of doing things. Business is the economic way of doing things.
Selected writings of Elbert Hubbard (1928), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Business (71)  |  Do (22)  |  Economic (21)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Way (36)

But weightier still are the contentment which comes from work well done, the sense of the value of science for its own sake, insatiable curiosity, and, above all, the pleasure of masterly performance and of the chase. These are the effective forces which move the scientist. The first condition for the progress of science is to bring them into play.
from his preface to Claude Bernard's 'Experimental Medicine'
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (53)  |  Chase (11)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contentment (10)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  First (174)  |  Force (194)  |  Insatiable (4)  |  Masterly (2)  |  Move (58)  |  Performance (27)  |  Play (60)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Progress Of Science (20)  |  Sake (17)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sense (240)  |  Value (180)  |  Work (457)

Effective science began when it passed from the occasional amateur into the hands of men who made the winning of knowledge their special function or profession.
Address to 48th annual summer convention of the American Institute of Electriccal Engineers, Cleveland (21 Jun 1932), abridged in 'The Rτle of the Engineer', The Electrical Journal (1932), 109, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (18)  |  Function (90)  |  Hand (103)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Making (26)  |  Occasional (10)  |  Passing (5)  |  Profession (54)  |  Science (1699)  |  Special (51)  |  Winning (3)

If a mathematician wishes to disparage the work of one of his colleagues, say, A, the most effective method he finds for doing this is to ask where the results can be applied. The hard pressed man, with his back against the wall, finally unearths the researches of another mathematician B as the locus of the application of his own results. If next B is plagued with a similar question, he will refer to another mathematician C. After a few steps of this kind we find ourselves referred back to the researches of A, and in this way the chain closes.
From final remarks in 'The Semantic Conception of Truth and the Foundations of Semantics' (1944), collected in Leonard Linsky (ed.), Semantics and the Philosophy of Language: A Collection of Readings (1952), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (15)  |  Chain (38)  |  Colleague (19)  |  Disparage (4)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Method (154)  |  Question (315)  |  Research (517)  |  Result (250)  |  Work (457)

If you ask ... the man in the street ... the human significance of mathematics, the answer of the world will be, that mathematics has given mankind a metrical and computatory art essential to the effective conduct of daily life, that mathematics admits of countless applications in engineering and the natural sciences, and finally that mathematics is a most excellent instrumentality for giving mental discipline... [A mathematician will add] that mathematics is the exact science, the science of exact thought or of rigorous thinking.
Address (28 Mar 1912), Michigan School Masters' Club, Ann Arbor, 'The Humanization of the Teaching of Mathematics. Printed in Science (26 Apr 1912). Collected in The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking: Essays and Addresses (1916), 65-66.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Computation (11)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Daily Life (5)  |  Definition (152)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Essential (87)  |  Exact (38)  |  Exact Science (4)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mental (57)  |  Metrical (3)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Rigorous (10)  |  Significance (60)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Thought (374)

Only reason can convince us of those three fundamental truths without a recognition of which there can be no effective liberty: that what we believe is not necessarily true; that what we like is not necessarily good; and that all questions are open.
In Civilization: An Essay (1928), 125.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Convince (17)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Good (228)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Open (38)  |  Question (315)  |  Reason (330)  |  Recognition (62)  |  True (120)  |  Truth (750)

Program testing can be a very effective way to show the presence of bugs, but is hopelessly inadequate for showing their absence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (16)  |  Bug (10)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Presence (26)  |  Program (32)  |  Show (55)  |  Test (96)

Science can be interpreted effectively only for those who have more than the usual intelligence and innate curiosity. These will work hard if given the chance and if they find they acquire something by so doing.
(1940). Epigraph, without citation, in I. Bernard Cohen, Science, Servant of Man: A Layman's Primer for the Age of Science (1948), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (19)  |  Chance (122)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Find (248)  |  Hard (70)  |  Innate (7)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interpret (15)  |  Science (1699)  |  Work (457)

The essence of modernity is that progress no longer waits on genius; instead we have learned to put our faith in the organized efforts of ordinary men. Science is as old as the race, but the effective organization of science is new. Ancient science, like placer mining, was a pursuit of solitary prospectors. Nuggets of truth were found, but the total wealth of knowledge increased slowly. Modern man began to transform this world when he began to mine the hidden veins of knowledge systematically.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (68)  |  Effort (94)  |  Essence (42)  |  Faith (131)  |  Finding (30)  |  Genius (186)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Increased (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mining (11)  |  Modern (104)  |  New (340)  |  Nugget (2)  |  Old (104)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organization (79)  |  Progress (317)  |  Prospector (2)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Race (76)  |  Science (1699)  |  Slowly (10)  |  Solitary (13)  |  Systematically (6)  |  Total (29)  |  Transform (20)  |  Truth (750)  |  Vein (11)  |  Waiting (9)  |  Wealth (50)  |  World (667)

The most important effect of the suffrage is psychological. The permanent consciousness of power for effective action, the knowledge that their own thoughts have an equal chance with those of any other person … this is what has always rendered the men of a free state so energetic, so acutely intelligent, so powerful.
In “Common Sense” Applied to Woman Suffrage (1894), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (151)  |  Chance (122)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Effect (133)  |  Energetic (5)  |  Equal (53)  |  Important (124)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Permanent (18)  |  Power (273)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Psychological (10)  |  Suffrage (4)  |  Thought (374)

The present state of electrical science seems peculiarly unfavorable to speculation … to appreciate the requirements of the science, the student must make himself familiar with a considerable body of most intricate mathematics, the mere retention of which in the memory materially interferes with further progress. The first process therefore in the effectual study of the science, must be one of simplification and reduction of the results of previous investigation to a form in which the mind can grasp them.
First sentence of Maxwell’s first paper (read 10 Dec 1855), 'On Faraday’s Lines of Force', Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society (1857), Vol. X, part I. Collected in William Davidson Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 1, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Body (193)  |  Considerable (11)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Familiar (22)  |  Form (210)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Interfere (8)  |  Intricate (14)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Process (201)  |  Progress (317)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Result (250)  |  Retention (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Simplification (12)  |  Speculation (77)  |  State (96)  |  Student (131)  |  Study (331)  |  Unfavorable (3)

The progress of science is often affected more by the frailties of humans and their institutions than by the limitations of scientific measuring devices. The scientific method is only as effective as the humans using it. It does not automatically lead to progress.
Chemistry (1989), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Automatic (13)  |  Device (24)  |  Human (445)  |  Institution (32)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Progress (317)  |  Progress Of Science (20)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)

The required techniques of effective reasoning are pretty formal, but as long as programming is done by people that don’t master them, the software crisis will remain with us and will be considered an incurable disease. And you know what incurable diseases do: they invite the quacks and charlatans in, who in this case take the form of Software Engineering gurus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Charlatan (6)  |  Consider (45)  |  Crisis (13)  |  Disease (257)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Form (210)  |  Formal (11)  |  Incurable (4)  |  Invite (8)  |  Know (321)  |  Long (95)  |  Master (55)  |  People (269)  |  Pretty (10)  |  Program (32)  |  Quack (12)  |  Reason (330)  |  Remain (77)  |  Require (33)  |  Software (11)  |  Technique (41)

The universe is governed by science. But science tells us that we can’t solve the equations, directly in the abstract. We need to use the effective theory of Darwinian natural selection of those societies most likely to survive. We assign them higher value.
[Answer to question: What is the value in knowing “Why are we here?”]
'Stephen Hawking: "There is no heaven; it's a fairy story"', interview in newspaper The Guardian (15 May 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Directly (15)  |  Equation (69)  |  Governing (4)  |  Higher (28)  |  Likely (23)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Need (211)  |  Science (1699)  |  Society (188)  |  Solution (168)  |  Survival (49)  |  Tell (67)  |  Theory (582)  |  Universe (563)  |  Use (70)  |  Value (180)

There is only one ultimate and effectual preventative for the maladies to which flesh is heir, and that is death.
'Medicine at the Crossroads', The Medical Career and Other Papers (1928, 1940), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (270)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Heir (6)  |  Malady (5)  |  Prevention (29)  |  Ultimate (61)

We shall therefore say that a program has common sense if it automatically deduces for itself a sufficient wide class of immediate consequences of anything it is told and what it already knows. ... Our ultimate objective is to make programs that learn from their experience as effectively as humans do.
'Programs with Common Sense', (probably the first paper on AI), delivered to the Teddington Conference on the Mechanization of Thought Processes (Dec 1958). Printed in National Physical Laboratory, Mechanisation of Thought Processes: Proceedings of a Symposium Held at the National Physical Laboratory on 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th November 1958 (1959), 78. Also Summary in John McCarthy and Vladimir Lifschitz (ed.), Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy (1990), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial Intelligence (8)  |  Automatic (13)  |  Class (64)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Definition (152)  |  Experience (268)  |  Human (445)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Make (23)  |  Objective (49)  |  Sufficient (24)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Wide (14)

When I was a boy, I read with great interest but skepticism about as magic lamp which was used with success by a certain Aladdin. Today I have no skepticism whatsoever about the magic of the xenon flash lamp which we use so effectively for many purposes.
In Electronic Flash, Strobe (1970), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Boy (33)  |  Flash (25)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lamp (12)  |  Magic (67)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Read (83)  |  Skepticism (18)  |  Today (86)  |  Xenon (5)

Without initiation into the scientific spirit one is not in possession of the best tools humanity has so far devised for effectively directed reflection. [Without these one] fails to understand the full meaning of knowledge.
Democracy and Education: an Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Devise (11)  |  Direct (44)  |  Fail (34)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Initiation (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Possession (37)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Tool (70)  |  Understanding (317)

[An outsider views a scientist] as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as a realist, insofar as he seeks to describe the world independent of the act of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as the free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from that which is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sense experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensable and effective tool of his research.
In 'Reply to Critcisms', Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949, 1959), Vol. 2, 684.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consider (45)  |  Describe (38)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Experience (268)  |  Human Spirit (8)  |  Idealist (3)  |  Independent (41)  |  Indispensable (8)  |  Invention (283)  |  Justify (19)  |  Logical (20)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Outsider (5)  |  Perception (53)  |  Positivist (2)  |  Realist (2)  |  Relation (96)  |  Representation (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sense (240)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Theory (582)  |  Tool (70)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  Viewpoint (6)  |  World (667)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.