Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index H > Category: Highest

Highest Quotes (16 quotes)

As far as we know in the universe, man is unique. He happens to represent the highest form of organization of matter and energy that has ever appeared.
In The Meaning of Evolution (Rev.Ed. 1967), 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Energy (185)  |  Know (321)  |  Matter (270)  |  Unique (24)  |  Universe (563)

Every individual alive today, even the very highest, is to be derived in an unbroken line from the first and lowest forms.
In Heredity (1892), Vol. 1, 161. As cited in James C. Fernald Scientific Side-lights: Illustrating Thousands of Topics by Selections from Standard Works of the Masters of Science Throughout the World (1903), 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Derive (18)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Individual (177)  |  Line (44)  |  Lowest (7)  |  Unbroken (9)

If we would indicate an idea … striving to remove the barriers which prejudice and limited views of every kind have erected among men, and to treat all mankind, without reference to religion, nation, or color, as one fraternity, one great community, fitted for the attainment of one object, the unrestrained development of the physical powers. This is the ultimate and highest aim of society.
In Ueber die Kawi-Sprache, Vol. 3, 426. As quoted in Alexander von Humboldt, Cosmos: A Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe (1850), Vol. 1, 358, as translated by Elise C. Ottι.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Attainment (35)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Color (78)  |  Community (65)  |  Development (228)  |  Fraternity (4)  |  Idea (440)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Nation (111)  |  Physical (94)  |  Power (273)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Religion (210)  |  Remove (18)  |  Society (188)  |  Strive (35)  |  Treat (17)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Unrestrained (2)

It is something to be able to paint a particular picture or to carve a statue and so to make a few objects beautiful; but it is far more glorious to carve and paint the very atmosphere and medium through which we look, which morally we can do. To affect the quality of the day, that is the highest of arts.
In Walden: or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1893), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (10)  |  Art (205)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Carve (4)  |  Day (38)  |  Glorious (17)  |  Medium (12)  |  Moral (100)  |  Object (110)  |  Paint (17)  |  Picture (55)  |  Quality (65)  |  Statue (9)

It is still false to conclude that man is nothing but the highest animal, or the most progressive product of organic evolution. He is also a fundamentally new sort of animal and one in which, although organic evolution continues on its way, a fundamentally new sort of evolution has also appeared. The basis of this new sort of evolution is a new sort of heredity, the inheritance of learning. This sort of heredity appears modestly in other mammals and even lower in the animal kingdom, but in man it has incomparably fuller development and it combines with man's other characteristics unique in degree with a result that cannot be considered unique only in degree but must also be considered unique in kind.
In The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Basis (60)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Combination (69)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Degree (48)  |  Development (228)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Falsity (12)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Kingdom (34)  |  Learning (174)  |  Mammal (28)  |  Man (345)  |  Organic (48)  |  Result (250)  |  Sort (32)  |  Uniqueness (7)

Man has risen, not fallen. He can choose to develop his capacities as the highest animal and to try to rise still farther, or he can choose otherwise. The choice is his responsibility, and his alone. There is no automatism that will carry him upward without choice or effort and there is no trend solely in the right direction. Evolution has no purpose; man must supply this for himself. The means to gaining right ends involve both organic evolution and human evolution, but human choice as to what are the right ends must be based on human evolution.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Basis (60)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Choice (64)  |  Development (228)  |  Direction (56)  |  Effort (94)  |  End (141)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fall (89)  |  Human (445)  |  Man (345)  |  Organic (48)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Right (144)  |  Rise (51)  |  Supply (31)  |  Trend (16)

Man is the highest product of his own history. The discoverer finds nothing so grand or tall as himself, nothing so valuable to him. The greatest star is at the small end of the telescope, the star that is looking, not looked after nor looked at.
In Theodore Parker and Rufus Leighton (ed.), Lessons from the World of Matter and the World of Man: Selected from Notes of Unpublished Sermons (1865), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Discoverer (9)  |  Find (248)  |  Grand (15)  |  Greatest (53)  |  History (302)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Product (72)  |  Star (251)  |  Tall (8)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Value (180)

One indicator of Ernest Lawrence’s influence is the fact that I am the eighth member of his laboratory staff to receive the highest award that can come to a scientist—the Nobel Prize.
From Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1968). Collected in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1968 (1969).
Science quotes on:  |  Award (5)  |  Indicator (6)  |  Influence (110)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Ernest Orlando Lawrence (5)  |  Nobel Prize (26)  |  Scientist (447)

Only when Genius is married to Science can the highest results be produced.
Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1889), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Genius (186)  |  Production (105)  |  Result (250)  |  Science (1699)

The purpose of the history of science is to establish the genesis and the development of scientific facts and ideas, taking into account all intellectual exchanges and all influences brought into play by the very progress of civilization. It is indeed a history of civilization considered from its highest point of view. The center of interest is the evolution of science, but general history remains always in the background.
In The Monist (1916), 26, 333; as cited in 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (24)  |  Center (30)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Considered (10)  |  Development (228)  |  Establish (30)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Fact (609)  |  General (92)  |  Genesis (13)  |  History (302)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Idea (440)  |  Influence (110)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Interest (170)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Progress (317)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Remains (9)  |  Scientific (169)

The successful launching of the Sputnik was a demonstration of one of the highest scientific and technological achievements of man—a tantalizing invitation both to the militarist in search of ever more devastating means of destruction and to the astronomer searching for new means of carrying his instruments away from their earthbound environment.
In BBC Reith Lecture (9 Nov 1958), 'Astronomy Breaks Free', published as The Individual and the Universe (1959, 1961), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Carry (35)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Devastating (4)  |  Environment (138)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Invitation (8)  |  Launch (8)  |  Means (109)  |  Military (24)  |  New (340)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Search (85)  |  Searching (5)  |  Sputnik (4)  |  Success (202)  |  Technology (199)

We may, perhaps, imagine that the creation was finished long ago. But that would be quite wrong. It continues still more magnificently, and at the highest levels of the world.
In The Divine Milieu (1927, 1968), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Continue (38)  |  Creation (211)  |  Finished (3)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Level (51)  |  Long (95)  |  Magnificently (2)  |  World (667)  |  Wrong (116)

What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly? ... wearying himself with climbing upon every ascent, ... bruising himself with continual falls, and at last breaking his neck? And all this, from an imagination that it would be glorious to have the eyes of people looking up at him, and mighty happy to eat, and drink, and sleep, at the top of the highest trees in the kingdom.
In A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1732), 168. This was written before Montgolfier brothers, pioneer balloonists, were born.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (12)  |  Ascent (5)  |  Brain (181)  |  Break (33)  |  Climb (14)  |  Day (38)  |  Drink (27)  |  Eating (21)  |  Extravagant (2)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fall (89)  |  Flight (45)  |  Glory (44)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Look (46)  |  Neck (7)  |  Night (73)  |  People (269)  |  Silly (10)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Study (331)  |  Suppose (29)  |  Top (20)  |  Tree (143)

When we have amassed a great store of such general facts, they become the objects of another and higher species of classification, and are themselves included in laws which, as they dispose of groups, not individuals have a far superior degree of generality, till at length, by continuing the process, we arrive at axioms of the highest degree of generality of which science is capable. This process is what we mean by induction.
In A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Amassed (2)  |  Arrive (17)  |  Axiom (26)  |  Become (100)  |  Capable (26)  |  Classification (79)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Degree (48)  |  Dispose (7)  |  Fact (609)  |  General (92)  |  Generality (22)  |  Great (300)  |  Group (52)  |  Higher (28)  |  Included (2)  |  Individual (177)  |  Induction (45)  |  Law (418)  |  Length (13)  |  Nomenclature (129)  |  Object (110)  |  Process (201)  |  Science (1699)  |  Species (181)  |  Store (17)  |  Superior (30)

Whoever looks at the insect world, at flies, aphides, gnats and innumerable parasites, and even at the infant mammals, must have remarked the extreme content they take in suction, which constitutes the main business of their life. If we go into a library or newsroom, we see the same function on a higher plane, performed with like ardor, with equal impatience of interruption, indicating the sweetness of the act. In the highest civilization the book is still the highest delight.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', in Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Aphid (2)  |  Ardor (3)  |  Book (181)  |  Business (71)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Content (39)  |  Delight (51)  |  Equal (53)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Fly (65)  |  Function (90)  |  Gnat (6)  |  Higher (28)  |  Impatience (11)  |  Indication (21)  |  Infant (13)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Insect (57)  |  Interruption (3)  |  Library (37)  |  Life (917)  |  Look (46)  |  Main (16)  |  Mammal (28)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Performed (3)  |  Plane (15)  |  Remark (14)  |  See (197)  |  Suction (2)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  World (667)

[Scientists] have learned to respect nothing but evidence, and to believe that their highest duty lies in submitting to it however it may jar against their inclinations.
From Man’s Place in Nature (1894), 109
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Duty (51)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Jar (9)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Respect (57)  |  Scientist (447)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.