Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Rise

Rise Quotes (70 quotes)

1122 … Thereafter there were many sailors on the sea and on inland water who said that they had seen a great and extensive fire near the ground in the northeast which continuously increased in width as it mounted to the sky. And the heavens opened into four parts and fought against it as if determined to put it out, and the fire stopped rising upwards. They saw that fire at the first streak of dawn, and it lasted until full daylight: this happened on 7 December.
From the 'Peterborough Chronicle (Laud Manuscript)', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as translated in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Issue 1624 (1975), 250. The Chronicle is the work of many successive hands at several monasteries across England.
Science quotes on:  |  Continuously (7)  |  Dawn (16)  |  Daylight (10)  |  December (3)  |  Determined (9)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Fight (44)  |  Fire (133)  |  First (314)  |  Great (534)  |  Ground (90)  |  Heavens (18)  |  Increase (146)  |  Meteorology (32)  |  Open (66)  |  Part (222)  |  Sailor (12)  |  Sea (188)  |  Sky (124)  |  Stop (76)  |  Upwards (6)

Parkinson's Second Law: Expenditure rises to meet income.
The Law and the Profits (1960), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Expenditure (6)  |  Income (10)  |  Parkinson’s Law (4)

A century ago astronomers, geologists, chemists, physicists, each had an island of his own, separate and distinct from that of every other student of Nature; the whole field of research was then an archipelago of unconnected units. To-day all the provinces of study have risen together to form a continent without either a ferry or a bridge.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 182-183.
Science quotes on:  |  Archipelago (4)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Bridge (30)  |  Century (131)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Continent (52)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Ferry (4)  |  Field (171)  |  Form (314)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Island (24)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Province (14)  |  Research (590)  |  Separate (74)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Today (117)  |  Together (79)  |  Unconnected (4)  |  Unit (31)  |  Whole (192)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Assemble (10)  |  Build (117)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Continent (52)  |  Deep (124)  |  Disappear (30)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Earth (638)  |  Far (154)  |  Initial (17)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Learn (288)  |  Live (272)  |  Minute (44)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Number (282)  |  Occur (43)  |  Opposite (50)  |  Pack (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Place (175)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Race (104)  |  Rapidly (13)  |  Ride (11)  |  Sense (321)  |  Settle (18)  |  Space (257)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Think (347)  |  Time (595)  |  Together (79)  |  Travel (61)

A rose is the visible result of an infinitude of complicated goings on in the bosom of the earth and in the air above, and similarly a work of art is the product of strange activities in the human mind.
In Since Cezanne (1922), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Air (190)  |  Art (294)  |  Bosom (8)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Earth (638)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Product (82)  |  Result (389)  |  Similarly (3)  |  Strange (94)  |  Visible (38)  |  Work (635)

A small cabin stands in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, about a hundred yards off a trail that crosses the Cascade Range. In midsummer, the cabin looked strange in the forest. It was only twelve feet square, but it rose fully two stories and then had a high and steeply peaked roof. From the ridge of the roof, moreover, a ten-foot pole stuck straight up. Tied to the top of the pole was a shovel. To hikers shedding their backpacks at the door of the cabin on a cold summer evening—as the five of us did—it was somewhat unnerving to look up and think of people walking around in snow perhaps thirty-five feet above, hunting for that shovel, then digging their way down to the threshold.
In Encounters with the Archdruid (1971), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabin (4)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Cold (58)  |  Cross (15)  |  Dig (11)  |  Door (39)  |  Down (86)  |  Five (16)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forest (107)  |  Fully (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  High (153)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Hunt (18)  |  Midsummer (2)  |  Moreover (3)  |  Peak (20)  |  People (390)  |  Pole (18)  |  Range (57)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Roof (13)  |  Shed (5)  |  Small (163)  |  Snow (24)  |  Square (24)  |  Stand (108)  |  Stick (24)  |  Story (73)  |  Straight (19)  |  Strange (94)  |  Summer (33)  |  Think (347)  |  Thirty-Five (2)  |  Threshold (7)  |  Tie (24)  |  Top (34)  |  Trail (10)  |  Walk (67)  |  Wilderness (39)  |  Yard (7)

Astronomy was thus the cradle of the natural sciences and the starting point of geometrical theories. The stars themselves gave rise to the concept of a ‘point’; triangles, quadrangles and other geometrical figures appeared in the constellations; the circle was realized by the disc of the sun and the moon. Thus in an essentially intuitive fashion the elements of geometrical thinking came into existence.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Circle (56)  |  Concept (146)  |  Constellation (15)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Disk (3)  |  Element (162)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Existence (299)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Figure (69)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Give (201)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Moon (199)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Point (123)  |  Quadrangle (2)  |  Realize (90)  |  Star (336)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Sun (276)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Theory (696)  |  Think (347)  |  Triangle (11)

Before any great scientific principle receives distinct enunciation by individuals, it dwells more or less clearly in the general scientific mind. The intellectual plateau is already high, and our discoverers are those who, like peaks above the plateau, rise a little above the general level of thought at the time.
In 'Faraday as a Discoverer', The American Journal of Science (Jul 1868), 2nd series, 46, No. 136, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Discoverer (15)  |  Enunciation (5)  |  General (160)  |  Great (534)  |  High (153)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Peak (20)  |  Plateau (6)  |  Principle (292)  |  Scientific Mind (5)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (11)  |  Appearance (85)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Confusion (42)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Country (147)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (15)  |  Earth (638)  |  Example (94)  |  Face (108)  |  Figure (69)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (535)  |  Gratitude (10)  |  Hand (142)  |  Heap (14)  |  Hill (20)  |  Inequality (8)  |  Isle (6)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Objection (18)  |  Order (242)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (176)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Rock (125)  |  Rubbish (8)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (25)  |  Shape (70)  |  Sight (48)  |  Termination (3)  |  Valley (22)

Common to all these types is the anthropomorphic character of their conception of God. In general, only individuals of exceptional endowments, and exceptionally high-minded communities, rise to any considerable extent above this level. But there is a third stage of religious experience which belongs to all of them, even though it is rarely found in a pure form: I shall call it cosmic religious feeling. It is very difficult to elucidate this feeling to anyone who is entirely without it, especially as there is no anthropomorphic conception of God corresponding to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropomorphic (3)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Belong (53)  |  Call (128)  |  Character (118)  |  Common (122)  |  Community (82)  |  Conception (92)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Endowment (11)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exceptional (7)  |  Exceptionally (3)  |  Experience (342)  |  Extent (51)  |  Feel (167)  |  Find (408)  |  Form (314)  |  General (160)  |  God (535)  |  Individual (221)  |  Level (67)  |  Pure (103)  |  Rarely (20)  |  Religious (49)  |  Stage (55)  |  Third (15)  |  Type (52)

Counting stars by candlelight all are dim but one is bright; the spiral light of Venus rising first and shining best, from the northwest corner of a brand-new crescent moon crickets and cicadas sing a rare and different tune.
Terrapin Station
Science quotes on:  |  Best (173)  |  Bright (42)  |  Candlelight (3)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Corner (30)  |  Count (49)  |  Crescent (4)  |  Cricket (7)  |  Different (186)  |  Dim (7)  |  First (314)  |  Light (347)  |  Moon (199)  |  Rare (50)  |  Shine (45)  |  Sing (25)  |  Spiral (14)  |  Star (336)  |  Tune (14)  |  Venus (15)

Does there truly exist an insuperable contradiction between religion and science? Can religion be superseded by science? The answers to these questions have, for centuries, given rise to considerable dispute and, indeed, bitter fighting. Yet, in my own mind there can be no doubt that in both cases a dispassionate consideration can only lead to a negative answer. What complicates the solution, however, is the fact that while most people readily agree on what is meant by ‘science,’ they are likely to differ on the meaning of ‘religion.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  Answer (249)  |  Bitter (14)  |  Both (81)  |  Case (99)  |  Century (131)  |  Complicate (3)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Contradiction (54)  |  Differ (22)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Exist (148)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (201)  |  Insuperable (3)  |  Lead (160)  |  Likely (33)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mind (760)  |  Negative (34)  |  People (390)  |  Question (404)  |  Readily (10)  |  Religion (239)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Solution (216)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Truly (33)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (42)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (44)  |  Aim (89)  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (40)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Balance (55)  |  Barren (15)  |  Body (247)  |  Branch (107)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (128)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Deserve (28)  |  Detect (14)  |  Direct (84)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (49)  |  Emphatically (3)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (24)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (4)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Explain (107)  |  Express (65)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Fail (58)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (124)  |  Force (249)  |  Form (314)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Goal (100)  |  God (535)  |  High (153)  |  Hold (94)  |  Human (550)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Institution (39)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Law (515)  |  Lead (160)  |  Learn (288)  |  Lie (115)  |  Limit (126)  |  Material (156)  |  Measure (104)  |  Mechanical (50)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (760)  |  Minute (44)  |  Motion (160)  |  Mouth (21)  |  Move (94)  |  Natural (173)  |  New (496)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Physical (134)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (133)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (126)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Pursue (23)  |  Reason (471)  |  Remember (82)  |  Research (590)  |  Say (228)  |  Scale (63)  |  Science (2067)  |  Second (59)  |  Secret (131)  |  Seek (107)  |  Set (99)  |  Speak (92)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Structure (225)  |  Study (476)  |  Sublime (27)  |  System (191)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Think (347)  |  Together (79)  |  Truly (33)  |  Universe (686)  |  Useless (32)  |  Vast (89)  |  Weigh (14)  |  Work (635)  |  World (898)

Each new machine or technique, in a sense, changes all existing machines and techniques, by permitting us to put them together into new combinations. The number of possible combinations rises exponentially as the number of new machines or techniques rises
Future Shock (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Change (364)  |  Combination (91)  |  Exist (148)  |  Exponentially (2)  |  Machine (157)  |  New (496)  |  Number (282)  |  Permit (31)  |  Possible (158)  |  Sense (321)  |  Technique (49)  |  Together (79)

Each year, it seems, larger and more daunting mountains of text rise from the lush lowlands of visual reproduction.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Daunting (3)  |  Large (130)  |  Lush (3)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Seem (143)  |  Text (14)  |  Visual (15)  |  Year (299)

Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy wealthy and wise.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1735).
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (22)  |  Early (62)  |  Heath (4)  |  Man (373)  |  Wealth (66)  |  Wisdom (182)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (67)  |  Cease (39)  |  Change (364)  |  Child (252)  |  Cling (6)  |  Down (86)  |  Earth (638)  |  Fail (58)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forever (60)  |  Generation (141)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (94)  |  Light (347)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (107)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rock (125)  |  Sea (188)  |  Shift (29)  |  Witness (32)

How can cosmic religious feeling be communicated from one person to another, if it can give rise to no definite notion of a God and no theology? In my view, it is the most important function of art and science to awaken this feeling and keep it alive in those who are receptive to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Art (294)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Communicate (17)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Definite (43)  |  Feel (167)  |  Function (131)  |  Give (201)  |  God (535)  |  Important (205)  |  Keep (100)  |  Notion (59)  |  Person (154)  |  Receptive (4)  |  Religious (49)  |  Science (2067)  |  Theology (40)  |  View (171)

How much has happened in these fifty years—a period more remarkable than any, I will venture to say, in the annals of mankind. I am not thinking of the rise and fall of Empires, the change of dynasties, the establishment of Governments. I am thinking of those revolutions of science which have had much more effect than any political causes, which have changed the position and prospects of mankind more than all the conquests and all the codes and all the legislators that ever lived.
Banquet speech, Glasgow. In Nature (27 Nov 1873), 9, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Annal (3)  |  Cause (285)  |  Change (364)  |  Code (15)  |  Conquest (19)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  Effect (166)  |  Empire (14)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Fall (120)  |  Government (93)  |  Legislator (4)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Politics (96)  |  Position (76)  |  Prospect (22)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Science (2067)  |  Thinking (231)

I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 10
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Everything (181)  |  See (369)  |  Sun (276)

I have seen a thousand sunsets and sunrises, on land where it floods forest and mountains with honey coloured light, at sea where it rises and sets like a blood orange in a multicoloured nest of cloud, slipping in and out of the vast ocean. I have seen a thousand moons: harvest moons like gold coins, winter moons as white as ice chips, new moons like baby swans’ feathers.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (20)  |  Blood (104)  |  Chip (4)  |  Cloud (69)  |  Coin (12)  |  Color (99)  |  Feather (12)  |  Flood (36)  |  Forest (107)  |  Gold (68)  |  Honey (10)  |  Ice (33)  |  Land (115)  |  Light (347)  |  Moon (199)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nest (17)  |  New (496)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Orange (11)  |  Sea (188)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Slip (5)  |  Sunrise (12)  |  Sunset (22)  |  Swan (3)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Vast (89)  |  White (56)  |  Winter (30)

I raised the visor on my helmet cover and looked out to try to identify constellations. As I looked out into space, I was overwhelmed by the darkness. I felt the flesh crawl on my back and the hair rise on my neck.
In How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space?: All the Answers to All the Questions You Have About Living in Space (1999), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Constellation (15)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crawl (6)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Feel (167)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Hair (25)  |  Identify (13)  |  Neck (13)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Raise (35)  |  Space (257)  |  Try (141)

If we lived on a planet where nothing ever changed, there would be little to do. There would be nothing to figure out. There would be no impetus for science. And if we lived in an unpredictable world, where things changed in random or very complex ways, we would not be able to figure things out. But we live in an in-between universe, where things change, but according to patterns, rules, or as we call them, laws of nature. If I throw a stick up in the air, it always falls down. If the sun sets in the west, it always rises again the next morning in the east. And so it becomes possible to figure things out. We can do science, and with it we can improve our lives.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Change (364)  |  Complexity (91)  |  Doing (36)  |  Down (86)  |  East (18)  |  Fall (120)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Impetus (3)  |  Improvement (74)  |  Law Of Nature (64)  |  Life (1131)  |  Little (188)  |  Morning (43)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Planet (263)  |  Random (25)  |  Rule (177)  |  Science (2067)  |  Setting (6)  |  Stick (24)  |  Sun (276)  |  Throw (43)  |  Universe (686)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  West (17)  |  World (898)

If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Conceit (12)  |  Deflate (2)  |  Disservice (4)  |  Long (174)  |  Reason (471)  |  Science (2067)  |  Set (99)  |  Star (336)  |  Universe (686)

In many ways the performances of Donald Trump remind me of male chimpanzees and their dominance rituals. In order to impress rivals, males seeking to rise in the dominance hierarchy perform spectacular displays: stamping, slapping the ground, dragging branches, throwing rocks. The more vigorous and imaginative the display, the faster the individual is likely to rise in the hierarchy, and the longer he is likely to maintain that position.
As quoted in magazine article by James Fallows, 'When Donald Meets Hillary', The Atlantic (Oct 2016). The reporter stated “Jane Goodall … told me shortly before Trump won the GOP nomination.”
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (107)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Display (24)  |  Dominance (5)  |  Drag (4)  |  Faster (12)  |  Hierarchy (14)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Impress (16)  |  Individual (221)  |  Longer (9)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Male (26)  |  Performance (33)  |  Position (76)  |  Remind (13)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Rival (10)  |  Rock (125)  |  Seek (107)  |  Slap (2)  |  Spectacular (10)  |  Stamp (15)  |  Throw (43)  |  Donald Trump (3)  |  Vigorous (20)

In the month of August 678, in the eighth year of Egfrid’s reign, there appeared a star known as a comet, which remained visible for three months, rising in the morning and emitting what seemed to be a tall column of bright flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (42)  |  Column (15)  |  Comet (50)  |  Emit (6)  |  Flame (26)  |  Morning (43)  |  Star (336)  |  Tall (9)  |  Visible (38)

Know then thyself, presume not God to scan;
The proper study of Mankind is Man.
Plac'd on this isthmus of a middle state,
A being darkly wise, and rudely great:
With too much knowledge for the Sceptic side,
With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride,
He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest;
In doubt to deem himself a God, or Beast;
In doubt his Mind or Body to prefer,
Born but to die, and reas'ning but to err;
Alike in ignorance, his reason such,
Whether he thinks too little, or too much:
Chaos of Thought and Passion, all confus'd;
Still by himself abus'd, or disabus'd;
Created half to rise, and half to fall;
Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all;
Sole judge of Truth, in endless Error hurl'd:
The glory, jest, and riddle of the world!
... Superior beings, when of late they saw
A mortal Man unfold all Nature's law,
Admir'd such wisdom in an earthly shape,
And shew'd a NEWTON as we shew an Ape.
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle II. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 516-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (10)  |  Admiration (44)  |  Ape (42)  |  Beast (38)  |  Being (41)  |  Birth (93)  |  Body (247)  |  Chaos (77)  |  Confusion (42)  |  Creation (242)  |  Death (302)  |  Error (277)  |  Fall (120)  |  Glory (57)  |  God (535)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Isthmus (2)  |  Jest (4)  |  Judge (63)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Law (515)  |  Lord (16)  |  Man (373)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Passion (71)  |  Preference (21)  |  Prey (12)  |  Pride (64)  |  Reason (471)  |  Riddle (22)  |  Sceptic (5)  |  Shape (70)  |  Show (93)  |  Stoic (3)  |  Study (476)  |  Superiority (12)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Thought (546)  |  Truth (928)  |  Weakness (36)  |  Wisdom (182)  |  World (898)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  Alone (106)  |  Amount (31)  |  Ask (160)  |  Attentive (5)  |  Bear (67)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (126)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (98)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Conception (92)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Continuous (38)  |  Declare (27)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (33)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Draw (55)  |  Error (277)  |  Evident (29)  |  Extravagant (4)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fear (142)  |  Fellow (37)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  Former (25)  |  Glance (20)  |  Great (534)  |  Hold (94)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Join (25)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (347)  |  Link (42)  |  Long (174)  |  Mark (42)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (176)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mode (40)  |  Movement (83)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Primary (41)  |  Principle (292)  |  Process (267)  |  Progress (368)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (471)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Remote (42)  |  Run (57)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Second (59)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Sound (90)  |  Spring (71)  |  Step (110)  |  Succession (45)  |  Testimony (13)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  True (208)  |  Understand (340)  |  Uninterrupted (3)  |  Vary (26)  |  View (171)  |  Whereby (2)

Like water, be gentle and strong. Be gentle enough to follow the natural paths of the earth, and strong enough to rise up and reshape the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (638)  |  Follow (124)  |  Gentle (7)  |  Natural (173)  |  Path (84)  |  Reshape (4)  |  Strong (72)  |  Water (293)  |  World (898)

Man has risen, not fallen. He can choose to develop his capacities as the highest animal and to try to rise still farther, or he can choose otherwise. The choice is his responsibility, and his alone. There is no automatism that will carry him upward without choice or effort and there is no trend solely in the right direction. Evolution has no purpose; man must supply this for himself. The means to gaining right ends involve both organic evolution and human evolution, but human choice as to what are the right ends must be based on human evolution.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Basis (91)  |  Capacity (64)  |  Choice (79)  |  Development (289)  |  Direction (76)  |  Effort (144)  |  End (195)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Fall (120)  |  Highest (18)  |  Human (550)  |  Man (373)  |  Organic (55)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Right (197)  |  Supply (47)  |  Trend (17)

Man is uncanny, yet nothing
uncannier than man bestirs itself, rising up beyond him.
Sophocles
First line of a choral ode in Antigone, line 332, as translated from a French translation. One of several variations given in Bernard Stiegler, Technics and Time, 3, (2010), 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (105)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Stir (14)  |  Uncanny (5)

Mathematics, as much as music or any other art, is one of the means by which we rise to a complete self-consciousness. The significance of mathematics resides precisely in the fact that it is an art; by informing us of the nature of our own minds it informs us of much that depends on our minds.
In Aspects of Science: Second Series (1926), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Dependence (37)  |  Informing (2)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Means (176)  |  Mind (760)  |  Music (106)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Self-Consciousness (2)  |  Significance (71)

May the road rise to meet you. May the wind always be at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face, the rains fall soft upon your fields and, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of his hand.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (104)  |  Face (108)  |  Fall (120)  |  Field (171)  |  God (535)  |  Hand (142)  |  Hold (94)  |  Meet (31)  |  Palm (5)  |  Rain (33)  |  Road (64)  |  Shine (45)  |  Soft (15)  |  Sun (276)  |  Warm (34)  |  Wind (80)

Music may be called the sister of painting, for she is dependent upon hearing, the sense which comes second and her harmony is composed of the union of proportional parts sounded simultaneously, rising and falling in one or more harmonic rhythms.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (128)  |  Compose (17)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Fall (120)  |  Harmonic (4)  |  Harmony (72)  |  Hear (63)  |  Music (106)  |  Painting (43)  |  Part (222)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Rhythm (18)  |  Second (59)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simultaneous (18)  |  Sister (8)  |  Sound (90)  |  Union (21)

My sun sets to rise again.
In poem 'At “The Mermaid”', The Complete Poetic Works of Browning (1895), 808.
Science quotes on:  |  Set (99)  |  Sun (276)

New, distant Scenes of endless Science rise:
So pleas'd at first, the towring Alps we try,...
In An Essay on Criticism (1711), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Alps (4)  |  Distant (32)  |  Endless (28)  |  First (314)  |  New (496)  |  Pleased (3)  |  Scene (14)  |  Science (2067)  |  Try (141)

Ninety-nine and nine-tenths of the earth’s volume must forever remain invisible and untouchable. Because more than 97 per cent of it is too hot to crystallize, its body is extremely weak. The crust, being so thin, must bend, if, over wide areas, it becomes loaded with glacial ice, ocean water or deposits of sand and mud. It must bend in the opposite sense if widely extended loads of such material be removed. This accounts for … the origin of chains of high mountains … and the rise of lava to the earth’s surface.
Presidential speech to the Geological Society of America at Cambridge, Mass. (1932). As quoted in New York Times (20 Sep 1957), 23. Also summarized in Popular Mechanics (Apr 1933), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Bend (12)  |  Chain (50)  |  Crust (18)  |  Crystal (53)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Earth (638)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Ice (33)  |  Lava (4)  |  Load (11)  |  Material (156)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Mud (15)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Opposite (50)  |  Origin (88)  |  Removal (11)  |  Sand (34)  |  Surface (101)  |  Water (293)

No existing form of anthropoid ape is even remotely related to the stock which has given rise to man.
In Henry Fairfield Osborn, 'Osborn States the Case For Evolution', New York Times (12 Jul 1925), XX1. Written in rebuttal to the anti-evolution publicity by William Jennings Bryan at the time of the Scopes Monkey Trial.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropoid (4)  |  Ape (42)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Existence (299)  |  Man (373)  |  Relation (154)  |  Remoteness (7)  |  Stock (7)

Nothing, however, is more common than energy in money-making, quite independent of any higher object than its accumulation. A man who devotes himself to this pursuit, body and soul, can scarcely fail to become rich. Very little brains will do; spend less than you earn; add guinea to guinea; scrape and save; and the pile of gold will gradually rise.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859, 1861), 301-302.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (30)  |  Brain (213)  |  Devote (35)  |  Earn (7)  |  Gold (68)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Guinea (2)  |  Money (142)  |  Pile (12)  |  Rich (61)  |  Save (56)  |  Soul (166)  |  Spend (43)

Nowadays everyone knows that the US is the world’s biggest polluter, and that with only one 20th of the world’s population it produces a quarter of its greenhouse gas emissions. But the US government, in an abdication of leadership of epic proportions, is refusing to take the problem seriously. … Emissions from the US are up 14% on those in 1990 and are projected to rise by a further 12% over the next decade.
In 'Global Warming is Now a Weapon of Mass Destruction', The Guardian (28 Jul 2003).
Science quotes on:  |  Biggest (8)  |  Decade (32)  |  Emission (17)  |  Epic (6)  |  Government (93)  |  Greenhouse Gas (3)  |  Leadership (8)  |  Polluter (2)  |  Population (79)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Seriously (19)  |  World (898)

Our delight in any particular study, art, or science rises and improves in proportion to the application which we bestow upon it. Thus, what was at first an exercise becomes at length an entertainment.
In The Spectator (2 Aug 1712), No. 447, collected in The Spectator (9th ed., 1728), Vol. 6, 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Bestow (8)  |  Delight (66)  |  Entertainment (12)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Improvement (74)  |  Length (22)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Study (476)

Our discombobulated lives need to sink some anchors in numerical stability. (I still have not recovered from the rise of a pound of hamburger at the supermarket to more than a buck.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anchor (10)  |  Buck (2)  |  Hamburger (2)  |  Live (272)  |  Need (287)  |  Numerical (15)  |  Pound (14)  |  Recover (11)  |  Sink (21)  |  Stability (20)

Our friends should be companions who inspire us, who help us rise to our best.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Best (173)  |  Companion (13)  |  Friend (86)  |  Help (103)  |  Inspire (51)

Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.
Confucius
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fall (120)  |  Glory (57)  |  Great (534)  |  Time (595)

Spong and I had also several fine discourses upon the globes this afternoon, particularly why the fixed stars do not rise and set at the same hour all the year long, which he could not demonstrate nor I neither.
Entry for 19 Aug 1666. In Samuel Pepys and Henry B. Wheatley (ed.), The Diary of Samuel Pepys (1895, 1900), Vol. 5, 382. He spent the day with Mr Reeves and Mr Spong.
Science quotes on:  |  Discourse (18)  |  Explain (107)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Set (99)  |  Star (336)

Suddenly, from behind the rim of the moon, in long, slow-motion moments of immense majesty, there emerges a sparkling blue and white jewel, a light, delicate sky-blue sphere laced with slowly swirling veils of white, rising gradually like a small pearl in a thick sea of black mystery. It takes more than a moment to fully realize this is Earth . . . home.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (38)  |  Black (42)  |  Blue (56)  |  Delicate (21)  |  Earth (638)  |  Emerge (21)  |  Fully (21)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Home (84)  |  Immense (42)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Lace (2)  |  Light (347)  |  Long (174)  |  Majesty (13)  |  Moment (107)  |  Moon (199)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Realize (90)  |  Rim (5)  |  Sea (188)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Small (163)  |  Sparkle (7)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Thick (6)  |  Veil (17)  |  White (56)

Talent gives out what it has taken in ; genius, what has risen from its unsounded wells of living thought.
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Genius (249)  |  Give (201)  |  Living (56)  |  Take (10)  |  Talent (63)  |  Thought (546)  |  Well (14)

Technique and ability alone do not get you to the top; it is the willpower that is the most important. This willpower you cannot buy with money or be given by others...it rises from your heart.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Alone (106)  |  Buy (20)  |  Give (201)  |  Heart (139)  |  Important (205)  |  Money (142)  |  Technique (49)  |  Top (34)  |  Will Power (3)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Aid (42)  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Binomial Theorem (3)  |  Call (128)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (84)  |  Common (122)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (242)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (186)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Easy (102)  |  Effort (144)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (69)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Great (534)  |  Group (72)  |  High (153)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Involve (48)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Large (130)  |  Law (515)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Line (90)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (59)  |  Object (175)  |  Operation (121)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (154)  |  Physical Science (66)  |  Place (175)  |  Point (123)  |  Power (366)  |  Practical (133)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Product (82)  |  Purely (28)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (471)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (85)  |  Result (389)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Mind (5)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Single (120)  |  Situation (52)  |  Solve (78)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (9)  |  Superior (41)  |  Tension (9)  |  Theory (696)  |  Train (45)  |  Triangle (11)  |  Universal (105)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (100)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wide (28)

The blue distance, the mysterious Heavens, the example of birds and insects flying everywhere, are always beckoning Humanity to rise into the air.
In The Successes of Air Balloons in the 19th Century (1901), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Beckon (2)  |  Bird (120)  |  Blue (56)  |  Distance (77)  |  Example (94)  |  Flying (20)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Insect (64)  |  Mysterious (33)

The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. All through the long history of Earth it has been an area of unrest where waves have broken heavily against the land, where the tides have pressed forward over the continents, receded, and then returned. For no two suc-cessive days is the shore line precisely the same. Not only do the tides advance and retreat in their eternal rhythms, but the level of the sea itself is never at rest. It rises or falls as the glaciers melt or grow, as the floor of the deep ocean basins shifts under its increasing load of sediments, or as the Earth’s crust along the continental margins warps up or down in adjustment to strain and tension. Today a little more land may belong to the sea, tomorrow a little less. Always the edge of the sea remains an elusive and indefinable boundary.
The Edge of the Sea
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (15)  |  Advance (165)  |  Area (29)  |  Basin (2)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Belong (53)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Break (54)  |  Continent (52)  |  Continental (2)  |  Crust (18)  |  Deep (124)  |  Down (86)  |  Earth (638)  |  Edge (23)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Fall (120)  |  Floor (20)  |  Forward (36)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Grow (99)  |  Heavily (4)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Increase (146)  |  Indefinable (5)  |  Land (115)  |  Less (102)  |  Level (67)  |  Line (90)  |  Little (188)  |  Load (11)  |  Long (174)  |  Margin (6)  |  Melt (16)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Place (175)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Press (21)  |  Recede (4)  |  Remain (113)  |  Rest (93)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Return (55)  |  Rhythm (18)  |  Same (156)  |  Sea (188)  |  Sediment (7)  |  Shift (29)  |  Shore (24)  |  Strain (11)  |  Strange (94)  |  Tension (9)  |  Tide (24)  |  Today (117)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  Unrest (2)  |  Warp (5)  |  Wave (68)

The facts proved by geology are briefly these: that during an immense, but unknown period, the surface of the earth has undergone successive changes; land has sunk beneath the ocean, while fresh land has risen up from it; mountain chains have been elevated; islands have been formed into continents, and continents submerged till they have become islands; and these changes have taken place, not once merely, but perhaps hundreds, perhaps thousands of times.
In 'On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species', The Annals and Magazine of Natural History (1855), 16, No. 93, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Beneath (16)  |  Chain (50)  |  Change (364)  |  Continent (52)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Fact (733)  |  Form (314)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Geology (201)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Island (24)  |  Land (115)  |  Merely (82)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Prove (109)  |  Sink (21)  |  Successive (23)  |  Surface Of The Earth (5)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Undergo (14)

The importance of rice will grow in the coming decades because of potential changes in temperature, precipitation, and sea-level rise, as a result of global warming. Rice grows under a wide range of latitudes and altitudes and can become the anchor of food security in a world confronted with the challenge of climate change.
In 'Science and Shaping the Future of Rice', collected in Pramod K. Aggarwal et al. (eds.), 206 International Rice Congress: Science, Technology, and Trade for Peace and Prosperity (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Altitude (4)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Challenge (61)  |  Change (364)  |  Climate Change (60)  |  Confront (17)  |  Decade (32)  |  Food Security (5)  |  Global Warming (26)  |  Grow (99)  |  Importance (218)  |  Latitude (4)  |  Potential (39)  |  Precipitation (5)  |  Range (57)  |  Result (389)  |  Rice (3)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Temperature (47)  |  World (898)

The minds that rise and become really great are never self-satisfied, but still continue to strive.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Continue (65)  |  Great (534)  |  Mind (760)  |  Self-Satisfied (2)  |  Strive (45)

The monarch oak, the patriarch of the trees,
Shoots rising up, and spreads by slow degrees:
Three centuries he grows, and three he stays
Supreme in state; and in three more decays.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (131)  |  Decay (33)  |  Forestry (15)  |  Grow (99)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Oak (9)  |  Patriarch (3)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Spread (34)  |  Supreme (37)  |  Tree (171)

The Moon and its phases gave man his first calendar. Trying to match that calendar with the seasons helped give him mathematics. The usefulness of the calendar helped give rise to the thought of beneficent gods. And with all that the Moon is beautiful, too.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Beneficent (6)  |  Calendar (5)  |  First (314)  |  God (535)  |  Match (16)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Moon (199)  |  Phase (16)  |  Season (26)  |  Thought (546)  |  Usefulness (77)

The power of my [steam] engine rises in a geometrical proportion, while the consumption of fuel has only an arithmetical ratio; in such proportion that every time I added one fourth more to the consumption of fuel, the powers of the engine were doubled.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 211-212.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Consumption (11)  |  Double (15)  |  Fuel (31)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Power (366)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Ratio (19)  |  Steam Engine (42)

The rise of every man he loved to trace,
Up to the very pod O!
And, in baboons, our parent race
Was found by old Monboddo.
Their A, B, C, he made them speak.
And learn their qui, quæ, quod, O!
Till Hebrew, Latin, Welsh, and Greek
They knew as well’s Monboddo!
Anonymous
From Ballad, 'The Memory of Monboddo', in Blackwood’s Magazine (Sep 1861), 90, No. 551, 363, Verse 2 (of 6). Written to the Air, The Looking Glass. It is footnoted to explain that Lord (James Burnett) Monboddo “has written a book about the origin of language, in which he traces monkeys up to men.” The note is quoted and cited from Boswell’s Life of Johnson, Vol. 4, 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Baboon (2)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Greek (73)  |  Hebrew (7)  |  Know (556)  |  Latin (33)  |  Learn (288)  |  Love (224)  |  Man (373)  |  Lord James Burnett Monboddo (2)  |  Parent (46)  |  Pod (2)  |  Race (104)  |  Speak (92)  |  Trace (53)

The rise of the ecologist almost exactly parallels the decline of the naturalist.
'Some Notes on the Ecology of Ecologists', The Scientific Monthly (1956), 3, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Decline (17)  |  Ecologist (7)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Parallel (18)

The student of biology is often struck with the feeling that historians, when dealing with the rise and fall of nations, do not generally view the phenomena from a sufficiently high biological standpoint. To me, at least, they seem to attach too much importance to individual rulers and soldiers, and to particular wars, policies, religions, and customs; while at the same time they make little attempt to extract the fundamental causes of national success or failure.
Introduction written by Ross for William Henry Samuel Jones, Malaria, a Neglected Factor in the History of Greece and Rome (1907), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (168)  |  Cause (285)  |  Custom (30)  |  Failure (138)  |  Fall (120)  |  Feeling (91)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Historian (33)  |  Nation (134)  |  Policy (24)  |  Religion (239)  |  Ruler (15)  |  Soldier (15)  |  Standpoint (10)  |  Striking (5)  |  Student (203)  |  Success (250)  |  War (161)

The sun rises. In that short phrase, in a single fact, is enough information to keep biology, physics, and philosophy busy for all the rest of time.
Lifetide: a Biology of the Unconscious (1979)
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (168)  |  Busy (28)  |  Fact (733)  |  Information (122)  |  Keep (100)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Phrase (29)  |  Physics (348)  |  Rest (93)  |  Short (51)  |  Single (120)  |  Sun (276)  |  Time (595)

There is the immense sea of energy ... a multidimensional implicate order, ... the entire universe of matter as we generally observe it is to be treated as a comparatively small pattern of excitation. This excitation pattern is relatively autonomous and gives rise to approximately recurrent, stable separable projections into a three-dimensional explicate order of manifestation, which is more or less equivalent to that of space as we commonly experience it.
Wholeness and the Implicate Order? (1981), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Dimension (38)  |  Energy (214)  |  Entire (47)  |  Equivalent (17)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experience (342)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (201)  |  Immense (42)  |  Manifestation (35)  |  Matter (343)  |  More Or Less (8)  |  Observation (450)  |  Observe (76)  |  Order (242)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Projection (5)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Sea (188)  |  Separable (3)  |  Small (163)  |  Space (257)  |  Stable (17)  |  Three-Dimensional (2)  |  Treat (34)  |  Universe (686)

Throughout the last four hundred years, during which the growth of science had gradually shown men how to acquire knowledge of the ways of nature and mastery over natural forces, the clergy have fought a losing battle against science, in astronomy and geology, in anatomy and physiology, in biology and psychology and sociology. Ousted from one position, they have taken up another. After being worsted in astronomy, they did their best to prevent the rise of geology; they fought against Darwin in biology, and at the present time they fight against scientific theories of psychology and education. At each stage, they try to make the public forget their earlier obscurantism, in order that their present obscurantism may not be recognized for what it is.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 6. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Battle (34)  |  Biology (168)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Education (347)  |  Fight (44)  |  Forgeting (2)  |  Geology (201)  |  Growth (124)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Loss (73)  |  Mastery (28)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Obscurantism (2)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Present (176)  |  Prevention (30)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Public (94)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Sociology (43)  |  Theory (696)

We all agree now - by “we” I mean intelligent people under sixty - that a work of art is like a rose. A rose is not beautiful because it is like something else. Neither is a work of art. Roses and works of art are beautiful in themselves.
In Since Cezanne (1922), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Agree (26)  |  Art (294)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Mean (101)  |  People (390)  |  Roses (3)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Work (635)

We find ourselves, in consequence of the progress of physical science, at the pinnacle of one ascent of civilisation, taking the first step upwards out on to the lowest plane of the next. Above us still rises indefinitely the ascent of physical power—far beyond the dreams of mortals in any previous system of philosophy.
Lecture (1908) at Glasgow University. Collected in The Interpretation of Radium: Being the Substance of Six Free Popular Experimental Lectures Delivered at the University of Glasgow (1912), 252.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Dream (167)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Physical Science (66)  |  Pinnacle (2)  |  Power (366)  |  Progress (368)

Whatever you can teach him from the nature of things themselves, do not teach him by words. Leave him to himself to see, hear, find, stumble, rise again, and be mistaken. Give no words when action or deed is possible. What he can do for himself, let him do.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Deed (21)  |  Find (408)  |  Give (201)  |  Hear (63)  |  Leave (128)  |  Let (61)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Nature Of Things (9)  |  Possible (158)  |  See (369)  |  Stumble (15)  |  Teach (188)  |  Word (302)

When I received the Nobel Prize, the only big lump sum of money I have ever seen, I had to do something with it. The easiest way to drop this hot potato was to invest it, to buy shares. I knew that World War II was coming and I was afraid that if I had shares which rise in case of war, I would wish for war. So I asked my agent to buy shares which go down in the event of war. This he did. I lost my money and saved my soul.
In The Crazy Ape (1970), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (32)  |  Asking (23)  |  Buy (20)  |  Case (99)  |  Ease (35)  |  Fall (120)  |  Fear (142)  |  Invest (12)  |  Loss (73)  |  Lump (4)  |  Money (142)  |  Nobel Prize (28)  |  Save (56)  |  Share (49)  |  Soul (166)  |  War (161)  |  Wish (92)  |  World War II (8)

When you are risen on the eastern horizon
You have filled every land with your beauty…
Though you are far away, your rays are on Earth.
Akhenaten
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (248)  |  Earth (638)  |  Eastern (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Fill (61)  |  Horizon (29)  |  Land (115)  |  Ray (41)

Who has not be amazed to learn that the function y = ex, like a phoenix rising again from its own ashes, is its own derivative?
In François Le Lionnais (ed.), Great Currents of Mathematical Thought: Mathematics in the Arts and Sciences (1971), Vol. 2, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazed (4)  |  Ash (19)  |  Derivative (6)  |  Function (131)  |  Learn (288)

[The National Academy of Sciences] would be unable to give a unanimous decision if asked whether the sun would rise tomorrow.
In David M. Rorvik, 'Ecology’s Angry Lobbyist: Dr. Paul Ehrlich Argues That the Chief Cause of Pollution Is Overpopulation', Look (21 Apr 1970). As quoted and cited in Columbia World of Quotations (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (160)  |  Decision (72)  |  Give (201)  |  Sun (276)  |  Tomorrow (39)  |  Unable (24)  |  Unanimous (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.