Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Purely

Purely Quotes (109 quotes)

... one of the main functions of an analogy or model is to suggest extensions of the theory by considering extensions of the analogy, since more is known about the analogy than is known about the subject matter of the theory itself … A collection of observable concepts in a purely formal hypothesis suggesting no analogy with anything would consequently not suggest either any directions for its own development.
'Operational Definition and Analogy in Physical Theories', British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (Feb 1952), 2, No. 8, 291.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Collection (64)  |  Concept (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Direction (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Function (228)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Known (454)  |  Matter (798)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)

A principle of induction would be a statement with the help of which we could put inductive inferences into a logically acceptable form. In the eyes of the upholders of inductive logic, a principle of induction is of supreme importance for scientific method: “... this principle”, says Reichenbach, “determines the truth of scientific theories. To eliminate it from science would mean nothing less than to deprive science of the power to decide the truth or falsity of its theories. Without it, clearly, science would no longer have the right to distinguish its theories from the fanciful and arbitrary creations of the poet’s mind.” Now this principle of induction cannot be a purely logical truth like a tautology or an analytic statement. Indeed, if there were such a thing as a purely logical principle of induction, there would be no problem of induction; for in this case, all inductive inferences would have to be regarded as purely logical or tautological transformations, just like inferences in inductive logic. Thus the principle of induction must be a synthetic statement; that is, a statement whose negation is not self-contradictory but logically possible. So the question arises why such a principle should be accepted at all, and how we can justify its acceptance on rational grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptable (13)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Arise (158)  |  Case (99)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Creation (327)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Determine (144)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Eye (419)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Ground (217)  |  Help (105)  |  Importance (286)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Inference (45)  |  Justify (24)  |  Less (103)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negation (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Poet (83)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regard (305)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Self (267)  |  Statement (142)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Why (491)

All the real true knowledge we have of Nature is intirely experimental, insomuch that, how strange soever the assertion seems, we may lay this down as the first fundamental unerring rule in physics, That it is not within the compass of human understanding to assign a purely speculative reason for any one phaenomenon in nature.
In The Procedure, Extent, and Limits of Human Understanding (1728, 1729), 205-206.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Compass (34)  |  Down (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Seem (145)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Strange (157)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

An evolution is a series of events that in itself as series is purely physical, — a set of necessary occurrences in the world of space and time. An egg develops into a chick; … a planet condenses from the fluid state, and develops the life that for millions of years makes it so wondrous a place. Look upon all these things descriptively, and you shall see nothing but matter moving instant after instant, each instant containing in its full description the necessity of passing over into the next. … But look at the whole appreciatively, historically, synthetically, as a musician listens to a symphony, as a spectator watches a drama. Now you shall seem to have seen, in phenomenal form, a story.
In The Spirit of Modern Philosophy: An Essay in the Form of Lectures (1892), 425.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Chick (3)  |  Condense (13)  |  Contain (68)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (268)  |  Drama (21)  |  Egg (69)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  History (673)  |  Instant (45)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Make (25)  |  Matter (798)  |  Million (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Musician (21)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pure (291)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Spectator (10)  |  State (491)  |  Story (118)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Any opinion as to the form in which the energy of gravitation exists in space is of great importance, and whoever can make his opinion probable will have, made an enormous stride in physical speculation. The apparent universality of gravitation, and the equality of its effects on matter of all kinds are most remarkable facts, hitherto without exception; but they are purely experimental facts, liable to be corrected by a single observed exception. We cannot conceive of matter with negative inertia or mass; but we see no way of accounting for the proportionality of gravitation to mass by any legitimate method of demonstration. If we can see the tails of comets fly off in the direction opposed to the sun with an accelerated velocity, and if we believe these tails to be matter and not optical illusions or mere tracks of vibrating disturbance, then we must admit a force in that direction, and we may establish that it is caused by the sun if it always depends upon his position and distance.
Letter to William Huggins (13 Oct 1868). In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 451-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Comet (54)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Effect (393)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equality (31)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (146)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Kind (557)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Optical (11)  |  Physical (508)  |  Position (77)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  See (1081)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stride (15)  |  Sun (385)  |  Track (38)  |  Universality (22)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2355)

Before delivering your lectures, the manuscript should be in such a perfect form that, if need be, it could be set in type. Whether you follow the manuscript during the delivery of the lecture is purely incidental. The essential point is that you are thus master of the subject matter.
Advice to his son. As quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side Of Scientists (1975), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Delivery (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Set (394)  |  Subject (521)  |  Type (167)

Besides agreeing with the aims of vegetarianism for aesthetic and moral reasons, it is my view that a vegetarian manner of living by its purely physical effect on the human temperament would most beneficially influence the lot of mankind.
In letter to Harmann Huth (27 Dec 1930). Presumably published in Vegetarische Warte (Vegetarian Watch, some time before 1935), a German magazine published by the society Vegetarier-Bund of which Harmann Huth was vice-president. As cited by Alice Calaprice (ed.) in The Ultimate Quotable Einstein (2010), 453. This might be the inspiration for a much-circulated and much-elaborated version attributed, but apparently wrongly, to Einstein. The questionable quote appears as: “Nothing will benefit human health and increase the chances for survival of life on Earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet,” but no reliable source has been found for this as Einstein’s own words. Calaprice included this quote in her earlier edition of The Quotable Einstein (1996) in a final section of “Attributed to Einstein,” but it was removed from the final edition (2010), presumably because after much effort, it remained unsubstantiated.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aim (165)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Effect (393)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Living (491)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reason (744)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Vegetarian (13)  |  View (488)

Boundaries which mark off one field of science from another are purely artificial, are set up only for temporary convenience. Let chemists and physicists dig deep enough, and they reach common ground.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Artificial (33)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Ground (4)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Enough (340)  |  Field (364)  |  Ground (217)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Temporary (23)

But in the present century, thanks in good part to the influence of Hilbert, we have come to see that the unproved postulates with which we start are purely arbitrary. They must be consistent, they had better lead to something interesting.
In A History of Geometrical Methods (1940, reprint 2003), 423.
Science quotes on:  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Better (486)  |  Century (310)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Good (889)  |  David Hilbert (46)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lead (384)  |  Must (1526)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Present (619)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Start (221)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Unproven (5)

But nature is remarkably obstinate against purely logical operations; she likes not schoolmasters nor scholastic procedures. As though she took a particular satisfaction in mocking at our intelligence, she very often shows us the phantom of an apparently general law, represented by scattered fragments, which are entirely inconsistent. Logic asks for the union of these fragments; the resolute dogmatist, therefore, does not hesitate to go straight on to supply, by logical conclusions, the fragments he wants, and to flatter himself that he has mastered nature by his victorious intelligence.
'On the Principles of Animal Morphology', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (2 Apr 1888), 15, 289. Original as Letter to Mr John Murray, communicated to the Society by Professor Sir William Turner. Page given as in collected volume published 1889.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Ask (411)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Dogmatist (4)  |  Fragment (54)  |  General (511)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inconsistent (9)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Law (894)  |  Like (22)  |  Logic (287)  |  Master (178)  |  Mocking (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obstinate (5)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Remarkably (3)  |  Represent (155)  |  Resolute (2)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Scattered (5)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Straight (73)  |  Supply (93)  |  Union (51)  |  Want (497)

Descartes is the completest type which history presents of the purely mathematical type of mind—that in which the tendencies produced by mathematical cultivation reign unbalanced and supreme.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 626.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  History (673)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Present (619)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reign (23)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Type (167)  |  Unbalanced (2)

Edison was by far the most successful and, probably, the last exponent of the purely empirical method of investigation. Everything he achieved was the result of persistent trials and experiments often performed at random but always attesting extraordinary vigor and resource. Starting from a few known elements, he would make their combinations and permutations, tabulate them and run through the whole list, completing test after test with incredible rapidity until he obtained a clue. His mind was dominated by one idea, to leave no stone unturned, to exhaust every possibility.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Clue (17)  |  Combination (144)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Element (310)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perform (121)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Random (41)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Resource (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Run (174)  |  Stone (162)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tabulate (2)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Whole (738)

Empirical sciences prosecuted purely for their own sake, and without philosophic tendency are like a face without eyes.
The World as Will and Idea translated by Richard Burdon Haldane Haldane, John Kemp (3rd. Ed.,1888), Vol. 2, 318-319.
Science quotes on:  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empirical Science (9)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tendency (99)

Engineering is an activity other than purely manual and physical work which brings about the utilization of the materials and laws of nature for the good of humanity.
1929
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Bring (90)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Good (889)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Law (894)  |  Manual (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Work (1351)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Best (459)  |  Best Friend (4)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Dog (70)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Friend (168)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Literature (103)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Objective (91)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Religion (361)  |  Representative (14)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Still (613)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Wrap (7)

Every definition implies an axiom, since it asserts the existence of the object defined. The definition then will not be justified, from the purely logical point of view, until we have ‘proved’ that it involves no contradiction either in its terms or with the truths previously admitted.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Assert (66)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (221)  |  Existence (456)  |  Imply (17)  |  Involve (90)  |  Justify (24)  |  Logical (55)  |  Object (422)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Previously (11)  |  Prove (250)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Frequently, I have been asked if an experiment I have planned is pure or applied science; to me it is more important to know if the experiment will yield new and probably enduring knowledge about nature. If it is likely to yield such knowledge, it is, in my opinion, good fundamental research; and this is more important than whether the motivation is purely aesthetic satisfaction on the part of the experimenter on the one hand or the improvement of the stability of a high-power transistor on the other.
Quoted in Richard R. Nelson, 'The Link Between Science and Invention: The Case of the Transistor,' The Rate and Direction of the Inventive Activity (1962). In Daniel S. Greenberg, The Politics of Pure Science (1999), 32, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Enduring (6)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Research (664)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stability (25)  |  Transistor (5)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

Geometry, which should only obey Physics, when united with it sometimes commands it. If it happens that the question which we wish to examine is too complicated for all the elements to be able to enter into the analytical comparison which we wish to make, we separate the more inconvenient [elements], we substitute others for them, less troublesome, but also less real, and we are surprised to arrive, notwithstanding a painful labour, only at a result contradicted by nature; as if after having disguised it, cut it short or altered it, a purely mechanical combination could give it back to us.
From Essai d’une nouvelle théorie de la résistance des fluides (1752), translated as an epigram in Ivor Grattan-Guinness, Convolutions in French Mathematics, 1800-1840: From the Calculus and Mechanics to Mathematical Analysis and Mathematical Physics (1990), Vol. 1, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Back (390)  |  Combination (144)  |  Command (58)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Cut (114)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Enter (141)  |  Examine (78)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Happen (274)  |  Inconvenient (4)  |  Labour (98)  |  Less (103)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obey (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painful (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Result (677)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  United (14)  |  Wish (212)

Having discovered … by observation and comparison that certain objects agree in certain respects, we generalise the qualities in which they coincide,—that is, from a certain number of individual instances we infer a general law; we perform an act of Induction. This induction is erroneously viewed as analytic; it is purely a synthetic process.
In Lecture VI of his Biennial Course, by William Hamilton and Henry L. Mansel (ed.) and John Veitch (ed.), Metaphysics (1860), Vol. 1, 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Agree (26)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Certain (550)  |  Coincide (5)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Discover (553)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  General (511)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infer (12)  |  Instance (33)  |  Law (894)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Perform (121)  |  Process (423)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quality (135)  |  Respect (207)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  View (488)

He who ascribes the movement of the seas to the movement of the earth assumes a purely forced movement; but he who lets the seas follow the moon makes this movement in a certain way a natural one.
As quoted in James Bruce Ross and Mary Martin McLaughlin, The Portable Renaissance Reader (1968), 603.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Earth (996)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Moon (237)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Sea (308)  |  Way (1217)

Humor can be dissected, as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the purely scientific mind.
In Elwyn Brooks White, Katharine Sergeant Angell White, first paragraph, 'The Preaching Humorist', The Saturday Review (18 Oct 1941), 16. Also collected in the same authors’ book, A Subtreasury of American Humor (1941), xvii. Seen in later books, in a number of variants, for example, “Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it”, in Bob Phillips, Phillips’ Treasury of Humorous Quotations (2004), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Death (388)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Frog (38)  |  Humour (116)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mind (1338)  |  People (1005)  |  Process (423)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Thing (1915)

I am coming more and more to the conviction that the necessity of our geometry cannot be demonstrated, at least neither by, nor for, the human intellect...geometry should be ranked, not with arithmetic, which is purely aprioristic, but with mechanics.
Quoted in J Koenderink, Solid Shape (1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Rank (67)

I consider [H. G. Wells], as a purely imaginative writer, to be deserving of very high praise, but our methods are entirely different. I have always made a point in my romances of basing my so-called inventions upon a groundwork of actual fact, and of using in their construction methods and materials which are not entirely without the pale of contemporary engineering skill and knowledge. ... The creations of Mr. Wells, on the other hand, belong unreservedly to an age and degree of scientific knowledge far removed from the present, though I will not say entirely beyond the limits of the possible.
Gordon Jones, 'Jules Verne at Home', Temple Bar (Jun 1904), 129, 670.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Age (499)  |  Belong (162)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construction (112)  |  Creation (327)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  High (362)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limit (280)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Romance (15)  |  Say (984)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Skill (109)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Herbert George (H.G.) Wells (38)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)

I feel more comfortable with gorillas than people. I can anticipate what a gorilla's going to do, and they're purely motivated.
Preferring the “silence of the forest” to the noise of a cocktail party while participating in a symposium, 'What We Can Learn About Humankind From the Apes' at Sweet Briar College campus. As quoted by Nan Robertson in 'Three Who Have Chosen a Life in the Wild', New York Times (1 May 1981), B36.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Pure (291)

I uphold my own rights, and therefore I also recognize the rights of others. This is the principle I act upon in life, in politics and in science. We owe it to ourselves to defend our rights, for it is the only guarantee for our individual development, and for our influence upon the community at large. Such a defence is no act of vain ambition, and it involves no renunciation of purely scientific aims. For, if we would serve science, we must extend her limits, not only as far as our own knowledge is concerned, but in the estimation of others.
Cellular Pathology, translated by Frank Chance (1860), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Aim (165)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Community (104)  |  Concern (228)  |  Defence (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Extend (128)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Involve (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Owe (71)  |  Politics (112)  |  Principle (507)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Vain (83)

I view the major features of my own odyssey as a set of mostly fortunate contingencies. I was not destined by inherited mentality or family tradition to become a paleontologist. I can locate no tradition for scientific or intellectual careers anywhere on either side of my eastern European Jewish background ... I view my serious and lifelong commitment to baseball in entirely the same manner: purely as a contingent circumstance of numerous, albeit not entirely capricious, accidents.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Background (43)  |  Baseball (3)  |  Become (815)  |  Capricious (7)  |  Career (75)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Contingent (12)  |  Destined (42)  |  Eastern (3)  |  Entirely (34)  |  European (5)  |  Family (94)  |  Feature (44)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Lifelong (9)  |  Locate (7)  |  Major (84)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Same (157)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Tradition (69)  |  View (488)

If a mathematician of the past, an Archimedes or even a Descartes, could view the field of geometry in its present condition, the first feature to impress him would be its lack of concreteness. There are whole classes of geometric theories which proceed not only without models and diagrams, but without the slightest (apparent) use of spatial intuition. In the main this is due, to the power of the analytic instruments of investigations as compared with the purely geometric.
In 'The Present Problems in Geometry', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1906), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Analytic (10)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Class (164)  |  Compare (69)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Condition (356)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Due (141)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometric (5)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lack (119)  |  Main (28)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Past (337)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

If it be urged that the action of the potato is chemical and mechanical only, and that it is due to the chemical and mechanical effects of light and heat, the answer would seem to lie in an enquiry whether every sensation is not chemical and mechanical in its operation? Whether those things which we deem most purely spiritual are anything but disturbances of equilibrium in an infinite series of levers, beginning with those that are too small for microscopic detection, and going up to the human arm and the appliances which it makes use of? Whether there be not a molecular action of thought, whence a dynamical theory of the passions shall be deducible?
In Erewhon, Or, Over the Range (1872), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appliance (9)  |  Arm (81)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Detection (16)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Due (141)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Lever (13)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Operation (213)  |  Passion (114)  |  Potato (10)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Small (477)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)

In a purely technical sense, each species of higher organism—beetle, moss, and so forth, is richer in information than a Caravaggio painting, Mozart symphony, or any other great work of art. Consider the typical case of the house mouse, Mus musculus. Each of its cells contains four strings of DNA, each of which comprises about a billion nucleotide pairs organized into a hundred thousand structural nucleotide pairs, organized into a hundred thousand structural genes. … The full information therein, if translated into ordinary-sized printed letters, would just about fill all 15 editions of the Encyclopaedia Britannica published since 1768.
'The Biological Diversity Crisis: A Challenge to Science', Issues in Science and Technology (Fall 1985), 2:1, 22. Reprinted in Nature Revealed: Selected Writings, 1949-2006 (2006), 622.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Billion (95)  |  Consider (416)  |  DNA (77)  |  Gene (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  House (140)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Information (166)  |  Letter (109)  |  Moss (10)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painting (44)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  Structural (29)  |  Symphony (9)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Work (1351)

In order to discover Truth in this manner by observation and reason, it is requisite we should fix on some principles whose certainty and effects are demonstrable to our senses, which may serve to explain the phenomena of natural bodies and account for the accidents that arise in them; such only are those which are purely material in the human body with mechanical and physical experiments … a physician may and ought to furnish himself with, and reason from, such things as are demonstrated to be true in anatomy, chemistry, and mechanics, with natural and experimental philosophy, provided he confines his reasoning within the bounds of truth and simple experiment.
As quoted in selection from the writings of Herman Boerhaave, collected in Oliver Joseph Thatcher (ed.), The Ideas that Have Influenced Civilization, in the Original Documents (1800), Vol. 6, 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Account (192)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Arise (158)  |  Body (537)  |  Bound (119)  |  Bounds (7)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Confine (26)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Effect (393)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Explain (322)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)

In studying the fate of our forest king, we have thus far considered the action of purely natural causes only; but, unfortunately, man is in the woods, and waste and pure destruction are making rapid headway. If the importance of the forests were even vaguely understood, even from an economic standpoint, their preservation would call forth the most watchful attention of government
John Muir
In The Mountains of California (1894), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Attention (190)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Fate (72)  |  Forest (150)  |  Government (110)  |  Headway (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  King (35)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Studying (70)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Waste (101)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wood (92)

In the modern interpretation of Mendelism, facts are being transformed into factors at a rapid rate. If one factor will not explain the facts, then two are involved; if two prove insufficient, three will sometimes work out. The superior jugglery sometimes necessary to account for the results may blind us, if taken too naively, to the common-place that the results are often so excellently 'explained' because the explanation was invented to explain them. We work backwards from the facts to the factors, and then, presto! explain the facts by the very factors that we invented to account for them. I am not unappreciative of the distinct advantages that this method has in handling the facts. I realize how valuable it has been to us to be able to marshal our results under a few simple assumptions, yet I cannot but fear that we are rapidly developing a sort of Mendelian ritual by which to explain the extraordinary facts of alternative inheritance. So long as we do not lose sight of the purely arbitrary and formal nature of our formulae, little harm will be done; and it is only fair to state that those who are doing the actual work of progress along Mendelian lines are aware of the hypothetical nature of the factor-assumption.
'What are 'Factors' in Mendelian Explanations?', American Breeders Association (1909), 5, 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Common (436)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Involved (90)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Superior (81)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In the social equation, the value of a single life is nil; in the cosmic equation, it is infinite… Not only communism, but any political movement which implicitly relies on purely utilitarian ethics, must become a victim to the same fatal error. It is a fallacy as naïve as a mathematical teaser, and yet its consequences lead straight to Goya’s Disasters, to the reign of the guillotine, the torture chambers of the Inquisition, or the cellars of the Lubianka.
In 'The Invisible Writing', Arrow in the Blue: An Autobiography (1952), Vol. 2, 357.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Communism (11)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Equation (132)  |  Error (321)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Guillotine (5)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inquisition (8)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Reign (23)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Straight (73)  |  Torture (29)  |  Value (365)  |  Victim (35)

In the temple of science are many mansions, and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them thither. Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual power; science is their own special sport to which they look for vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. Were an angel of the Lord to come and drive all the people belonging to these two categories out of the temple, the assemblage would be seriously depleted, but there would still be some men, of both present and past times, left inside. Our Planck is one of them, and that is why we love him.
Address at Physical Society, Berlin (1918), for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Altar (10)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Angel (44)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Depletion (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Joy (107)  |  Look (582)  |  Lord (93)  |  Love (309)  |  Motive (59)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Sport (22)  |  Still (613)  |  Superior (81)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Utility (49)  |  Various (200)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Why (491)

In working out physical problems there should be, in the first place, no pretence of rigorous formalism. The physics will guide the physicist along somehow to useful and important results, by the constant union of physical and geometrical or analytical ideas. The practice of eliminating the physics by reducing a problem to a purely mathematical exercise should be avoided as much as possible. The physics should be carried on right through, to give life and reality to the problem, and to obtain the great assistance which the physics gives to the mathematics.
In Electromagnetic Theory (1892), Vol. 2, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Assistance (20)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Constant (144)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Exercise (110)  |  First (1283)  |  Formalism (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Through (849)  |  Union (51)  |  Useful (250)  |  Will (2355)

It is interesting to note how many fundamental terms which the social sciences are trying to adopt from physics have as a matter of historical fact originated in the social field. Take, for instance, the notion of cause. The Greek aitia or the Latin causa was originally a purely legal term. It was taken over into physics, developed there, and in the 18th century brought back as a foreign-born kind for the adoration of the social sciences. The same is true of the concept of law of nature. Originally a strict anthropomorphic conception, it was gradually depersonalized or dehumanized in the natural sciences and then taken over by the social sciences in an effort to eliminate final causes or purposes from the study of human affairs. It is therefore not anomalous to find similar transformations in the history of such fundamental concepts of statistics as average and probability. The concept of average was developed in the Rhodian laws as to the distribution of losses in maritime risks. After astronomers began to use it in correcting their observations, it spread to other physical sciences; and the prestige which it thus acquired has given it vogue in the social field. The term probability, as its etymology indicates, originates in practical and legal considerations of probing and proving.
The Statistical View of Nature (1936), 327-8.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Adoration (4)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Greek (107)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Latin (38)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Matter (798)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observation (555)  |  Originate (36)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Probability (130)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Risk (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Spread (83)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Trying (144)  |  Use (766)

It is not only a decided preference for synthesis and a complete denial of general methods which characterizes the ancient mathematics as against our newer Science [modern mathematics]: besides this extemal formal difference there is another real, more deeply seated, contrast, which arises from the different attitudes which the two assumed relative to the use of the concept of variability. For while the ancients, on account of considerations which had been transmitted to them from the Philosophie school of the Eleatics, never employed the concept of motion, the spatial expression for variability, in their rigorous system, and made incidental use of it only in the treatment of phonoromically generated curves, modern geometry dates from the instant that Descartes left the purely algebraic treatment of equations and proceeded to investigate the variations which an algebraic expression undergoes when one of its variables assumes a continuous succession of values.
In 'Untersuchungen über die unendlich oft oszillierenden und unstetigen Functionen', Ostwald’s Klassiker der exacten Wissenschaften (1905), No. 153, 44-45. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 115. From the original German, “Nicht allein entschiedene Vorliebe für die Synthese und gänzliche Verleugnung allgemeiner Methoden charakterisiert die antike Mathematik gegenüber unserer neueren Wissenschaft; es gibt neben diesem mehr äußeren, formalen, noch einen tiefliegenden realen Gegensatz, welcher aus der verschiedenen Stellung entspringt, in welche sich beide zu der wissenschaftlichen Verwendung des Begriffes der Veränderlichkeit gesetzt haben. Denn während die Alten den Begriff der Bewegung, des räumlichen Ausdruckes der Veränderlichkeit, aus Bedenken, die aus der philosophischen Schule der Eleaten auf sie übergegangen waren, in ihrem strengen Systeme niemals und auch in der Behandlung phoronomisch erzeugter Kurven nur vorübergehend verwenden, so datiert die neuere Mathematik von dem Augenblicke, als Descartes von der rein algebraischen Behandlung der Gleichungen dazu fortschritt, die Größenveränderungen zu untersuchen, welche ein algebraischer Ausdruck erleidet, indem eine in ihm allgemein bezeichnete Größe eine stetige Folge von Werten durchläuft.”
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Curve (49)  |  Denial (17)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equation (132)  |  Expression (175)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Instant (45)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Never (1087)  |  Preference (28)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succession (77)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  System (537)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Variable (34)  |  Variation (90)

It is often held that scientific hypotheses are constructed, and are to be constructed, only after a detailed weighing of all possible evidence bearing on the matter, and that then and only then may one consider, and still only tentatively, any hypotheses. This traditional view however, is largely incorrect, for not only is it absurdly impossible of application, but it is contradicted by the history of the development of any scientific theory. What happens in practice is that by intuitive insight, or other inexplicable inspiration, the theorist decides that certain features seem to him more important than others and capable of explanation by certain hypotheses. Then basing his study on these hypotheses the attempt is made to deduce their consequences. The successful pioneer of theoretical science is he whose intuitions yield hypotheses on which satisfactory theories can be built, and conversely for the unsuccessful (as judged from a purely scientific standpoint).
Co-author with Raymond Arthur Lyttleton, in 'The Internal Constitution of the Stars', Occasional Notes of the Royal Astronomical Society 1948, 12, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Happen (274)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Yield (81)

It is true that mathematics, owing to the fact that its whole content is built up by means of purely logical deduction from a small number of universally comprehended principles, has not unfittingly been designated as the science of the self-evident [Selbstverständlichen]. Experience however, shows that for the majority of the cultured, even of scientists, mathematics remains the science of the incomprehensible [Unverständlichen].
In Ueber Wert und angeblichen Unwert der Mathematik, Jahresbericht der Deutschen Maihemaliker Vereinigung (1904), 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Content (69)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Designation (13)  |  Evident (91)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Logic (287)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Number (699)  |  Owing (39)  |  Principle (507)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Universal (189)  |  Whole (738)

It required unusual inquisitiveness to pursue the development of scientific curiosities such as charged pith balls, the voltaic cell, and the electrostatic machine. Without such endeavors and the evolution of associated instrumentation, initially of purely scientific interest, most of the investigations that lead to the basic equations of electromagnetism would have been missed. … We would have been deprived of electromagnetic machinery as well as knowledge of electromagnetic waves.
From The Science Matrix: The Journey, Travails, Triumphs (1992, 1998), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Basic (138)  |  Charge (59)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deprived (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Electromagnetic Wave (2)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Equation (132)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Inquisitiveness (5)  |  Instrumentation (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missed (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Required (108)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Voltaic (9)  |  Wave (107)

MAGNITUDE, n. Size. Magnitude being purely relative, nothing is large and nothing small. If everything in the universe were increased in bulk one thousand diameters nothing would be any larger than it was before, but if one thing remained unchanged all the others would be larger than they had been. To an understanding familiar with the relativity of magnitude and distance the spaces and masses of the astronomer would be no more impressive than those of the microscopist. For anything we know to the contrary, the visible universe may be a small part of an atom, with its component ions, floating in the life-fluid (luminiferous ether) of some animal. Possibly the wee creatures peopling the corpuscles of our own blood are overcome with the proper emotion when contemplating the unthinkable distance from one of these to another.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  209.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Component (48)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Creature (233)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Distance (161)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ether (35)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Humour (116)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Ion (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Proper (144)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Remain (349)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Visible (84)

Mathematics gives the young man a clear idea of demonstration and habituates him to form long trains of thought and reasoning methodically connected and sustained by the final certainty of the result; and it has the further advantage, from a purely moral point of view, of inspiring an absolute and fanatical respect for truth. In addition to all this, mathematics, and chiefly algebra and infinitesimal calculus, excite to a high degree the conception of the signs and symbols—necessary instruments to extend the power and reach of the human mind by summarizing an aggregate of relations in a condensed form and in a kind of mechanical way. These auxiliaries are of special value in mathematics because they are there adequate to their definitions, a characteristic which they do not possess to the same degree in the physical and mathematical [natural?] sciences.
There are, in fact, a mass of mental and moral faculties that can be put in full play only by instruction in mathematics; and they would be made still more available if the teaching was directed so as to leave free play to the personal work of the student.
In 'Science as an Instrument of Education', Popular Science Monthly (1897), 253.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Addition (66)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Available (78)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Clear (100)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condense (13)  |  Connect (125)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excite (15)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fanatical (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Final (118)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Full (66)  |  Give (202)  |  Habituate (3)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leave (130)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mental (177)  |  Methodically (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Physical (508)  |  Play (112)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sign (58)  |  Special (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

Mathematics has not a foot to stand upon which is not purely metaphysical.
'Kant in His Miscellaneous Essays', Blackwood's Magazine, 1830, 28, 244-68.
Science quotes on:  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Stand (274)

Men of science belong to two different types—the logical and the intuitive. Science owes its progress to both forms of minds. Mathematics, although a purely logical structure, nevertheless makes use of intuition. Among the mathematicians there are intuitives and logicians, analysts and geometricians. Hermite and Weierstrass were intuitives. Riemann and Bertrand, logicians. The discoveries of intuition have always to be developed by logic.
In Man the Unknown (1935), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyst (8)  |  Belong (162)  |  Joseph Bertrand (6)  |  Both (493)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Charles Hermite (10)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logician (17)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Owe (71)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pure (291)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Use (766)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)

Most, if not all, of the great ideas of modern mathematics have had their origin in observation. Take, for instance, the arithmetical theory of forms, of which the foundation was laid in the diophantine theorems of Fermat, left without proof by their author, which resisted all efforts of the myriad-minded Euler to reduce to demonstration, and only yielded up their cause of being when turned over in the blow-pipe flame of Gauss’s transcendent genius; or the doctrine of double periodicity, which resulted from the observation of Jacobi of a purely analytical fact of transformation; or Legendre’s law of reciprocity; or Sturm’s theorem about the roots of equations, which, as he informed me with his own lips, stared him in the face in the midst of some mechanical investigations connected (if my memory serves me right) with the motion of compound pendulums; or Huyghen’s method of continued fractions, characterized by Lagrange as one of the principal discoveries of that great mathematician, and to which he appears to have been led by the construction of his Planetary Automaton; or the new algebra, speaking of which one of my predecessors (Mr. Spottiswoode) has said, not without just reason and authority, from this chair, “that it reaches out and indissolubly connects itself each year with fresh branches of mathematics, that the theory of equations has become almost new through it, algebraic geometry transfigured in its light, that the calculus of variations, molecular physics, and mechanics” (he might, if speaking at the present moment, go on to add the theory of elasticity and the development of the integral calculus) “have all felt its influence”.
In 'A Plea for the Mathematician', Nature, 1, 238 in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 655-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blow (44)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chair (24)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Compound (113)  |  Connect (125)  |  Construction (112)  |  Continue (165)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Double (15)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  Equation (132)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Flame (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Christiaan Huygens (10)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inform (47)  |  Instance (33)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integral Calculus (6)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Karl Jacobi (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Laid (7)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Adrien-Marie Legendre (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Lip (4)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Periodicity (6)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Resist (15)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Root (120)  |  Say (984)  |  Serve (59)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  William Spottiswoode (3)  |  Star (427)  |  Stare (9)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Transcendent (2)  |  Transfigure (2)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variation (90)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Nothing has afforded me so convincing a proof of the unity of the Deity as these purely mental conceptions of numerical and mathematical science which have been by slow degrees vouchsafed to man, and are still granted in these latter times by the Differential Calculus, now superseded by the Higher Algebra, all of which must have existed in that sublimely omniscient Mind from eternity.
Martha Somerville (ed.) Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville (1874), 140-141.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Conception (154)  |  Convince (41)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deity (22)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Exist (443)  |  Grant (73)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Omniscient (6)  |  Proof (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slow (101)  |  Still (613)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vouchsafe (2)

Now that we locate them [genes] in the chromosomes are we justified in regarding them as material units; as chemical bodies of a higher order than molecules? Frankly, these are questions with which the working geneticist has not much concern himself, except now and then to speculate as to the nature of the postulated elements. There is no consensus of opinion amongst geneticists as to what the genes are—whether they are real or purely fictitious—because at the level at which the genetic experiments lie, it does not make the slightest difference whether the gene is a hypothetical unit, or whether the gene is a material particle. In either case the unit is associated with a specific chromosome, and can be localized there by purely genetic analysis. Hence, if the gene is a material unit, it is a piece of chromosome; if it is a fictitious unit, it must be referred to a definite location in a chromosome—the same place as on the other hypothesis. Therefore, it makes no difference in the actual work in genetics which point of view is taken. Between the characters that are used by the geneticist and the genes that his theory postulates lies the whole field of embryonic development.
'The Relation of Genetics to Physiology and Medicine', Nobel Lecture (4 Jun 1934). In Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Definite (110)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Element (310)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Field (364)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Lie (364)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (353)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Question (621)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

On the day of Cromwell’s death, when Newton was sixteen, a great storm raged all over England. He used to say, in his old age, that on that day he made his first purely scientific experiment. To ascertain the force of the wind, he first jumped with the wind and then against it; and, by comparing these distances with the extent of his own jump on a calm day, he was enabled to compute the force of the storm. When the wind blew thereafter, he used to say it was so many feet strong.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 248.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calm (31)  |  Compare (69)  |  Compute (18)  |  Oliver Cromwell (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Distance (161)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Jump (29)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strong (174)  |  Wind (128)

Our enmity to the serpent, which often exists together with a mythic and anthropomorphic belief in the serpent’s enmity to us, might be regarded as purely traditional, having its origin in the Scriptural narrative of man’s disobedience and expulsion from Paradise.
In The Book of a Naturalist (1919), 178.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anthropomorphic (3)  |  Belief (578)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expulsion (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrative (7)  |  Origin (239)  |  Paradise (13)  |  Regard (305)  |  Serpent (5)  |  Snake (26)  |  Together (387)  |  Tradition (69)

Our first endeavors are purely instinctive prompting of an imagination vivid and undisciplined. As we grow older reason asserts itself and we become more and more systematic and designing. But those early impulses, though not immediately productive, are o
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Become (815)  |  Design (195)  |  Early (185)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  First (1283)  |  Grow (238)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Instinctive (4)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Productive (32)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Vivid (23)

Our most trustworthy safeguard in making general statements on this question is imagination. If we can imagine the breaking of a law of physics then… it is in some degree an empirical law. With a purely rational law we could not conceive an alternative… This ultimate criterion serves as an anchor to keep us from drifting unduly in a perilous sea of thought.
From concluding paragraph of 'Transition to General Relativity', The Special Theory of Relativity (1940, 2014), Chap 8, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Break (99)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Degree (276)  |  Drift (13)  |  Empirical (54)  |  General (511)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Keep (101)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Rational (90)  |  Safeguard (7)  |  Sea (308)  |  Serve (59)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trustworthy (11)  |  Ultimate (144)

Our natural way of thinking about these coarser emotions is that the mental perception of some fact excites the mental affection called the emotion, and that this latter state of mind gives rise to the bodily expression. My theory, on the contrary, is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur IS the emotion. Common-sense says, we lose our fortune, are sorry and weep; we meet a bear, are frightened and run; we are insulted by a rival, are angry and strike. The hypothesis here to be defended says that this order of sequence is incorrect, that the one mental state is not immediately induced by the other, that the bodily manifestations must first be interposed between, and that the more rational statement is that we feel sorry because we cry, angry because we strike, afraid because we tremble, and not that we cry, strike, or tremble, because we are sorry, angry, or fearful, as the case may be. Without the bodily states following on the perception, the latter would be purely cognitive in form, pale, colorless, destitute of emotional warmth. We might then see the bear, and judge it best to run, receive the insult and deem it right to strike, but we should not actually feel afraid or angry.
The Principles or Psychology (1890), Vol. 2, 449-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Bear (159)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Cognitive (7)  |  Common (436)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cry (29)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feel Sorry (4)  |  Feeling (250)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Insult (14)  |  Judge (108)  |  Lose (159)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Rational (90)  |  Receive (114)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rival (19)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Sorry (30)  |  State (491)  |  Statement (142)  |  Strike (68)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Way (1217)

Parkinson's Law is a purely scientific discovery, inapplicable except in theory to the politics of the day. It is not the business of the botanist to eradicate the weeds. Enough for him if he can tell us just how fast they grow.
Parkinson's Law or the Pursuit of Progress (1958), 15.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Business (149)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eradicate (5)  |  Eradication (2)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Law (894)  |  Parkinson’s Law (4)  |  Politics (112)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Weed (18)

Physical science enjoys the distinction of being the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, and its laws are obeyed universally, so far as is known, not merely by inanimate things, but also by living organisms, in their minutest parts, as single individuals, and also as whole communities. It results from this that, however complicated a series of phenomena may be and however many other sciences may enter into its complete presentation, the purely physical aspect, or the application of the known laws of matter and energy, can always be legitimately separated from the other aspects.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Being (1278)  |  Community (104)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Legitimacy (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obey (40)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Single (353)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

Physicists speak of the particle representation or the wave representation. Bohr's principle of complementarity asserts that there exist complementary properties of the same object of knowledge, one of which if known will exclude knowledge of the other. We may therefore describe an object like an electron in ways which are mutually exclusive—e.g., as wave or particle—without logical contradiction provided we also realize that the experimental arrangements that determine these descriptions are similarly mutually exclusive. Which experiment—and hence which description one chooses—is purely a matter of human choice.
The Cosmic Code: Quantum Physics as the Language of Nature (1982), 94.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Complementarity (5)  |  Complementary (14)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Electron (93)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Representation (53)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Positive, objective knowledge is public property. It can be transmitted directly from one person to another, it can be pooled, and it can be passed on from one generation to the next. Consequently, knowledge accumulates through the ages, each generation adding its contribution. Values are quite different. By values, I mean the standards by which we judge the significance of life. The meaning of good and evil, of joy and sorrow, of beauty, justice, success-all these are purely private convictions, and they constitute our store of wisdom. They are peculiar to the individual, and no methods exist by which universal agreement can be obtained. Therefore, wisdom cannot be readily transmitted from person to person, and there is no great accumulation through the ages. Each man starts from scratch and acquires his own wisdom from his own experience. About all that can be done in the way of communication is to expose others to vicarious experience in the hope of a favorable response.
The Nature of Science and other Lectures (1954), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Age (499)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Communication (94)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Different (577)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expose (23)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Individual (404)  |  Joy (107)  |  Judge (108)  |  Justice (39)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Next (236)  |  Objective (91)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Person (363)  |  Positive (94)  |  Property (168)  |  Response (53)  |  Scratch (13)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Start (221)  |  Store (48)  |  Success (302)  |  Through (849)  |  Universal (189)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)

Psychological introspection goes hand in hand with the methods of experimental physiology. If one wants to put the main emphasis on the characteristic of the method, our science, experimental psychology, is to be distinguished from the ordinary mental philosophy [Seelenlehre], based purely on introspection.
In Grundzüge der physiologischen Psychologie [Principles of Physiological Psychology] (1874), 2-3. Trans. K. Damiger, Constructing the Subject: Historical Origins of Psychological Research (1990), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Want (497)

Psychology, as the behaviorist views it, is a purely objective, experimental branch of natural science which needs introspection as little as do the sciences of chemistry and physics. It is granted that the behavior of animals can be investigated without appeal to consciousness. Heretofore the viewpoint has been that such data have value only in so far as they can be interpreted by analogy in terms of consciousness. The position is taken here that the behavior of man and the behavior of animals must be considered in the same plane.
In Psychology as the Behaviorist Views It (1913), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Animal (617)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Branch (150)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Data (156)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Grant (73)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Need (290)  |  Objective (91)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plane (20)  |  Position (77)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)

Science is analytical, descriptive, informative. Man does not live by bread alone, but by science he attempts to do so. Hence the deadliness of all that is purely scientific.
'Art', Essays (1948), Sec. 2, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bread (39)  |  Deadliness (2)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)

Science is organized knowledge; and before knowledge can be organized, some of it must first be possessed. Every study, therefore, should have a purely experimental introduction; and only after an ample fund of observations has been accumulated, should reasoning begin.
In essay 'The Art of Education', The North British Review (May 1854), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Ample (4)  |  Begin (260)  |  Experimental (192)  |  First (1283)  |  Fund (18)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organized (9)  |  Possess (156)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)

Science, by itself, cannot supply us with an ethic. It can show us how to achieve a given end, and it may show us that some ends cannot be achieved. But among ends that can be achieved our choice must be decided by other than purely scientific considerations. If a man were to say, “I hate the human race, and I think it would be a good thing if it were exterminated,” we could say, “Well, my dear sir, let us begin the process with you.” But this is hardly argument, and no amount of science could prove such a man mistaken.
'The Science to Save us from Science', New York Times Magazine (19 Mar 1950). Collected in M. Gardner (ed.), Great Essays in Science (1950), 396-397.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Amount (151)  |  Argument (138)  |  Begin (260)  |  Choice (110)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Decision (91)  |  End (590)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Good (889)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Race (268)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)

Scientific method is not just a method which it has been found profitable to pursue in this or that abstruse subject for purely technical reasons. It represents the only method of thinking that has proved fruitful in any subject—that is what we mean when we call it scientific. It is not a peculiar development of thinking for highly specialized ends; it is thinking, so far as thought has become conscious of its proper ends and of the equipment indispensable for success in their pursuit ... When our schools truly become laboratories of knowledge-making, not mills fitted out with information-hoppers, there will no longer be need to discuss the place of science in education.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909), 'Science as Subject-Matter and as Method'. Published in Science (28 Jan 1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Development (422)  |  Education (378)  |  End (590)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Method (505)  |  Mill (16)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Proper (144)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reason (744)  |  Represent (155)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truly (116)  |  Will (2355)

Scientific work, especially mathematical work which is purely conceptual, may indeed possess the appearance of beauty, because of the inner coherence which it shares with fine art, or may resemble a piece of architecture.
From 'Characters of the Beautiful', Beauty, Chap. 3, collected in Collected Works Of Samuel Alexander (2000), 51-52.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inner (71)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Possess (156)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Share (75)  |  Work (1351)

Scientists and particularly the professional students of evolution are often accused of a bias toward mechanism or materialism, even though believers in vitalism and in finalism are not lacking among them. Such bias as may exist is inherent in the method of science. The most successful scientific investigation has generally involved treating phenomena as if they were purely materialistic, rejecting any metaphysical hypothesis as long as a physical hypothesis seems possible. The method works. The restriction is necessary because science is confined to physical means of investigation and so it would stultify its own efforts to postulate that its subject is not physical and so not susceptible to its methods.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Confinement (4)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involved (90)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Stultify (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitalism (5)  |  Work (1351)

Surely something is wanting in our conception of the universe. We know positive and negative electricity, north and south magnetism, and why not some extra terrestrial matter related to terrestrial matter, as the source is to the sink. ... Worlds may have formed of this stuff, with element and compounds possessing identical properties with out own, indistinguishable from them until they are brought into each other's vicinity. ... Astronomy, the oldest and most juvenile of the sciences, may still have some surprises in store. Many anti-matter be commended to its care! ... Do dreams ever come true?
[Purely whimsical prediction long before the 1932 discovery of the positron, the antiparticle of the electron.]
'Potential Matter—A Holiday Dream', Letter to the Editor, Nature (18 Aug 1898), 58, 367. Quoted in Edward Robert Harrison, Cosmology: the Science of the Universe (2000), 433.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anti-Matter (4)  |  Antiparticle (4)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Care (186)  |  Commend (7)  |  Commendation (3)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Form (959)  |  Identical (53)  |  Juvenile (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Negative (63)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Oldest (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Positive (94)  |  Positron (4)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sink (37)  |  Something (719)  |  Source (93)  |  South (38)  |  Still (613)  |  Store (48)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Universe (857)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

Sylvester was incapable of reading mathematics in a purely receptive way. Apparently a subject either fired in his brain a train of active and restless thought, or it would not retain his attention at all. To a man of such a temperament, it would have been peculiarly helpful to live in an atmosphere in which his human associations would have supplied the stimulus which he could not find in mere reading. The great modern work in the theory of functions and in allied disciplines, he never became acquainted with …
What would have been the effect if, in the prime of his powers, he had been surrounded by the influences which prevail in Berlin or in Gottingen? It may be confidently taken for granted that he would have done splendid work in those domains of analysis, which have furnished the laurels of the great mathematicians of Germany and France in the second half of the present century.
In Address delivered at a memorial meeting at the Johns Hopkins University (2 May 1897), published in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Jun 1897), 303. Also in Johns Hopkins University Circulars, 16 (1897), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Active (76)  |  All (4108)  |  Ally (6)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Association (46)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Berlin (10)  |  Brain (270)  |  Century (310)  |  Confidently (2)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Domain (69)  |  Effect (393)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  France (27)  |  Function (228)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Germany (13)  |  Grant (73)  |  Great (1574)  |  Half (56)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Influence (222)  |  Laurel (2)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mere (84)  |  Modern (385)  |  Never (1087)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Prime (11)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Receptive (5)  |  Restless (11)  |  Retain (56)  |  Second (62)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supply (93)  |  Surround (30)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

That brain of mine is something more than merely mortal; as time will show; (if only my breathing & some other etceteras do not make too rapid a progress towards instead of from mortality).
Before ten years are over, the Devil’s in it if I haven’t sucked out some of the life-blood from the mysteries of this universe, in a way that no purely mortal lips or brains could do.
In letter to Charles Babbage (5 Jul 1843). British Library Additional Manuscripts, MSS 37192, folio 349. As quoted and cited in Dorothy Stein (ed.), 'This First Child of Mine', Ada: A Life and a Legacy (1985), 110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Blood (134)  |  Brain (270)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Devil (31)  |  Do (1908)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifeblood (4)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Other (2236)  |  Progress (465)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Suck (8)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  High (362)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Involve (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Line (91)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rose (34)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Solve (130)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (14)  |  Superior (81)  |  Tension (24)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Universal (189)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

The arithmetization of mathematics … which began with Weierstrass … had for its object the separation of purely mathematical concepts, such as number and correspondence and aggregate, from intuitional ideas, which mathematics had acquired from long association with geometry and mechanics. These latter, in the opinion of the formalists, are so firmly entrenched in mathematical thought that in spite of the most careful circumspection in the choice of words, the meaning concealed behind these words, may influence our reasoning. For the trouble with human words is that they possess content, whereas the purpose of mathematics is to construct pure thought. But how can we avoid the use of human language? The … symbol. Only by using a symbolic language not yet usurped by those vague ideas of space, time, continuity which have their origin in intuition and tend to obscure pure reason—only thus may we hope to build mathematics on the solid foundation of logic.
In Tobias Dantzig and Joseph Mazur (ed.), Number: The Language of Science (1930, ed. by Joseph Mazur 2007), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Association (46)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Begin (260)  |  Behind (137)  |  Build (204)  |  Careful (24)  |  Choice (110)  |  Circumspection (5)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Concept (221)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Entrench (2)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Latter (21)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Origin (239)  |  Possess (156)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Separation (57)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Spite (55)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Vague (47)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Word (619)

The aim of science is to apprehend this purely intelligible world as a thing in itself, an object which is what it is independently of all thinking, and thus antithetical to the sensible world.... The world of thought is the universal, the timeless and spaceless, the absolutely necessary, whereas the world of sense is the contingent, the changing and moving appearance which somehow indicates or symbolizes it.
'Outlines of a Philosophy of Art,' Essays in the Philosophy of Art, Indiana University Press (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Antithetical (2)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Apprehend (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Contingent (12)  |  Independently (24)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Spaceless (2)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Timeless (8)  |  Universal (189)  |  World (1774)

The antagonism between science and religion, about which we hear so much, appears to me purely factitious, fabricated on the one hand by short-sighted religious people, who confound theology with religion; and on the other by equally short-sighted scientific people who forget that science takes for its province only that which is susceptible of clear intellectual comprehension.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Appear (118)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confound (21)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fabricate (6)  |  Forget (115)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Province (35)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Short (197)  |  Short-Sighted (4)  |  Sight (132)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  Theology (52)

The attempted synthesis of paleontology and genetics, an essential part of the present study, may be particularly surprising and possibly hazardous. Not long ago, paleontologists felt that a geneticist was a person who shut himself in a room, pulled down the shades, watched small flies disporting themselves in milk bottles, and thought that he was studying nature. A pursuit so removed from the realities of life, they said, had no significance for the true biologist. On the other hand, the geneticists said that paleontology had no further contributions to make to biology, that its only point had been the completed demonstration of the truth of evolution, and that it was a subject too purely descriptive to merit the name 'science'. The paleontologist, they believed, is like a man who undertakes to study the principles of the internal combustion engine by standing on a street corner and watching the motor cars whiz by.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Car (71)  |  Cat (47)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Completed (30)  |  Completion (22)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Corner (57)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Description (84)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Down (456)  |  Engine (98)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fly (146)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Himself (461)  |  Internal (66)  |  Internal Combustion Engine (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merit (50)  |  Milk (22)  |  Motor (23)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Person (363)  |  Point (580)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pull (43)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Room (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shut (41)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Standing (11)  |  Street (23)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Subject (521)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whiz (2)

The degree of exactness of the intuition of space may be different in different individuals, perhaps even in different races. It would seem as if a strong naive space-intuition were an attribute pre-eminently of the Teutonic race, while the critical, purely logical sense is more fully developed in the Latin and Hebrew races. A full investigation of this subject, somewhat on the lines suggested by Francis Gallon in his researches on heredity, might be interesting.
In The Evanston Colloquium Lectures (1894), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (61)  |  Critical (66)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Developed (11)  |  Different (577)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Hebrew (10)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Latin (38)  |  Line (91)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  More (2559)  |  Naive (13)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Race (268)  |  Research (664)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggest (34)

The development of mathematics is largely a natural, not a purely logical one: mathematicians are continually answering questions suggested by astronomers or physicists; many essential mathematical theories are but the reflex outgrowth from physical puzzles.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Continually (16)  |  Development (422)  |  Essential (199)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Question (621)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Suggested (2)  |  Theory (970)

The enthusiasm of Sylvester for his own work, which manifests itself here as always, indicates one of his characteristic qualities: a high degree of subjectivity in his productions and publications. Sylvester was so fully possessed by the matter which for the time being engaged his attention, that it appeared to him and was designated by him as the summit of all that is important, remarkable and full of future promise. It would excite his phantasy and power of imagination in even a greater measure than his power of reflection, so much so that he could never marshal the ability to master his subject-matter, much less to present it in an orderly manner.
Considering that he was also somewhat of a poet, it will be easier to overlook the poetic flights which pervade his writing, often bombastic, sometimes furnishing apt illustrations; more damaging is the complete lack of form and orderliness of his publications and their sketchlike character, … which must be accredited at least as much to lack of objectivity as to a superfluity of ideas. Again, the text is permeated with associated emotional expressions, bizarre utterances and paradoxes and is everywhere accompanied by notes, which constitute an essential part of Sylvester’s method of presentation, embodying relations, whether proximate or remote, which momentarily suggested themselves. These notes, full of inspiration and occasional flashes of genius, are the more stimulating owing to their incompleteness. But none of his works manifest a desire to penetrate the subject from all sides and to allow it to mature; each mere surmise, conceptions which arose during publication, immature thoughts and even errors were ushered into publicity at the moment of their inception, with utmost carelessness, and always with complete unfamiliarity of the literature of the subject. Nowhere is there the least trace of self-criticism. No one can be expected to read the treatises entire, for in the form in which they are available they fail to give a clear view of the matter under contemplation.
Sylvester’s was not a harmoniously gifted or well-balanced mind, but rather an instinctively active and creative mind, free from egotism. His reasoning moved in generalizations, was frequently influenced by analysis and at times was guided even by mystical numerical relations. His reasoning consists less frequently of pure intelligible conclusions than of inductions, or rather conjectures incited by individual observations and verifications. In this he was guided by an algebraic sense, developed through long occupation with processes of forms, and this led him luckily to general fundamental truths which in some instances remain veiled. His lack of system is here offset by the advantage of freedom from purely mechanical logical activity.
The exponents of his essential characteristics are an intuitive talent and a faculty of invention to which we owe a series of ideas of lasting value and bearing the germs of fruitful methods. To no one more fittingly than to Sylvester can be applied one of the mottos of the Philosophic Magazine:
“Admiratio generat quaestionem, quaestio investigationem investigatio inventionem.”
In Mathematische Annalen (1898), 50, 155-160. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 176-178.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creative (137)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fail (185)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genius (284)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inception (3)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lack (119)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mature (16)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Production (183)  |  Promise (67)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Read (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surmise (7)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Veil (26)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

The examination system, and the fact that instruction is treated mainly as a training for a livelihood, leads the young to regard knowledge from a purely utilitarian point of view as the road to money, not as the gateway to wisdom.
In 'Education as a Political Institution', Atlantic Monthly, (Jun 1916), 117 755. Also in Principles of Social Reconstruction (1916, 2013), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Gateway (6)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Money (170)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Regard (305)  |  System (537)  |  Training (80)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Young (227)

The flight of most members of a profession to the high empyrean, where they can work peacefully on purely scientific problems, isolated from the turmoil of real life, was perhaps quite appropriate at an earlier stage of science; but in today's world it is a luxury we cannot afford.
The Scientific Imagination: Case Studies (1978), 250.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Empyrean (3)  |  Flight (98)  |  High (362)  |  Life (1795)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Profession (99)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stage (143)  |  Today (314)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The genius of Laplace was a perfect sledge hammer in bursting purely mathematical obstacles; but, like that useful instrument, it gave neither finish nor beauty to the results. In truth, in truism if the reader please, Laplace was neither Lagrange nor Euler, as every student is made to feel. The second is power and symmetry, the third power and simplicity; the first is power without either symmetry or simplicity. But, nevertheless, Laplace never attempted investigation of a subject without leaving upon it the marks of difficulties conquered: sometimes clumsily, sometimes indirectly, always without minuteness of design or arrangement of detail; but still, his end is obtained and the difficulty is conquered.
In 'Review of “Théorie Analytique des Probabilites” par M. le Marquis de Laplace, 3eme edition. Paris. 1820', Dublin Review (1837), 2, 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Clumsiness (2)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Design (195)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  End (590)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Please (65)  |  Power (746)  |  Result (677)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sledge Hammer (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)

The Jewish scriptures admirably illustrate the development from the religion of fear to moral religion, a development continued in the New Testament. The religions of all civilized peoples, especially the peoples of the Orient, are primarily moral religions. The development from a religion of fear to moral religion is a great step in peoples’ lives. And yet, that primitive religions are based entirely on fear and the religions of civilized peoples purely on morality is a prejudice against which we must be on our guard. The truth is that all religions are a varying blend of both types, with this differentiation: that on the higher levels of social life the religion of morality predominates.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirably (3)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Blend (9)  |  Both (493)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Continue (165)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Especially (31)  |  Fear (197)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guard (18)  |  High (362)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Level (67)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Orient (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Religion (361)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Life (8)  |  Step (231)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Type (167)  |  Vary (27)

The layman, taught to revere scientists for their absolute respect for the observed facts, and for the judiciously detached and purely provisional manner in which they hold scientific theories (always ready to abandon a theory at the sight of any contradictory evidence) might well have thought that, at [Dayton C.] Miller's announcement of this overwhelming evidence of a “positive effect” [indicating that the speed of light is not independent from the motion of the observer, as Einstein's theory of relativity demands] in his presidential address to the American Physical Society on December 29th, 1925, his audience would have instantly abandoned the theory of relativity. Or, at the very least, that scientists—wont to look down from the pinnacle of their intellectual humility upon the rest of dogmatic mankind—might suspend judgment in this matter until Miller's results could be accounted for without impairing the theory of relativity. But no: by that time they had so well closed their minds to any suggestion which threatened the new rationality achieved by Einstein's world-picture, that it was almost impossible for them to think again in different terms. Little attention was paid to the experiments, the evidence being set aside in the hope that it would one day turn out to be wrong.
Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy (1958, 1998), 13. Miller had earlier presented his evidence against the validity of the relativity theory at the annual meeting, 28 Apr 1925, of the National Academy of Sciences. Miller believed he had, by a much-refined and improved repetition of the so-called Michelson-Morley experiment, shown that there is a definite and measurable motion of the earth through the ether. In 1955, a paper by R.S. Shankland, et al., in Rev. Modern Phys. (1955), 27, 167, concluded that statistical fluctuations and temperature effects in the data had simulated what Miller had taken to be he apparent ether drift.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Account (192)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audience (26)  |  Being (1278)  |  Closed (38)  |  Demand (123)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humility (28)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Layman (21)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Positive (94)  |  Provisional (7)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Society (326)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

The mathematician, carried along on his flood of symbols, dealing apparently with purely formal truths, may still reach results of endless importance for our description of the physical universe.
In The Grammar of Science (1900), 505.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (20)  |  Carry (127)  |  Deal (188)  |  Description (84)  |  Endless (56)  |  Flood (50)  |  Formal (33)  |  Importance (286)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Still (613)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)

The power of man to do work—one man-power—is, in its purely physical sense, now an insignificant accomplishment, and could only again justify his existence if other sources of power failed. … Curious persons in cloisteral seclusion are experimenting with new sources of energy, which, if ever harnessed, would make coal and oil as useless as oars and sails. If they fail in their quest, or are too late, so that coal and oil, everywhere sought for, are no longer found, and the only hope of men lay in their time-honoured traps to catch the sunlight, who doubts that galley-slaves and helots would reappear in the world once more?
Science and Life (1920), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Coal (57)  |  Curious (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fail (185)  |  Harness (23)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hope (299)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Late (118)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Oil (59)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Quest (39)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Slave (37)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The progress of synthesis, or the building up of natural materials from their constituent elements, proceeds apace. Even some of the simpler albuminoids, a class of substances of great importance in the life process, have recently been artificially prepared. ... Innumerable entirely new compounds have been produced in the last century. The artificial dye-stuffs, prepared from materials occurring in coal-tar, make the natural colours blush. Saccharin, which is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, is a purely artificial substance. New explosives, drugs, alloys, photographic substances, essences, scents, solvents, and detergents are being poured out in a continuous stream.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (4)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blush (3)  |  Building (156)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Coal (57)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Color (137)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Detergent (2)  |  Drug (57)  |  Dye (10)  |  Element (310)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Essence (82)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pour (10)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Progress (465)  |  Recent (77)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Scent (7)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solvent (6)  |  Stream (81)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)

The purely formal sciences, logic and mathematics, deal with such relations which are independent of the definite content, or the substance of the objects, or at least can be. In particular, mathematics involves those relations of objects to each other that involve the concept of size, measure, number.
In Theorie der Complexen Zahlensysteme, (1867), 1. Translated by Webmaster using Google Translate from the original German, “Die rein formalen Wissenschaften, Logik und Mathematik, haben solche Relationen zu behandeln, welche unabhängig von dem bestimmten Inhalte, der Substanz der Objecte sind oder es wenigstens sein können.”
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Content (69)  |  Deal (188)  |  Definite (110)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Formal (33)  |  Independent (67)  |  Involve (90)  |  Logic (287)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Substance (248)

The purely formal Sciences, logic and mathematics, deal with those relations which are, or can be, independent of the particular content or the substance of objects. To mathematics in particular fall those relations between objects which involve the concepts of magnitude, of measure and of number.
In Theorie der Complexen Zahlensysteme (1867), 1. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 4. From the original German, “Die rein formalen Wissenschaften, Logik und Mathematik, haben solche Relationen zu behandeln, welche unabhängig von dem bestimmten Inhalte, der Substanz der Objecte sind oder es wenigstens sein können. Der Mathematik fallen ins Besondere diejenigen Beziehungen der Objecte zu einander zu, die den Begriff der Grösse, des Maasses, der Zahl involviren.”
Science quotes on:  |  Concept (221)  |  Content (69)  |  Deal (188)  |  Fall (230)  |  Formal (33)  |  Independent (67)  |  Involve (90)  |  Logic (287)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Substance (248)

The school of Plato has advanced the interests of the race as much through geometry as through philosophy. The modern engineer, the navigator, the astronomer, built on the truths which those early Greeks discovered in their purely speculative investigations. And if the poetry, statesmanship, oratory, and philosophy of our day owe much to Plato’s divine Dialogues, our commerce, our manufactures, and our science are equally indebted to his Conic Sections. Later instances may be abundantly quoted, to show that the labors of the mathematician have outlasted those of the statesman, and wrought mightier changes in the condition of the world. Not that we would rank the geometer above the patriot, but we claim that he is worthy of equal honor.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 228.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Build (204)  |  Change (593)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conic Section (8)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divine (112)  |  Early (185)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greek (107)  |  Honor (54)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Late (118)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Outlast (3)  |  Owe (71)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Quote (42)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Statesmanship (2)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Worthy (34)

The steady progress of physics requires for its theoretical formulation a mathematics which get continually more advanced. ... it was expected that mathematics would get more and more complicated, but would rest on a permanent basis of axioms and definitions, while actually the modern physical developments have required a mathematics that continually shifts its foundation and gets more abstract. Non-euclidean geometry and noncommutative algebra, which were at one time were considered to be purely fictions of the mind and pastimes of logical thinkers, have now been found to be very necessary for the description of general facts of the physical world. It seems likely that this process of increasing abstraction will continue in the future and the advance in physics is to be associated with continual modification and generalisation of the axioms at the base of mathematics rather than with a logical development of any one mathematical scheme on a fixed foundation.
Introduction to a paper on magnetic monopoles, 'Quantised singularities in the electromagnetic field', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Lonndon (1931), A, 133 60. In Helge Kragh, Dirac: a Scientific Biography (1990), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continual (43)  |  Continue (165)  |  Definition (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Physics (533)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Shift (44)  |  Steady (44)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The study of mathematics cannot be replaced by any other activity that will train and develop man’s purely logical faculties to the same level of rationality.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Develop (268)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Level (67)  |  Logical (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Replace (31)  |  Same (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Train (114)  |  Will (2355)

The theoretical idea … does not arise apart from and independent of experience; nor can it be derived from experience by a purely logical procedure. It is produced by a creative act. Once a theoretical idea has been acquired, one does well to hold fast to it until it leads to an untenable conclusion.
'On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation', Scientific American (Apr 1950). Collected in David H. Levy (ed.), The Scientific American Book of the Cosmos (2000), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Arise (158)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Produced (187)  |  Theory (970)  |  Untenable (5)

The whole theory of the motive power of heat is founded on the two following propositions, due respectively to Joule, and to Carnot and Clausius.
PROP. I. Joule).—When equal quantities of mechanical effect are produced by any means whatever from purely thermal sources, or lost in purely thermal effects, equal quantities of heat are put out of existence or are generated.
PROP. II. (Carnot and Clausius).—If an engine be such that, when it is worked backwards, the physical and mechanical agencies in every part of its motions are all reversed, it produces as much mechanical effect as can be produced by any thermo-dynamic engine, with the same temperatures of source and refrigerator, from a given quantity of heat.
In 'On the Dynamical Theory of Heat, with Numerical Results Deduced from Mr Joule's Equivalent of a Thermal Unit, and M. Regnault's Observations on Steam' (1851). In Mathematical and Physical Papers (1882), Vol. 1, 178.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engine (98)  |  Existence (456)  |  Heat (174)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Motion (310)  |  Motive (59)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Refrigerator (8)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Two (937)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Their specific effect on the glucosides might thus be explained by assuming that the intimate contact between the molecules necessary for the release of the chemical reaction is possible only with similar geometrical configurations. To give an illustration I will say that enzyme and glucoside must fit together like lock and key in order to be able to exercise a chemical action on each other. This concept has undoubtedly gained in probability and value for stereochemical research, after the phenomenon itself was transferred from the biological to the purely chemical field. It is an extension of the theory of asymmetry without being a direct consequence of it: for the conviction that the geometrical structure of the molecule even for optical isomers exercises such a great influence on the chemical affinities, in my opinion could only be gained by new actual observations.
'Einfluss der Configuration auf die wirkung der Enzyme', Berichte der deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft, 1894, 27, 2985-93. Trans. B. Holmstedt and G. Liljestrand (eds.) Readings in Pharmacology (1963), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Actual (117)  |  Asymmetry (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contact (65)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fit (134)  |  Gain (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Influence (222)  |  Isomer (6)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Optical (11)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Release (27)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Specific (95)  |  Stereochemistry (2)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

There is still a difference between something and nothing, but it is purely geometrical and there is nothing behind the geometry.
In The Mathematical Magic Show (1977), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Difference (337)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)

There was yet another disadvantage attaching to the whole of Newton’s physical inquiries, ... the want of an appropriate notation for expressing the conditions of a dynamical problem, and the general principles by which its solution must be obtained. By the labours of LaGrange, the motions of a disturbed planet are reduced with all their complication and variety to a purely mathematical question. It then ceases to be a physical problem; the disturbed and disturbing planet are alike vanished: the ideas of time and force are at an end; the very elements of the orbit have disappeared, or only exist as arbitrary characters in a mathematical formula
Address to the Mechanics Institute, 'An Address on the Genius and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton' (1835), excerpted in paper by Luis M. Laita, Luis de Ledesma, Eugenio Roanes-Lozano and Alberto Brunori, 'George Boole, a Forerunner of Symbolic Computation', collected in John A. Campbell and Eugenio Roanes-Lozano (eds.), Artificial Intelligence and Symbolic Computation: International Conference AISC 2000 (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Cease (79)  |  Character (243)  |  Complication (29)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notation (27)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Variety (132)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)

Things that people learn purely out of curiosity can have a revolutionary effect on human affairs.
From interview (3 Sep 1997), published on George C. Marshall Institute web site
Science quotes on:  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Effect (393)  |  Human (1468)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  People (1005)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Thing (1915)

This method is, to define as the number of a class the class of all classes similar to the given class. Membership of this class of classes (considered as a predicate) is a common property of all the similar classes and of no others; moreover every class of the set of similar classes has to the set of a relation which it has to nothing else, and which every class has to its own set. Thus the conditions are completely fulfilled by this class of classes, and it has the merit of being determinate when a class is given, and of being different for two classes which are not similar. This, then, is an irreproachable definition of the number of a class in purely logical terms.
The Principles of Mathematics (1903), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Definition (221)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Irreproachable (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Membership (5)  |  Merit (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predicate (3)  |  Property (168)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Set (394)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Two (937)

Through purely logical thinking we can attain no knowledge whatsoever of the empirical world.
In Francis Crick, The Astonishing Hypothesis: the Scientific Search for the Soul (1995), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logical (55)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  World (1774)

To characterize the import of pure geometry, we might use the standard form of a movie-disclaimer: No portrayal of the characteristics of geometrical figures or of the spatial properties of relationships of actual bodies is intended, and any similarities between the primitive concepts and their customary geometrical connotations are purely coincidental.
From 'Geometry and Empirical Science', collected in Carl Hempel and James H. Fetzer (ed.), The Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel: Studies in Science, Explanation, and Rationality (2001), Chap. 2, 24. Also Carl Hempel, 'Geometry and Empirical Science', collected in J.R. Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 3, 1641.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Body (537)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connotation (2)  |  Customary (18)  |  Disclaimer (2)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intend (16)  |  Movie (16)  |  Portrayal (2)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Use (766)

To emphasize this opinion that mathematicians would be unwise to accept practical issues as the sole guide or the chief guide in the current of their investigations, ... let me take one more instance, by choosing a subject in which the purely mathematical interest is deemed supreme, the theory of functions of a complex variable. That at least is a theory in pure mathematics, initiated in that region, and developed in that region; it is built up in scores of papers, and its plan certainly has not been, and is not now, dominated or guided by considerations of applicability to natural phenomena. Yet what has turned out to be its relation to practical issues? The investigations of Lagrange and others upon the construction of maps appear as a portion of the general property of conformal representation; which is merely the general geometrical method of regarding functional relations in that theory. Again, the interesting and important investigations upon discontinuous two-dimensional fluid motion in hydrodynamics, made in the last twenty years, can all be, and now are all, I believe, deduced from similar considerations by interpreting functional relations between complex variables. In the dynamics of a rotating heavy body, the only substantial extension of our knowledge since the time of Lagrange has accrued from associating the general properties of functions with the discussion of the equations of motion. Further, under the title of conjugate functions, the theory has been applied to various questions in electrostatics, particularly in connection with condensers and electrometers. And, lastly, in the domain of physical astronomy, some of the most conspicuous advances made in the last few years have been achieved by introducing into the discussion the ideas, the principles, the methods, and the results of the theory of functions. … the refined and extremely difficult work of Poincare and others in physical astronomy has been possible only by the use of the most elaborate developments of some purely mathematical subjects, developments which were made without a thought of such applications.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1897), Nature, 56, 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accrue (3)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Associate (25)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Belief (578)  |  Body (537)  |  Build (204)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chief (97)  |  Choose (112)  |  Complex (188)  |  Condenser (4)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Conspicuous (12)  |  Construction (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deem (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discontinuous (6)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Domain (69)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Fluid Motion (2)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  General (511)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Interpreting (5)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Issue (42)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Last (426)  |  Least (75)  |  Let (61)  |  Map (44)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Plan (117)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Refine (8)  |  Regard (305)  |  Region (36)  |  Relation (157)  |  Representation (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Rotate (8)  |  Score (8)  |  Similar (36)  |  Sole (49)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Title (18)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turned Out (4)  |  Two (937)  |  Unwise (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

To prove to an indignant questioner on the spur of the moment that the work I do was useful seemed a thankless task and I gave it up. I turned to him with a smile and finished, 'To tell you the truth we don't do it because it is useful but because it's amusing.' The answer was thought of and given in a moment: it came from deep down in my soul, and the results were as admirable from my point of view as unexpected. My audience was clearly on my side. Prolonged and hearty applause greeted my confession. My questioner retired shaking his head over my wickedness and the newspapers next day, with obvious approval, came out with headlines 'Scientist Does It Because It's Amusing!' And if that is not the best reason why a scientist should do his work, I want to know what is. Would it be any good to ask a mother what practical use her baby is? That, as I say, was the first evening I ever spent in the United States and from that moment I felt at home. I realised that all talk about science purely for its practical and wealth-producing results is as idle in this country as in England. Practical results will follow right enough. No real knowledge is sterile. The most useless investigation may prove to have the most startling practical importance: Wireless telegraphy might not yet have come if Clerk Maxwell had been drawn away from his obviously 'useless' equations to do something of more practical importance. Large branches of chemistry would have remained obscure had Willard Gibbs not spent his time at mathematical calculations which only about two men of his generation could understand. With this faith in the ultimate usefulness of all real knowledge a man may proceed to devote himself to a study of first causes without apology, and without hope of immediate return.
A.V. Hill
Quoted in Larry R. Squire (ed.), The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography (1996), Vol. I, 351.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apology (7)  |  Ask (411)  |  Audience (26)  |  Baby (28)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Confession (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Deep (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Equation (132)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Generation (242)  |  J. Willard Gibbs (8)  |  Good (889)  |  Headline (6)  |  Himself (461)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idle (33)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Importance (286)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mother (114)  |  Next (236)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Side (233)  |  Smile (31)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spent (85)  |  Startling (15)  |  State (491)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Study (653)  |  Task (147)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To the pure geometer the radius of curvature is an incidental characteristic—like the grin of the Cheshire cat. To the physicist it is an indispensable characteristic. It would be going too far to say that to the physicist the cat is merely incidental to the grin. Physics is concerned with interrelatedness such as the interrelatedness of cats and grins. In this case the “cat without a grin” and the “grin without a cat” are equally set aside as purely mathematical phantasies.
In 'The Universe and the Atom' The Expanding Universe. (1933), 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Cat (47)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concern (228)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Equally (130)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Merely (316)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pure (291)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)

True rigor is productive, being distinguished in this from another rigor which is purely formal and tiresome, casting a shadow over the problems it touches.
From address to the section of Algebra and Analysis, International Congress of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), 'On the Development of Mathematical Analysis and its Relation to Certain Other Sciences,' as translated by M.W. Haskell in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (May 1905), 11, 417.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Casting (10)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Formal (33)  |  Problem (676)  |  Productive (32)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Tiresome (2)  |  Touch (141)  |  True (212)

Truth and falsity, indeed understanding, is not necessarily something purely intellectual, remote from feelings and attitudes. ... It is in the total conduct of men rather than in their statements that truth or falsehood lives, more in what a man does, in his real reaction to other men and to things, in his will to do them justice, to live at one with them. Here lies the inner connection between truth and justice. In the realm of behavior and action, the problem recurs as to the difference between piece and part.
From 'On Truth', collected in Mary Henle (ed.), Documents of Gestalt Psychology (1961), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Connection (162)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inner (71)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Real (149)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recur (4)  |  Remote (83)  |  Something (719)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

We may regard the cell quite apart from its familiar morphological aspects, and contemplate its constitution from the purely chemical standpoint. We are obliged to adopt the view, that the protoplasm is equipped with certain atomic groups, whose function especially consists in fixing to themselves food-stuffs, of importance to the cell-life. Adopting the nomenclature of organic chemistry, these groups may be designated side-chains. We may assume that the protoplasm consists of a special executive centre (Leistungs-centrum) in connection with which are nutritive side-chains… The relationship of the corresponding groups, i.e., those of the food-stuff, and those of the cell, must be specific. They must be adapted to one another, as, e.g., male and female screw (Pasteur), or as lock and key (E. Fischer).
Croonian Lecture, 'On Immunity with Special Reference to Cell Life', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1900, 66, 433-434.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Female (50)  |  Emil Fischer (7)  |  Food (199)  |  Function (228)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Screw (17)  |  Side (233)  |  Special (184)  |  Specific (95)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Themselves (433)  |  View (488)

We must admit with humility that, while number is purely a product of our minds, space has a reality outside our minds, so that we cannot completely prescribe its properties a priori.
Letter to Friedrich Bessel (1830).
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Completely (135)  |  Humility (28)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Outside (141)  |  Product (160)  |  Reality (261)  |  Space (500)

What struck me most in England was the perception that only those works which have a practical tendency awake attention and command respect, while the purely scientific, which possess far greater merit are almost unknown. And yet the latter are the proper source from which the others flow. Practice alone can never lead to the discovery of a truth or a principle. In Germany it is quite the contrary. Here in the eyes of scientific men no value, or at least but a trifling one, is placed upon the practical results. The enrichment of science is alone considered worthy attention.
Letter to Michael Faraday (19 Dec 1844). In Bence Jones (ed.), The life and letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 2, 188-189.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Attention (190)  |  Awake (19)  |  Command (58)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Discovery (780)  |  England (40)  |  Enrichment (7)  |  Eye (419)  |  Flow (83)  |  Germany (13)  |  Greater (288)  |  Lead (384)  |  Merit (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Possess (156)  |  Practical (200)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proper (144)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)

When... the biologist is confronted with the fact that in the organism the parts are so adapted to each other as to give rise to a harmonious whole; and that the organisms are endowed with structures and instincts calculated to prolong their life and perpetuate their race, doubts as to the adequacy of a purely physiochemical viewpoint in biology may arise. The difficulties besetting the biologist in this problem have been rather increased than diminished by the discovery of Mendelian heredity, according to which each character is transmitted independently of any other character. Since the number of Mendelian characters in each organism is large, the possibility must be faced that the organism is merely a mosaic of independent hereditary characters. If this be the case the question arises: What moulds these independent characters into a harmonious whole? The vitalist settles this question by assuming the existence of a pre-established design for each organism and of a guiding 'force' or 'principle' which directs the working out of this design. Such assumptions remove the problem of accounting for the harmonious character of the organism from the field of physics or chemistry. The theory of natural selection invokes neither design nor purpose, but it is incomplete since it disregards the physiochemical constitution of living matter about which little was known until recently.
The Organism as a Whole: From a Physiochemical Viewpoint (1916), v-vi.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Design (195)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Independently (24)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Number (699)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rise (166)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Whole (738)

Whether you take the doughnut hole as a blank space or as an entity unto itself is a purely metaphysical question and does not affect the taste of the doughnut one bit.
A Wild Sheep Chase. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 45
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Bit (22)  |  Blank (11)  |  Doughnut (3)  |  Entity (35)  |  Hole (16)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Question (621)  |  Space (500)  |  Taste (90)  |  Unto (8)

[Cantor’s set theory:] The finest product of mathematical genius and one of the supreme achievements of purely intellectual human activity.
As quoted in Constance Reid, Hilbert (1970), 176.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Activity (210)  |  Fine (33)  |  Genius (284)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Product (160)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Theory (6)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Theory (970)

[The Book of Genesis is] [p]rofoundly interesting and indeed pathetic to me are those attempts of the opening mind of man to appease its hunger for a Cause. But the Book of Genesis has no voice in scientific questions. It is a poem, not a scientific treatise. In the former aspect it is for ever beautiful; in the latter it has been, and it will continue to be, purely obstructive and hurtful.'
In 'Professor Virchow and Evolution', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 377. Tyndall is quoting himself from “four years ago”&mdashthus c.1875.
Science quotes on:  |  Appease (6)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Continue (165)  |  Early (185)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Former (137)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Hurtful (8)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obstruction (4)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Pathetic (4)  |  Poem (96)  |  Profound (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.