Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday


Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index V > Category: Voltaic

Voltaic Quotes (9 quotes)

I had observed that there were different lines exhibited in the spectra of different metals when ignited in the voltaic arc; and if I had had any reasonable amount of wit I ought to have seen the converse, viz., that by ignition different bodies show in their spectral lines the materials of which they are formed. If that thought had occured to my mind, I should have discovered the spectroscope before Kirchoff; but it didn’t.
Address, in 'Report to the Chemical Society's Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, 493. Words as in original text, occured and Kirchoff are sic.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Arc (12)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Converse (8)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Electricity (160)  |  Form (961)  |  Ignite (3)  |  Ignition (3)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Line (91)  |  Material (353)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Occur (150)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Realize (147)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Research (679)  |  Show (346)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscope (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Thought (956)  |  Wit (59)

It required unusual inquisitiveness to pursue the development of scientific curiosities such as charged pith balls, the voltaic cell, and the electrostatic machine. Without such endeavors and the evolution of associated instrumentation, initially of purely scientific interest, most of the investigations that lead to the basic equations of electromagnetism would have been missed. … We would have been deprived of electromagnetic machinery as well as knowledge of electromagnetic waves.
From The Science Matrix: The Journey, Travails, Triumphs (1992, 1998), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Basic (139)  |  Charge (60)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deprived (2)  |  Development (425)  |  Electromagnetic Wave (2)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Equation (132)  |  Evolution (594)  |  Inquisitiveness (5)  |  Instrumentation (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Lead (385)  |  Machine (260)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Miss (51)  |  Missed (2)  |  Most (1729)  |  Purely (110)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Required (108)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Wave (107)

The external resistance may also be varied. For instance, let mercury or some other liquid form part of a voltaic circuit, then the more deeply the conducting wire is immersed in the mercury or other liquid the less resistance does the liquid offer to the passage of the current Hence the vibration of the conducting wire in mercury or other liquid included in the circuit occasions undulations in the current…
Specification of Patent (filed 14 Feb 1876), United States Patent Office, 'Improvement in Telegraphy', No. 174, 465. Also quoted in George Bartlett Prescott, 'The Speaking Telephone, Talking Phonograph, and Other Novelties', Electric Engineering (1878), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Circuit (29)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Current (118)  |  Depth (94)  |  External (57)  |  Form (961)  |  Immerse (5)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Mercury (49)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Undulation (4)  |  Vary (27)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Wire (35)

The native intellectual powers of men in different times, are not so much the causes of the different success of their labours, as the peculiar nature of the means and artificial resources in their possession‎. Independent of vessels of glass, there could have been no accurate manipulations in common chemistry: the air pump was necessary for live investigation of the properties of gaseous matter; and without the Voltaic apparatus, there was no possibility of examining the relations of electrical polarities to chemical attractions.
In Elements of Chemical Philosophy (1812), Vol. 1, Part 1, 28-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (87)  |  Air (349)  |  Air Pump (2)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Artificial (34)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Cause (542)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Common (436)  |  Different (577)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Examine (78)  |  Gas (83)  |  Glass (92)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Labour (98)  |  Live (629)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Matter (801)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Native (38)  |  Nature (1928)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Possession (65)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (748)  |  Property (169)  |  Relation (157)  |  Resource (63)  |  Success (303)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vessel (63)

The word “electromagnetic” which is used to characterize the phenomena produced by the conducting wires of the voltaic pile, … were those which M. Oersted discovered, exhibited by an electric current and a magnet. I have determined to use the word electrodynamic in order to unite under a common name all these phenomena, and particularly to designate those which I have observed between two voltaic conductors. It expresses their true character, that of being produced by electricity in motion: while the electric attractions and repulsions, which have been known for a long time, are electrostatic phenomena produced by the unequal distribution of electricity at rest in the bodies in which they are observed.
New terminology introduced in 'Experiments on the New Electrodynamical Phenomena', Annales de Chemie et de Physique (1822), Series 2, Vol. 20, 60. As translated in Dagobert David Runes (ed.), A Treasury of World Science (1962), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Current (118)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (160)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Electromagnetic (2)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Known (454)  |  Long (789)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Motion (312)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Observed (149)  |  Hans Christian Oersted (5)  |  Order (632)  |  Produced (187)  |  Repulsion (7)  |  Rest (281)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Unite (43)  |  Use (766)  |  Voltaic Pile (2)  |  Wire (35)  |  Word (625)

When Aloisio Galvani first stimulated the nervous fiber by the accidental contact of two heterogeneous metals, his contemporaries could never have anticipated that the action of the voltaic pile would discover to us, in the alkalies, metals of a silvery luster, so light as to swim on water, and eminently inflammable; or that it would become a powerful instrument of chemical analysis, and at the same time a thermoscope and a magnet.
In 'Introduction' Cosmos: A Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe (1860), Vol. 1, 52, as translated by E.C. Otté.
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (27)  |  Action (328)  |  Alkali (6)  |  Analysis (234)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Contact (65)  |  Discover (553)  |  Fiber (16)  |  First (1284)  |  Inflammable (5)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Light (609)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Metal (84)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Powerful (140)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Swim (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Voltaic Pile (2)  |  Water (482)

Who would not have been laughed at if he had said in 1800 that metals could be extracted from their ores by electricity or that portraits could be drawn by chemistry.
[Commenting on Becquerel’s process for extracting metals by voltaic means.]
Letter (20 Aug 1847), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), footnote, 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Henri Becquerel (5)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Electricity (160)  |  Extract (40)  |  Extraction (9)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Metal (84)  |  Ore (12)  |  Portrait (4)  |  Process (423)

[Davy's] March of Glory, which he has run for the last six weeks—within which time by the aid and application of his own great discovery, of the identity of electricity and chemical attractions, he has placed all the elements and all their inanimate combinations in the power of man; having decomposed both the Alkalies, and three of the Earths, discovered as the base of the Alkalies a new metal... Davy supposes there is only one power in the world of the senses; which in particles acts as chemical attractions, in specific masses as electricity, & on matter in general, as planetary Gravitation... when this has been proved, it will then only remain to resolve this into some Law of vital Intellect—and all human knowledge will be Science and Metaphysics the only Science.
In November 1807 Davy gave his famous Second Bakerian Lecture at the Royal Society, in which he used Voltaic batteries to “decompose, isolate and name” several new chemical elements, notably sodium and potassium.
Letter to Dorothy Wordsworth, 24 November 1807. In Earl Leslie Griggs (ed.), The Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1956), Vol. 3, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4107)  |  Application (242)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (494)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Combination (144)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (49)  |  Decompose (9)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (786)  |  Earth (998)  |  Electricity (160)  |  Element (310)  |  General (511)  |  Gravitation (71)  |  Great (1575)  |  Human (1470)  |  Identity (19)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Knowledge (1537)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (895)  |  Lecture (106)  |  Man (2249)  |  March (46)  |  Matter (801)  |  Metal (84)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Name (333)  |  New (1218)  |  Particle (196)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Power (748)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resolve (41)  |  Royal (56)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Specific (95)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)  |  Week (70)  |  Will (2354)  |  World (1778)

[On Oxygen, Chlorine, Iodine, Fluorine:] The most important division of ponderable substances seems to be that which represents their electrical energies or their respective inherent states. When the poles of a voltaic apparatus are introduced into a mixture of the simple substances, it is found that four of them go to the positive, while the rest evince their state by passing to the negative pole. As this division coincides with one resulting from a consideration of their most important properties, it is that which I shall adopt as the first.
From 5th Lecture in 1816, in Bence Jones, The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 217-218.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Division (66)  |  Electrical (57)  |  First (1284)  |  Fluorine (5)  |  Importance (288)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Mixture (42)  |  Most (1729)  |  Negative (63)  |  Oxygen (67)  |  Passing (76)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Pole (47)  |  Ponderable (4)  |  Positive (94)  |  Property (169)  |  Represent (154)  |  Rest (281)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.