TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®  •  TODAYINSCI ®
Celebrating 24 Years on the Web
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Time

Time Quotes (1911 quotes)


... I left Caen, where I was living, to go on a geologic excursion under the auspices of the School of Mines. The incidents of the travel made me forget my mathematical work. Having reached Coutances, we entered an omnibus to go to some place or other. At the moment when I put my foot on the step, the idea came to me, without anything in my former thoughts seeming to have paved the way for it, that the transformations I had used to define the Fuchsian functions were identical with those of non-Eudidean geometry. I did not verify the idea; I should not have had time, as upon taking my seat in the omnibus, I went on with a conversation already commenced, but I felt a perfect certainty. On my return to Caen, for convenience sake, I verified the result at my leisure.
Quoted in Sir Roger Penrose, The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (1990), 541. Science and Method (1908) 51-52, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Convenience (54)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Enter (145)  |  Excursion (12)  |  Forget (125)  |  Former (138)  |  Function (235)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Idea (881)  |  Identical (55)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Leisure (25)  |  Living (492)  |  Mine (78)  |  Moment (260)  |  Non-Euclidian (2)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Reach (286)  |  Result (700)  |  Return (133)  |  Sake (61)  |  School (227)  |  Step (234)  |  Thought (995)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Travel (125)  |  Verify (24)  |  Way (1214)  |  Work (1402)

... in time of war, soldiers, however sensible, care a great deal more on some occasions about slaking their thirst than about the danger of enteric fever.
[Better known as typhoid, the disease is often spread by drinking contaminated water.]
Parliamentaray Debate (21 Mar 1902). Quoted in Winston Churchill and Richard Langworth (ed.), Churchill by Himself: The Definitive Collection of Quotations (2008), 469.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Care (203)  |  Danger (127)  |  Deal (192)  |  Disease (340)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Fever (34)  |  Great (1610)  |  Known (453)  |  More (2558)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Soldier (28)  |  Spread (86)  |  Typhoid (7)  |  War (233)  |  Water (503)

… our “Physick” and “Anatomy” have embraced such infinite varieties of being, have laid open such new worlds in time and space, have grappled, not unsuccessfully, with such complex problems, that the eyes of Vesalius and of Harvey might be dazzled by the sight of the tree that has grown out of their grain of mustard seed.
A Lay Sermon, delivered at St. Martin's Hall (7 Jan 1866), 'On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', published in The Fortnightly Review (1866), Vol. 3, 629.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Being (1276)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Eye (440)  |  Grain (50)  |  Grappling (2)  |  William Harvey (30)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Mustard (2)  |  New (1273)  |  Open (277)  |  Problem (731)  |  Seed (97)  |  Sight (135)  |  Space (523)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Tree (269)  |  Variety (138)  |  Andreas Vesalius (15)  |  World (1850)

... perhaps ‘our universe is simply one of those things that happen from time to time.’
[Speaking of the Universe as a vacuum fluctuation.]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Fluctuation (15)  |  Happen (282)  |  Simply (53)  |  Speak (240)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vacuum (41)

… the truth is that the knowledge of external nature and of the sciences which that knowledge requires or includes, is not the great or the frequent business of the human mind. Whether we provide for action or conversation, whether we wish to be useful or pleasing, the first requisite is the religious and moral knowledge of right and wrong; the next is an acquaintance with the history of mankind, and with those examples which may be said to embody truth, and prove by events the reasonableness of opinions. Prudence and justice are virtues, and excellencies, of all times and of all places; we are perpetually moralists, but we are geometricians only by chance. Our intercourse with intellectual nature is necessary; our speculations upon matter are voluntary, and at leisure. Physical knowledge is of such rare emergence, that one man may know another half his life without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostatics or astronomy; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears.
In Lives of the Poets (1779-81).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (38)  |  Action (342)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Being (1276)  |  Business (156)  |  Chance (244)  |  Character (259)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Emergence (35)  |  Estimate (59)  |  Event (222)  |  First (1302)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Include (93)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Justice (40)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Leisure (25)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Moral (203)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Next (238)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Physical (518)  |  Prove (261)  |  Rare (94)  |  Reasonableness (6)  |  Religious (134)  |  Require (229)  |  Right (473)  |  Skill (116)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Useful (260)  |  Virtue (117)  |  Wish (216)  |  Wrong (246)

... we ought to have saints' days to commemorate the great discoveries which have been made for all mankind, and perhaps for all time—or for whatever time may be left to us. Nature ... is a prodigal of pain. I should like to find a day when we can take a holiday, a day of jubilation when we can fête good Saint Anaesthesia and chaste and pure Saint Antiseptic. ... I should be bound to celebrate, among others, Saint Penicillin...
Speech at Guildhall, London (10 Sep 1947). Collected in Winston Churchill and Randolph Spencer Churchill (ed.), Europe Unite: Speeches, 1947 and 1948 (1950), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Anaesthesia (4)  |  Anesthesia (5)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Bound (120)  |  Celebrate (21)  |  Commemorate (3)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Find (1014)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Holiday (12)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pain (144)  |  Penicillin (18)  |  Pure (299)  |  Saint (17)  |  Whatever (234)

…as our friend Zach has often noted, in our days those who do the best for astronomy are not the salaried university professors, but so-called dillettanti, physicians, jurists, and so forth.Lamenting the fragmentary time left to a professor has remaining after fulfilling his teaching duties.
Letter to Heinrich Olbers (26 Oct 1802). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Best (467)  |  Call (781)  |  Do (1905)  |  Education (423)  |  Fragmentary (8)  |  Friend (180)  |  Physician (284)  |  Professor (133)  |  Remaining (45)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Teaching (190)  |  University (130)

…continental blocks can join and rift at random.… The fact that two provinces of the Canadian Shield have been together during post-Cambrian time does not necessarily mean that they were formed close together or that the sediments lying in one province were derived from the province now beside it.
In 'The Effect of New Orogenetic Theories Upon Ideas of the Tectonics of the Canadian Shield', collected in Royal Society of Canada, Special Publication No. 4, The Tectonics of the Canadian Shield (1962), 135-138. As quoted and cited in Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1995), 41, 544. This quote’s relevance is to show that after some years of reluctance, Wilson did eventually accept the idea of continental drift.
Science quotes on:  |  Block (13)  |  Cambrian (2)  |  Close (77)  |  Continental Drift (15)  |  Derive (70)  |  Form (976)  |  Join (32)  |  Mean (810)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Province (37)  |  Random (42)  |  Rift (4)  |  Sediment (9)  |  Shield (8)  |  Together (392)

...learning chiefly in mathematical sciences can so swallow up and fix one's thought, as to possess it entirely for some time; but when that amusement is over, nature will return, and be where it was, being rather diverted than overcome by such speculations.
An Exposition of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England (1850), 154
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (37)  |  Being (1276)  |  Biography (254)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Learning (291)  |  Lighthouse (6)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Observation (593)  |  Overcome (40)  |  Possess (157)  |  Return (133)  |  John Smeaton (5)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Swallow (32)  |  Thought (995)  |  Will (2350)

…the Form or true definition of heat … is in few words as follows: Heat is a motion; expansive, restrained, and acting in its strife upon the smaller particles of bodies. But the expansion is thus modified; while it expands all ways, it has at the same time an inclination upward. And the struggle in the particles is modified also; it is not sluggish, but hurried and with violence.
Novum Organum (1620), Book 2, Aphorism 20. Translated as 'First Vintage Concerning the Form of Heat', The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 154-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (238)  |  Expand (56)  |  Expansion (43)  |  Expansive (5)  |  Follow (389)  |  Form (976)  |  Heat (180)  |  Inclination (36)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Motion (320)  |  Particle (200)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Upward (44)  |  Violence (37)  |  Way (1214)  |  Word (650)

…The present revolution of scientific thought follows in natural sequence on the great revolutions at earlier epochs in the history of science. Einstein’s special theory of relativity, which explains the indeterminateness of the frame of space and time, crowns the work of Copernicus who first led us to give up our insistence on a geocentric outlook on nature; Einstein's general theory of relativity, which reveals the curvature or non-Euclidean geometry of space and time, carries forward the rudimentary thought of those earlier astronomers who first contemplated the possibility that their existence lay on something which was not flat. These earlier revolutions are still a source of perplexity in childhood, which we soon outgrow; and a time will come when Einstein’s amazing revelations have likewise sunk into the commonplaces of educated thought.
In The Theory of Relativity and its Influence on Scientific Thought (1922), 31-32
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Childhood (42)  |  Commonplace (24)  |  Crown (39)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Epoch (46)  |  Existence (481)  |  Explain (334)  |  First (1302)  |  Flat (34)  |  Follow (389)  |  Forward (104)  |  General (521)  |  Geocentric (6)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Outlook (32)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Present (630)  |  Relativity (91)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Revelation (51)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Something (718)  |  Soon (187)  |  Space (523)  |  Space And Time (38)  |  Special (188)  |  Still (614)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Thought (995)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

...the scientific cast of mind examines the world critically, as if many alternative worlds might exist, as if other things might be here which are not. Then we are forced to ask why what we see is present and not something else. Why are the Sun and moon and the planets spheres? Why not pyramids, or cubes, or dodecahedra? Why not irregular, jumbly shapes? Why so symmetrical, worlds? If you spend any time spinning hypotheses, checking to see whether they make sense, whether they conform to what else we know. Thinking of tests you can pose to substantiate or deflate hypotheses, you will find yourself doing science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (32)  |  Ask (420)  |  Cast (69)  |  Check (26)  |  Conform (15)  |  Critical (73)  |  Cube (14)  |  Deflate (2)  |  Doing (277)  |  Examine (84)  |  Exist (458)  |  Find (1014)  |  Force (497)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Irregular (7)  |  Jumble (10)  |  Know (1538)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Moon (252)  |  Other (2233)  |  Planet (402)  |  Pose (9)  |  Present (630)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Scientific (955)  |  See (1094)  |  Sense (785)  |  Shape (77)  |  Something (718)  |  Spend (97)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Sun (407)  |  Symmetrical (3)  |  Test (221)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

…this discussion would be unprofitable if it did not lead us to appreciate the wisdom of our Creator, and the wondrous knowledge of the Author of the world, Who in the beginning created the world out of nothing, and set everything in number, measure and weight, and then, in time and the age of man, formulated a science which reveals fresh wonders the more we study it.
Hrosvita
From her play Sapientia, as quoted and cited in Philip Davis with Reuben Hersh, in The Mathematical Experience (1981), 110-111. Davis and Hersh introduce the quote saying it comes “after a rather long and sophisticated discussion of certain facts in the theory of numbers” by the character Sapientia.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Appreciate (67)  |  Author (175)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Creator (97)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Everything (489)  |  Formulate (16)  |  Fresh (69)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Measure (241)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Set (400)  |  Study (701)  |  Unprofitable (7)  |  Weight (140)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Wonder (251)  |  Wondrous (22)  |  World (1850)

…tis a dangerous thing to ingage the authority of Scripture in disputes about the Natural World, in opposition to Reason; lest Time, which brings all things to light, should discover that to be evidently false which we had made Scripture to assert.
The Sacred Theory of the Earth (1681)
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (69)  |  Authority (99)  |  Bring (95)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  Discover (571)  |  Dispute (36)  |  Engage (41)  |  Evidently (26)  |  False (105)  |  Lest (3)  |  Light (635)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural World (33)  |  Opposition (49)  |  Reason (766)  |  Scripture (14)  |  Thing (1914)  |  World (1850)

‘I was reading an article about “Mathematics”. Perfectly pure mathematics. My own knowledge of mathematics stops at “twelve times twelve,” but I enjoyed that article immensely. I didn’t understand a word of it; but facts, or what a man believes to be facts, are always delightful. That mathematical fellow believed in his facts. So do I. Get your facts first, and’—the voice dies away to an almost inaudible drone—’then you can distort ‘em as much as you please.’
In 'An Interview with Mark Twain', in Rudyard Kipling, From Sea to Sea (1899), Vol. 2, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (22)  |  Belief (615)  |  Delight (111)  |  Delightful (18)  |  Distort (22)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drone (4)  |  Enjoyment (37)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1302)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Please (68)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Reading (136)  |  Stop (89)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Word (650)

’Tis evident, that as common Air when reduc’d to half Its wonted extent, obtained near about twice as forcible a Spring as it had before; so this thus- comprest Air being further thrust into half this narrow room, obtained thereby a Spring about as strong again as that It last had, and consequently four times as strong as that of the common Air. And there is no cause to doubt, that If we had been here furnisht with a greater quantity of Quicksilver and a very long Tube, we might by a further compression of the included Air have made It counter-balance “the pressure” of a far taller and heavier Cylinder of Mercury. For no man perhaps yet knows how near to an infinite compression the Air may be capable of, If the compressing force be competently increast.
A Defense of the Doctrine Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air (1662), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Balance (82)  |  Being (1276)  |  Boyle�s Law (2)  |  Capable (174)  |  Cause (561)  |  Common (447)  |  Compression (7)  |  Cylinder (11)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Evident (92)  |  Extent (142)  |  Force (497)  |  Greater (288)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Know (1538)  |  Last (425)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mercury (54)  |  Narrow (85)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Pressure (69)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Quicksilver (8)  |  Spring (140)  |  Strong (182)  |  Thrust (13)

“Advance, ye mates! Cross your lances full before me. Well done! Let me touch the axis.” So saying, with extended arm, he grasped the three level, radiating lances at their crossed centre; while so doing, suddenly and nervously twitched them; meanwhile, glancing intently from Starbuck to Stubb; from Stubb to Flask. It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life. The three mates quailed before his strong, sustained, and mystic aspect. Stubb and Flask looked sideways from him; the honest eye of Starbuck fell downright.
“In vain!&rsdquo; cried Ahab; “but, maybe, ’tis well. For did ye three but once take the full-forced shock, then mine own electric thing, that had perhaps expired from out me. Perchance, too, it would have dropped ye dead.…”
[Commentary by Henry Schlesinger: Electricity—mysterious and powerful as it seemed at the time—served as a perfect metaphor for Captain Ahab’s primal obsession and madness, which he transmits through the crew as if through an electrical circuit in Moby-Dick.]
Extract from Herman Melville, Moby-Dick and comment by Henry Schlesinger from his The Battery: How Portable Power Sparked a Technological Revolution (2010), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (51)  |  Advance (298)  |  Arm (82)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Captain (16)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Death (406)  |  Doing (277)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Emotion (106)  |  Extend (129)  |  Eye (440)  |  Honest (53)  |  Interior (35)  |  Leyden Jar (2)  |  Life (1870)  |  Look (584)  |  Madness (33)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Metaphor (37)  |  Mine (78)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Mystic (23)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Quail (2)  |  Shock (38)  |  Strong (182)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Sustain (52)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Touch (146)  |  Vain (86)  |  Volition (3)

“But in the binary system,” Dale points out, handing back the squeezable glass, “the alternative to one isn’t minus one, it’s zero. That’s the beauty of it, mechanically.” “O.K. Gotcha. You’re asking me, What’s this minus one? I’ll tell you. It’s a plus one moving backward in time. This is all in the space-time foam, inside the Planck duration, don’t forget. The dust of points gives birth to time, and time gives birth to the dust of points. Elegant, huh? It has to be. It’s blind chance, plus pure math. They’re proving it, every day. Astronomy, particle physics, it’s all coming together. Relax into it, young fella. It feels great. Space-time foam.”
In Roger's Version: A Novel (1986), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (32)  |  Asking (74)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Back (395)  |  Backward (10)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Binary (12)  |  Birth (154)  |  Blind (98)  |  Chance (244)  |  Coming (114)  |  Dust (68)  |  Elegance (40)  |  Elegant (37)  |  Feel (371)  |  Foam (3)  |  Forget (125)  |  Glass (94)  |  Great (1610)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  Minus One (4)  |  Moving (11)  |  Particle (200)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Max Planck (83)  |  Plus (43)  |  Point (584)  |  Proof (304)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Space (523)  |  Space-Time (20)  |  System (545)  |  Tell (344)  |  Together (392)  |  Young (253)  |  Zero (38)

“I should have more faith,” he said; “I ought to know by this time that when a fact appears opposed to a long train of deductions it invariably proves to be capable of bearing some other interpretation.”
Spoken by character, Sherlock Holmes, in A Study in Scarlet (1887), in Works of Arthur Conan Doyle (1902), Vol. 11, 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (145)  |  Bearing (10)  |  Capability (44)  |  Capable (174)  |  Deduction (90)  |  Face (214)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Faith (209)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Long (778)  |  More (2558)  |  Opposition (49)  |  Other (2233)  |  Proof (304)  |  Prove (261)  |  Train (118)

“Normal science” means research firmly based upon one or more past scientific achievements, achievements that some particular scientific community acknowledges for a time as supplying the foundation for its further practice.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (187)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Community (111)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  More (2558)  |  Past (355)  |  Practice (212)  |  Research (753)  |  Scientific (955)

“Science studies everything,” say the scientists. But, really, everything is too much. Everything is an infinite quantity of objects; it is impossible at one and the same time to study all. As a lantern cannot light up everything, but only lights up the place on which it is turned or the direction in which the man carrying it is walking, so also science cannot study everything, but inevitably only studies that to which its attention is directed. And as a lantern lights up most strongly the place nearest to it, and less and less strongly objects that are more and more remote from it, and does not at all light up those things its light does not reach, so also human science, of whatever kind, has always studied and still studies most carefully what seems most important to the investigators, less carefully what seems to them less important, and quite neglects the whole remaining infinite quantity of objects. ... But men of science to-day ... have formed for themselves a theory of “science for science's sake,” according to which science is to study not what mankind needs, but everything.
In 'Modern Science', Essays and Letters (1903), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Attention (196)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Direct (228)  |  Direction (185)  |  Everything (489)  |  Expectation (67)  |  Form (976)  |  Human (1512)  |  Importance (299)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Kind (564)  |  Lantern (8)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Need (320)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Object (438)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Reach (286)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Remote (86)  |  Sake (61)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Still (614)  |  Study (701)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Turn (454)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)

“Scientific people,” proceeded the Time Traveler, after the pause required for the proper assimilation of this, “know very well that Time is only a kind of Space.”
In The Time Machine (1898), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Kind (564)  |  Know (1538)  |  Pause (6)  |  People (1031)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Proper (150)  |  Require (229)  |  Required (108)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Space (523)  |  Traveler (33)

“She can't do sums a bit!” the Queens said together, with great emphasis.
“Can you do sums?” Alice said, turning suddenly on the White Queen, for she didn't like being found fault with so much.
The Queen gasped and shut her eyes. “I can do Addition, if you give me time-but I can do Subtraction, under any circumstances!”
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (70)  |  Alice (8)  |  Being (1276)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fault (58)  |  Give (208)  |  Great (1610)  |  Shut (41)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Sum (103)  |  Together (392)  |  Under (7)  |  White (132)  |  White Queen (2)

“The time has come,” the Walrus said, “To talk of many things”…
In Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Talk (108)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Walrus (4)

“These changes in the body,” he wrote in the review paper he sent to the American Journal of Physiology late in 1913, “are, each one of them, directly serviceable in making the organism more efficient in the struggle which fear or rage or pain may involve; for fear and rage are organic preparations for action, and pain is the most powerful known stimulus to supreme exertion. The organism which with the aid of increased adrenal secretion can best muster its energies, can best call forth sugar to supply the labouring muscles, can best lessen fatigue, and can best send blood to the parts essential in the run or the fight for life, is most likely to survive. Such, according to the view here propounded, is the function of the adrenal medulla at times of great emergency.”
Quoted in S. Benison, A. C. Barger and E. L. Wolfe, Walter B Cannon: The Life and Times of a Young Scientist (1987), 311.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Action (342)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Aid (101)  |  Best (467)  |  Blood (144)  |  Body (557)  |  Call (781)  |  Change (639)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Essential (210)  |  Fatigue (13)  |  Fear (212)  |  Function (235)  |  Great (1610)  |  Involve (93)  |  Journal (31)  |  Known (453)  |  Late (119)  |  Life (1870)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Muscle (47)  |  Organic (161)  |  Organism (231)  |  Pain (144)  |  Paper (192)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Preparation (60)  |  Review (27)  |  Run (158)  |  Stimulus (30)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Sugar (26)  |  Supply (100)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Survival (105)  |  Survive (87)  |  View (496)

“They were apes only yesterday. Give them time.”
“Once an ape—always an ape.”…
“No, it will be different. … Come back here in an age or so and you shall see. …”
[The gods, discussing the Earth, in the movie version of Wells’ The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936).]
The Man Who Could Work Miracles: a film by H.G. Wells based on the short story (1936), 105-106. Quoted in Carl Sagan, Broca’s Brain (1979, 1986), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Ape (54)  |  Back (395)  |  Different (595)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Evolution (635)  |  God (776)  |  Man (2252)  |  Miracle (85)  |  See (1094)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)  |  Yesterday (37)

“Time’s noblest offspring is the last.” This line of Bishop Berkeley’s expresses the real cause of the belief in progress in the animal creation.
Leonard G. Wilson (ed.), Sir Charles Lyell’s Scientific Journals on the Species Question (1970), 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Belief (615)  |  Cause (561)  |  Creation (350)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Last (425)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Progress (492)

[A contemporary study] predicted the loss of two-thirds of all tropical forests by the turn of the century. Hundreds of thousands of species will perish, and this reduction of 10 to 20 percent of the earth’s biota will occur in about half a human life span. … This reduction of the biological diversity of the planet is the most basic issue of our time.
Foreword, written for Michael Soulé and Bruce Wilcox (eds.), papers from the 1978 International Conference on Conservation Biology, collected as Conservation Biology (1980), ix. As quoted and cited in Timothy J. Farnham, Saving Nature's Legacy: Origins of the Idea of Biological Diversity (2007), 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (144)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biological Diversity (5)  |  Biota (2)  |  Century (319)  |  Diversity (75)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Forest (161)  |  Human (1512)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Issue (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lifespan (9)  |  Loss (117)  |  Most (1728)  |  Occur (151)  |  Perish (56)  |  Planet (402)  |  Predict (86)  |  Rain Forest (34)  |  Reduction (52)  |  Species (435)  |  Study (701)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Turn (454)  |  Two (936)  |  Will (2350)

[About the great synthesis of atomic physics in the 1920s:] It was a heroic time. It was not the doing of any one man; it involved the collaboration of scores of scientists from many different lands. But from the first to last the deeply creative, subtle and critical spirit of Niels Bohr guided, restrained, deepened and finally transmuted the enterprise.
Quoted in Bill Becker, 'Pioneer of the Atom', New York Times Sunday Magazine (20 Oct 1957), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Niels Bohr (55)  |  Collaboration (16)  |  Creative (144)  |  Creativity (84)  |  Critical (73)  |  Deep (241)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Doing (277)  |  Enterprise (56)  |  First (1302)  |  Great (1610)  |  Guide (107)  |  Involved (90)  |  Land (131)  |  Last (425)  |  Man (2252)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Synthesis (58)  |  Transmutation (24)

[Alchemists] finde out men so covetous of so much happiness, whom they easily perswade that they shall finde greater Riches in Hydargyrie [mercury], than Nature affords in Gold. Such, whom although they have twice or thrice already been deluded, yet they have still a new Device wherewith to deceive um again; there being no greater Madness…. So that the smells of Coles, Sulphur, Dung, Poyson, and Piss, are to them a greater pleasure than the taste of Honey; till their Farms, Goods, and Patrimonies being wasted, and converted into Ashes and Smoak, when they expect the rewards of their Labours, births of Gold, Youth, and Immortality, after all their Time and Expences; at length, old, ragged, famisht, with the continual use of Quicksilver [mercury] paralytick, onely rich in misery, … a laughing-stock to the people: … compell’d to live in the lowest degree of poverty, and … at length compell’d thereto by Penury, they fall to Ill Courses, as Counterfeiting of Money.
In The Vanity of the Arts and Sciences (1530), translation (1676), 313.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (23)  |  Already (226)  |  Being (1276)  |  Birth (154)  |  Coal (64)  |  Continual (44)  |  Counterfeit (2)  |  Course (413)  |  Covetous (2)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Degree (277)  |  Delude (3)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Device (71)  |  Dung (10)  |  Expect (203)  |  Fall (243)  |  Farm (28)  |  Gold (101)  |  Good (906)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Honey (15)  |  Labor (200)  |  Live (650)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mercury (54)  |  Misery (31)  |  Money (178)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Old (499)  |  Penury (3)  |  People (1031)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Piss (3)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Poison (46)  |  Poverty (40)  |  Quicksilver (8)  |  Reward (72)  |  Smell (29)  |  Smoke (32)  |  Still (614)  |  Sulphur (19)  |  Taste (93)  |  Use (771)  |  Youth (109)

[American] Fathers are spending too much time taking care of babies. No other civilization ever let responsible and important men spend their time in this way. They should not be involved in household details. They should take the children on trips, explore with them and talk things over. Men today have lost something by turning towards the home instead of going out of it.
As quoted in interview with Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (29)  |  Care (203)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Detail (150)  |  Exploration (161)  |  Father (113)  |  Go (6)  |  Home (184)  |  Household (8)  |  Important (229)  |  Instead (23)  |  Involve (93)  |  Involved (90)  |  Other (2233)  |  Responsible (19)  |  Something (718)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spending (24)  |  Talk (108)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Today (321)  |  Trip (11)  |  Turn (454)  |  Way (1214)

[Before the time of Benjamin Peirce it never occurred to anyone that mathematical research] was one of the things for which a mathematical department existed. Today it is a commonplace in all the leading universities. Peirce stood alone—a mountain peak whose absolute height might be hard to measure, but which towered above all the surrounding country.
In 'The Story of Mathematics at Harvard', Harvard Alumni Bulletin (3 Jan 1924), 26, 376. Cited by R. C. Archibald in 'Benjamin Peirce: V. Biographical Sketch', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Alone (324)  |  Commonplace (24)  |  Country (269)  |  Department (93)  |  Exist (458)  |  Hard (246)  |  Height (33)  |  Leading (17)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Measure (241)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Never (1089)  |  Occurred (2)  |  Peak (20)  |  Benjamin Peirce (11)  |  Research (753)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Today (321)  |  Tower (45)  |  University (130)

[Boswell]: Sir Alexander Dick tells me, that he remembers having a thousand people in a year to dine at his house: that is, reckoning each person as one, each time that he dined there.
[Johnson]: That, Sir, is about three a day.
[Boswell]: How your statement lessens the idea.
[Johnson]: That, Sir, is the good of counting. It brings every thing to a certainty, which before floated in the mind indefinitely.
Entry for Fri 18 Apr 1783. In George Birkbeck-Hill (ed.), Boswell's Life of Johnson (1934-50), Vol. 4, 204.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (144)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Counting (26)  |  Float (31)  |  Good (906)  |  House (143)  |  Idea (881)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Number (710)  |  People (1031)  |  Person (366)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remember (189)  |  Statement (148)  |  Tell (344)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Year (963)

[Choosing to become a geophysicist was] entirely accidental and was due to the difficulty of getting a job during the depression. There happened to be one available in Cambridge at the time when I needed it.
Quoted in 'Edward Crisp Bullard,' Current Biography (1954)
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (31)  |  Available (80)  |  Become (821)  |  Career (86)  |  Depression (26)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Due (143)  |  Geophysicist (3)  |  Geophysics (5)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Job (86)

[Coleridge] selected an instance of what was called the sublime, in DARWIN, who imagined the creation of the universe to have taken place in a moment, by the explosion of a mass of matter in the womb, or centre of space. In one and the same instant of time, suns and planets shot into systems in every direction, and filled and spangled the illimitable void! He asserted this to be an intolerable degradation—referring, as it were, all the beauty and harmony of nature to something like the bursting of a barrel of gunpowder! that spit its combustible materials into a pock-freckled creation!
In Seamus Perry (eds.), Coleridge’s Responses: Vol. 1: Coleridge on Writers and Writing (2007), 338-339.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (69)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Big Bang (45)  |  Call (781)  |  Creation (350)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Degradation (18)  |  Direction (185)  |  Explosion (51)  |  Gunpowder (18)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Instant (46)  |  Mass (160)  |  Material (366)  |  Matter (821)  |  Moment (260)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Planet (402)  |  Select (45)  |  Something (718)  |  Space (523)  |  Sublime (50)  |  Sun (407)  |  System (545)  |  Universe (900)  |  Void (31)  |  Womb (25)

[Concerning the Piltdown hoax,] that jaw has been literally a bone of contention for a long time.
In 'Quotation Marks', New York Times (29 Nov 1953), SM71.
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (101)  |  Contention (14)  |  Hoax (6)  |  Jaw (4)  |  Literally (30)  |  Long (778)

[Davy's] March of Glory, which he has run for the last six weeks—within which time by the aid and application of his own great discovery, of the identity of electricity and chemical attractions, he has placed all the elements and all their inanimate combinations in the power of man; having decomposed both the Alkalies, and three of the Earths, discovered as the base of the Alkalies a new metal... Davy supposes there is only one power in the world of the senses; which in particles acts as chemical attractions, in specific masses as electricity, & on matter in general, as planetary Gravitation... when this has been proved, it will then only remain to resolve this into some Law of vital Intellect—and all human knowledge will be Science and Metaphysics the only Science.
In November 1807 Davy gave his famous Second Bakerian Lecture at the Royal Society, in which he used Voltaic batteries to “decompose, isolate and name” several new chemical elements, notably sodium and potassium.
Letter to Dorothy Wordsworth, 24 November 1807. In Earl Leslie Griggs (ed.), The Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1956), Vol. 3, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Aid (101)  |  Application (257)  |  Attraction (61)  |  Base (120)  |  Both (496)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Combination (150)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (49)  |  Decompose (10)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Element (322)  |  General (521)  |  Gravitation (72)  |  Great (1610)  |  Human (1512)  |  Identity (19)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Last (425)  |  Law (913)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Man (2252)  |  March (48)  |  Matter (821)  |  Metal (88)  |  Metaphysics (53)  |  Name (359)  |  New (1273)  |  Particle (200)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Potassium (12)  |  Power (771)  |  Remain (355)  |  Resolve (43)  |  Royal (56)  |  Royal Society (17)  |  Run (158)  |  Sense (785)  |  Society (350)  |  Sodium (15)  |  Specific (98)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Vital (89)  |  Voltaic (9)  |  Week (73)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

[Decimal currency is desirable because] by that means all calculations of interest, exchange, insurance, and the like are rendered much more simple and accurate, and, of course, more within the power of the great mass of people. Whenever such things require much labor, time, and reflection, the greater number who do not know, are made the dupes of the lesser number who do.
Letter to Congress (15 Jan 1782). 'Coinage Scheme Proposed by Robert Morris, Superintendent of Finance', from MS. letters and reports of the Superintendent of Finance, No, 137, Vol. 1, 289-300. Reprinted as Appendix, in Executive Documents, Senate of the U.S., Third Session of the Forty-Fifth Congress, 1878-79 (1879), 430.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Accurate (88)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Course (413)  |  Currency (3)  |  Decimal (21)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dupe (5)  |  Exchange (38)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greater (288)  |  Insurance (12)  |  Interest (416)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Labor (200)  |  Mass (160)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  More (2558)  |  Number (710)  |  People (1031)  |  Power (771)  |  Reflection (93)  |  Render (96)  |  Require (229)  |  Requirement (66)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Whenever (81)

[Defining Life] the sum of the phenomena proper to organized beings. In consists essentially in this, that organized beings are all, during a certain time, the centres to which foreign substances penetrate and are appropriated, and from which others issue.
Béclard, "Anatomie Générale." In The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine (1865), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Being (1276)  |  Centre (31)  |  Certain (557)  |  Consist (223)  |  Define (53)  |  Essentially (15)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Issue (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Organize (33)  |  Other (2233)  |  Penetrate (68)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Proper (150)  |  Substance (253)  |  Sum (103)

[During a violent dust storm, Bartender (Dewey Robinson):] You ain't aimin' to drive back to your farm tonight, mister?
[John Phillips (John Wayne):] Why not?
[Bartender:] Save time by stayin' put. Let the wind blow the farm to you.
From movie Three Faces West (1940). Writers, F. Hugh Herbert, Joseph Moncure March, Samuel Ornitz. In Larry Langman and Paul Gold, Comedy Quotes from the Movies (2001), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Blow (45)  |  Driving (28)  |  Dust (68)  |  Dust Storm (2)  |  Farm (28)  |  Joke (90)  |  Save (126)  |  Stay (26)  |  Storm (56)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Why (491)  |  Wind (141)

[Euclid's Elements] has been for nearly twenty-two centuries the encouragement and guide of that scientific thought which is one thing with the progress of man from a worse to a better state. The encouragement; for it contained a body of knowledge that was really known and could be relied on, and that moreover was growing in extent and application. For even at the time this book was written—shortly after the foundation of the Alexandrian Museum—Mathematics was no longer the merely ideal science of the Platonic school, but had started on her career of conquest over the whole world of Phenomena. The guide; for the aim of every scientific student of every subject was to bring his knowledge of that subject into a form as perfect as that which geometry had attained. Far up on the great mountain of Truth, which all the sciences hope to scale, the foremost of that sacred sisterhood was seen, beckoning for the rest to follow her. And hence she was called, in the dialect of the Pythagoreans, ‘the purifier of the reasonable soul.’
From a lecture delivered at the Royal Institution (Mar 1873), collected postumously in W.K. Clifford, edited by Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock, Lectures and Essays, (1879), Vol. 1, 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (175)  |  Alexandria (2)  |  Application (257)  |  Attain (126)  |  Beckoning (4)  |  Better (493)  |  Body (557)  |  Book (413)  |  Call (781)  |  Career (86)  |  Conquest (31)  |  Element (322)  |  Encouragement (27)  |  Euclid (60)  |  Extent (142)  |  Follow (389)  |  Following (16)  |  Form (976)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Great (1610)  |  Growing (99)  |  Guide (107)  |  Hope (321)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Merely (315)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Museum (40)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Progress (492)  |  Reason (766)  |  Rest (287)  |  Sacred (48)  |  Scale (122)  |  School (227)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Soul (235)  |  Start (237)  |  State (505)  |  Student (317)  |  Subject (543)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thought (995)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Two (936)  |  Whole (756)  |  Whole World (29)  |  World (1850)

[Helmholtz] is not a philosopher in the exclusive sense, as Kant, Hegel, Mansel are philosophers, but one who prosecutes physics and physiology, and acquires therein not only skill in developing any desideratum, but wisdom to know what are the desiderata, e.g., he was one of the first, and is one of the most active, preachers of the doctrine that since all kinds of energy are convertible, the first aim of science at this time. should be to ascertain in what way particular forms of energy can be converted into each other, and what are the equivalent quantities of the two forms of energy.
Letter to Lewis Campbell (21 Apr 1862). In P.M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1990), Vol. 1, 711.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (46)  |  Active (80)  |  Aim (175)  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Conservation Of Energy (30)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Desideratum (5)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Energy (373)  |  Equivalent (46)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (32)  |  Immanuel Kant (50)  |  Kind (564)  |  Know (1538)  |  Most (1728)  |  Other (2233)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Prosecute (3)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Sense (785)  |  Skill (116)  |  Two (936)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wisdom (235)

[I predict] the electricity generated by water power is the only thing that is going to keep future generations from freezing. Now we use coal whenever we produce electric power by steam engine, but there will be a time when there’ll be no more coal to use. That time is not in the very distant future. … Oil is too insignificant in its available supply to come into much consideration.
As quoted in 'Electricity Will Keep The World From Freezing Up', New York Times (12 Nov 1911), SM4.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (80)  |  Coal (64)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Distant (33)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Engine (99)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Future (467)  |  Generation (256)  |  Generator (2)  |  Hydroelectricity (2)  |  Insignificant (33)  |  More (2558)  |  Oil (67)  |  Power (771)  |  Predict (86)  |  Prediction (89)  |  Produce (117)  |  Steam (81)  |  Steam Engine (47)  |  Supply (100)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Use (771)  |  Water (503)  |  Water Power (6)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2350)

[I was advised] to read Jordan's 'Cours d'analyse'; and I shall never forget the astonishment with which I read that remarkable work, the first inspiration for so many mathematicians of my generation, and learnt for the first time as I read it what mathematics really meant.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (30)  |  First (1302)  |  Forget (125)  |  Generation (256)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Never (1089)  |  Read (308)  |  Work (1402)

[I] learnt, for the first time, the joys of substituting hard, disciplined study for the indulgence of day-dreaming.
[Comment on his successful undergraduate studies at the University of St. Andrews.]
As quoted in Obituary, The Times (24 Mar 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (254)  |  Day Dream (2)  |  Discipline (85)  |  First (1302)  |  Hard (246)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Joy (117)  |  Study (701)  |  Successful (134)  |  Undergraduate (17)  |  University (130)

[I]magine you want to know the sex of your unborn child. There are several approaches. You could, for example, do what the late film star ... Cary Grant did before he was an actor: In a carnival or fair or consulting room, you suspend a watch or a plumb bob above the abdomen of the expectant mother; if it swings left-right it's a boy, and if it swings forward-back it's a girl. The method works one time in two. Of course he was out of there before the baby was born, so he never heard from customers who complained he got it wrong. ... But if you really want to know, then you go to amniocentesis, or to sonograms; and there your chance of being right is 99 out of 100. ... If you really want to know, you go to science.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (6)  |  Actor (9)  |  Approach (112)  |  Baby (29)  |  Back (395)  |  Being (1276)  |  Birth (154)  |  Boy (100)  |  Carnival (2)  |  Chance (244)  |  Child (333)  |  Complaint (13)  |  Consulting (13)  |  Course (413)  |  Customer (8)  |  Do (1905)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fair (16)  |  Forward (104)  |  Girl (38)  |  Grant (76)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Late (119)  |  Method (531)  |  Mother (116)  |  Never (1089)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Right (473)  |  Sex (68)  |  Star (460)  |  Swing (12)  |  Two (936)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Want (504)  |  Watch (118)  |  Work (1402)  |  Wrong (246)

[Ignorance] of the principle of conservation of energy … does not prevent inventors without background from continually putting forward perpetual motion machines… Also, such persons undoubtedly have their exact counterparts in the fields of art, finance, education, and all other departments of human activity… persons who are unwilling to take the time and to make the effort required to find what the known facts are before they become the champions of unsupported opinions—people who take sides first and look up facts afterward when the tendency to distort the facts to conform to the opinions has become well-nigh irresistible.
From Evolution in Science and Religion (1927), 58-59. An excerpt from the book including this quote appears in 'New Truth and Old', Christian Education (Apr 1927), 10, No. 7, 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Art (680)  |  Background (44)  |  Become (821)  |  Conform (15)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Conservation Of Energy (30)  |  Continual (44)  |  Counterpart (11)  |  Department (93)  |  Distort (22)  |  Education (423)  |  Effort (243)  |  Energy (373)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Field (378)  |  Finance (4)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Forward (104)  |  Human (1512)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Irresistible (17)  |  Known (453)  |  Look (584)  |  Machine (271)  |  Motion (320)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Person (366)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Prevention (37)  |  Principle (530)  |  Required (108)  |  Side (236)  |  Tendency (110)  |  Unwilling (9)

[In 1909,] Paris was the center of the aviation world. Aeronautics was neither an industry nor even a science; both were yet to come. It was an “art” and I might say a “passion”. Indeed, at that time it was a miracle. It meant the realization of legends and dreams that had existed for thousands of years and had been pronounced again and again as impossible by scientific authorities. Therefore, even the brief and unsteady flights of that period were deeply impressive. Many times I observed expressions of joy and tears in the eyes of witnesses who for the first time watched a flying machine carrying a man in the air.
In address (16 Nov 1964) presented to the Wings Club, New York City, Recollections and Thoughts of a Pioneer (1964), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (15)  |  Air (366)  |  Art (680)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Both (496)  |  Brief (37)  |  Carry (130)  |  Center (35)  |  Dream (222)  |  Exist (458)  |  Expression (181)  |  Eye (440)  |  First (1302)  |  Flight (101)  |  Flying (74)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Impressive (27)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Industry (159)  |  Joy (117)  |  Legend (18)  |  Machine (271)  |  Man (2252)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Observe (179)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paris (11)  |  Passion (121)  |  Period (200)  |  Realization (44)  |  Say (989)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Tear (48)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Watch (118)  |  Witness (57)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

[In childhood, to overcome fear, the] need took me back again and again to a sycamore tree rising from the earth at the edge of a ravine. It was a big, old tree that had grown out over the ravine, so that when you climbed it, you looked straight down fifty feet or more. Every time I climbed that tree, I forced myself to climb to the last possible safe limb and then look down. Every time I did it, I told myself I’d never do it again. But I kept going back because it scared me and I had to know I could overcome that.
In John Glenn and Nick Taylor, John Glenn: A Memoir (2000), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Childhood (42)  |  Climb (39)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Edge (51)  |  Fear (212)  |  Force (497)  |  Know (1538)  |  Last (425)  |  Limb (9)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Myself (211)  |  Need (320)  |  Never (1089)  |  Old (499)  |  Overcome (40)  |  Possible (560)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Rising (44)  |  Safe (61)  |  Scared (2)  |  Straight (75)  |  Tell (344)  |  Tree (269)

[It] is the little causes, long continued, which are considered as bringing about the greatest changes of the earth.
Theory of the Earth, with Proofs and Illustrations, Vol. 2 (1795), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (561)  |  Change (639)  |  Consider (428)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Little (717)  |  Long (778)

[J.J.] Sylvester’s methods! He had none. “Three lectures will be delivered on a New Universal Algebra,” he would say; then, “The course must be extended to twelve.” It did last all the rest of that year. The following year the course was to be Substitutions-Théorie, by Netto. We all got the text. He lectured about three times, following the text closely and stopping sharp at the end of the hour. Then he began to think about matrices again. “I must give one lecture a week on those,” he said. He could not confine himself to the hour, nor to the one lecture a week. Two weeks were passed, and Netto was forgotten entirely and never mentioned again. Statements like the following were not unfrequent in his lectures: “I haven’t proved this, but I am as sure as I can be of anything that it must be so. From this it will follow, etc.” At the next lecture it turned out that what he was so sure of was false. Never mind, he kept on forever guessing and trying, and presently a wonderful discovery followed, then another and another. Afterward he would go back and work it all over again, and surprise us with all sorts of side lights. He then made another leap in the dark, more treasures were discovered, and so on forever.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265-266.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (117)  |  Back (395)  |  Confine (26)  |  Course (413)  |  Dark (145)  |  Deliver (30)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  End (603)  |  Extend (129)  |  False (105)  |  Follow (389)  |  Forever (111)  |  Forget (125)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Frequent (26)  |  Go Back (4)  |  Guess (67)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (192)  |  Keep (104)  |  Last (425)  |  Leap (57)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Light (635)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mention (84)  |  Mentioned (3)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  Never (1089)  |  New (1273)  |  Next (238)  |  Pass (241)  |  Prove (261)  |  Rest (287)  |  Say (989)  |  Side (236)  |  Statement (148)  |  Surprise (91)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Think (1122)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (454)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Two (936)  |  Universal (198)  |  Week (73)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonderful (155)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)

[Learning is] the actual process of broadening yourself, of knowing there’s a little extra facet of the universe you know about and can think about and can understand. It seems to me that when it’s time to die, and that will come to all of us, there’ll be a certain pleasure in thinking that you had utilized your life well, that you had learned as much as you could, gathered in as much as possible of the universe, and enjoyed it. I mean, there’s only this universe and only this one lifetime to try to grasp it. And, while it is inconceivable that anyone can grasp more than a tiny portion of it, at least do that much. What a tragedy to just pass through and get nothing out of it.
'Isaac Asimov Speaks' with Bill Moyers in The Humanist (Jan/Feb 1989), 49. Reprinted in Carl Howard Freedman (ed.), Conversations with Isaac Asimov (2005), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Certain (557)  |  Do (1905)  |  Facet (9)  |  Gather (76)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (291)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Mean (810)  |  More (2558)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Pass (241)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Portion (86)  |  Possible (560)  |  Process (439)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Through (846)  |  Tiny (74)  |  Tragedy (31)  |  Try (296)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Universe (900)  |  Will (2350)

[M]y work, which I’ve done for a long time, was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more than in most other men. And therewithal, whenever I found out anything remarkable, I have thought it my duty to put down my discovery on paper, so that all ingenious people might be informed thereof.
Letter (27 Jun 1716) thanking the University of Louvain for ending him a medal designed in honour of his research. (Leeuwenhoek was then in his 84th year.) As cited by Charles-Edward Amory Winslow in The Conquest of Epidemic Disease: A Chapter in the History of Ideas (), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Craving (5)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Down (455)  |  Duty (71)  |  Find (1014)  |  Gain (146)  |  Inform (50)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Long (778)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Notice (81)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paper (192)  |  People (1031)  |  Praise (28)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Research (753)  |  Reside (25)  |  Thought (995)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1402)  |  Write (250)

[Molecular biology] is concerned particularly with the forms of biological molecules and with the evolution, exploitation and ramification of these forms in the ascent to higher and higher levels of organisation. Molecular biology is predominantly three-dimensional and structural—which does not mean, however, that it is merely a refinement of morphology. It must at the same time inquire into genesis and function.
From Harvey lecture (1951). As cited by John Law in 'The Case of X-ray Protein Crystallography', collected in Gerard Lemaine (ed.), Perspectives on the Emergence of Scientific Disciplines, 1976, 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (232)  |  Concern (239)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Form (976)  |  Function (235)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Inquire (26)  |  Mean (810)  |  Merely (315)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Must (1525)  |  Ramification (8)  |  Refinement (19)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (365)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)

[My Book] will endeavour to establish the principle[s] of reasoning in ... [geology]; and all my geology will come in as illustration of my views of those principles, and as evidence strengthening the system necessarily arising out of the admission of such principles, which... are neither more nor less than that no causes whatever have from the earliest time to which we can look back, to the present, ever acted, but those now acting; and that they never acted with different degrees of energy from that which they now exert.
Letter to Roderick Murchison Esq. (15 Jan 1829). In Mrs Lyell (ed.), The Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Admission (17)  |  Arising (22)  |  Back (395)  |  Book (413)  |  Cause (561)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Energy (373)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Exert (40)  |  Geology (240)  |  Illustration (51)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Never (1089)  |  Present (630)  |  Principle (530)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  System (545)  |  Uniformitarianism (9)  |  View (496)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2350)

[My research] throve best under adversity … in Germany in the middle 1930s under the Nazis when things became quite unpleasant and official seminars became dull. … We had a little private club… theoretical physicists and biologists. The discussions we had at that time have had a remarkable long-range effect, an effect that astonished us all. This was one adverse situation. Like the great Plague in Florence in 1348, which is the background setting for Bocaccio's Decameron.
In 'Homo Scientificus According to Beckett', collected in William Beranek, Jr. (ed.),Science, Scientists, and Society, (1972), 135-. Excerpted in Ann E. Kammer, Science, Sex, and Society (1979), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Adversity (6)  |  Astonish (39)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Club (8)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Effect (414)  |  Florence (2)  |  Germany (16)  |  Long-Range (3)  |  Nazi (10)  |  Private (29)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Research (753)  |  Theoretical Physicist (21)  |  Thrive (22)  |  Unpleasant (15)

[On mediocrity] What we have today is a retreat into low-level goodness. Men are all working hard building barbecues, being devoted to their wives and spending time with their children. Many of us feel, “We never had it so good!” After three wars and a depression, we’re impressed by the rising curve. All we want is it not to blow up.
As quoted in interview with Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Barbecue (2)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blow (45)  |  Blow Up (8)  |  Building (158)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depression (26)  |  Devote (45)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Feel (371)  |  Good (906)  |  Goodness (26)  |  Hard (246)  |  Impress (66)  |  Impressed (39)  |  Low (86)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Never (1089)  |  Retreat (13)  |  Rising (44)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spending (24)  |  Today (321)  |  Want (504)  |  War (233)  |  Wife (41)

[P]olitical and social and scientific values … should be correlated in some relation of movement that could be expressed in mathematics, nor did one care in the least that all the world said it could not be done, or that one knew not enough mathematics even to figure a formula beyond the schoolboy s=(1/2)gt2. If Kepler and Newton could take liberties with the sun and moon, an obscure person ... could take liberties with Congress, and venture to multiply its attraction into the square of its time. He had only to find a value, even infinitesimal, for its attraction.
The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography? (1918), 376.
Science quotes on:  |  Attraction (61)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Care (203)  |  Congress (20)  |  Enough (341)  |  Express (192)  |  Figure (162)  |  Find (1014)  |  Formula (102)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Johannes Kepler (95)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Moon (252)  |  Motion (320)  |  Movement (162)  |  Multiply (40)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Obscure (66)  |  Person (366)  |  Politics (122)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Social (261)  |  Society (350)  |  Square (73)  |  Sun (407)  |  Value (393)  |  World (1850)

[Reply when questioned, “Don’t you find it very inconvenient stammering, Dr. Darwin?”] No, sir, because I have time to think before I speak, and don’t ask impertinent questions.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Reminiscences', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 118, footnote. The quote is stated by Francis Darwin to have been told to him by his father, Charles Darwin.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Find (1014)  |  Impertinent (5)  |  Inconvenient (5)  |  Question (649)  |  Reply (58)  |  Speak (240)  |  Think (1122)

[Resist the temptation to] work so hard that there is no time left for serious thinking …[Scientists] should heed the saying, “A busy life is a wasted life.”
As quoted in J. Michael Bishop, How to Win the Nobel Prize: An Unexpected Life in Science (2009), 59. Citing What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Hard (246)  |  Heed (12)  |  Life (1870)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Serious (98)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Work (1402)

[T]he 47th proposition in Euclid might now be voted down with as much ease as any proposition in politics; and therefore if Lord Hawkesbury hates the abstract truths of science as much as he hates concrete truth in human affairs, now is his time for getting rid of the multiplication table, and passing a vote of censure upon the pretensions of the hypotenuse.
In 'Peter Plymley's Letters', Essays Social and Political (1877), 530.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Censure (5)  |  Concrete (55)  |  Down (455)  |  Euclid (60)  |  Hate (68)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Affairs (6)  |  Hypotenuse (4)  |  Lord (97)  |  Multiplication (46)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Passing (76)  |  Politics (122)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Table (105)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Vote (16)

[The black hole] teaches us that space can be crumpled like a piece of paper into an infinitesimal dot, that time can be extinguished like a blown-out flame, and that the laws of physics that we regard as “sacred,” as immutable, are anything but.
In John A. Wheeler and Kenneth Ford, Geons, Black Holes & Quantum Foam: A Life in Physics. Quoted in Dennis Overbye, 'John A. Wheeler, Physicist Who Coined the Term Black Hole, Is Dead at 96', New York Times (14 Apr 2008).
Science quotes on:  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Dot (18)  |  Flame (44)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Law (913)  |  Paper (192)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Regard (312)  |  Sacred (48)  |  Space (523)

[The toughest part of being in charge is] killing ideas that are great but poorly timed. And delivering tough feedback that’s difficult to hear but that I know will help people—and the team—in the long term.
In Issie Lapowsky, 'Scott Belsky', Inc. (Nov 2013), 140. Biography in Context,
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Business (156)  |  Charge (63)  |  Deliver (30)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Feedback (10)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hear (144)  |  Help (116)  |  Idea (881)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1538)  |  Leadership (13)  |  Long (778)  |  Long Term (4)  |  People (1031)  |  Poorly (2)  |  Team (17)  |  Term (357)  |  Tough (22)  |  Will (2350)

[The] first postulate of the Principle of Uniformity, namely, that the laws of nature are invariant with time, is not peculiar to that principle or to geology, but is a common denominator of all science. In fact, instead of being an assumption or an ad hoc hypothesis, it is simply a succinct summation of the totality of all experimental and observational evidence.
'Critique of the Principle of Uniformity', in C. C. Albritton (ed.), Uniformity and Simplicity (1967), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (96)  |  Being (1276)  |  Common (447)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fact (1257)  |  First (1302)  |  Geology (240)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Law (913)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Observational (15)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Postulate (42)  |  Principle (530)  |  Summation (3)  |  Totality (17)  |  Uniformity (38)

[Thomas Henry] Huxley, I believe, was the greatest Englishman of the Nineteenth Century—perhaps the greatest Englishman of all time. When one thinks of him, one thinks inevitably of such men as Goethe and Aristotle. For in him there was that rich, incomparable blend of intelligence and character, of colossal knowledge and high adventurousness, of instinctive honesty and indomitable courage which appears in mankind only once in a blue moon. There have been far greater scientists, even in England, but there has never been a scientist who was a greater man.
'Thomas Henry Huxley.' In the Baltimore Evening Sun (4 May 1925). Reprinted in A Second Mencken Chrestomathy: A New Selection from the Writings of America's Legendary Editor, Critic, and Wit (2006), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (179)  |  Century (319)  |  Character (259)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Courage (82)  |  England (43)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (150)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (330)  |  High (370)  |  Honesty (29)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (132)  |  Indomitable (4)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Moon (252)  |  Never (1089)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Think (1122)

[To one of his students he saw in a school dramatic production:] I’ve always been proud that Course X leaves little time for outside activities. You have proved me wrong so far and I’m glad you have. But don’t push your luck too far!
As quoted in A Dollar to a Doughnut: The Doc Lewis Story (1953), 49, which was a privately printed collection of anecdotes published by former students upon his retirement. Note that “X” was the actual designation of his chemical engineering course at MIT. The boy was a Course X student who had played the leading “lady” in the previous MIT Tech Show. The anecdote continues: “A word to the wise was sufficient—the leading lady that year was not from Course X.”
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Course (413)  |  Dramatic (19)  |  Little (717)  |  Luck (44)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pride (84)  |  Production (190)  |  Push (66)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (227)  |  Student (317)  |  Wrong (246)

[To] mechanical progress there is apparently no end: for as in the past so in the future, each step in any direction will remove limits and bring in past barriers which have till then blocked the way in other directions; and so what for the time may appear to be a visible or practical limit will turn out to be but a bend in the road.
Opening address to the Mechanical Science Section, Meeting of the British Association, Manchester. In Nature (15 Sep 1887), 36, 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (85)  |  Appear (122)  |  Barrier (34)  |  Bend (13)  |  Block (13)  |  Bring (95)  |  Direction (185)  |  End (603)  |  Future (467)  |  Limit (294)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Other (2233)  |  Past (355)  |  Practical (225)  |  Progress (492)  |  Remove (50)  |  Road (71)  |  Step (234)  |  Turn (454)  |  Visible (87)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)

[We are] a fragile species, still new to the earth, … here only a few moments as evolutionary time is measured, … in real danger at the moment of leaving behind only a thin layer of of our fossils, radioactive at that.
The Fragile Species (1992, 1996), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (139)  |  Danger (127)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Fragile (26)  |  Layer (41)  |  Leave (138)  |  Measure (241)  |  Moment (260)  |  New (1273)  |  Radioactive (24)  |  Real (159)  |  Species (435)  |  Still (614)  |  Thin (18)

[We] do not learn for want of time,
The sciences that should become our country.
In Henry V (1599), Act 5, Scene 2, line 59-60.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Country (269)  |  Do (1905)  |  Learn (672)  |  Science And Politics (16)  |  Want (504)

[When combustion occurs,] one body, at least, is oxygenated, and another restored, at the same time, to its combustible state... This view of combustion may serve to show how nature is always the same, and maintains her equilibrium by preserving the same quantities of air and water on the surface of our globe: for as fast as these are consumed in the various processes of combustion, equal quantities are formed, and rise regenerated like the Phoenix from her ashes.
Fulhame believed 'that water was the only source of oxygen, which oxygenates combustible bodies' and that 'the hydrogen of water is the only substance that restores bodies to their combustible state.'
An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), 179-180. In Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie and Joy Dorothy Harvey, The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000), 478.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Body (557)  |  Combustion (22)  |  Conservation Of Matter (7)  |  Equilibrium (34)  |  Form (976)  |  Hydrogen (80)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Occur (151)  |  Oxidation (8)  |  Oxygen (77)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Redox Reaction (2)  |  Reduction (52)  |  Rise (169)  |  Show (353)  |  State (505)  |  Substance (253)  |  Surface (223)  |  Various (205)  |  View (496)  |  Water (503)

[Writing this letter] has permitted me, for a moment, to abstract myself from the dry and dreary waste of politics, into which I have been impressed by the times on which I happened, and to indulge in the rich fields of nature, where alone I should have served as a volunteer, if left to my natural inclinations and partialties.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Alone (324)  |  Dry (65)  |  Field (378)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Impress (66)  |  Impressed (39)  |  Inclination (36)  |  Indulge (15)  |  Letter (117)  |  Moment (260)  |  Myself (211)  |  Natural (810)  |  Naturalist (79)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Politics (122)  |  Volunteer (7)  |  Waste (109)  |  Writing (192)

[Young] was afterwards accustomed to say, that at no period of his life was he particularly fond of repeating experiments, or even of very frequently attempting to originate new ones; considering that, however necessary to the advancement of science, they demanded a great sacrifice of time, and that when the fact was once established, that time was better employed in considering the purposes to which it might be applied, or the principles which it might tend to elucidate.
Hudson Gurney, Memoir of the Life of Thomas Young, M.D. F.R.S. (1831), 12-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Advancement (63)  |  Application (257)  |  Applied (176)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Better (493)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Demand (131)  |  Elucidation (7)  |  Employ (115)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fond (13)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Great (1610)  |  Life (1870)  |  Necessary (370)  |  New (1273)  |  Originate (39)  |  Origination (7)  |  Particular (80)  |  Period (200)  |  Principle (530)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Repeat (44)  |  Sacrifice (58)  |  Say (989)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tendency (110)  |  Young (253)  |  Thomas Young (15)

“The Universe repeats itself, with the possible exception of history.” Of all earthly studies history is the only one that does not repeat itself. ... Astronomy repeats itself; botany repeats itself; trigonometry repeats itself; mechanics repeats itself; compound long division repeats itself. Every sum if worked out in the same way at any time will bring out the same answer. ... A great many moderns say that history is a science; if so it occupies a solitary and splendid elevation among the sciences; it is the only science the conclusions of which are always wrong.
In 'A Much Repeated Repetition', Daily News (26 Mar 1904). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Botany (63)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Compound (117)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Division (67)  |  Earthly (8)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exception (74)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  Long (778)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  Modern (402)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Possible (560)  |  Repetition (29)  |  Say (989)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Solitary (16)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Study (701)  |  Sum (103)  |  Trigonometry (7)  |  Universe (900)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)  |  Wrong (246)

Ode to The Amoeba
Recall from Time's abysmal chasm
That piece of primal protoplasm
The First Amoeba, strangely splendid,
From whom we're all of us descended.
That First Amoeba, weirdly clever,
Exists today and shall forever,
Because he reproduced by fission;
He split himself, and each division
And subdivision deemed it fitting
To keep on splitting, splitting, splitting;
So, whatsoe'er their billions be,
All, all amoebas still are he.
Zoologists discern his features
In every sort of breathing creatures,
Since all of every living species,
No matter how their breed increases
Or how their ranks have been recruited,
From him alone were evoluted.
King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba
And Hoover sprang from that amoeba;
Columbus, Shakespeare, Darwin, Shelley
Derived from that same bit of jelly.
So famed is he and well-connected,
His statue ought to be erected,
For you and I and William Beebe
Are undeniably amoebae!
(1922). Collected in Gaily the Troubadour (1936), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (30)  |  Alone (324)  |  Amoeba (21)  |  William Beebe (5)  |  Billion (104)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Breed (26)  |  Chasm (9)  |  Clever (41)  |  Christopher Columbus (16)  |  Connect (126)  |  Creature (242)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Descend (49)  |  Discern (35)  |  Division (67)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  First (1302)  |  Fission (10)  |  Forever (111)  |  Himself (461)  |  Herbert Hoover (13)  |  Increase (225)  |  Jelly (6)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Matter (821)  |  Ode (3)  |  Poem (104)  |  Primal (5)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Rank (69)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  William Shakespeare (109)  |   Mary Shelley (9)  |  Species (435)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Split (15)  |  Statue (17)  |  Still (614)  |  Today (321)  |  Zoologist (12)

Strictly Germ-proof

The Antiseptic Baby and the Prophylactic Pup
Were playing in the garden when the Bunny gamboled up;
They looked upon the Creature with a loathing undisguised;—
It wasn't Disinfected and it wasn't Sterilized.

They said it was a Microbe and a Hotbed of Disease;
They steamed it in a vapor of a thousand-odd degrees;
They froze it in a freezer that was cold as Banished Hope
And washed it in permanganate with carbolated soap.

In sulphurated hydrogen they steeped its wiggly ears;
They trimmed its frisky whiskers with a pair of hard-boiled shears;
They donned their rubber mittens and they took it by the hand
And elected it a member of the Fumigated Band.

There's not a Micrococcus in the garden where they play;
They bathe in pure iodoform a dozen times a day;
And each imbibes his rations from a Hygienic Cup—
The Bunny and the Baby and the Prophylactic Pup.
Printed in various magazines and medical journals, for example, The Christian Register (11 Oct 1906), 1148, citing Women's Home Companion. (Making fun of the contemporary national passion for sanitation.)
Science quotes on:  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Baby (29)  |  Banish (11)  |  Boil (24)  |  Cold (115)  |  Creature (242)  |  Degree (277)  |  Disease (340)  |  Ear (69)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Fumigation (2)  |  Gambol (2)  |  Garden (64)  |  Germ (54)  |  Hard (246)  |  Hope (321)  |  Hydrogen (80)  |  Hygiene (13)  |  Imbibed (3)  |  Loathe (4)  |  Look (584)  |  Microbe (30)  |  Play (116)  |  Playing (42)  |  Proof (304)  |  Pure (299)  |  Rubber (11)  |  Soap (11)  |  Steam (81)  |  Sterile (24)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Wash (23)

The Mighty Task is Done

At last the mighty task is done;
Resplendent in the western sun
The Bridge looms mountain high;
Its titan piers grip ocean floor,
Its great steel arms link shore with shore,
Its towers pierce the sky.

On its broad decks in rightful pride,
The world in swift parade shall ride,
Throughout all time to be;
Beneath, fleet ships from every port,
Vast landlocked bay, historic fort,
And dwarfing all the sea.

To north, the Redwood Empires gates;
To south, a happy playground waits,
In Rapturous appeal;
Here nature, free since time began,
Yields to the restless moods of man,
Accepts his bonds of steel.

Launched midst a thousand hopes and fears,
Damned by a thousand hostile sneers,
Yet Neer its course was stayed,
But ask of those who met the foe
Who stood alone when faith was low,
Ask them the price they paid.

Ask of the steel, each strut and wire,
Ask of the searching, purging fire,
That marked their natal hour;
Ask of the mind, the hand, the heart,
Ask of each single, stalwart part,
What gave it force and power.

An Honored cause and nobly fought
And that which they so bravely wrought,
Now glorifies their deed,
No selfish urge shall stain its life,
Nor envy, greed, intrigue, nor strife,
Nor false, ignoble creed.

High overhead its lights shall gleam,
Far, far below lifes restless stream,
Unceasingly shall flow;
For this was spun its lithe fine form,
To fear not war, nor time, nor storm,
For Fate had meant it so.

Written upon completion of the building of the Golden Gate Bridge, May 1937. In Allen Brown, Golden Gate: biography of a Bridge (1965), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Alone (324)  |  Arm (82)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (420)  |  Bay (6)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Bond (46)  |  Bravery (2)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Cause (561)  |  Course (413)  |  Creed (28)  |  Deck (3)  |  Deed (34)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Envy (15)  |  Faith (209)  |  Fate (76)  |  Fear (212)  |  Fire (203)  |  Flow (89)  |  Foe (11)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Fort (2)  |  Free (239)  |  Gate (33)  |  Golden Gate Bridge (2)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greed (17)  |  Happy (108)  |  Heart (243)  |  High (370)  |  History (716)  |  Honor (57)  |  Hope (321)  |  Hour (192)  |  Last (425)  |  Launch (21)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Loom (20)  |  Low (86)  |  Man (2252)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Ocean Floor (6)  |  Parade (3)  |  Playground (6)  |  Poem (104)  |  Power (771)  |  Price (57)  |  Pride (84)  |  Rapture (8)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Ride (23)  |  Sea (326)  |  Selfish (12)  |  Ship (69)  |  Shore (25)  |  Single (365)  |  Sky (174)  |  Sneer (9)  |  South (39)  |  Steel (23)  |  Storm (56)  |  Stream (83)  |  Strut (2)  |  Sun (407)  |  Task (152)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tower (45)  |  Vast (188)  |  War (233)  |  Western (45)  |  Wire (36)  |  World (1850)  |  Yield (86)

[About reading Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, age 14, in the back seat of his parents' sedan. I almost threw up. I got physically ill when I learned that ospreys and peregrine falcons weren't raising chicks because of what people were spraying on bugs at their farms and lawns. This was the first time I learned that humans could impact the environment with chemicals. [That a corporation would create a product that didn't operate as advertised] was shocking in a way we weren't inured to.
As quoted by Eliza Griswold, in 'The Wild Life of “Silent Spring”', New York Times (23 Sep 2012), Magazine 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Back (395)  |  Bug (10)  |  Rachel Carson (49)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chick (5)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Create (245)  |  Environment (239)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Farm (28)  |  First (1302)  |  Human (1512)  |  Impact (45)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Parent (80)  |  People (1031)  |  Product (166)  |  Reading (136)  |  Shock (38)  |  Sick (83)  |  Spring (140)  |  Way (1214)

[Colonel Ross:] “Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?”
[Sherlock Holmes:] “To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.”
“The dog did nothing in the night-time.”
“That was the curious incident.”
Fiction from 'XIII—The Adventure of the Silver Blaze', Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, in The Strand Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly (Dec 1892), Vol. 4, 656-657.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (196)  |  Curious (95)  |  Dog (70)  |  Draw (140)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Observation (593)  |  Point (584)  |  Sherlock Holmes (5)  |  Wish (216)

[On seeing the marsupials in Australia for the first time and comparing them to placental mammals:] An unbeliever … might exclaim “Surely two distinct Creators must have been at work.”
In Diary (19 Jan 1836). In Richard D. Keynes (ed.), The Beagle Record: Selections from the Original Pictorial Records and Written Accounts of the Voyage of HMS Beagle (1979), 345.
Science quotes on:  |  Australia (11)  |  Creator (97)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Exclaim (15)  |  First (1302)  |  Mammal (41)  |  Marsupial (2)  |  Must (1525)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Surely (101)  |  Two (936)  |  Unbeliever (3)  |  Work (1402)

Dilbert: Evolution must be true because it is a logical conclusion of the scientific method.
Dogbert: But science is based on the irrational belief that because we cannot perceive reality all at once, things called “time” and “cause and effect” exist.
Dilbert: That’s what I was taught and that’s what I believe.
Dogbert: Sounds cultish.
Dilbert comic strip (8 Feb 1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Call (781)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cause And Effect (21)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Cult (5)  |  Effect (414)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Irrational (16)  |  Logic (311)  |  Method (531)  |  Must (1525)  |  Perception (97)  |  Reality (274)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  Sound (187)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)

Dilbert: I’m obsessed with inventing a perpetual motion machine. Most scientists think it's impossible, but I have something they don’t.
Dogbert: A lot of spare time?
Dilbert: Exactly.
Dilbert cartoon strip (8 Aug 1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Invention (400)  |  Lot (151)  |  Machine (271)  |  Most (1728)  |  Motion (320)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Something (718)  |  Spare Time (3)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)

Eine brennendste Zeitfrage allerdings! Es brennt in allen Ecken und Enden der ethnologischen Welt, brennt hell, lichterloh, in vollster Brunst, es brennt ringsum, Gross Feuer! und Niemand regt eine Hand.
A most burning question of time, though. It burns in every nook and cranny of the ethnological world, burning, bright, brightly, in the fullest blaze, and it burns all around, huge fire! and no one lifts a hand.
[Expressing his desperation over the loss of the cultural memory of ethnic traditions as so many cultures were no longer living in isolation.]
From Das Besẗandige in den Menschenrassen und die Spielweite ihrer Veränderlichkeit (1868), 180, footnote. Approximate translation by Webmaster using Google Translate.
Science quotes on:  |  Blaze (14)  |  Bright (81)  |  Burn (99)  |  Burning (49)  |  Culture (157)  |  Desperation (6)  |  Ethnology (9)  |  Fire (203)  |  Hand (149)  |  Isolation (32)  |  Lift (57)  |  Living (492)  |  Loss (117)  |  Memory (144)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nook And Cranny (2)  |  Question (649)  |  Tradition (76)  |  World (1850)

Forging differs from hoaxing, inasmuch as in the later the deceit is intended to last for a time, and then be discovered, to the ridicule of those who have credited it; whereas the forger is one who, wishing to acquire a reputation for science, records observations which he has never made.
Reflections on the Decline of Science in England (1830). In Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao, Statistics and Truth (1997), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Deceit (7)  |  Differ (88)  |  Discover (571)  |  Forgery (3)  |  Last (425)  |  Never (1089)  |  Observation (593)  |  Record (161)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Ridicule (23)

If the Indians hadn’t spent the $24. In 1626 Peter Minuit, first governor of New Netherland, purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for about $24. … Assume for simplicity a uniform rate of 7% from 1626 to the present, and suppose that the Indians had put their $24 at [compound] interest at that rate …. What would be the amount now, after 280 years? 24 x (1.07)280 = more than 4,042,000,000.
The latest tax assessment available at the time of writing gives the realty for the borough of Manhattan as $3,820,754,181. This is estimated to be 78% of the actual value, making the actual value a little more than $4,898,400,000.
The amount of the Indians’ money would therefore be more than the present assessed valuation but less than the actual valuation.
In A Scrap-book of Elementary Mathematics: Notes, Recreations, Essays (1908), 47-48.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Amount (153)  |  Assessment (3)  |  Available (80)  |  Compound (117)  |  First (1302)  |  Governor (13)  |  Indian (32)  |  Interest (416)  |  Invest (20)  |  Island (49)  |  Little (717)  |  Making (300)  |  Manhattan (3)  |  Money (178)  |  More (2558)  |  New (1273)  |  Present (630)  |  Purchase (8)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Spent (85)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Tax (27)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Value (393)  |  Writing (192)  |  Year (963)

L’astronomie … est l’arbitre de la division civile du temps, l'ame de la chronologie et de la géographie, et l’unique guide des navigateurs.
Astronomy is the governor of the civil division of time, the soul of chronology and geography, and the only guide of the navigator.
Original French in Leçons Élémentaires d’Astronomie Géométrique et Physique (1764), iii. English as quoted in Preface to Hannah Mary Bouvier Peterson, Bouvier’s Familiar Astronomy; Or, An Introduction to the Study of the Heavens (1855), Preface, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Civil (26)  |  Division (67)  |  Geography (39)  |  Governor (13)  |  Guide (107)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Soul (235)  |  Unique (72)

La verità fu sola figliola del tenpo.
Truth was the only daughter of Time.
From manuscript original “Moto, colpo,” 58b, editted and translated by Jean Paul Richter (ed.) compiled in 'Philosphical Maxims, Morals, Polemics and Speculations' The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci (1883), Vol. 2, 288, Maxim No. 1152.
Science quotes on:  |  Daughter (30)  |  Truth (1109)

Longtemps les objets dont s'occupent les mathématiciens étaient our la pluspart mal définis; on croyait les connaître, parce qu'on se les représentatit avec le sens ou l'imagination; mais on n'en avait qu'une image grossière et non une idée précise sure laquelle le raisonment pût avoir prise.
For a long time the objects that mathematicians dealt with were mostly ill-defined; one believed one knew them, but one represented them with the senses and imagination; but one had but a rough picture and not a precise idea on which reasoning could take hold.
La valeur de la science. In Anton Bovier, Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems (2006), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (881)  |  Image (97)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Long (778)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Object (438)  |  Picture (148)  |  Precise (71)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Represent (157)  |  Sense (785)

Opinionum commenta delet dies, naturae judicia confirmat
Time obliterates the fictions of opinion and confirms the decisions of nature.
De Natura Deorum, II, ii, 5. In Samuel Johnson, W. Jackson Bate, The Selected Essays from the Rambler, Adventurer, and Idler (1968),167
Science quotes on:  |  Confirm (58)  |  Decision (98)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Opinion (291)

Or any science under sonne,
The sevene artz and alle,
But thei ben lerned for oure Lordes love
Lost is al the tyme.

Every science under the sun, including the Seven Arts,
Unless learned for love of Our Lord, is only time lost.
In William Langland and B. Thomas Wright (ed.) The Vision and Creed of Piers Ploughman (1842), 212. An associated Note on p.539 lists: “The seven arts studied in the schools were very famous throughout the middle ages. They were grammar, dialectics, rhetoric, music, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy; and were included in the following memorial distich:—
“Gram, loquitur, Dia. vera docet, Rliet. verba colorat,
Mus. canit, Ar. numerat, Geo. ponderat, As. colit astra.”
Modern translation by Terrence Tiller in Piers Plowman (1981, 1999), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (291)  |  Lord (97)  |  Lost (34)  |  Love (328)  |  Sun (407)

Parkinson's First Law: Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.
Parkinson's Law or the Pursuit of Progress1 (1958), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Availability (10)  |  Available (80)  |  Completion (23)  |  Expand (56)  |  Expansion (43)  |  First (1302)  |  Law (913)  |  Parkinson�s Law (4)  |  Quip (81)  |  Work (1402)

Question: Explain how to determine the time of vibration of a given tuning-fork, and state what apparatus you would require for the purpose.
Answer: For this determination I should require an accurate watch beating seconds, and a sensitive ear. I mount the fork on a suitable stand, and then, as the second hand of my watch passes the figure 60 on the dial, I draw the bow neatly across one of its prongs. I wait. I listen intently. The throbbing air particles are receiving the pulsations; the beating prongs are giving up their original force; and slowly yet surely the sound dies away. Still I can hear it, but faintly and with close attention; and now only by pressing the bones of my head against its prongs. Finally the last trace disappears. I look at the time and leave the room, having determined the time of vibration of the common “pitch” fork. This process deteriorates the fork considerably, hence a different operation must be performed on a fork which is only lent.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 176-7, Question 4. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Accurate (88)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (366)  |  Answer (389)  |  Apparatus (70)  |  Attention (196)  |  Beat (42)  |  Bone (101)  |  Bow (15)  |  Close (77)  |  Common (447)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Determination (80)  |  Determine (152)  |  Dial (9)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Draw (140)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Ear (69)  |  Examination (102)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Faint (10)  |  Figure (162)  |  Force (497)  |  Head (87)  |  Hear (144)  |  Hearing (50)  |  Howler (15)  |  Last (425)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Listen (81)  |  Look (584)  |  Looking (191)  |  Mount (43)  |  Mounting (2)  |  Must (1525)  |  Operation (221)  |  Original (61)  |  Particle (200)  |  Perform (123)  |  Performance (51)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Pressing (2)  |  Process (439)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Question (649)  |  Require (229)  |  Room (42)  |  Second (66)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Slow (108)  |  Sound (187)  |  Stand (284)  |  State (505)  |  Still (614)  |  Sure (15)  |  Surely (101)  |  Trace (109)  |  Tuning Fork (2)  |  Vibration (26)  |  Watch (118)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Before (8)  |  Bound (120)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Down (455)  |  Dry (65)  |  Examination (102)  |  Following (16)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Hear (144)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Music (133)  |  Never (1089)  |  Note (39)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paint (22)  |  Parallel (46)  |  Passage (52)  |  Path (159)  |  Persistence (25)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Question (649)  |  Reflector (4)  |  Short (200)  |  Similarity (32)  |  Sound (187)  |  Step (234)  |  Stop (89)  |  Term (357)  |  Two (936)  |  Walk (138)  |  Wall (71)

Quinquies exscriptus, maneat tot millibus annis.
(I wrote it out five times, may it last the same number of millennia.)
final line of Ars magna
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (58)  |  Last (425)  |  Number (710)

Steckt keine Poesie in der Lokomotive, die brausend durch die Nacht zieht und über die zitternde Erde hintobt, als wollte sie Raum und Zeit zermalmen, in dem hastigen, aber wohl geregelten Zucken und Zerren ihrer gewaltigen Glieder, in dem stieren, nur auf ein Ziel losstürmenden Blick ihrer roten Augen, in dem emsigen, willenlosen Gefolge der Wagen, die kreischend und klappernd, aber mit unfehlbarer Sicherheit dem verkörperten Willen aus Eisen und Stahl folge leisten?
Is there no poetry in the locomotive roaring through the night and charging over the quivering earth as if it wanted to crush time and space? Is there no poetry in the hasty but regular jerking and tugging of its powerful limbs, in the stare of its red eyes that never lose sight of their goal? Is there no poetry in the bustling, will-less retinue of cars that follow, screeching and clattering with unmistakable surety, the steel and iron embodiment of will?
Max Eyth
From 'Poesie und Technik' (1904) (Poetry and Technology), in Schweizerische Techniker-Zeitung (1907), Vol 4, 306, as translated in Paul A. Youngman, Black Devil and Iron Angel: The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism (2005), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (75)  |  Crush (19)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Eye (440)  |  Follow (389)  |  Goal (155)  |  Hasty (7)  |  Iron (99)  |  Limb (9)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Lose (165)  |  Never (1089)  |  Night (133)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Quivering (2)  |  Red (38)  |  Regular (48)  |  Retinue (3)  |  Sight (135)  |  Space (523)  |  Stare (9)  |  Steel (23)  |  Through (846)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Want (504)  |  Wanted (4)  |  Will (2350)

Temporis fila.
Child of time.
A favourite expression of Linnaeus.
Quoted in Tore Frängsmyr, 'Linnaeus as a Geologist', in Tore Frangsmyr (ed.), Linnaeus: The Man and his Work (1983), 143.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (333)  |  Expression (181)  |  French Saying (67)

Temporis filia veritas; cui me obstetricari non pudet.
Truth is the daughter of time, and I feel no shame in being her midwife.
Opening remark from 'Narratio de observatis a se quatuor Jovis satellitibus erronibus, quos Galilaeus Galilaeus Mathematicus Florentinus jure inventionis medicaea sidera nuncupavit' (Account of personal observations of the four moving satellites of Jupiter, which Florentine Mathematician Galileo Galilei had the right of discovery to Name as the Medicicaean Stars) (observed 30 Aug 1610, written 11 Sep 1610, printed about Oct 1610) in which he confirmed having seen the things announced by Galileo in Mar 1610. Collected in Cav. Giambatista Venturi, Memorie e Lettere Inedite Finora o Disperse di Galileo Galilei (Memoirs and Letters, Previously Unpublished or Missing, of Galileo Galilei) (1811), Vol 1, 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Daughter (30)  |  Feel (371)  |  Truth (1109)

Theologus esse volebam: diu angebar: Deus ecce mea opera etiam in astronomia celebratur.
I wanted to become a theologian. For a long time I was restless. Now, however, behold how through my effort God is being celebrated in astronomy.
Letter to Michael Maestlin (3 Oct 1595). Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 13, letter 23, l. 256-7, p. 40. As translated in Owen Gingerich, 'Johannes Kepler' article in Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.) Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol. 7, 291. Also seen translated as “I wanted to become a theologian; for a long time I was unhappy. Now, behold, God is praised by my work even in astronomy.”
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Become (821)  |  Being (1276)  |  Effort (243)  |  God (776)  |  Long (778)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Theologian (23)  |  Through (846)  |  Want (504)

Vladimir: That passed the time.
Esragon: It would have passed in any case.
From Act 1 of the play, Waiting for Godot. In The Collected Works of Samuel Beckett (1970), Vol. 15, 31. books.google.com/books?id=lEYrAQAAIAAJ
Science quotes on:  |  Pass (241)

CALPURNIA: When beggars die there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
CAESAR: Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I have yet heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
Julius Caesar (1599), II, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Comet (65)  |  Coward (5)  |  Death (406)  |  End (603)  |  Fear (212)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Most (1728)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Never (1089)  |  Prince (13)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Small (489)  |  Strange (160)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonder (251)

SCIENCE: a way of finding things out and then making them work. Science explains what is happening around us the whole time. So does RELIGION, but science is better because it comes up with more understandable excuses when it’s wrong.
In Wings (1990, 2007), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Explain (334)  |  Happening (59)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2558)  |  Religion (369)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Small (489)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Work (1402)  |  Wrong (246)

~~[Attributed]~~ I have had my results for a long time; but I do not yet know how I am to arrive at them.
Quoted, without primary source citation, in Agnes Arber, The Mind and the Eye: A Study of the Biologist’s Standpoint (1954, 1964), 47. Arber footnotes finding the quote also in Leonard Nelson and T.K. Brown (trans.), Socratic Method and Critical Philosophy (1949, 1965), 89; W.I.B. Beveridge, The Art of Scientific Investigation (1950, 1957), 149. Notably, Arber states being “unable to trace this dictum to its original source.” With benefit of Google, Webmaster also has, yet, no success, either. In German, guessed as, “Meine Lösungen habe ich schon lange, ich weiß nur noch nicht, wie ich zu ihnen gelangel!” Webmaster found the quote in a 1968 German book, and “Meine Resultate habe ich schon lange, ich weiß nur nicht, wie ich zu ihnen gelangen kann” (1958). All of these leave a century of apparent silence before them. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1905)  |  Know (1538)  |  Long (778)  |  Proof (304)  |  Result (700)

~~[Attributed]~~ It is not once nor twice but times without number that the same ideas make their appearance in the world.
Aristotle
As quoted in Thomas L. Heath Manual of Greek Mathematics (1931, 2003), 205. Webmaster has so far found no primary source, and is dubious about authenticity. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (122)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Idea (881)  |  Number (710)  |  Repeat (44)  |  Same (166)  |  World (1850)

~~[Misattributed; NOT by Collins]~~ Hypochondriacs squander large sums of time in search of nostrums by which they vainly hope they may get more time to squander.
This appears in Charles Caleb Colton, Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words, Addressed to Those who Think (1823), Vol. 1, 99. Since Mortimer Collins was born in 1827, four years after the Colton publication, Collins cannot be the author. Nevertheless, it is widely seen misattributed to Collins, for example in Peter McDonald (ed.), Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 27. Even seen attributed to Peter Ouspensky (born 1878), in Encarta Book of Quotations (2000). See the Charles Caleb Colton Quotes page on this website. The quote appears on this page to include it with this caution of misattribution.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (340)  |  Drug (61)  |  Hope (321)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Large (398)  |  Misattributed (19)  |  More (2558)  |  Nostrum (2)  |  Search (175)  |  Sum (103)

~~[Misattributed]~~ Time and space are modes by which we think and not conditions in which we live.
Although seen in later years in various sources as a direct quote by Einstein, it apparently is not. This statement first appears as these authors’ own commentary about Einstein’s relativity theory, as given by Dimitri Marianoff and ‎Palma Wayne, Einstein: An Intimate Study of a Great Man (1944), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (362)  |  Live (650)  |  Mode (43)  |  Space (523)  |  Space-Time (20)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time And Space (39)

1066. … At that time, throughout all England, a portent such as men had never seen before was seen in the heavens. Some declared that the star was a comet, which some call “the long-haired star”: it first appeared on the eve of the festival of Letania Maior, that is on 24 April, and shone every night for a week.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 195. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. The monasteries continued independently updating these annals. This quote comes from a copy once owned by Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury. Known as the Winchester (or Parker) Chronicle, it is the oldest surviving manuscript.
Science quotes on:  |  April (9)  |  Call (781)  |  Comet (65)  |  Declared (24)  |  England (43)  |  Eve (4)  |  Festival (2)  |  First (1302)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Long (778)  |  Never (1089)  |  Night (133)  |  Portent (2)  |  Shine (49)  |  Star (460)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Week (73)

1106. … In the first week of Lent, on the Friday, 16 February, a strange star appeared in the evening, and for a long time afterwards was seen shining for a while each evening. The star made its appearance in the south-west, and seemed to be small and dark, but the light that shone from it was very bright, and appeared like an enormous beam of light shining north-east; and one evening it seemed as if the beam were flashing in the opposite direction towards the star. Some said that they had seen other unknown stars about this time, but we cannot speak about these without reservation, because we did not ourselves see them.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 240. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. This quote comes from the copy known as the Peterborough Chronicle (a.k.a. Laud manuscript).
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (145)  |  Beam (26)  |  Bright (81)  |  Comet (65)  |  Dark (145)  |  Direction (185)  |  Enormous (44)  |  First (1302)  |  Flash (49)  |  Light (635)  |  Long (778)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Other (2233)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  See (1094)  |  Shine (49)  |  Shining (35)  |  Small (489)  |  South (39)  |  Speak (240)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Strange (160)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Week (73)

A ... hypothesis may be suggested, which supposes the word 'beginning' as applied by Moses in the first of the Book of Genesis, to express an undefined period of time which was antecedent to the last great change that affected the surface of the earth, and to the creation of its present animal and vegetable inhabitants; during which period a long series of operations and revolutions may have been going on, which, as they are wholly unconnected with the history of the human race, are passed over in silence by the sacred historian, whose only concern with them was largely to state, that the matter of the universe is not eternal and self-existent but was originally created by the power of the Almighty.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (23)  |  Animal (651)  |  Applied (176)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Book (413)  |  Change (639)  |  Concern (239)  |  Creation (350)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Express (192)  |  First (1302)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Geology (240)  |  Great (1610)  |  Historian (59)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Race (104)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Inhabitant (50)  |  Last (425)  |  Long (778)  |  Matter (821)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Pass (241)  |  Period (200)  |  Power (771)  |  Present (630)  |  Race (278)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Sacred (48)  |  Self (268)  |  Series (153)  |  Silence (62)  |  State (505)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Surface (223)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Unconnected (10)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vegetable (49)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Word (650)

A bad earthquake at once destroys the oldest associations: the world, the very emblem of all that is solid, has moved beneath our feet like a crust over a fluid; one second of time has conveyed to the mind a strange idea of insecurity, which hours of reflection would never have created.
Journal of Researches: Into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. BeagIe Round the World (1839), ch. XVI, 369.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (49)  |  Bad (185)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Crust (43)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Earthquake (37)  |  Fluid (54)  |  Hour (192)  |  Idea (881)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Never (1089)  |  Reflection (93)  |  Solid (119)  |  Strange (160)  |  World (1850)

A biologist, if he wishes to know how many toes a cat has, does not "frame the hypothesis that the number of feline digital extremities is 4, or 5, or 6," he simply looks at a cat and counts. A social scientist prefers the more long-winded expression every time, because it gives an entirely spurious impression of scientificness to what he is doing.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (70)  |  Cat (52)  |  Count (107)  |  Digital (10)  |  Doing (277)  |  Expression (181)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Impression (118)  |  Know (1538)  |  Long (778)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Number (710)  |  Research (753)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Science (37)  |  Spurious (3)  |  Toe (8)  |  Wind (141)

A body of work such as Pasteur’s is inconceivable in our time: no man would be given a chance to create a whole science. Nowadays a path is scarcely opened up when the crowd begins to pour in.
Pensées d’un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), Chap. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Body (557)  |  Chance (244)  |  Create (245)  |  Creation (350)  |  Crowd (25)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nowadays (6)  |  Open (277)  |  Opening (15)  |  Louis Pasteur (85)  |  Path (159)  |  Pouring (3)  |  Scarcely (75)  |  Whole (756)  |  Work (1402)

A casual glance at crystals may lead to the idea that they were pure sports of nature, but this is simply an elegant way of declaring one’s ignorance. With a thoughtful examination of them, we discover laws of arrangement. With the help of these, calculation portrays and links up the observed results. How variable and at the same time how precise and regular are these laws! How simple they are ordinarily, without losing anything of their significance! The theory which has served to develop these laws is based entirely on a fact, whose existence has hitherto been vaguely discerned rather than demonstrated. This fact is that in all minerals which belong to the same species, these little solids, which are the crystal elements and which I call their integrant molecules, have an invariable form, in which the faces lie in the direction of the natural fracture surfaces corresponding to the mechanical division of the crystals. Their angles and dimensions are derived from calculations combined with observation.
Traité de mineralogie … Publié par le conseil des mines (1801), Vol. 1, xiii-iv, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Belong (168)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Call (781)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Develop (278)  |  Dimension (64)  |  Direction (185)  |  Discern (35)  |  Discover (571)  |  Division (67)  |  Elegant (37)  |  Element (322)  |  Examination (102)  |  Existence (481)  |  Face (214)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Form (976)  |  Fracture (7)  |  Glance (36)  |  Idea (881)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Law (913)  |  Lead (391)  |  Lie (370)  |  Little (717)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Mineral (66)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observed (149)  |  Precise (71)  |  Pure (299)  |  Regular (48)  |  Result (700)  |  Significance (114)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solid (119)  |  Species (435)  |  Sport (23)  |  Surface (223)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thoughtful (16)  |  Variable (37)  |  Way (1214)

A Chinese tale tells of some men sent to harm a young girl who, upon seeing her beauty, become her protectors rather than her violators. That’s how I felt seeing the Earth for the first time. "I could not help but love and cherish her.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (313)  |  Become (821)  |  Cherish (25)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Feel (371)  |  First (1302)  |  First Time (14)  |  Girl (38)  |  Harm (43)  |  Help (116)  |  Love (328)  |  See (1094)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Send (23)  |  Tale (17)  |  Tell (344)  |  Young (253)

A circumstance which influenced my whole career more than any other … was my friendship with Professor Henslow … a man who knew every branch of science…. During the latter half of my time at Cambridge [I] took long walks with him on most days; so that I was called by some of the dons “the man who walks with Henslow.”
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (254)  |  Branch (155)  |  Call (781)  |  Career (86)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Friendship (18)  |  John Stevens Henslow (2)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Other (2233)  |  Professor (133)  |  Walk (138)  |  Whole (756)

A crystal is like a class of children arranged for drill, but standing at ease, so that while the class as a whole has regularity both in time and space, each individual child is a little fidgety!
In Crystals and X-Rays (1948), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Both (496)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Class (168)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Drill (12)  |  Ease (40)  |  Individual (420)  |  Little (717)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Space (523)  |  Standing (11)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Whole (756)

A definition of what we mean by “probability”. … The German Dictionary by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm gives us detailed information: The Latin term “probabilis”, we are told, was at one time translated by “like truth”, or, by “with an appearance of truth” (“mit einem Schein der Wahrheit”). Only since the middle of the seventeenth century has it been rendered by “wahrscheinlich” (lit. truth-resembling).
In Probability, Statistics, and Truth (1939, 2nd. ed., 1957), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (20)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Century (319)  |  Definition (238)  |  Detail (150)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  German (37)  |  Information (173)  |  Latin (44)  |  Mean (810)  |  Probability (135)  |  Render (96)  |  Term (357)  |  Truth (1109)

A drop of old tuberculin, which is an extract of tubercle bacilli, is put on the skin and then a small superficial scarification is made by turning, with some pressure, a vaccination lancet on the surface of the skin. The next day only those individuals show an inflammatory reaction at the point of vaccination who have already been infected with tuberculosis, whereas the healthy individuals show no reaction at all. Every time we find a positive reaction, we can say with certainty that the child is tuberculous.
'The Relation of Tuberculosis to Infant Mortality', read at the third mid-year meeting of the American Academy of Medicine, New Haven, Conn, (4 Nov 1909). In Bulletin of the American Academy of Medicine (1910), 11, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Bacillus (9)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Child (333)  |  Drop (77)  |  Extract (40)  |  Find (1014)  |  Healthy (70)  |  Individual (420)  |  Infection (27)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Next (238)  |  Old (499)  |  Point (584)  |  Positive (98)  |  Pressure (69)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Say (989)  |  Show (353)  |  Skin (48)  |  Small (489)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Surface (223)  |  Test (221)  |  Tuberculosis (9)  |  Vaccination (7)

A fair number of people who go on to major in astronomy have decided on it certainly by the time they leave junior high, if not during junior high. I think it’s somewhat unusual that way. I think most children pick their field quite a bit later, but astronomy seems to catch early, and if it does, it sticks.
From interview by Rebecca Wright, 'Oral History Transcript' (15 Sep 2000), on NASA website.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Career (86)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Decide (50)  |  Early (196)  |  Field (378)  |  High (370)  |  Junior (6)  |  Junior High (3)  |  Major (88)  |  Most (1728)  |  Number (710)  |  People (1031)  |  Pick (16)  |  Think (1122)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Way (1214)

A few of the results of my activities as a scientist have become embedded in the very texture of the science I tried to serve—this is the immortality that every scientist hopes for. I have enjoyed the privilege, as a university teacher, of being in a position to influence the thought of many hundreds of young people and in them and in their lives I shall continue to live vicariously for a while. All the things I care for will continue for they will be served by those who come after me. I find great pleasure in the thought that those who stand on my shoulders will see much farther than I did in my time. What more could any man want?
In 'The Meaning of Death,' in The Humanist Outlook edited by A. J. Ayer (1968) [See Gerald Holton and Sir Isaac Newton].
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Being (1276)  |  Care (203)  |  Continue (179)  |  Farther (51)  |  Find (1014)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hope (321)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Influence (231)  |  Live (650)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  People (1031)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Privilege (41)  |  Result (700)  |  Scientist (881)  |  See (1094)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Stand (284)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thought (995)  |  University (130)  |  Want (504)  |  Will (2350)  |  Young (253)

A good many times I have been present at gatherings of people who, by the standards of the traditional culture, are thought highly educated and who have with considerable gusto been expressing their incredulity at the illiteracy of scientists. Once or twice I have been provoked and have asked the company how many of them could describe the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The response was cold: it was also negative. Yet I was asking something which is about the scientific equivalent of: Have you read a work of Shakespeare’s?
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 15-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Asking (74)  |  Cold (115)  |  Company (63)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Culture (157)  |  Describe (132)  |  Educated (12)  |  Equivalent (46)  |  Gather (76)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Good (906)  |  Illiteracy (8)  |  Incredulity (5)  |  Law (913)  |  Negative (66)  |  People (1031)  |  Present (630)  |  Read (308)  |  Reading (136)  |  Response (56)  |  Science Literacy (6)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Illiteracy (8)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  William Shakespeare (109)  |  Something (718)  |  Standard (64)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thought (995)  |  Traditional (16)  |  Work (1402)

A good notation has a subtlety and suggestiveness which at times make it almost seem like a live teacher. … a perfect notation would be a substitute for thought.
In 'Introduction' by Bertrand Russell written for Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1922), 17-18.
Science quotes on:  |  Good (906)  |  Live (650)  |  Notation (28)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Substitute (47)  |  Subtle (37)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Suggestive (4)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Thought (995)

A good physiological experiment like a good physical one requires that it should present anywhere, at any time, under identical conditions, the same certain and unequivocal phenomena that can always be confirmed.
Bestätigung des Bell'schen Lehrsatzes, dass die doppelten Wurzeln der Rückenmarksnerven verschiedene Functionen haben, durch neue nod entscheidende Experimente' (1831). Trans. Edwin Clarke and C. D. O'Malley, The Human Brain and Spinal Cord (1968), 304.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (557)  |  Condition (362)  |  Confirm (58)  |  Confirmation (25)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Good (906)  |  Identical (55)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physiological (64)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Present (630)  |  Require (229)

A great advantage of X-ray analysis as a method of chemical structure analysis is its power to show some totally unexpected and surprising structure with, at the same time, complete certainty.
In 'X-ray Analysis of Complicated Molecules', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1964). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1942-1962 (1964), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (144)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Complete (209)  |  Great (1610)  |  Method (531)  |  Power (771)  |  Ray (115)  |  Show (353)  |  Structure (365)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  X-ray (43)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

A great department of thought must have its own inner life, however transcendent may be the importance of its relations to the outside. No department of science, least of all one requiring so high a degree of mental concentration as Mathematics, can be developed entirely, or even mainly, with a view to applications outside its own range. The increased complexity and specialisation of all branches of knowledge makes it true in the present, however it may have been in former times, that important advances in such a department as Mathematics can be expected only from men who are interested in the subject for its own sake, and who, whilst keeping an open mind for suggestions from outside, allow their thought to range freely in those lines of advance which are indicated by the present state of their subject, untrammelled by any preoccupation as to applications to other departments of science. Even with a view to applications, if Mathematics is to be adequately equipped for the purpose of coping with the intricate problems which will be presented to it in the future by Physics, Chemistry and other branches of physical science, many of these problems probably of a character which we cannot at present forecast, it is essential that Mathematics should be allowed to develop freely on its own lines.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (50)  |  Advance (298)  |  Allow (51)  |  Application (257)  |  Branch (155)  |  Character (259)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cope (9)  |  Degree (277)  |  Department (93)  |  Develop (278)  |  Entirely (36)  |  Equip (6)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Essential (210)  |  Expect (203)  |  Forecast (15)  |  Former (138)  |  Freely (13)  |  Future (467)  |  Great (1610)  |  High (370)  |  Importance (299)  |  Important (229)  |  Increase (225)  |  Indicate (62)  |  Inner (72)  |  Interest (416)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Least (75)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mainly (10)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mental (179)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Must (1525)  |  Open (277)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical Science (104)  |  Physics (564)  |  Preoccupation (7)  |  Present (630)  |  Probably (50)  |  Problem (731)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Range (104)  |  Relation (166)  |  Require (229)  |  Sake (61)  |  Specialize (4)  |  State (505)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (543)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Thought (995)  |  Transcendent (3)  |  True (239)  |  View (496)  |  Will (2350)

A great invention for dieters would be a refrigerator which weighs you every time you open the door.
Anonymous
In E.C. McKenzie, 14,000 Quips and Quotes for Speakers, Writers, Editors, Preachers, and Teachers (1990), 546.
Science quotes on:  |  Door (94)  |  Great (1610)  |  Invention (400)  |  Open (277)  |  Refrigerator (8)  |  Weigh (51)  |  Weight (140)

A great reform in geological speculation seems now to have become necessary. … It is quite certain that a great mistake has been made—that British popular geology at the present time is in direct opposition to the principles of Natural Philosophy.
From Sir W. Thomson, Address (27 Feb 1868), to the Geological Society of Glasgow, 'On Geological Time', Transactions of the Geological Society of Glasgow 3, collected in Popular Lectures and Addresses (1894), Vol. 2, 10 & 44. As Epigraph in Thomas Henry Huxley, 'Geological Reform' (1869), Collected Essays: Discourses, Biological and Geological (1894), 306.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  British (42)  |  Certain (557)  |  Direct (228)  |  Geology (240)  |  Great (1610)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Opposition (49)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Popular (34)  |  Present (630)  |  Principle (530)  |  Reform (22)  |  Speculation (137)

A great swindle of our time is the assumption that science has made religion obsolete. All science has damaged is the story of Adam and Eve and the story of Jonah and the Whale. Everything else holds up pretty well, particularly lessons about fairness and gentleness. People who find those lessons irrelevant in the twentieth century are simply using science as an excuse for greed and harshness. Science has nothing to do with it, friends.
Through the Looking Glass. In Carl Sagan, Broca's Brain (1986), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Adam And Eve (5)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Century (319)  |  Do (1905)  |  Everything (489)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Find (1014)  |  Friend (180)  |  Gentleness (4)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greed (17)  |  Lesson (58)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  People (1031)  |  Religion (369)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Story (122)  |  Swindle (2)  |  Whale (45)

A grove of giant redwoods or sequoias should be kept just as we keep a great or beautiful cathedral. The extermination of the passenger pigeon meant that mankind was just so much poorer; exactly as in the case of the destruction of the cathedral at Rheims. And to lose the chance to see frigate-birds soaring in circles above the storm, or a file of pelicans winging their way homeward across the crimson afterglow of the sunset, or a myriad terns flashing in the bright light of midday as they hover in a shifting maze above the beach—why, the loss is like the loss of a gallery of the masterpieces of the artists of old time.
In A Book-Lover's Holidays in the Open (1916), 316-317.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (97)  |  Beach (23)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Bird (163)  |  Bright (81)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Chance (244)  |  Circle (117)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Extinction (80)  |  Flash (49)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Giant (73)  |  Great (1610)  |  Grove (7)  |  Hover (8)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Light (635)  |  Lose (165)  |  Loss (117)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Masterpiece (9)  |  Maze (11)  |  Midday (4)  |  Myriad (32)  |  Old (499)  |  Pigeon (8)  |  Poor (139)  |  Redwood (8)  |  See (1094)  |  Sequoia (4)  |  Shift (45)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Storm (56)  |  Sunset (27)  |  Tern (2)  |  Tree (269)  |  Way (1214)  |  Why (491)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (75)  |  Achievement (187)  |  Affection (44)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Being (1276)  |  Call (781)  |  Circle (117)  |  Compassion (12)  |  Completely (137)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Creature (242)  |  Delusion (26)  |  Desire (212)  |  Embrace (47)  |  Experience (494)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Free (239)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Inner (72)  |  Kind (564)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nobody (103)  |  Optical (11)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Part (235)  |  Person (366)  |  Personal (75)  |  Prison (13)  |  Rest (287)  |  Restrict (13)  |  Security (51)  |  Separate (151)  |  Something (718)  |  Space (523)  |  Strive (53)  |  Task (152)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)  |  Widen (10)

A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (65)  |  Depend (238)  |  Exert (40)  |  Give In (3)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Inner (72)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Measure (241)  |  Must (1525)  |  Myself (211)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outer (13)  |  Receive (117)  |  Remind (16)  |  Still (614)

A hundred years ago … an engineer, Herbert Spencer, was willing to expound every aspect of life, with an effect on his admiring readers which has not worn off today.
Things do not happen quite in this way nowadays. This, we are told, is an age of specialists. The pursuit of knowledge has become a profession. The time when a man could master several sciences is past. He must now, they say, put all his efforts into one subject. And presumably, he must get all his ideas from this one subject. The world, to be sure, needs men who will follow such a rule with enthusiasm. It needs the greatest numbers of the ablest technicians. But apart from them it also needs men who will converse and think and even work in more than one science and know how to combine or connect them. Such men, I believe, are still to be found today. They are still as glad to exchange ideas as they have been in the past. But we cannot say that our way of life is well-fitted to help them. Why is this?
In 'The Unification of Biology', New Scientist (11 Jan 1962), 13, No. 269, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Able (2)  |  Age (509)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Become (821)  |  Combine (58)  |  Connect (126)  |  Do (1905)  |  Effect (414)  |  Effort (243)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Enthusiasm (59)  |  Exchange (38)  |  Follow (389)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Happen (282)  |  Help (116)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Idea (881)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Master (182)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  Need (320)  |  Number (710)  |  Past (355)  |  Profession (108)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Rule (307)  |  Say (989)  |  Several (33)  |  Specialist (33)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Still (614)  |  Subject (543)  |  Technician (9)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Today (321)  |  Way (1214)  |  Way Of Life (15)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2350)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

A learned man is an idler who kills time with study. Beware of his false knowledge: it is more dangerous than ignorance.
In 'Maxims for Revolutionists: Education', in Man and Superman (1905), 230.
Science quotes on:  |  Beware (16)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  False (105)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Kill (100)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Study (701)

A liberal education may be had at a very slight cost of time …[with] ten books which you may make close friends.
I. Old and New Testament.
II. Shakespeare.
III. Montaigne.
IV. Plutarch’s Lives.
V. Marcus Aurelius.
VI. Epictetus.
VII. Religio Medici.
VIII. Don Quixote.
IX. Emerson
X. Oliver Wendell Holmes—Breakfast-Table Series.
From 'Bed-Side Reading List For Medical Students', final page of Aequanimitas and Other Addresses (1904, 1906), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Marcus Antoninus Aurelius (8)  |  Bible (105)  |  Book (413)  |  Cost (94)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (161)  |  Friend (180)  |  Oliver Wendell Holmes (38)  |  Liberal Education (2)  |  Plutarch (16)  |  Shakespeare (6)  |  Slight (32)

A line is not made up of points. … In the same way, time is not made up of parts considered as indivisible “nows.”
Part of Aristotle’s reply to Zeno's paradox concerning continuity.
Aristotle
A succinct summary, not a direct quotation of Aristotle's words. From Aristotle's Physics, Book VI. Sections 1 and 9 as given by Florian Cajori in part 2 of an article 'The History of Zeno's Arguments on Motion', in The American Mathematical Monthly (Feb 1915), 22:2, 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (428)  |  Continuity (39)  |  Indivisible (22)  |  Line (100)  |  Now (5)  |  Paradox (54)  |  Part (235)  |  Point (584)  |  Reply (58)  |  Way (1214)  |  Zeno (5)

A man in twenty-four hours converts as much as seven ounces of carbon into carbonic acid; a milch cow will convert seventy ounces, and a horse seventy-nine ounces, solely by the act of respiration. That is, the horse in twenty-four hours burns seventy-nine ounces of charcoal, or carbon, in his organs of respiration to supply his natural warmth in that time ..., not in a free state, but in a state of combination.
In A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Act (278)  |  Burn (99)  |  Burning (49)  |  Carbon (68)  |  Carbon Dioxide (25)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Combination (150)  |  Conversion (17)  |  Cow (42)  |  Free (239)  |  Horse (78)  |  Hour (192)  |  Man (2252)  |  Natural (810)  |  Organ (118)  |  Ounce (9)  |  Respiration (14)  |  State (505)  |  Supply (100)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2350)

A man loses his fortune; he gains earnestness. His eyesight goes; it leads him to a spirituality... We think we are pushing our own way bravely, but there is a great Hand in ours all the time.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 20
Science quotes on:  |  Bravely (3)  |  Earnestness (3)  |  Eyesight (5)  |  Fortune (50)  |  Gain (146)  |  Great (1610)  |  Lead (391)  |  Lose (165)  |  Man (2252)  |  Ours (4)  |  Push (66)  |  Spirituality (8)  |  Think (1122)  |  Way (1214)

A Man may Smoak, or Drink, or take Snuff, ’till he is unable to pass away his Time without it.
In The Spectator (2 Aug 1712), No. 447, collected in The Spectator (9th ed., 1728), Vol. 6, 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Addiction (6)  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Drink (56)  |  Man (2252)  |  Pass (241)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Snuff (2)  |  Tobacco (19)

A man that is young in years may be old in hours, if he has lost no time.
‘Of Youth and Age’, Essays.
Science quotes on:  |  Hour (192)  |  Man (2252)  |  Old (499)  |  Year (963)  |  Young (253)  |  Youth (109)

A man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discovered the value of life.
In a Letter to his sister Susan (Aug 1836), collected in Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters, Volume 5 (1892), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Dare (55)  |  Discover (571)  |  Hour (192)  |  Life (1870)  |  Value (393)  |  Waste (109)

A man who has once looked with the archaeological eye will never see quite normally. He will be wounded by what other men call trifles. It is possible to refine the sense of time until an old shoe in the bunch grass or a pile of nineteenth century beer bottles in an abandoned mining town tolls in one’s head like a hall clock.
The Night Country (1971), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (41)  |  Abandon (73)  |  Archaeology (51)  |  Beer (10)  |  Bottle (17)  |  Call (781)  |  Century (319)  |  Clock (51)  |  Eye (440)  |  Grass (49)  |  Hall (5)  |  Head (87)  |  Look (584)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mine (78)  |  Mining (22)  |  Never (1089)  |  Old (499)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pile (12)  |  Possible (560)  |  Refine (8)  |  See (1094)  |  Sense (785)  |  Shoe (12)  |  Toll (3)  |  Town (30)  |  Trifle (18)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wound (26)

A man who is all theory is like “a rudderless ship on a shoreless sea.” … Theories and speculations may be indulged in with safety only as long as they are based on facts that we can go back to at all times and know that we are on solid ground.
In Nature's Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science (1899), Vol. 1, Introduction, vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Base (120)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Ground (222)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  Rudder (4)  |  Safety (58)  |  Sea (326)  |  Ship (69)  |  Shore (25)  |  Solid (119)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Theory (1015)

A man, in his books, may be said to walk the earth a long time after he is gone.
John Muir
Quoted, without citation, in John Muir and Edwin Way Teale (ed.) The Wilderness World of John Muir (1954, 2001), Introduction, xx.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (413)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  Walk (138)

A mathematical argument is, after all, only organized common sense, and it is well that men of science should not always expound their work to the few behind a veil of technical language, but should from time to time explain to a larger public the reasoning which lies behind their mathematical notation.
In The Tides and Kindred Phenomena in the Solar System: The Substance of Lectures Delivered in 1897 at the Lowell Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (1898), Preface, v. Preface
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (145)  |  Behind (139)  |  Common (447)  |  Common Sense (136)  |  Explain (334)  |  Language (308)  |  Lie (370)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Notation (28)  |  Organized (9)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Sense (785)  |  Technical (53)  |  Veil (27)  |  Work (1402)

A mathematician … has no material to work with but ideas, and so his patterns are likely to last longer, since ideas wear less with time than words.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (881)  |  Last (425)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Longer (10)  |  Material (366)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Wear (20)  |  Word (650)  |  Work (1402)

A million years is a short time—the shortest worth messing with for most problems. You begin tuning your mind to a time scale that is the planet’s time scale. For me, it is almost unconscious now and is a kind of companionship with the earth.
In Basin and Range (1981), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Kind (564)  |  Mess (14)  |  Million (124)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Planet (402)  |  Problem (731)  |  Scale (122)  |  Short (200)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Tune (20)  |  Unconscious (24)  |  Worth (172)  |  Year (963)

A mind is accustomed to mathematical deduction, when confronted with the faulty foundations of astrology, resists a long, long time, like an obstinate mule, until compelled by beating and curses to put its foot into that dirty puddle.
As quoted in Arthur Koestler, The Sleep Walkers: A History of Man’s Changing Vision of the Universe (1959), 243, citing De Stella Nova in Pede Serpentarii (1606).
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Astrology (46)  |  Beat (42)  |  Compel (31)  |  Confront (18)  |  Curse (20)  |  Deduction (90)  |  Dirt (17)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Faulty (3)  |  Foot (65)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Long (778)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Mule (2)  |  Obstinate (5)  |  Resist (15)

A mouse can fall down a mine shaft a third of a mile deep without injury. A rat falling the same distance would break his bones; a man would simply splash ... Elephants have their legs thickened to an extent that seems disproportionate to us, but this is necessary if their unwieldly bulk is to be moved at all ... A 60-ft. man would weigh 1000 times as much as a normal man, but his thigh bone would have its area increased by only 100 times ... Consequently such an unfortunate monster would break his legs the moment he tried to move.
Expressing, in picturesque terms, the strength of an organism relative to its bulk.
Address at the annual congress of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Quoted in 'On the Itchen', Time Magazine (Mon. 14 Sep 1925).
Science quotes on:  |  Bone (101)  |  Break (109)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Deep (241)  |  Distance (171)  |  Down (455)  |  Elephant (35)  |  Extent (142)  |  Fall (243)  |  Injury (36)  |  Leg (35)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mine (78)  |  Moment (260)  |  Monster (33)  |  Mouse (33)  |  Move (223)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Organism (231)  |  Rat (37)  |  Strength (139)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Weigh (51)

A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most.
Anonymous
Widely found in varied accounts, so is most likely proverbial. Seen misattributed (?) to George Bernard Shaw, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source as verification.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Describe (132)  |  Dog (70)  |  Elder (9)  |  Evil (122)  |  Feed (31)  |  Fight (49)  |  Good (906)  |  Inner (72)  |  Inside (30)  |  Manner (62)  |  Mean (810)  |  Moment (260)  |  Most (1728)  |  Native (41)  |  Native American (4)  |  Other (2233)  |  Psychology (166)  |  Reflect (39)  |  Reply (58)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Two (936)  |  Win (53)

A noteworthy and often-remarked similarity exists between the facts and methods of geology and those of linguistic study. The science of language is, as it were, the geology of the most modern period, the Age of the Man, having for its task to construct the history of development of the earth and its inhabitants from the time when the proper geological record remains silent … The remains of ancient speech are like strata deposited in bygone ages, telling of the forms of life then existing, and of the circumstances which determined or affected them; while words are as rolled pebbles, relics of yet more ancient formations, or as fossils, whose grade indicates the progress of organic life, and whose resemblances and relations show the correspondence or sequence of the different strata; while, everywhere, extensive denudation has marred the completeness of the record, and rendered impossible a detailed exhibition of the whole course of development.
In Language and the Study of Language (1867), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Construct (129)  |  Construction (114)  |  Correspondence (24)  |  Course (413)  |  Denudation (2)  |  Detail (150)  |  Development (441)  |  Different (595)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Exist (458)  |  Extensive (34)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (976)  |  Formation (100)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Geology (240)  |  History (716)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Indicate (62)  |  Inhabitant (50)  |  Language (308)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Marred (3)  |  Method (531)  |  Modern (402)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Organic (161)  |  Pebble (27)  |  Period (200)  |  Progress (492)  |  Proper (150)  |  Record (161)  |  Remain (355)  |  Render (96)  |  Resemblance (39)  |  Roll (41)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (353)  |  Similarity (32)  |  Speech (66)  |  Strata (37)  |  Stratum (11)  |  Study (701)  |  Task (152)  |  Whole (756)  |  Word (650)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (298)  |  Air (366)  |  Arise (162)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Behind (139)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belief (615)  |  Certain (557)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (107)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Edge (51)  |  Everything (489)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (31)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Frontier (41)  |  Giant (73)  |  Grandeur (35)  |  Green (65)  |  Growing (99)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (180)  |  Historian (59)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (107)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2558)  |  Never (1089)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Point (584)  |  Progress (492)  |  Regard (312)  |  Research (753)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (31)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Spring (140)  |  Sun (407)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (269)  |  Trivial (59)  |  Trunk (23)  |  Twig (15)  |  Vague (50)  |  Victim (37)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (246)  |  Year (963)

A nutritive centre, anatomically considered, is merely a cell, the nucleus of which is the permanent source of successive broods of young cells, which from time to time fill the cavity of their parent, and carrying with them the cell wall of the parent, pass off in certain directions, and under various forms, according to the texture or organ of which their parent forms a part.
Anatomical and Pathological Observations (1845), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Cavity (9)  |  Cell (146)  |  Cell Nucleus (2)  |  Certain (557)  |  Consider (428)  |  Direction (185)  |  Form (976)  |  Merely (315)  |  Nucleus (54)  |  Organ (118)  |  Parent (80)  |  Pass (241)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Successive (73)  |  Various (205)  |  Wall (71)  |  Young (253)

A painter makes patterns with shapes and colours, a poet with words. A painting may embody an “idea,” but the idea is usually commonplace and unimportant. In poetry, ideas count for a good deal more; but, as Housman insisted, the importance of ideas in poetry is habitually exaggerated. … The poverty of ideas seems hardly to affect the beauty of the verbal pattern. A mathematician, on the other hand, has no material to work with but ideas, and so his patterns are likely to last longer, since ideas wear less with time than words.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 2012), 84-85.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Color (155)  |  Commonplace (24)  |  Count (107)  |  Deal (192)  |  Embody (18)  |  Exaggerate (7)  |  Good (906)  |  Habitually (2)  |  A. E. Housman (2)  |  Idea (881)  |  Importance (299)  |  Insist (22)  |  Last (425)  |  Less (105)  |  Material (366)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  More (2558)  |  On The Other Hand (40)  |  Other (2233)  |  Painter (30)  |  Painting (46)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Poet (97)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Poverty (40)  |  Shape (77)  |  Unimportant (6)  |  Usually (176)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Wear (20)  |  Word (650)  |  Work (1402)

A parable: A man was examining the construction of a cathedral. He asked a stone mason what he was doing chipping the stones, and the mason replied, “I am making stones.” He asked a stone carver what he was doing. “I am carving a gargoyle.” And so it went, each person said in detail what they were doing. Finally he came to an old woman who was sweeping the ground. She said. “I am helping build a cathedral.”
...Most of the time each person is immersed in the details of one special part of the whole and does not think of how what they are doing relates to the larger picture.
[For example, in education, a teacher might say in the next class he was going to “explain Young's modulus and how to measure it,” rather than, “I am going to educate the students and prepare them for their future careers.”]
In The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn (1975, 2005), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Build (211)  |  Building (158)  |  Career (86)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Class (168)  |  Construction (114)  |  Detail (150)  |  Doing (277)  |  Education (423)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Future (467)  |  Gargoyle (3)  |  Ground (222)  |  Immersion (4)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mason (2)  |  Measure (241)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Most (1728)  |  Next (238)  |  Old (499)  |  Parable (5)  |  Part (235)  |  Person (366)  |  Picture (148)  |  Preparation (60)  |  Relation (166)  |  Say (989)  |  Special (188)  |  Stone (168)  |  Student (317)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Whole (756)  |  Woman (160)  |  Young (253)

A physician ought to have his shop provided with plenty of all necessary things, as lint, rollers, splinters: let there be likewise in readiness at all times another small cabinet of such things as may serve for occasions of going far from home; let him have also all sorts of plasters, potions, and purging medicines, so contrived that they may keep some considerable time, and likewise such as may be had and used whilst they are fresh.
In Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay (1876), 536.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabinet (5)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Fresh (69)  |  Home (184)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Physician (284)  |  Plaster (5)  |  Potion (3)  |  Purge (11)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Roller (3)  |  Shop (11)  |  Small (489)  |  Thing (1914)

A quarter-horse jockey learns to think of a twenty-second race as if it were occurring across twenty minutes—in distinct parts, spaced in his consciousness. Each nuance of the ride comes to him as he builds his race. If you can do the opposite with deep time, living in it and thinking in it until the large numbers settle into place, you can sense how swiftly the initial earth packed itself together, how swiftly continents have assembled and come apart, how far and rapidly continents travel, how quickly mountains rise and how quickly they disintegrate and disappear.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Assemble (14)  |  Build (211)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Continent (79)  |  Deep (241)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Do (1905)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Far (158)  |  Horse (78)  |  Initial (17)  |  Jockey (2)  |  Large (398)  |  Learn (672)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Minute (129)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Number (710)  |  Occur (151)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Pack (6)  |  Part (235)  |  Place (192)  |  Quickly (21)  |  Race (278)  |  Rapidly (67)  |  Ride (23)  |  Rise (169)  |  Sense (785)  |  Settle (23)  |  Space (523)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Together (392)  |  Travel (125)

A science in its infancy is the least satisfactory, and, at the same time, the most profitable theme for a general description.
In Modern Astrophysics (1924), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Description (89)  |  General (521)  |  Infancy (14)  |  Least (75)  |  Most (1728)  |  Profitable (29)  |  Satisfactory (19)  |  Theme (17)

A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times, may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes of nature.
Lecture (Feb 1893) delivered before the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, 'On Light and Other High Frequency Phenomena,' collected in Thomas Commerford Martin and Nikola Tesla, The Inventions, Researches and Writings of Nikola Tesla (1894), 298.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (64)  |  Altered (32)  |  Bygone (4)  |  Change (639)  |  Complex (202)  |  Course (413)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Distant (33)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fall (243)  |  Globe (51)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Nation (208)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Process (439)  |  Ray (115)  |  Single (365)  |  Star (460)  |  Surface (223)  |  Transform (74)  |  Tyrant (10)

A social fact is every way of acting, fixed or not, capable of exercising on the individual an external constraint; or again, every way of acting which is general throughout a given society, while at the same time existing in its own right independent of its individual manifestations.
The Rules of Sociological Method (1895), 8th edition, trans. Sarah A. Solovay and John M. Mueller, ed. George E. G. Catlin (1938, 1964 edition), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (174)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Fact (1257)  |  General (521)  |  Human Nature (71)  |  Individual (420)  |  Manifestation (61)  |  Right (473)  |  Social (261)  |  Society (350)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Way (1214)

A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
Anonymous
In Lily Splane, Quantum Consciousness (2004), 307
Science quotes on:  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (624)

A strict materialist believes that everything depends on the motion of matter. He knows the form of the laws of motion though he does not know all their consequences when applied to systems of unknown complexity.
Now one thing in which the materialist (fortified with dynamical knowledge) believes is that if every motion great & small were accurately reversed, and the world left to itself again, everything would happen backwards the fresh water would collect out of the sea and run up the rivers and finally fly up to the clouds in drops which would extract heat from the air and evaporate and afterwards in condensing would shoot out rays of light to the sun and so on. Of course all living things would regrede from the grave to the cradle and we should have a memory of the future but not of the past.
The reason why we do not expect anything of this kind to take place at any time is our experience of irreversible processes, all of one kind, and this leads to the doctrine of a beginning & an end instead of cyclical progression for ever.
Letter to Mark Pattison (7 Apr 1868). In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 360-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Applied (176)  |  Backwards (18)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Course (413)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Cycle (42)  |  Depend (238)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drop (77)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  End (603)  |  Everything (489)  |  Expect (203)  |  Experience (494)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fly (153)  |  Form (976)  |  Fresh (69)  |  Future (467)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happen (282)  |  Heat (180)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Kind (564)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Lead (391)  |  Light (635)  |  Living (492)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Matter (821)  |  Memory (144)  |  Motion (320)  |  Past (355)  |  Process (439)  |  Progression (23)  |  Ray (115)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reverse (33)  |  River (140)  |  Run (158)  |  Sea (326)  |  Small (489)  |  Sun (407)  |  System (545)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Water (503)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1850)

A superstition is a premature explanation that overstays its time.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Explanation (246)  |  Overstay (2)  |  Premature (22)  |  Superstition (70)

A taxonomy of abilities, like a taxonomy anywhere else in science, is apt to strike a certain type of impatient student as a gratuitous orgy of pedantry. Doubtless, compulsions to intellectual tidiness express themselves prematurely at times, and excessively at others, but a good descriptive taxonomy, as Darwin found in developing his theory, and as Newton found in the work of Kepler, is the mother of laws and theories.
From Intelligence: Its Structure, Growth and Action: Its Structure, Growth and Action (1987), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Certain (557)  |  Compulsion (19)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Descriptive (18)  |  Express (192)  |  Good (906)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Impatient (4)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Johannes Kepler (95)  |  Law (913)  |  Mother (116)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Orgy (3)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pedantry (5)  |  Premature (22)  |  Strike (72)  |  Student (317)  |  Taxonomy (19)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Tidiness (4)  |  Type (171)  |  Work (1402)

A teacher of mathematics has a great opportunity. If he fills his allotted time with drilling his students in routine operations he kills their interest, hampers their intellectual development, and misuses his opportunity. But if he challenges the curiosity of his students by setting them problems proportionate to their knowledge, and helps them to solve their problems with stimulating questions, he may give them a taste for, and some means of, independent thinking.
In How to Solve It (1948), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (91)  |  Curiosity (138)  |  Development (441)  |  Drill (12)  |  Fill (67)  |  Give (208)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hamper (7)  |  Help (116)  |  Independent (74)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Interest (416)  |  Kill (100)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Misuse (12)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Problem (731)  |  Proportionate (4)  |  Question (649)  |  Routine (26)  |  Setting (44)  |  Solve (145)  |  Stimulate (21)  |  Student (317)  |  Taste (93)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Thinking (425)

A time will come when men will stretch out their eyes. They should see planets like our Earth.
Inaugural Lecture as Professor of Astronomy, Gresham College. In Stephen Webb, If the Universe is Teeming With Aliens—Where is Everybody? (2002), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (1076)  |  Eye (440)  |  Planet (402)  |  See (1094)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Will (2350)

A time will come when science will transform [our bodies] by means which we cannot conjecture... And then, the earth being small, mankind will migrate into space, and will cross the airless Saharas which separate planet from planet, and sun from sun. The earth will become a Holy Land which will be visited by pilgrims from all quarters of the universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Airless (3)  |  Become (821)  |  Being (1276)  |  Body (557)  |  Conjecture (51)  |  Cross (20)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Holy (35)  |  Land (131)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Pilgrim (4)  |  Planet (402)  |  Quarter (6)  |  Sahara Desert (3)  |  Separate (151)  |  Small (489)  |  Space (523)  |  Sun (407)  |  Transform (74)  |  Universe (900)  |  Visit (27)  |  Will (2350)

A time will come, when fields will be manured with a solution of glass (silicate of potash), with the ashes of burnt straw, and with the salts of phosphoric acid, prepared in chemical manufactories, exactly as at present medicines are given for fever and goitre.
Agricultural Chemistry (1847), 4th edn., 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Ash (21)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Factory (20)  |  Fertilizer (13)  |  Fever (34)  |  Field (378)  |  Glass (94)  |  Goitre (2)  |  Industrial Chemistry (2)  |  Manure (8)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Phosphate (6)  |  Present (630)  |  Salt (48)  |  Silicate (2)  |  Solution (282)  |  Straw (7)  |  Will (2350)

A time will however come (as I believe) when physiology will invade and destroy mathematical physics, as the latter has destroyed geometry.
In Daedalus, or Science and the Future (1923). Reprinted in Krishna R. Dronamraju (ed.), Haldane’s Daedalus Revisited (1995), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Destroy (189)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Invade (5)  |  Mathematical Physics (12)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Will (2350)

A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is.
Essay, 'Mysticism and Logic' in Hibbert Journal (Jul 1914). Collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1919), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Eternal (113)  |  External (62)  |  Image (97)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Outside (141)  |  Regard (312)  |  Stream (83)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Tyrant (10)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged, it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time in which it is used.
In Towne v. Eisner (1918), 245 U.S. 425. As quoted in Richard A. Posner (ed.), The Essential Holmes: Selections from the Letters, Speeches, Judicial Opinions, and Other Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1992), 287.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Change (639)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Color (155)  |  Content (75)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Living (492)  |  Skin (48)  |  Thought (995)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Vary (27)  |  Word (650)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (97)  |  Ashamed (3)  |  Assert (69)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Baking (2)  |  Begin (275)  |  Behind (139)  |  Bird (163)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Business (156)  |  Company (63)  |  Cry (30)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  Dare (55)  |  Death (406)  |  Defend (32)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  England (43)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (11)  |  Genius (301)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (49)  |  Life (1870)  |  Money (178)  |  Music (133)  |  Must (1525)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Open (277)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (5)  |  Pie (4)  |  Right (473)  |  Run (158)  |  Say (989)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sing (29)  |  Singing (19)  |  Something (718)  |  Song (41)  |  Stand (284)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (8)  |  Stop (89)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themself (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

A young man once asked [Erasmus Darwin] in, as he thought, an offensive manner, whether he did not find stammering very inconvenient. He answered, 'No, Sir, it gives me time for reflection, and saves me from asking impertinent questions.'
C. Darwin, The Life of Erasmus Darwin (1887), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Ask (420)  |  Asking (74)  |  Erasmus Darwin (40)  |  Find (1014)  |  Impertinence (4)  |  Impertinent (5)  |  Man (2252)  |  Question (649)  |  Reflection (93)  |  Save (126)  |  Thought (995)  |  Young (253)

About 6 or 8 years ago My Ingenious friend Mr John Robinson having [contrived] conceived that a fire engine might be made without a Lever—by Inverting the Cylinder & placing it above the mouth of the pit proposed to me to make a model of it which was set about by having never Compleated & I [being] having at that time Ignorant little knoledge of the machine however I always thought the Machine Might be applied to [more] other as valuable purposes [than] as drawing Water.
Entry in notebook (1765). The bracketed words in square brackets were crossed out by Watt. in Eric Robinson and Douglas McKie (eds.), Partners in Science: Letters of James Watt and Joseph Black (1970), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (257)  |  Applied (176)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bracket (2)  |  Completed (30)  |  Conceived (3)  |  Cylinder (11)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Engine (99)  |  Fire (203)  |  Friend (180)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lever (13)  |  Little (717)  |  Machine (271)  |  Model (106)  |  More (2558)  |  Mouth (54)  |  Never (1089)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pit (20)  |  Proposal (21)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Set (400)  |  Steam Engine (47)  |  Thought (995)  |  Value (393)  |  Water (503)  |  Year (963)

About 85 per cent of my “thinking” time was spent getting into a position to think, to make a decision, to learn something I needed to know. Much more time went into finding or obtaining information than into digesting it. Hours went into the plotting of graphs... When the graphs were finished, the relations were obvious at once, but the plotting had to be done in order to make them so.
From article 'Man-Computer Symbiosis', in IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics (Mar 1960), Vol. HFE-1, 4-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (98)  |  Digesting (2)  |  Finding (34)  |  Finish (62)  |  Graph (8)  |  Hour (192)  |  Information (173)  |  Know (1538)  |  Learn (672)  |  More (2558)  |  Need (320)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Order (638)  |  Relation (166)  |  Something (718)  |  Spent (85)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)

About eight days ago I discovered that sulfur in burning, far from losing weight, on the contrary, gains it; it is the same with phosphorus; this increase of weight arises from a prodigious quantity of air that is fixed during combustion and combines with the vapors. This discovery, which I have established by experiments, that I regard as decisive, has led me to think that what is observed in the combustion of sulfur and phosphorus may well take place in the case of all substances that gain in weight by combustion and calcination; and I am persuaded that the increase in weight of metallic calxes is due to the same cause... This discovery seems to me one of the most interesting that has been made since Stahl and since it is difficult not to disclose something inadvertently in conversation with friends that could lead to the truth I have thought it necessary to make the present deposit to the Secretary of the Academy to await the time I make my experiments public.
Sealed note deposited with the Secretary of the French Academy 1 Nov 1772. Oeuvres de Lavoisier, Correspondance, Fasc. II. 1770-75 (1957), 389-90. Adapted from translation by A. N. Meldrum, The Eighteenth-Century Revolution in Science (1930), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (37)  |  Air (366)  |  Arise (162)  |  Burn (99)  |  Burning (49)  |  Calcination (4)  |  Cause (561)  |  Combination (150)  |  Combine (58)  |  Combustion (22)  |  Compound (117)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Disclose (19)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Due (143)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Friend (180)  |  Gain (146)  |  Increase (225)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lead (391)  |  Letter (117)  |  Most (1728)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phosphorus (18)  |  Present (630)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Regard (312)  |  Something (718)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (9)  |  Substance (253)  |  Sulfur (5)  |  Sulphur (19)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Weight (140)

Absolute, true, and mathematical time, in and of itself and of its own nature, without reference to anything external, flows uniformly and by another name is called duration. Relative, apparent, and common time is any sensible and external measure (precise or imprecise) of duration by means of motion; such as a measure—for example, an hour, a day, a month, a year—is commonly used instead of true time.
The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687), 3rd edition (1726), trans. I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman (1999), Definitions, Scholium, 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Call (781)  |  Common (447)  |  Day (43)  |  Duration (12)  |  External (62)  |  Flow (89)  |  Hour (192)  |  Imprecise (3)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Measure (241)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Month (91)  |  Motion (320)  |  Name (359)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Precise (71)  |  Precision (72)  |  Relative (42)  |  Sensible (28)  |  Uniformity (38)  |  Year (963)

According to astronomers, next week Wednesday will occur twice. They say such a thing happens only once every 60,000 years and although they don’t know why it occurs, they’re glad they have an extra day to figure it out.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Extra (7)  |  Figure (162)  |  Happen (282)  |  Know (1538)  |  Next (238)  |  Occur (151)  |  Say (989)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Wednesday (2)  |  Week (73)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

According to my derivative hypothesis, a change takes place first in the structure of the animal, and this, when sufficiently advanced, may lead to modifications of habits… . “Derivation” holds that every species changes, in time, by virtue of inherent tendencies thereto. “Natural Selection” holds that no such change can take place without the influence of altered external circumstances educing or selecting such change… . The hypothesis of “natural selection” totters on the extension of a conjectural condition, explanatory of extinction to the majority of organisms, and not known or observed to apply to the origin of any species.
In On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1868), Vol. 3, 808.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Alter (64)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (651)  |  Apply (170)  |  Change (639)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (362)  |  Conjecture (51)  |  Derivation (15)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Extension (60)  |  External (62)  |  Extinction (80)  |  First (1302)  |  Habit (174)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Influence (231)  |  Inherent (43)  |  Known (453)  |  Lead (391)  |  Majority (68)  |  Modification (57)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Selection (98)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (231)  |  Origin (250)  |  Selection (130)  |  Species (435)  |  Structure (365)  |  Virtue (117)

According to the common law of nature, deficiency of power is supplied by duration of time.
'Geological Illustrations', Appendix to G. Cuvier, Essay on the Theory of the Earth, trans. R. Jameson (1827), 430.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Common (447)  |  Deficiency (15)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Nature (80)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Power (771)

According to their [Newton and his followers] doctrine, God Almighty wants to wind up his watch from time to time: otherwise it would cease to move. He had not, it seems, sufficient foresight to make it a perpetual motion. Nay, the machine of God's making, so imperfect, according to these gentlemen; that he is obliged to clean it now and then by an extraordinary concourse, and even to mend it, as clockmaker mends his work.
'Mr. Leibniz's First Paper' (1715). In H. G. Alexander (ed.), The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence (1956), 11-2.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Cease (81)  |  Clean (52)  |  Extraordinary (83)  |  God (776)  |  Imperfect (46)  |  Imperfection (32)  |  Machine (271)  |  Making (300)  |  Motion (320)  |  Move (223)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Want (504)  |  Watch (118)  |  Wind (141)  |  Work (1402)

According to this view of the matter, there is nothing casual in the formation of Metamorphic Rocks. All strata, once buried deep enough, (and due TIME allowed!!!) must assume that state,—none can escape. All records of former worlds must ultimately perish.
Letter to Mr Murchison, In explanation of the views expressed in his previous letter to Mr Lyell, 15 Nov 1836. Quoted in the Appendix to Charles Babbage, The Ninth Bridgewater Treatise: A Fragment (1838), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Deep (241)  |  Due (143)  |  Enough (341)  |  Escape (85)  |  Formation (100)  |  Former (138)  |  Geology (240)  |  Matter (821)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Perish (56)  |  Record (161)  |  Rock (176)  |  State (505)  |  Strata (37)  |  Ultimately (56)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

Accordingly the primordial state of things which I picture is an even distribution of protons and electrons, extremely diffuse and filling all (spherical) space, remaining nearly balanced for an exceedingly long time until its inherent instability prevails. We shall see later that the density of this distribution can be calculated; it was about one proton and electron per litre. There is no hurry for anything to begin to happen. But at last small irregular tendencies accumulate, and evolution gets under way. The first stage is the formation of condensations ultimately to become the galaxies; this, as we have seen, started off an expansion, which then automatically increased in speed until it is now manifested to us in the recession of the spiral nebulae.
As the matter drew closer together in the condensations, the various evolutionary processes followed—evolution of stars, evolution of the more complex elements, evolution of planets and life.
The Expanding Universe (1933), 56-57.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Closer (43)  |  Complex (202)  |  Condensation (12)  |  Density (25)  |  Distribution (51)  |  Electron (96)  |  Element (322)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Expansion (43)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  Formation (100)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Happen (282)  |  Hurry (16)  |  Inherent (43)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Long (778)  |  Matter (821)  |  More (2558)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Picture (148)  |  Planet (402)  |  Prevail (47)  |  Proton (23)  |  Remaining (45)  |  See (1094)  |  Small (489)  |  Space (523)  |  Speed (66)  |  Spiral (19)  |  Stage (152)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Start (237)  |  State (505)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Together (392)  |  Ultimately (56)  |  Various (205)  |  Way (1214)

Accordingly, we find Euler and D'Alembert devoting their talent and their patience to the establishment of the laws of rotation of the solid bodies. Lagrange has incorporated his own analysis of the problem with his general treatment of mechanics, and since his time M. Poinsôt has brought the subject under the power of a more searching analysis than that of the calculus, in which ideas take the place of symbols, and intelligent propositions supersede equations.
J. C. Maxwell on Louis Poinsôt (1777-1859) in 'On a Dynamical Top' (1857). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 1, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (13)  |  Equation (138)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Find (1014)  |  General (521)  |  Idea (881)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Law (913)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  More (2558)  |  Patience (58)  |  Louis Poinsot (4)  |  Power (771)  |  Problem (731)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Rotation (13)  |  Solid (119)  |  Subject (543)  |  Symbol (100)  |  Talent (99)  |  Treatment (135)

Act as if you are going to live for ever and cast your plans way ahead. You must feel responsible without time limitations, and the consideration of whether you may or may not be around to see the results should never enter your thoughts.
In Theodore Rockwell, The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made A Difference (2002), 342.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Ahead (21)  |  Cast (69)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Death (406)  |  Enter (145)  |  Ever (4)  |  Feel (371)  |  Life (1870)  |  Limitation (52)  |  Live (650)  |  Must (1525)  |  Never (1089)  |  Plan (122)  |  Responsibility (71)  |  Result (700)  |  See (1094)  |  Thought (995)  |  Way (1214)

Adam is fading out. It is on account of Darwin and that crowd. I can see that he is not going to last much longer. There's a plenty of signs. He is getting belittled to a germ—a little bit of a speck that you can't see without a microscope powerful enough to raise a gnat to the size of a church. They take that speck and breed from it: first a flea; then a fly, then a bug, then cross these and get a fish, then a raft of fishes, all kinds, then cross the whole lot and get a reptile, then work up the reptiles till you've got a supply of lizards and spiders and toads and alligators and Congressmen and so on, then cross the entire lot again and get a plant of amphibiums, which are half-breeds and do business both wet and dry, such as turtles and frogs and ornithorhyncuses and so on, and cross-up again and get a mongrel bird, sired by a snake and dam'd by a bat, resulting in a pterodactyl, then they develop him, and water his stock till they've got the air filled with a million things that wear feathers, then they cross-up all the accumulated animal life to date and fetch out a mammal, and start-in diluting again till there's cows and tigers and rats and elephants and monkeys and everything you want down to the Missing Link, and out of him and a mermaid they propagate Man, and there you are! Everything ship-shape and finished-up, and nothing to do but lay low and wait and see if it was worth the time and expense.
'The Refuge of the Derelicts' collected in Mark Twain and John Sutton Tuckey, The Devil's Race-Track: Mark Twain's Great Dark Writings (1980), 340-41. - 1980
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Accumulation (51)  |  Adam (7)  |  Air (366)  |  Amphibian (7)  |  Animal (651)  |  Animal Life (21)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bird (163)  |  Both (496)  |  Bug (10)  |  Business (156)  |  Church (64)  |  Cow (42)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Develop (278)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Dry (65)  |  Elephant (35)  |  Enough (341)  |  Everything (489)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Expense (21)  |  Feather (13)  |  Finish (62)  |  First (1302)  |  Fish (130)  |  Flea (11)  |  Fly (153)  |  Frog (44)  |  Germ (54)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Kind (564)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Lot (151)  |  Low (86)  |  Mammal (41)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mermaid (5)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Missing (21)  |  Missing Link (4)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Plant (320)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Pterodactyl (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Reptile (33)  |  See (1094)  |  Ship (69)  |  Snake (29)  |  Speck (25)  |  Spider (14)  |  Start (237)  |  Supply (100)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tiger (7)  |  Toad (10)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Wait (66)  |  Want (504)  |  Water (503)  |  Whole (756)  |  Work (1402)  |  Worth (172)

Adapting from the earlier book Gravitation, I wrote, “Spacetime tells matter how to move; matter tells spacetime how to curve.” In other words, a bit of matter (or mass, or energy) moves in accordance with the dictates of the curved spacetime where it is located. … At the same time, that bit of mass or energy is itself contributing to the curvature of spacetime everywhere.
With co-author Kenneth William Ford Geons, Black Holes, and Quantum Foam: A Life in Physics (1998, 2010), 235. Adapted from his earlier book, co-authored with Charles W. Misner and Kip S. Thorne, Gravitation (1970, 1973), 5, in which one of the ideas in Einstein’s geometric theory of gravity was summarized as, “Space acts on matter, telling it how to move. In turn, matter reacts back on space, telling it how to curve”.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (413)  |  Contribute (30)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Curve (49)  |  Energy (373)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Gravitation (72)  |  Mass (160)  |  Matter (821)  |  Move (223)  |  Other (2233)  |  Spacetime (4)  |  Tell (344)  |  Word (650)

Adrenalin does not excite sympathetic ganglia when applied to them directly, as does nicotine. Its effective action is localised at the periphery. The existence upon plain muscle of a peripheral nervous network, that degenerates only after section of both the constrictor and inhibitory nerves entering it, and not after section of either alone, has been described. I find that even after such complete denervation, whether of three days' or ten months' duration, the plain muscle of the dilatator pupillae will respond to adrenalin, and that with greater rapidity and longer persistence than does the iris whose nervous relations are uninjured. Therefore it cannot be that adrenalin excites any structure derived from, and dependent for its persistence on, the peripheral neurone. But since adrenalin does not evoke any reaction from muscle that has at no time of its life been innervated by the sympathetic, the point at which the stimulus of the chemical excitant is received, and transformed into what may cause the change of tension of the muscle fibre, is perhaps a mechanism developed out of the muscle cell in response to its union with the synapsing sympathetic fibre, the function of which is to receive and transform the nervous impulse. Adrenalin might then be the chemical stimulant liberated on each occasion when the impulse arrives at the periphery.
'On the Action of Adrenalin', Proceedings of the Physiological Society, 21 May 1904, in The Journal of Physiology 1904, 31, xxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Alone (324)  |  Applied (176)  |  Both (496)  |  Cause (561)  |  Change (639)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Complete (209)  |  Develop (278)  |  Effective (68)  |  Evoke (13)  |  Existence (481)  |  Find (1014)  |  Function (235)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impulse (52)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Month (91)  |  Muscle (47)  |  Nerve (82)  |  Network (21)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Persistence (25)  |  Point (584)  |  Rapidity (29)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Receive (117)  |  Response (56)  |  Stimulus (30)  |  Structure (365)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Tension (24)  |  Transform (74)  |  Union (52)  |  Will (2350)

After a tremendous task has been begun in our time, first by Copernicus and then by many very learned mathematicians, and when the assertion that the earth moves can no longer be considered something new, would it not be much better to pull the wagon to its goal by our joint efforts, now that we have got it underway, and gradually, with powerful voices, to shout down the common herd, which really does not weigh arguments very carefully?
Letter to Galileo (13 Oct 1597). In James Bruce Ross (ed.) and Mary Martin (ed., trans.), 'Comrades in the Pursuit of Truth', The Portable Renaissance Reader (1953, 1981), 599. As quoted and cited in Merry E. Wiesner, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789 (2013), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (145)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Better (493)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Common (447)  |  Consider (428)  |  Copernicus_Nicolaud (2)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Effort (243)  |  First (1302)  |  Goal (155)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Herd (17)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Move (223)  |  New (1273)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Pull (43)  |  Shout (25)  |  Something (718)  |  Task (152)  |  Tremendous (29)  |  Voice (54)  |  Wagon (10)  |  Weigh (51)

After all, we scientific workers … like women, are the victims of fashion: at one time we wear dissociated ions, at another electrons; and we are always loth to don rational clothing; some fixed belief we must have manufactured for us: we are high or low church, of this or that degree of nonconformity, according to the school in which we are brought up—but the agnostic is always rare of us and of late years the critic has been taboo.
'The Thirst of Salted Water or the Ions Overboard', Science Progress (1909), 3, 643.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Agnostic (10)  |  Belief (615)  |  Church (64)  |  Degree (277)  |  Electron (96)  |  High (370)  |  Ion (21)  |  Late (119)  |  Low (86)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Must (1525)  |  Rare (94)  |  Rational (95)  |  School (227)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Taboo (5)  |  Victim (37)  |  Year (963)

After having produced aquatic animals of all ranks and having caused extensive variations in them by the different environments provided by the waters, nature led them little by little to the habit of living in the air, first by the water's edge and afterwards on all the dry parts of the globe. These animals have in course of time been profoundly altered by such novel conditions; which so greatly influenced their habits and organs that the regular gradation which they should have exhibited in complexity of organisation is often scarcely recognisable.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Alter (64)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (651)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Condition (362)  |  Course (413)  |  Different (595)  |  Dry (65)  |  Edge (51)  |  Environment (239)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Extensive (34)  |  First (1302)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Habit (174)  |  Little (717)  |  Living (492)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Novel (35)  |  Organ (118)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rank (69)  |  Regular (48)  |  Scarcely (75)  |  Variation (93)  |  Water (503)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Amount (153)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Atom (381)  |  Atomic Theory (16)  |  Attack (86)  |  Bear (162)  |  Become (821)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Niels Bohr (55)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Enlightenment (21)  |  First (1302)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Hearing (50)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (35)  |  Language (308)  |  Law (913)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (23)  |  Material (366)  |  More (2558)  |  Music (133)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Name (359)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nucleus (54)  |  Order (638)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Physics (564)  |  Max Planck (83)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Problem (731)  |  Quantum (118)  |  Quantum Theory (67)  |  Regulation (25)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  Rhythm (21)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (121)  |  Solution (282)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (35)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Spite (55)  |  Spring (140)  |  Structure (365)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Train (118)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Variety (138)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

After the planet becomes theirs, many millions of years will have to pass before a beetle particularly loved by God, at the end of its calculations will find written on a sheet of paper in letters of fire that energy is equal to the mass multiplied by the square of the velocity of light. The new kings of the world will live tranquilly for a long time, confining themselves to devouring each other and being parasites among each other on a cottage industry scale.
'Beetles' Other People’s Trades (1985, trans. 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Beetle (19)  |  Being (1276)  |  Calculation (134)  |  End (603)  |  Energy (373)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fire (203)  |  God (776)  |  Industry (159)  |  Insect (89)  |  Letter (117)  |  Light (635)  |  Live (650)  |  Long (778)  |  Mass (160)  |  New (1273)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paper (192)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Pass (241)  |  Planet (402)  |  Scale (122)  |  Square (73)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Velocity (51)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley’s ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed, that though we are satisfied his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it, “I refute it thus.”
In Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (389)  |  George Berkeley (7)  |  Church (64)  |  Existence (481)  |  Force (497)  |  Forget (125)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Samuel Johnson (51)  |  Large (398)  |  Matter (821)  |  Merely (315)  |  Never (1089)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Prove (261)  |  Stone (168)  |  Striking (48)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Together (392)  |  Universe (900)

Again and again, often in the busiest phases of the insulin investigations, he [Frederick Banting] found time to set a fracture or perform a surgical operation on one of his army comrades or on some patient who was in need.
In 'Obituary: Sir Frederick Banting', Science (14 Mar 1941), N.S. 93, No. 2411, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (35)  |  Sir Frederick Grant Banting (10)  |  Comrade (4)  |  Fracture (7)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Operation (221)  |  Patient (209)  |  Perform (123)  |  Phase (37)  |  Set (400)  |  Surgery (54)

Ah, the architecture of this world. Amoebas may not have backbones, brains, automobiles, plastic, television, Valium or any other of the blessings of a technologically advanced civilization; but their architecture is two billion years ahead of its time.
In The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (12)  |  Ahead (21)  |  Amoeba (21)  |  Architecture (50)  |  Automobile (23)  |  Backbone (12)  |  Billion (104)  |  Blessing (26)  |  Blessings (17)  |  Brain (281)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Other (2233)  |  Plastic (30)  |  Technology (281)  |  Television (33)  |  Two (936)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

Alas, your dear friend and servant is totally blind. Henceforth this heaven, this universe, which by wonderful observations I had enlarged by a hundred and a thousand times beyond the conception of former ages, is shrunk for me into the narrow space which I myself fill in it. So it pleases God; it shall therefore please me also.
In Letter, as quoted in Sir Oliver Lodge, Pioneers of Science (1905), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Blind (98)  |  Conception (160)  |  Enlarge (37)  |  Former (138)  |  Friend (180)  |  God (776)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Myself (211)  |  Narrow (85)  |  Observation (593)  |  Please (68)  |  Servant (40)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (523)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Universe (900)  |  Wonderful (155)

All change is relative. The universe is expanding relatively to our common material standards; our material standards are shrinking relatively to the size of the universe. The theory of the “expanding universe” might also be called the theory of the “shrinking atom”. …
:Let us then take the whole universe as our standard of constancy, and adopt the view of a cosmic being whose body is composed of intergalactic spaces and swells as they swell. Or rather we must now say it keeps the same size, for he will not admit that it is he who has changed. Watching us for a few thousand million years, he sees us shrinking; atoms, animals, planets, even the galaxies, all shrink alike; only the intergalactic spaces remain the same. The earth spirals round the sun in an ever-decreasing orbit. It would be absurd to treat its changing revolution as a constant unit of time. The cosmic being will naturally relate his units of length and time so that the velocity of light remains constant. Our years will then decrease in geometrical progression in the cosmic scale of time. On that scale man’s life is becoming briefer; his threescore years and ten are an ever-decreasing allowance. Owing to the property of geometrical progressions an infinite number of our years will add up to a finite cosmic time; so that what we should call the end of eternity is an ordinary finite date in the cosmic calendar. But on that date the universe has expanded to infinity in our reckoning, and we have shrunk to nothing in the reckoning of the cosmic being.
We walk the stage of life, performers of a drama for the benefit of the cosmic spectator. As the scenes proceed he notices that the actors are growing smaller and the action quicker. When the last act opens the curtain rises on midget actors rushing through their parts at frantic speed. Smaller and smaller. Faster and faster. One last microscopic blurr of intense agitation. And then nothing.
In The Expanding Universe (1933) , 90-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  Act (278)  |  Action (342)  |  Agitation (10)  |  Alike (60)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Animal (651)  |  Atom (381)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1276)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Body (557)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (781)  |  Change (639)  |  Common (447)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Constant (148)  |  Cosmic (74)  |  Drama (24)  |  Earth (1076)  |  End (603)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Expand (56)  |  Faster (50)  |  Finite (60)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Growing (99)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Material (366)  |  Microscopic (27)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Notice (81)  |  Number (710)  |  Open (277)  |  Orbit (85)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Owing (39)  |  Planet (402)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Progression (23)  |  Property (177)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Remain (355)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Rise (169)  |  Say (989)  |  Scale (122)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1094)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Space (523)  |  Speed (66)  |  Spiral (19)  |  Stage (152)  |  Sun (407)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Universe (900)  |  Velocity (51)  |  View (496)  |  Walk (138)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

All fossil anthropoids found hitherto have been known only from mandibular or maxillary fragments, so far as crania are concerned, and so the general appearance of the types they represented had been unknown; consequently, a condition of affairs where virtually the whole face and lower jaw, replete with teeth, together with the major portion of the brain pattern, have been preserved, constitutes a specimen of unusual value in fossil anthropoid discovery. Here, as in Homo rhodesiensis, Southern Africa has provided documents of higher primate evolution that are amongst the most complete extant. Apart from this evidential completeness, the specimen is of importance because it exhibits an extinct race of apes intermediate between living anthropoids and man ... Whether our present fossil is to be correlated with the discoveries made in India is not yet apparent; that question can only be solved by a careful comparison of the permanent molar teeth from both localities. It is obvious, meanwhile, that it represents a fossil group distinctly advanced beyond living anthropoids in those two dominantly human characters of facial and dental recession on one hand, and improved quality of the brain on the other. Unlike Pithecanthropus, it does not represent an ape-like man, a caricature of precocious hominid failure, but a creature well advanced beyond modern anthropoids in just those characters, facial and cerebral, which are to be anticipated in an extinct link between man and his simian ancestor. At the same time, it is equally evident that a creature with anthropoid brain capacity and lacking the distinctive, localised temporal expansions which appear to be concomitant with and necessary to articulate man, is no true man. It is therefore logically regarded as a man-like ape. I propose tentatively, then, that a new family of Homo-simidæ be created for the reception of the group of individuals which it represents, and that the first known species of the group be designated Australopithecus africanus, in commemoration, first, of the extreme southern and unexpected horizon of its discovery, and secondly, of the continent in which so many new and important discoveries connected with the early history of man have recently been made, thus vindicating the Darwinian claim that Africa would prove to be the cradle of mankind.
'Australopithicus africanus: The Man-Ape of South Africa', Nature, 1925, 115, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (38)  |  Ancestor (63)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Anthropology (61)  |  Ape (54)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Both (496)  |  Brain (281)  |  Capacity (105)  |  Character (259)  |  Claim (154)  |  Commemoration (2)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Complete (209)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Concern (239)  |  Condition (362)  |  Connect (126)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Continent (79)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Creature (242)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Early (196)  |  Equally (129)  |  Evident (92)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Expansion (43)  |  Extinct (25)  |  Extreme (78)  |  Face (214)  |  Failure (176)  |  Family (101)  |  First (1302)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Fragment (58)  |  General (521)  |  History (716)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Horizon (47)  |  Human (1512)  |  Importance (299)  |  Individual (420)  |  Intermediate (38)  |  Known (453)  |  Living (492)  |  Major (88)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Modern (402)  |  Most (1728)  |  Necessary (370)  |  New (1273)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Portion (86)  |  Present (630)  |  Primate (11)  |  Prove (261)  |  Quality (139)  |  Question (649)  |  Race (278)  |  Reception (16)  |  Regard (312)  |  Represent (157)  |  Species (435)  |  Specimen (32)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Together (392)  |  Two (936)  |  Type (171)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (393)  |  Whole (756)

All frescoes are as high finished as miniatures or enamels, and they are known to be unchangeable; but oil, being a body itself, will drink or absorb very little colour, and changing yellow, and at length brown, destroys every colour it is mixed with, especially every delicate colour. It turns every permanent white to a yellow and brown putty, and has compelled the use of that destroyer of colour, white lead, which, when its protecting oil is evaporated, will become lead again. This is an awful thing to say to oil painters ; they may call it madness, but it is true. All the genuine old little pictures, called cabinet pictures, are in fresco and not in oil. Oil was not used except by blundering ignorance till after Vandyke’s time ; but the art of fresco painting being lost, oil became a fetter to genius and a dungeon to art.
In 'Opinions', The Poems: With Specimens of the Prose Writings of William Blake (1885), 276-277.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (54)  |  Art (680)  |  Become (821)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Body (557)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (781)  |  Change (639)  |  Color (155)  |  Compel (31)  |  Delicate (45)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Drink (56)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Finish (62)  |  Genius (301)  |  Genuine (54)  |  High (370)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Known (453)  |  Lead (391)  |  Little (717)  |  Madness (33)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Oil (67)  |  Old (499)  |  Painter (30)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Picture (148)  |  Putty (2)  |  Say (989)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Turn (454)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Use (771)  |  White (132)  |  Will (2350)  |  Yellow (31)

All good intellects have repeated, since Bacon’s time, that there can be no real knowledge but that which is based on observed facts. This is incontestable, in our present advanced stage; but, if we look back to the primitive stage of human knowledge, we shall see that it must have been otherwise then. If it is true that every theory must be based upon observed facts, it is equally true that facts cannot be observed without the guidance of some theory. Without such guidance, our facts would be desultory and fruitless; we could not retain them: for the most part we could not even perceive them.
The Positive Philosophy, trans. Harriet Martineau (1853), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Equally (129)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fruitless (9)  |  Good (906)  |  Guidance (30)  |  Human (1512)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Look (584)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Observed (149)  |  Present (630)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Retain (57)  |  See (1094)  |  Stage (152)  |  Theory (1015)

All in all, the total amount of power conceivably available from the uranium and thorium supplies of the earth is about twenty times that available from the coal and oil we have left.
In The Intelligent Man's Guide to Science: The physical sciences (1960), 371.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (153)  |  Available (80)  |  Coal (64)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Left (15)  |  Oil (67)  |  Power (771)  |  Supply (100)  |  Thorium (5)  |  Total (95)  |  Uranium (21)

All men and women are born, live suffer and die; what distinguishes us one from another is our dreams, whether they be dreams about worldly or unworldly things, and what we do to make them come about... We do not choose to be born. We do not choose our parents. We do not choose our historical epoch, the country of our birth, or the immediate circumstances of our upbringing. We do not, most of us, choose to die; nor do we choose the time and conditions of our death. But within this realm of choicelessness, we do choose how we live.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (162)  |  Birth (154)  |  Choose (116)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (362)  |  Country (269)  |  Death (406)  |  Die (94)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dream (222)  |  Epoch (46)  |  Historical (70)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Live (650)  |  Most (1728)  |  Parent (80)  |  Realm (87)  |  Suffer (43)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Upbringing (2)  |  Woman (160)  |  Worldly (2)

All over the world there lingers on the memory of a giant tree, the primal tree, rising up from the centre of the Earth to the heavens and ordering the universe around it. It united the three worlds: its roots plunged down into subterranean abysses, Its loftiest branches touched the empyrean. Thanks to the Tree, it became possible to breathe the air; to all the creatures that then appeared on Earth it dispensed its fruit, ripened by the sun and nourished by the water which it drew from the soil. From the sky it attracted the lightning from which man made fire and, beckoning skyward, where clouds gathered around its fall. The Tree was the source of all life, and of all regeneration. Small wonder then that tree-worship was so prevalent in ancient times.
From 'L'Arbre Sacre' ('The Sacred Tree'), UNESCO Courier (Jan 1989), 4. Epigraph to Chap 1, in Kenton Miller and Laura Tangley, Trees of Life: Saving Tropical Forests and Their Biological Wealt (1991), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (30)  |  Air (366)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Appeared (4)  |  Attracted (3)  |  Beckoning (4)  |  Branch (155)  |  Breathe (49)  |  Centre (31)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Creature (242)  |  Dispense (10)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Empyrean (3)  |  Fall (243)  |  Fire (203)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Gather (76)  |  Giant (73)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lightning (49)  |  Linger (14)  |  Man (2252)  |  Memory (144)  |  Nourished (2)  |  Possible (560)  |  Prevalent (4)  |  Primal (5)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Rising (44)  |  Root (121)  |  Sky (174)  |  Skyward (2)  |  Small (489)  |  Soil (98)  |  Source (101)  |  Subterranean (2)  |  Sun (407)  |  Thank (48)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Three (10)  |  Touch (146)  |  Tree (269)  |  United (15)  |  Universe (900)  |  Water (503)  |  Wonder (251)  |  World (1850)  |  Worship (32)

All that comes above that surface [of the globe] lies within the province of Geography. All that comes below that surface lies inside the realm of Geology. The surface of the earth is that which, so to speak, divides them and at the same time “binds them together in indissoluble union.” We may, perhaps, put the case metaphorically. The relationships of the two are rather like that of man and wife. Geography, like a prudent woman, has followed the sage advice of Shakespeare and taken unto her “an elder than herself;” but she does not trespass on the domain of her consort, nor could she possibly maintain the respect of her children were she to flaunt before the world the assertion that she is “a woman with a past.”
From Anniversary Address to Geological Society of London (20 Feb 1903), 'The Relations of Geology', published in Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London (22 May 1903), 59, Part 2, lxxviii. As reprinted in Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution (1904), 373.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (57)  |  Children (201)  |  Divide (77)  |  Domain (72)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Elder (9)  |  Follow (389)  |  Geography (39)  |  Geology (240)  |  Lie (370)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2252)  |  Metaphor (37)  |  Past (355)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Province (37)  |  Realm (87)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Respect (212)  |  Sage (25)  |  William Shakespeare (109)  |  Speak (240)  |  Surface (223)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Together (392)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Two (936)  |  Union (52)  |  Wife (41)  |  Woman (160)  |  World (1850)

All the human culture, all the results of art, science and technology that we see before us today, are almost exclusively the creative product of the Aryan. This very fact admits of the not unfounded inference that he alone was the founder of all higher humanity, therefore representing the prototype of all that we understand by the word 'man.' He is the Prometheus of mankind from whose shining brow the divine spark of genius has sprung at all times, forever kindling anew that fire of knowledge which illuminated the night of silent mysteries and thus caused man to climb the path to mastery over the other beings of the earth ... It was he who laid the foundations and erected the walls of every great structure in human culture.
Mein Kampf (1925-26), American Edition (1943), 290. In William Lawrence Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich (1990), 86-87.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Anew (19)  |  Art (680)  |  Being (1276)  |  Creative (144)  |  Culture (157)  |  Divine (112)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fire (203)  |  Forever (111)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Founder (26)  |  Genius (301)  |  Great (1610)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Inference (45)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Mastery (36)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Other (2233)  |  Path (159)  |  Product (166)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Result (700)  |  Science And Technology (46)  |  See (1094)  |  Shining (35)  |  Spark (32)  |  Structure (365)  |  Technology (281)  |  Today (321)  |  Understand (648)  |  Wall (71)  |  Word (650)

All things on the earth are the result of chemical combination. The operation by which the commingling of molecules and the interchange of atoms take place we can imitate in our laboratories; but in nature they proceed by slow degrees, and, in general, in our hands they are distinguished by suddenness of action. In nature chemical power is distributed over a long period of time, and the process of change is scarcely to be observed. By acts we concentrate chemical force, and expend it in producing a change which occupies but a few hours at most.
In chapter 'Chemical Forces', The Poetry of Science: Or, Studies of the Physical Phenomena of Nature (1848), 235-236. Charles Dicken used this quote, with his own sub-head of 'Relative Importance Of Time To Man And Nature', to conclude his review of the book, published in The Examiner (1848).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Action (342)  |  Atom (381)  |  Change (639)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Combination (150)  |  Concentrate (28)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Degree (277)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Force (497)  |  General (521)  |  Hour (192)  |  Imitate (18)  |  Interchange (4)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Long (778)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (221)  |  Period (200)  |  Place (192)  |  Power (771)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Proceeding (38)  |  Process (439)  |  Producing (6)  |  Result (700)  |  Scarcely (75)  |  Slow (108)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Thing (1914)

Although few expressions are more commonly used in writing about science than “science revolution,” there is a continuing debate as to the propriety of applying the concept and term “revolution” to scientific change. There is, furthermore, a wide difference of opinion as to what may constitute a revolution. And although almost all historians would agree that a genuine alteration of an exceptionally radical nature (the Scientific Revolution) occurred in the sciences at some time between the late fifteenth (or early sixteenth) century and the end of the seventeenth century, the question of exactly when this revolution occurred arouses as much scholarly disagreement as the cognate question of precisely what it was.
The Newtonian Revolution (1980), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  15th Century (5)  |  16th Century (3)  |  17th Century (20)  |  Alteration (31)  |  Arouse (13)  |  Century (319)  |  Change (639)  |  Cognate (2)  |  Concept (242)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Debate (40)  |  Difference (355)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Early (196)  |  End (603)  |  Exceptional (19)  |  Expression (181)  |  Genuine (54)  |  Historian (59)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Late (119)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Occurred (2)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Question (649)  |  Radical (28)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Scholar (52)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Revolution (13)  |  Term (357)  |  Wide (97)  |  Writing (192)

Although the time of death is approaching me, I am not afraid of dying and going to Hell or (what would be considerably worse) going to the popularized version of Heaven. I expect death to be nothingness and, for removing me from all possible fears of death, I am thankful to atheism.
In John Altson, Patti Rae Miliotis, What Happened to Grandpa? (2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Atheism (11)  |  Biography (254)  |  Death (406)  |  Expect (203)  |  Fear (212)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Hell (32)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Possible (560)  |  Thankful (4)

Although we are mere sojourners on the surface of the planet, chained to a mere point in space, enduring but for a moment of time, the human mind is not only enabled to number worlds beyond the unassisted ken of mortal eye, but to trace the events of indefinite ages before the creation of our race, and is not even withheld from penetrating into the dark secrets of the ocean, or the interior of the solid globe; free, like the spirit which the poet described as animating the universe.
In Principles of Geology (1830).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Creation (350)  |  Dark (145)  |  Event (222)  |  Eye (440)  |  Free (239)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Indefinite (21)  |  Interior (35)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Moment (260)  |  Mortal (55)  |  Number (710)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Planet (402)  |  Point (584)  |  Race (278)  |  Secret (216)  |  Solid (119)  |  Space (523)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Surface (223)  |  Trace (109)  |  Universe (900)  |  World (1850)

Although with the majority of those who study and practice in these capacities [engineers, builders, surveyors, geographers, navigators, hydrographers, astronomers], secondhand acquirements, trite formulas, and appropriate tables are sufficient for ordinary purposes, yet these trite formulas and familiar rules were originally or gradually deduced from the profound investigations of the most gifted minds, from the dawn of science to the present day. … The further developments of the science, with its possible applications to larger purposes of human utility and grander theoretical generalizations, is an achievement reserved for a few of the choicest spirits, touched from time to time by Heaven to these highest issues. The intellectual world is filled with latent and undiscovered truth as the material world is filled with latent electricity.
In Orations and Speeches, Vol. 3 (1870), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (187)  |  Acquirement (3)  |  Application (257)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Builder (16)  |  Capacity (105)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Deduce (27)  |  Development (441)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Familiar (47)  |  Far (158)  |  Fill (67)  |  Formula (102)  |  Generalization (61)  |  Geographer (7)  |  Gift (105)  |  Gifted (25)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grand (29)  |  Heaven (266)  |  High (370)  |  Human (1512)  |  Hydrographer (3)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Issue (46)  |  Large (398)  |  Latent (13)  |  Majority (68)  |  Material (366)  |  Material World (8)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Navigator (8)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Originally (7)  |  Possible (560)  |  Practice (212)  |  Present (630)  |  Present Day (5)  |  Profound (105)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Reserve (26)  |  Rule (307)  |  Secondhand (6)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Study (701)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Surveyor (5)  |  Table (105)  |  Theoretical (27)  |  Touch (146)  |  Trite (5)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Utility (52)  |  World (1850)

Aluminum is at once as white as silver, as incorrodible as gold, as tenacious as iron, as fusible as copper, and as light as glass. It is easily worked; it is widely spread in nature, alumina forming the bases of most rocks; it is three times lighter than iron; in short, it seems to have been created expressly to furnish material for our projectile!
Planning a spacecraft to be fired from a cannon to the moon. In From the Earth to the Moon (1865, 1890), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aluminum (15)  |  Base (120)  |  Copper (25)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Form (976)  |  Forming (42)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Glass (94)  |  Gold (101)  |  Iron (99)  |  Light (635)  |  Material (366)  |  Mineralogy (24)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Ore (14)  |  Projectile (3)  |  Rock (176)  |  Short (200)  |  Silver (49)  |  Spread (86)  |  White (132)  |  Work (1402)

Amazing that the human race has taken enough time out from thinking about food or sex to create the arts and sciences.
City Aphorisms, Eighth Selection (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Art (680)  |  Create (245)  |  Enough (341)  |  Food (213)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Race (104)  |  Race (278)  |  Sex (68)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)

Among all the occurrences possible in the universe the a priori probability of any particular one of them verges upon zero. Yet the universe exists; particular events must take place in it, the probability of which (before the event) was infinitesimal. At the present time we have no legitimate grounds for either asserting or denying that life got off to but a single start on earth, and that, as a consequence, before it appeared its chances of occurring were next to nil. ... Destiny is written concurrently with the event, not prior to it.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Appear (122)  |  Assert (69)  |  Chance (244)  |  Concurrent (2)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Deny (71)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Event (222)  |  Exist (458)  |  Ground (222)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Legitimate (26)  |  Life (1870)  |  Must (1525)  |  Next (238)  |  Occur (151)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Particular (80)  |  Possible (560)  |  Present (630)  |  Prior (6)  |  Probability (135)  |  Single (365)  |  Start (237)  |  Universe (900)  |  Verge (10)  |  Write (250)  |  Zero (38)

Among the memoirs of Kirchhoff are some of uncommon beauty. … Can anything be beautiful, where the author has no time for the slightest external embellishment?—But—; it is this very simplicity, the indispensableness of each word, each letter, each little dash, that among all artists raises the mathematician nearest to the World-creator; it establishes a sublimity which is equalled in no other art, something like it exists at most in symphonic music. The Pythagoreans recognized already the similarity between the most subjective and the most objective of the arts.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 28-29, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 186. From the original German, “Gerade unter den zuletzt erwähnten Abhandlungen Kirchhoff’s sind einige von ungewöhnlicher Schönheit. … kann etwas schön sein, wo dem Autor auch zur kleinsten äusseren Ausschmückung die Zeit fehlt?–Doch–; gerade durch diese Einfachheit, durch diese Unentbehrlichkeit jedes Wortes, jedes Buchstaben, jedes Strichelchens kömmt der Mathematiker unter allen Künstlern dem Weltenschöpfer am nächsten; sie begründet eine Erhabenheit, die in keiner Kunst ein Gleiches,–Aehnliches höchstens in der symphonischen Musik hat. Erkannten doch schon die Pythagoräer die Aehnlichkeit der subjectivsten und der objectivsten der Künste.”
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Art (680)  |  Artist (97)  |  Author (175)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Creator (97)  |  Dash (3)  |  Equal (88)  |  Establish (63)  |  Exist (458)  |  Indispensable (31)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Letter (117)  |  Little (717)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Most (1728)  |  Music (133)  |  Objective (96)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Raise (38)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Similarity (32)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Something (718)  |  Subjective (20)  |  Sublimity (6)  |  Symphony (10)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)

Ampère was a mathematician of various resources & I think might rather be called excentric [sic] than original. He was as it were always mounted upon a hobby horse of a monstrous character pushing the most remote & distant analogies. This hobby horse was sometimes like that of a child ['s] made of heavy wood, at other times it resembled those [?] shapes [?] used in the theatre [?] & at other times it was like a hypogrif in a pantomime de imagie. He had a sort of faith in animal magnetism & has published some refined & ingenious memoirs to prove the identity of electricity & magnetism but even in these views he is rather as I said before excentric than original. He has always appeared to me to possess a very discursive imagination & but little accuracy of observation or acuteness of research.
'Davy’s Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 135-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Animal (651)  |  Call (781)  |  Character (259)  |  Child (333)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Faith (209)  |  Horse (78)  |  Identity (19)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Little (717)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mount (43)  |  Observation (593)  |  Other (2233)  |  Personality (66)  |  Possess (157)  |  Prove (261)  |  Remote (86)  |  Research (753)  |  Think (1122)  |  Various (205)  |  View (496)  |  Wood (97)

An engineer passing a pond heard a frog say, “If you kiss me, I’ll turn into a beautiful princess.” He picked up the frog, looked at it, and put it in his pocket. The frog said, “Why didn’t you kiss me?” Replied the engineer, “Look, I’m an engineer. I don’t have time for a girlfriend, but a talking frog is cool.”
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Frog (44)  |  Girlfriend (2)  |  Joke (90)  |  Kiss (9)  |  Look (584)  |  Passing (76)  |  Pocket (11)  |  Pond (17)  |  Say (989)  |  Talk (108)  |  Talking (76)  |  Turn (454)  |  Why (491)

An Englishman, unless asleep, feels an invisible compulsion to be doing something, to consider time as of some importance. With us, according to custom and tradition, the charm of life consists in ease—ease from the absence of compulsion to do anything.
Comparing English and Indian culture in Address to Mysore Civil Engineers Association (14 Nov 1910), collected in Speeches by Sir M. Visvesvaraya, KCIE. Dewan of Mysore. 1910-11 to 1916-17 (1917), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (21)  |  Asleep (4)  |  Charm (54)  |  Compulsion (19)  |  Consider (428)  |  Custom (44)  |  Ease (40)  |  Englishman (5)  |  Importance (299)  |  Indian (32)  |  Invisible (66)  |  Life (1870)  |  Tradition (76)

An enthusiasm about psychiatry is preposterous—it shows one just hasn’t grown up; but at the same time, for the psychiatrist to be indifferent toward his work is fatal.
The Psychiatric Interview (1954, 1970), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Enthusiasm (59)  |  Fatal (14)  |  Grow Up (9)  |  Indifference (16)  |  Preposterous (8)  |  Psychiatrist (16)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Show (353)  |  Work (1402)

An evolution is a series of events that in itself as series is purely physical, — a set of necessary occurrences in the world of space and time. An egg develops into a chick; … a planet condenses from the fluid state, and develops the life that for millions of years makes it so wondrous a place. Look upon all these things descriptively, and you shall see nothing but matter moving instant after instant, each instant containing in its full description the necessity of passing over into the next. … But look at the whole appreciatively, historically, synthetically, as a musician listens to a symphony, as a spectator watches a drama. Now you shall seem to have seen, in phenomenal form, a story.
In The Spirit of Modern Philosophy: An Essay in the Form of Lectures (1892), 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciative (2)  |  Chick (5)  |  Condense (15)  |  Contain (68)  |  Description (89)  |  Develop (278)  |  Drama (24)  |  Egg (71)  |  Event (222)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Fluid (54)  |  Form (976)  |  History (716)  |  Instant (46)  |  Life (1870)  |  Listen (81)  |  Look (584)  |  Make (25)  |  Matter (821)  |  Million (124)  |  Move (223)  |  Musician (23)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Next (238)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Pass (241)  |  Passing (76)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Physical (518)  |  Planet (402)  |  Pure (299)  |  Purely (111)  |  See (1094)  |  Series (153)  |  Set (400)  |  Space (523)  |  Space And Time (38)  |  Spectator (11)  |  State (505)  |  Story (122)  |  Symphony (10)  |  Synthetic (27)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Watch (118)  |  Whole (756)  |  Wonder (251)  |  Wondrous (22)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

An evolutionary view of human health and disease is not surprising or new; it is merely inevitable in the face of evidence and time.
Epigraph, without citation, in Robert Perlman, Evolution and Medicine (2013), xiii. Webmaster has not yet found the primary source; can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (340)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Face (214)  |  Health (210)  |  Human (1512)  |  Inevitable (53)  |  Merely (315)  |  New (1273)  |  Surprise (91)  |  View (496)

An honest man, armed with all the knowledge available to us now, could only state that in some sense, the origin of life appears at the moment to be almost a miracle, so many are the conditions which would have had to have been satisfied to get it going. But this should not be taken to imply that there are good reasons to believe that it could not have started on the earth by a perfectly reasonable sequence of fairly ordinary chemical reactions. The plain fact is that the time available was too long, the many microenvironments on the earth’s surface too diverse, the various chemical possibilities too numerous and our own knowledge and imagination too feeble to allow us to be able to unravel exactly how it might or might not have happened such a long time ago, especially as we have no experimental evidence from that era to check our ideas against.
In Life Itself: Its Origin and Nature (1981), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Arm (82)  |  Available (80)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemical Reaction (17)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Condition (362)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Era (51)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Good (906)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Honest (53)  |  Idea (881)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Moment (260)  |  Numerous (70)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Origin (250)  |  Origin Of Life (37)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Reason (766)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Start (237)  |  State (505)  |  Surface (223)  |  Unravel (16)  |  Various (205)

An Individual, whatever species it might be, is nothing in the Universe. A hundred, a thousand individuals are still nothing. The species are the only creatures of Nature, perpetual creatures, as old and as permanent as it. In order to judge it better, we no longer consider the species as a collection or as a series of similar individuals, but as a whole independent of number, independent of time, a whole always living, always the same, a whole which has been counted as one in the works of creation, and which, as a consequence, makes only a unity in Nature.
'De la Nature: Seconde Vue', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1765), Vol. 13, i. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Collection (68)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Consider (428)  |  Count (107)  |  Creation (350)  |  Creature (242)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Individual (420)  |  Judge (114)  |  Living (492)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  Old (499)  |  Order (638)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Series (153)  |  Species (435)  |  Still (614)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Unity (81)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)  |  Work (1402)

An induction shock results in a contraction or fails to do so according to its strength; if it does so at all, it produces in the muscle at that time the maximal contraction that can result from stimuli of any strength.
Über die Eigentümlichkeiten der Reizbarkeit welche die Muskelfasern des Herzen zeigen', Ber. süchs. Akad. Wiss., Math.-nat Klasse, 1871, 23, 652-689. Trans. Edwin Clarke and C. D. O'Malley, The Human Brain and Spinal Cord (1968), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Contraction (18)  |  Do (1905)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Fail (191)  |  Induction (81)  |  Muscle (47)  |  Result (700)  |  Shock (38)  |  Strength (139)

An inventor fails 999 times, and if he succeeds once, he’s in. He treats his failures simply as practice shots.
Science quotes on:  |  Fail (191)  |  Failure (176)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Practice (212)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)

An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn’t take his education too seriously. You see, from the time a person is six years old until he graduates form college he has to take three or four examinations a year. If he flunks once, he is out. But an inventor is almost always failing. He tries and fails maybe a thousand times. It he succeeds once then he’s in. These two things are diametrically opposite. We often say that the biggest job we have is to teach a newly hired employee how to fail intelligently. We have to train him to experiment over and over and to keep on trying and failing until he learns what will work.
In 'How Can We Develop Inventors?' presented to the Annual meeting of the American Society of Society Engineers. Reprinted in Mechanical Engineering (Apr 1944). Collected in Prophet of Progress: Selections from the Speeches of Charles F. Kettering (1961), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  College (71)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Education (423)  |  Examination (102)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fail (191)  |  Failure (176)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Form (976)  |  Graduate (32)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Job (86)  |  Learn (672)  |  Old (499)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Person (366)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)  |  Teach (299)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Train (118)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (936)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)

An observer situated in a nebula and moving with the nebula will observe the same properties of the universe as any other similarly situated observer at any time.
'Review of Cosmology', Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 1948, 108, 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmology (26)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Observe (179)  |  Other (2233)  |  Universe (900)  |  Will (2350)

An old medical friend gave me some excellent practical advice. He said: “You will have for some time to go much oftener down steps than up steps. Never mind! win the good opinions of washerwomen and such like, and in time you will hear of their recommendations of you to the wealthier families by whom they are employed.” I did so, and found it succeed as predicted.
[On beginning a medical practice.]
From Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 94. Going “down steps” refers to the homes of lower-class workers of the era that were often in basements and entered by exterior steps down from street level.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (57)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Down (455)  |  Employ (115)  |  Employment (34)  |  Family (101)  |  Friend (180)  |  Good (906)  |  Hear (144)  |  Medical (31)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Never (1089)  |  Old (499)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Practical (225)  |  Practice (212)  |  Predict (86)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Step (234)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)  |  Up (5)  |  Wealth (100)  |  Will (2350)  |  Win (53)

Anaximander son of Praxiades, of Miletus: he said that the principle and element is the Indefinite, not distinguishing air or water or anything else. … he was the first to discover a gnomon, and he set one up on the Sundials (?) in Sparta, according to Favorinus in his Universal History, to mark solstices and equinoxes; and he also constructed hour indicators. He was the first to draw an outline of earth and sea, but also constructed a [celestial] globe. Of his opinions he made a summary exposition, which I suppose Apollodorus the Athenian also encountered. Apollodorus says in his Chronicles that Anaximander was sixty-four years old in the year of the fifty-eighth Olympiad [547/6 B.C.], and that he died shortly afterwards (having been near his prime approximately during the time of Polycrates, tyrant of Samos).
Diogenes Laërtius II, 1-2. In G.S. Kirk, J.E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1957), 99. The editors of this translation note that Anaximander may have introduced the gnomon into Greece, but he did not discover it—the Babylonians used it earlier, and the celestial sphere, and the twelve parts of the day.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Air (366)  |  Anaximander (5)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Construct (129)  |  Discover (571)  |  Draw (140)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Element (322)  |  First (1302)  |  History (716)  |  Hour (192)  |  Indefinite (21)  |  Old (499)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Principle (530)  |  Say (989)  |  Sea (326)  |  Set (400)  |  Summary (11)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Universal (198)  |  Water (503)  |  Year (963)

Anaximenes son of Eurystratus, of Miletus, was a pupil of Anaximander; some say he was also a pupil of Parmenides. He said that the material principle was air and the infinite; and that the stars move, not under the earth, but round it. He used simple and economical Ionic speech. He was active, according to what Apollodorus says, around the time of the capture of Sardis, and died in the 63rd Olympiad.
Diogenes Laertius 2.3. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts(1983), p. 143.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Active (80)  |  Air (366)  |  Anaximenes (5)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Material (366)  |  Move (223)  |  Principle (530)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Say (989)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solar System (81)  |  Speech (66)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)

And do you know what “the world” is to me? Shall I show it to you in my mirror? This world: a monster of energy, without beginning, without end; a firm, iron magnitude of force that does not grow bigger or smaller, that does not expend itself but only transforms itself; as a whole, of unalterable size, a household without expenses or losses, but likewise without increase or income; enclosed by “nothingness”' as by a boundary; not by something blurry or wasted, not something endlessly extended, but set in a definite space as a definite force, and not a space that might be “empty” here or there, but rather as force throughout, as a play of forces and waves of forces, at the same time one and many, increasing here and at the same time decreasing there; a sea of forces flowing and rushing together, eternally changing, eternally flooding back, with tremendous years of recurrence, with an ebb and a flood of its forms; out of the simplest forms striving toward the most complex, out of the stillest, most rigid, coldest forms toward the hottest, most turbulent, most self-contradictory, and then again returning home to the simple out of this abundance, out of the play of contradictions back to the joy of concord, still affirming itself in this uniformity of its courses and its years, blessing itself as that which must return eternally, as a becoming that knows no satiety, no disgust, no weariness: this, my Dionysian world of the eternally self-creating, the eternally self-destroying, this mystery world of the twofold voluptuous delight, my “beyond good and evil,” without goal, unless the joy of the circle itself is a goal; without will, unless a ring feels good will toward itself-do you want a name for this world? A solution for all its riddles? A light for you, too, you best-concealed, strongest, most intrepid, most midnightly men?—This world is the will to power—and nothing besides! And you yourselves are also this will to power—and nothing besides!
The Will to Power (Notes written 1883-1888), book 4, no. 1067. Trans. W. Kaufmann and R. J. Hollingdale and ed. W. Kaufmann (1968), 549-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (26)  |  Back (395)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Best (467)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Blessing (26)  |  Boundary (55)  |  Circle (117)  |  Complex (202)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Contradiction (69)  |  Course (413)  |  Definite (114)  |  Delight (111)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Do (1905)  |  Empty (82)  |  End (603)  |  Energy (373)  |  Evil (122)  |  Extend (129)  |  Feel (371)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flood (52)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Goal (155)  |  Good (906)  |  Grow (247)  |  Home (184)  |  Income (18)  |  Increase (225)  |  Iron (99)  |  Joy (117)  |  Know (1538)  |  Light (635)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Mirror (43)  |  Monster (33)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Name (359)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Power (771)  |  Return (133)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Sea (326)  |  Self (268)  |  Set (400)  |  Show (353)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solution (282)  |  Something (718)  |  Space (523)  |  Still (614)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Together (392)  |  Transform (74)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Tremendous (29)  |  Uniformity (38)  |  Voluptuous (3)  |  Want (504)  |  Wave (112)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

And if you want the exact moment in time, it was conceived mentally on 8th March in this year one thousand six hundred and eighteen, but submitted to calculation in an unlucky way, and therefore rejected as false, and finally returning on the 15th of May and adopting a new line of attack, stormed the darkness of my mind. So strong was the support from the combination of my labour of seventeen years on the observations of Brahe and the present study, which conspired together, that at first I believed I was dreaming, and assuming my conclusion among my basic premises. But it is absolutely certain and exact that the proportion between the periodic times of any two planets is precisely the sesquialterate proportion of their mean distances.
Harmonice Mundi, The Harmony of the World (1619), book V, ch. 3. Trans. E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan and J. V. Field (1997), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (86)  |  Basic (144)  |  Tycho Brahe (24)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Certain (557)  |  Combination (150)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Darkness (72)  |  Distance (171)  |  First (1302)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Labor (200)  |  March (48)  |  Mean (810)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Moment (260)  |  New (1273)  |  Observation (593)  |  Period (200)  |  Planet (402)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Premise (40)  |  Present (630)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Reject (67)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Storm (56)  |  Strong (182)  |  Study (701)  |  Support (151)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Together (392)  |  Two (936)  |  Want (504)  |  Way (1214)  |  Year (963)

Animals, even plants, lie to each other all the time, and we could restrict the research to them, putting off the real truth about ourselves for the several centuries we need to catch our breath. What is it that enables certain flowers to resemble nubile insects, or opossums to play dead, or female fireflies to change the code of their flashes in order to attract, and then eat, males of a different species?
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Attraction (61)  |  Breath (61)  |  Century (319)  |  Certain (557)  |  Change (639)  |  Code (31)  |  Death (406)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  Enable (122)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Female (50)  |  Firefly (8)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flower (112)  |  Insect (89)  |  Lie (370)  |  Lying (55)  |  Male (26)  |  Opossum (3)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Plant (320)  |  Put Off (2)  |  Reality (274)  |  Research (753)  |  Resemble (65)  |  Resembling (2)  |  Restriction (14)  |  Species (435)  |  Truth (1109)

Another error is a conceit that … the best has still prevailed and suppressed the rest: so as, if a man should begin the labor of a new search, he were but like to light upon somewhat formerly rejected, and by rejection brought into oblivion; as if the multitude, or the wisest for the multitude’s sake, were not ready to give passage rather to that which is popular and superficial, than to that which is substantial and profound: for the truth is, that time seemeth to be of the nature of a river or stream, which carrieth down to us that which is light and blown up, and sinketh and drowneth that which is weighty and solid.
Advancement of Learning, Book 1. Collected in The Works of Francis Bacon (1826), Vol 1, 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Best (467)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Down (455)  |  Error (339)  |  Labor (200)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Multitude (50)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Passage (52)  |  Prevail (47)  |  Profound (105)  |  Reject (67)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (36)  |  Rest (287)  |  River (140)  |  Sake (61)  |  Search (175)  |  Solid (119)  |  Still (614)  |  Stream (83)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Truth (1109)

Anthropologists are highly individual and specialized people. Each of them is marked by the kind of work he or she prefers and has done, which in time becomes an aspect of that individual’s personality.
In Margaret Mead and Rhoda Bubendey Métraux (ed.), Margaret Mead, Some Personal Views (1979), 258.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropologist (8)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Become (821)  |  Individual (420)  |  Kind (564)  |  Marked (55)  |  People (1031)  |  Personality (66)  |  Specialized (9)  |  Work (1402)

Anthropology has reached that point of development where the careful investigation of facts shakes our firm belief in the far-reaching theories that have been built up. The complexity of each phenomenon dawns on our minds, and makes us desirous of proceeding more cautiously. Heretofore we have seen the features common to all human thought. Now we begin to see their differences. We recognize that these are no less important than their similarities, and the value of detailed studies becomes apparent. Our aim has not changed, but our method must change. We are still searching for the laws that govern the growth of human culture, of human thought; but we recognize the fact that before we seek for what is common to all culture, we must analyze each culture by careful and exact methods, as the geologist analyzes the succession and order of deposits, as the biologist examines the forms of living matter. We see that the growth of human culture manifests itself in the growth of each special culture. Thus we have come to understand that before we can build up the theory of the growth of all human culture, we must know the growth of cultures that we find here and there among the most primitive tribes of the Arctic, of the deserts of Australia, and of the impenetrable forests of South America; and the progress of the civilization of antiquity and of our own times. We must, so far as we can, reconstruct the actual history of mankind, before we can hope to discover the laws underlying that history.
The Jesup North Pacific Expedition: Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History (1898), Vol. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Aim (175)  |  America (143)  |  Anthropology (61)  |  Antiquity (34)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Australia (11)  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Belief (615)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Build (211)  |  Change (639)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Common (447)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Culture (157)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desert (59)  |  Desirous (2)  |  Detail (150)  |  Development (441)  |  Difference (355)  |  Discover (571)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (1014)  |  Firm (47)  |  Forest (161)  |  Form (976)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Govern (66)  |  Growth (200)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Living (492)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Order (638)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Point (584)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Proceeding (38)  |  Progress (492)  |  Reach (286)  |  Recognize (136)  |  See (1094)  |  Seek (218)  |  Shake (43)  |  South (39)  |  South America (6)  |  Special (188)  |  Still (614)  |  Succession (80)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thought (995)  |  Tribe (26)  |  Underlying (33)  |  Understand (648)  |  Value (393)

Anton Chekhov wrote that ‘one must not put a loaded rifle on stage if no one is thinking of firing it.’ Good drama requires spare and purposive action, sensible linking of potential causes with realized effects. Life is much messier; nothing happens most of the time. Millions of Americans (many hotheaded) own rifles (many loaded), but the great majority, thank God, do not go off most of the time. We spend most of real life waiting for Godot, not charging once more unto the breach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  American (56)  |  Breach (2)  |  Cause (561)  |  Charge (63)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drama (24)  |  Effect (414)  |  Fire (203)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happen (282)  |  Life (1870)  |  Link (48)  |  Linking (8)  |  Load (12)  |  Majority (68)  |  Messy (6)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Potential (75)  |  Real Life (8)  |  Realize (157)  |  Require (229)  |  Rifle (3)  |  Sensible (28)  |  Spare (9)  |  Spend (97)  |  Stage (152)  |  Thank (48)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Unto (8)  |  Wait (66)  |  Waiting (42)  |  Write (250)

Any child born into the hugely consumptionist way of life so common in the industrial world will have an impact that is, on average, many times more destructive than that of a child born in the developing world.
Al Gore
Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit (2006), 308.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (89)  |  Child (333)  |  Common (447)  |  Impact (45)  |  Industrialisation (4)  |  Life (1870)  |  More (2558)  |  Population (115)  |  Way (1214)  |  Way Of Life (15)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

Any time you wish to demonstrate something, the number of faults is proportional to the number of viewers.
Anonymous
Bye's First Law of Model Railroading. In Paul Dickson, The Official Rules, (1978), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Demonstrate (79)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Failure (176)  |  Fault (58)  |  Number (710)  |  Something (718)  |  Wish (216)

Anyone who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in the state of sin. For, as has been pointed out several times, there is no such thing as a random number—there are only methods to produce random numbers, and a strict arithmetic procedure of course is not such a method.
In paper delivered at a symposium on the Monte Carlo method. 'Various Techniques Used in Connection with Random Digits', Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards, Appl. Math. Series, Vol. 3 (1951), 3, 36. Reprinted in John von Neumann: Collected Works (1963), Vol. 5, 700. Also often seen misquoted (?) as “Anyone who attempts to generate random numbers by deterministic means is, of course, living in a state of sin.”
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (144)  |  Consider (428)  |  Course (413)  |  Method (531)  |  Number (710)  |  Point (584)  |  Procedure (48)  |  Produce (117)  |  Random (42)  |  Random Number (3)  |  Sin (45)  |  State (505)  |  Thing (1914)

Anything made out of destructible matter
Infinite time would have devoured before.
But if the atoms that make and replenish the world
Have endured through the immense span of the past
Their natures are immortal—that is clear.
Never can things revert to nothingness!
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book I, lines 232-7, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Devour (29)  |  Endure (21)  |  Immense (89)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Matter (821)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Past (355)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  World (1850)

Anything worth doing is worth doing twice, the first time quick and dirty and the second time the best way you can.
As quoted in Steven Chu and Charles H. Townes, 'Arthur Schawlow', Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (2003), Vol. 83, 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (467)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Doing (277)  |  First (1302)  |  Quick (13)  |  Research (753)  |  Way (1214)  |  Worth (172)

Apprehension, uncertainty, waiting, expectation, fear of surprise, do a patient more harm than any exertion. Remember he is face to face with his enemy all the time.
In Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Do (1905)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Exertion (17)  |  Expectation (67)  |  Face (214)  |  Fear (212)  |  Harm (43)  |  More (2558)  |  Patient (209)  |  Remember (189)  |  Surprise (91)  |  Uncertainty (58)  |  Waiting (42)

Archimedes … had stated that given the force, any given weight might be moved, and even boasted, we are told, relying on the strength of demonstration, that if there were another earth, by going into it he could remove this. Hiero being struck with amazement at this, and entreating him to make good this problem by actual experiment, and show some great weight moved by a small engine, he fixed accordingly upon a ship of burden out of the king’s arsenal, which could not be drawn out of the dock without great labor and many men; and, loading her with many passengers and a full freight, sitting himself the while far off with no great endeavor, but only holding the head of the pulley in his hand and drawing the cords by degrees, he drew the ship in a straight line, as smoothly and evenly, as if she had been in the sea. The king, astonished at this, and convinced of the power of the art, prevailed upon Archimedes to make him engines accommodated to all the purposes, offensive and defensive, of a siege. … the apparatus was, in most opportune time, ready at hand for the Syracusans, and with it also the engineer himself.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (17)  |  According (236)  |  Actual (118)  |  Amazement (19)  |  Apparatus (70)  |  Archimedes (63)  |  Arsenal (5)  |  Art (680)  |  Astonish (39)  |  Astonished (10)  |  At Hand (7)  |  Being (1276)  |  Boast (22)  |  Burden (30)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cord (3)  |  Defensive (2)  |  Degree (277)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Draw (140)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Endeavor (74)  |  Engine (99)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Far (158)  |  Fix (34)  |  Force (497)  |  Freight (3)  |  Full (68)  |  Give (208)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hand (149)  |  Head (87)  |  Hiero (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hold (96)  |  King (39)  |  Labor (200)  |  Load (12)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1728)  |  Move (223)  |  Offensive (4)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Power (771)  |  Prevail (47)  |  Problem (731)  |  Pulley (2)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Ready (43)  |  Rely (12)  |  Remove (50)  |  Sea (326)  |  Ship (69)  |  Show (353)  |  Siege (2)  |  Sit (51)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Small (489)  |  Smoothly (2)  |  State (505)  |  Straight (75)  |  Straight Line (34)  |  Strength (139)  |  Strike (72)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Tell (344)  |  Weight (140)

Are part-time band leaders semi-conductors?
Anonymous
Seen, for example, collected in Stephen Motway, Jokes, Quotes, and Other Assorted Things (2010), 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Band (9)  |  Conductor (17)  |  Joke (90)  |  Leader (51)  |  Semiconductor (4)

Arithmetic is where the answer is right and everything is nice and you can look out of the window and see the blue sky—or the answer is wrong and you have to start all over and try again and see how it comes out this time.
From 'Arithmetic', Harvest Poems, 1910-1960 (1960), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Arithmetic (144)  |  Blue (63)  |  Everything (489)  |  Look (584)  |  Nice (15)  |  Right (473)  |  See (1094)  |  Sky (174)  |  Start (237)  |  Try (296)  |  Window (59)  |  Wrong (246)

As a result of the phenomenally rapid change and growth of physics, the men and women who did their great work one or two generations ago may be our distant predecessors in terms of the state of the field, but they are our close neighbors in terms of time and tastes. This may be an unprecedented state of affairs among professionals; one can perhaps be forgiven if one characterizes it epigrammatically with a disastrously mixed metaphor; in the sciences, we are now uniquely privileged to sit side-by-side with the giants on whose shoulders we stand.
In 'On the Recent Past of Physics', American Journal of Physics (1961), 29, 807.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (639)  |  Field (378)  |  Generation (256)  |  Giant (73)  |  Great (1610)  |  Growth (200)  |  Metaphor (37)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Professional (77)  |  Result (700)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Side (236)  |  Stand (284)  |  State (505)  |  Taste (93)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Two (936)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Work (1402)

As an exercise of the reasoning faculty, pure mathematics is an admirable exercise, because it consists of reasoning alone, and does not encumber the student with an exercise of judgment: and it is well to begin with learning one thing at a time, and to defer a combination of mental exercises to a later period.
In Annotations to Bacon’s Essays (1873), Essay 1, 493.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (20)  |  Alone (324)  |  Begin (275)  |  Combination (150)  |  Consist (223)  |  Encumber (4)  |  Exercise (113)  |  Faculty (76)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Late (119)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learning (291)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mental (179)  |  Period (200)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Student (317)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

As Arkwright and Whitney were the demi-gods of cotton, so prolific Time will yet bring an inventor to every plant. There is not a property in nature but a mind is born to seek and find it.
In Fortune of the Republic (1878), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Richard Arkwright (3)  |  Born (37)  |  Bring (95)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Find (1014)  |  God (776)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Plant (320)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Property (177)  |  Seek (218)  |  Will (2350)

As every circumstance relating to so capital a discovery as this (the greatest, perhaps, that has been made in the whole compass of philosophy, since the time of Sir Isaac Newton) cannot but give pleasure to all my readers, I shall endeavour to gratify them with the communication of a few particulars which I have from the best authority. The Doctor [Benjamin Franklin], after having published his method of verifying his hypothesis concerning the sameness of electricity with the matter lightning, was waiting for the erection of a spire in Philadelphia to carry his views into execution; not imagining that a pointed rod, of a moderate height, could answer the purpose; when it occurred to him, that, by means of a common kite, he could have a readier and better access to the regions of thunder than by any spire whatever. Preparing, therefore, a large silk handkerchief, and two cross sticks, of a proper length, on which to extend it, he took the opportunity of the first approaching thunder storm to take a walk into a field, in which there was a shed convenient for his purpose. But dreading the ridicule which too commonly attends unsuccessful attempts in science, he communicated his intended experiment to no body but his son, who assisted him in raising the kite.
The kite being raised, a considerable time elapsed before there was any appearance of its being electrified. One very promising cloud passed over it without any effect; when, at length, just as he was beginning to despair of his contrivance, he observed some loose threads of the hempen string to stand erect, and to avoid one another, just as if they had been suspended on a common conductor. Struck with this promising appearance, he inmmediately presented his knuckle to the key, and (let the reader judge of the exquisite pleasure he must have felt at that moment) the discovery was complete. He perceived a very evident electric spark. Others succeeded, even before the string was wet, so as to put the matter past all dispute, and when the rain had wetted the string, he collected electric fire very copiously. This happened in June 1752, a month after the electricians in France had verified the same theory, but before he had heard of any thing that they had done.
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767, 3rd ed. 1775), Vol. 1, 216-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (21)  |  Answer (389)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Attend (67)  |  Authority (99)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Body (557)  |  Carry (130)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Common (447)  |  Communication (101)  |  Compass (37)  |  Complete (209)  |  Conductor (17)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Dispute (36)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Effect (414)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Evident (92)  |  Execution (25)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Exquisite (27)  |  Extend (129)  |  Field (378)  |  Fire (203)  |  First (1302)  |  France (29)  |  Benjamin Franklin (95)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Judge (114)  |  Key (56)  |  Kite (4)  |  Large (398)  |  Lightning (49)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Method (531)  |  Moment (260)  |  Month (91)  |  Must (1525)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Past (355)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Point (584)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Present (630)  |  Proper (150)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Rain (70)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Sameness (3)  |  Silk (14)  |  Spark (32)  |  Spire (5)  |  Stand (284)  |  Storm (56)  |  String (22)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thread (36)  |  Thunder (21)  |  Two (936)  |  Verification (32)  |  View (496)  |  Waiting (42)  |  Walk (138)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)

As evolutionary time is measured, we have only just turned up and have hardly had time to catch breath, still marveling at our thumbs, still learning to use the brand-new gift of language. Being so young, we can be excused all sorts of folly and can permit ourselves the hope that someday, as a species, we will begin to grow up.
From 'Introduction' written by Lewis Thomas for Horace Freeland Judson, The Search for Solutions (1980, 1987), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Breath (61)  |  Catch (34)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Folly (44)  |  Gift (105)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growth (200)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Hope (321)  |  Language (308)  |  Learning (291)  |  Marvel (37)  |  Measurement (178)  |  New (1273)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Permission (7)  |  Permit (61)  |  Someday (15)  |  Species (435)  |  Still (614)  |  Thumb (18)  |  Turn (454)  |  Use (771)  |  Will (2350)  |  Young (253)

As far as I see, such a theory [of the primeval atom] remains entirely outside any metaphysical or religious question. It leaves the materialist free to deny any transcendental Being. He may keep, for the bottom of space-time, the same attitude of mind he has been able to adopt for events occurring in non-singular places in space-time. For the believer, it removes any attempt to familiarity with God, as were Laplace’s chiquenaude or Jeans’ finger. It is consonant with the wording of Isaiah speaking of the “Hidden God” hidden even in the beginning of the universe … Science has not to surrender in face of the Universe and when Pascal tries to infer the existence of God from the supposed infinitude of Nature, we may think that he is looking in the wrong direction.
From 'The Primeval Atom Hypothesis and the Problem of Clusters of Galaxies', in R. Stoops (ed.), La Structure et l'Evolution de l'Univers (1958), 1-32. As translated in Helge Kragh, Cosmology and Controversy: The Historical Development of Two Theories of the Universe (1996), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belief (615)  |  Believer (26)  |  Bible (105)  |  Deny (71)  |  Direction (185)  |  Event (222)  |  Existence (481)  |  Face (214)  |  Familiarity (21)  |  Free (239)  |  God (776)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Sir James Jeans (34)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (63)  |  Looking (191)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (53)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Outside (141)  |  Blaise Pascal (81)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Question (649)  |  Religion (369)  |  Religious (134)  |  Remain (355)  |  Remove (50)  |  See (1094)  |  Singular (24)  |  Space (523)  |  Space-Time (20)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Surrender (21)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Think (1122)  |  Transcendental (11)  |  Universe (900)  |  Wrong (246)

As followers of natural science we know nothing of any relation between thoughts and the brain, except as a gross correlation in time and space.
Man on his Nature (1942), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (281)  |  Correlation (19)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Natural (810)  |