Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Consist

Consist Quotes (46 quotes)

A scientific invention consists of six (or some number) ideas, five of which are absurd but which, with the addition of the sixth and enough rearrangement of the combinations, results in something no one has thought of before.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (30)  |  Combination (91)  |  Idea (580)  |  Invention (324)  |  Rearrangement (2)  |  Result (389)

All advances in science consist either in enlarging the range of experience or in expressing the regularities found or to be found in it.
Presidential Address, Royal Astronomical Society, London (13 Feb 1953), 'On Science and Modern Cosmology', Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (1953), 113, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Enlarge (27)  |  Experience (342)  |  Express (65)  |  Find (408)  |  Range (57)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Science (2067)

As an exercise of the reasoning faculty, pure mathematics is an admirable exercise, because it consists of reasoning alone, and does not encumber the student with an exercise of judgment: and it is well to begin with learning one thing at a time, and to defer a combination of mental exercises to a later period.
In Annotations to Bacon’s Essays (1873), Essay 1, 493.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Alone (106)  |  Begin (108)  |  Combination (91)  |  Encumber (4)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Late (52)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mental (78)  |  Period (66)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Reason (471)  |  Student (203)  |  Time (595)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Chemistry is like a majestic skyscraper. The concrete secure foundation of chemistry consists of countless experimentally observed facts. The theories, principles and laws developed from these observations are like an elevator which runs from the bottom to the top of the edifice.
Ernest R. Toon and George L. Ellis (eds.), Foundations of Chemistry (1968), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottom (33)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Concrete (32)  |  Countless (22)  |  Developed (11)  |  Edifice (15)  |  Elevator (2)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Fact (733)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Law (515)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Observation (450)  |  Principle (292)  |  Secure (21)  |  Skyscraper (8)  |  Theory (696)  |  Top (34)

Confined to its true domain, mathematical reasoning is admirably adapted to perform the universal office of sound logic: to induce in order to deduce, in order to construct. … It contents itself to furnish, in the most favorable domain, a model of clearness, of precision, and consistency, the close contemplation of which is alone able to prepare the mind to render other conceptions also as perfect as their nature permits. Its general reaction, more negative than positive, must consist, above all, in inspiring us everywhere with an invincible aversion for vagueness, inconsistency, and obscurity, which may always be really avoided in any reasoning whatsoever, if we make sufficient effort.
In Synthèse Subjective (1856), 98. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 202-203. From the original French, “Bornée à son vrai domaine, la raison mathématique y peut admirablement remplir l’office universel de la saine logique: induire pour déduire, afin de construire. … Elle se contente de former, dans le domaine le plus favorable, un type de clarté, de précision, et de consistance, dont la contemplation familière peut seule disposer l’esprit à rendre les autres conceptions aussi parfaites que le comporte leur nature. Sa réaction générale, plus négative que positive, doit surtout consister à nous inspirer partout une invincible répugnance pour le vague, l’incohérence, et l’obscurité, que nous pouvons réellement éviter envers des pensées quelconques, si nous y faisons assez d’efforts.”
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (28)  |  Alone (106)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Close (67)  |  Conception (92)  |  Confine (26)  |  Consistent (18)  |  Construct (41)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Content (69)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Domain (42)  |  Effort (144)  |  Favorable (12)  |  Furnish (42)  |  General (160)  |  Inconsistent (9)  |  Induce (14)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Logic (260)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics And Logic (10)  |  Mind (760)  |  Model (81)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Negative (34)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perform (38)  |  Permit (31)  |  Positive (44)  |  Precision (52)  |  Prepare (35)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Render (33)  |  Sufficient (42)  |  True (208)  |  Universal (105)  |  Vagueness (11)

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.
Aristotle
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deserve (28)  |  Dignity (23)  |  Honor (31)  |  Possess (56)

Education consists in co-operating with what is already inside a child's mind … The best way to learn geometry is to follow the road which the human race originally followed: Do things, make things, notice things, arrange things, and only then reason about things.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (29)  |  Arrange (20)  |  Best (173)  |  Child (252)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Education (347)  |  Follow (124)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Inside (26)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mind (760)  |  Notice (37)  |  Original (57)  |  Reason (471)  |  Road (64)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Best (173)  |  Both (81)  |  Circle (56)  |  Computation (18)  |  Confound (14)  |  Consider (81)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Design (115)  |  Determine (76)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Division (34)  |  Draw (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elegance (30)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equation (96)  |  Expression (110)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (408)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Industrious (9)  |  Introduce (42)  |  Invent (51)  |  Line (90)  |  Lose (94)  |  Modern (162)  |  Multiplication (23)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Place (175)  |  Problem (497)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Right (197)  |  Science (2067)  |  Simple (178)  |  Simplicity (147)  |  Solid (50)  |  Sort (49)  |  Surface (101)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tedious (9)  |  Term (122)  |  Truly (33)  |  Wherefore (2)

I am quite aware that we have just now lightheartedly expelled in imagination many excellent men who are largely, perhaps chiefly, responsible for the buildings of the temple of science; and in many cases our angel would find it a pretty ticklish job to decide. But of one thing I feel sure: if the types we have just expelled were the only types there were, the temple would never have come to be, any more than a forest can grow which consists of nothing but creepers. For these people any sphere of human activity will do, if it comes to a point; whether they become engineers, officers, tradesmen, or scientists depends on circumstances.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (135)  |  Angel (30)  |  Aware (31)  |  Become (172)  |  Buildings (4)  |  Case (99)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Decide (40)  |  Depend (90)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expel (4)  |  Feel (167)  |  Find (408)  |  Forest (107)  |  Grow (99)  |  Human (550)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Job (43)  |  Largely (13)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Officer (8)  |  People (390)  |  Point (123)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Temple (25)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Type (52)

If we are to define science, ... it does not consist so much in knowing, nor even in “organized knowledge,” as it does in diligent inquiry into truth for truth’s sake, without any sort of axe to grind, nor for the sake of the delight of contemplating it, but from an impulse to penetrate into the reason of things.
From 'Lessons from the History of Science: The Scientific Attitude' (c.1896), in Collected Papers (1931), Vol. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Axe (15)  |  Contemplate (17)  |  Define (49)  |  Delight (66)  |  Diligent (8)  |  Grind (11)  |  Impulse (33)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Organized (9)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Reason (471)  |  Sake (23)  |  Science (2067)  |  Truth (928)

Many errors, of a truth, consist merely in the application of the wrong names of things. For if a man says that the lines which are drawn from the centre of the circle to the circumference are not equal, he understands by the circle, at all events for the time, something else than mathematicians understand by it.
In 'Prop. 47: The human mind possesses an adequate knowledge of the eternal and infinite essence of God', Ethic, translated by William Hale White (1883), 93-94. Collected in The English and Foreign Philosophical Library, Vol. 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Center (34)  |  Circle (56)  |  Circumference (16)  |  Definition (192)  |  Drawing (21)  |  Else (4)  |  Equal (83)  |  Error (277)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Merely (82)  |  Name (170)  |  Nomenclature (138)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Thing (37)  |  Truth (928)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Wrong (139)

Medicine is not only a science; it is also an art. It does not consist of compounding pills and plasters; it deals with the very processes of life, which must be understood before they may be guided.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Compound (58)  |  Deal (49)  |  Guide (65)  |  Life (1131)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Pill (6)  |  Plaster (4)  |  Process (267)  |  Science (2067)  |  Understand (340)

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble minds. That deeply emotional conviction of the presence of a superior reasoning power, which is revealed in the incomprehensible universe, forms my idea of God.
As quoted in obituary, 'Einstein Noted as an Iconoclast In Research, Politics and Religion', The New York Times (19 Apr 1955), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Detail (87)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Frail (2)  |  Humble (31)  |  Illimitable (2)  |  Mind (760)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Religion (239)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Superior (41)

Nature does not consist entirely, or even largely, of problems designed by a Grand Examiner to come out neatly in finite terms, and whatever subject we tackle the first need is to overcome timidity about approximating.
As co-author with Bertha Swirles Jeffreys, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1946, 1999), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (10)  |  Design (115)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Examiner (4)  |  Finite (32)  |  First (314)  |  Grand (27)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Neat (5)  |  Need (287)  |  Overcome (13)  |  Problem (497)  |  Subject (240)  |  Tackle (6)  |  Term (122)  |  Timidity (5)

Next to enjoying ourselves, the next greatest pleasure consists in preventing others from enjoying themselves, or, more generally, in the acquisition of power.
In Sceptical Essays (1928), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (42)  |  Enjoy (39)  |  Generally (15)  |  Great (534)  |  Next (35)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Power (366)  |  Prevent (40)

No substantial part of the universe is so simple that it can be grasped and controlled without abstraction. Abstraction consists in replacing the part of the universe under consideration by a model of similar but simpler structure. Models, formal and intellectual on the one hand, or material on the other, are thus a central necessity of scientific procedure.
As coauthor with Norbert Wiener in 'The Role of Models in Science', Philosophy of Science (Oct 1945), 12, No. 4, 316.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Central (34)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Control (114)  |  Formal (33)  |  Grasp (60)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Material (156)  |  Model (81)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Part (222)  |  Procedure (25)  |  Replace (30)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Similar (35)  |  Simple (178)  |  Structure (225)  |  Substantial (14)  |  Universe (686)

One of the most curious and interesting reptiles which I met with in Borneo was a large tree-frog, which was brought me by one of the Chinese workmen. He assured me that he had seen it come down in a slanting direction from a high tree, as if it flew. On examining it, I found the toes very long and fully webbed to their very extremity, so that when expanded they offered a surface much larger than the body. The forelegs were also bordered by a membrane, and the body was capable of considerable inflation. The back and limbs were of a very deep shining green colour, the undersurface and the inner toes yellow, while the webs were black, rayed with yellow. The body was about four inches long, while the webs of each hind foot, when fully expanded, covered a surface of four square inches, and the webs of all the feet together about twelve square inches. As the extremities of the toes have dilated discs for adhesion, showing the creature to be a true tree frog, it is difficult to imagine that this immense membrane of the toes can be for the purpose of swimming only, and the account of the Chinaman, that it flew down from the tree, becomes more credible. This is, I believe, the first instance known of a “flying frog,” and it is very interesting to Darwinians as showing that the variability of the toes which have been already modified for purposes of swimming and adhesive climbing, have been taken advantage of to enable an allied species to pass through the air like the flying lizard. It would appear to be a new species of the genus Rhacophorus, which consists of several frogs of a much smaller size than this, and having the webs of the toes less developed.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Account (68)  |  Adhesion (5)  |  Adhesive (2)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Air (190)  |  Ally (6)  |  Already (29)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assure (15)  |  Back (104)  |  Become (172)  |  Belief (504)  |  Black (42)  |  Body (247)  |  Border (9)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Bring (90)  |  Capable (51)  |  Chinese (7)  |  Climb (34)  |  Color (99)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creature (155)  |  Credible (3)  |  Curious (43)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Deep (124)  |  Develop (107)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Direction (76)  |  Disk (3)  |  Down (86)  |  Enable (46)  |  Examine (44)  |  Expand (23)  |  Extremity (4)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Fly (99)  |  Foot (60)  |  Frog (33)  |  Fully (21)  |  Genus (18)  |  Green (32)  |  High (153)  |  Hind (3)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Immense (42)  |  Inch (9)  |  Inflation (5)  |  Inner (39)  |  Instance (32)  |  Interest (237)  |  Know (556)  |  Large (130)  |  Less (102)  |  Limb (7)  |  Lizard (6)  |  Long (174)  |  Meet (31)  |  Membrane (12)  |  Modify (15)  |  New (496)  |  Offer (43)  |  Pass (93)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Ray (41)  |  Reptile (26)  |  See (369)  |  Several (31)  |  Shine (45)  |  Show (93)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (163)  |  Species (221)  |  Square (24)  |  Surface (101)  |  Swim (16)  |  Toe (7)  |  Together (79)  |  Tree (171)  |  True (208)  |  Underside (2)  |  Variability (5)  |  Web (15)  |  Workman (13)  |  Yellow (17)

Our nature consists in motion; complete rest is death.
In Pensées (1670), Section 23, No. 67. From Blaise Pascal and W.F. Trotter (trans.), 'Thoughts', collected in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics (1910), Vol. 48, 50. Also seen translated as “…in movement, absolute rest…”. From the French, “Notre nature est dans le mouvement; le repos entier est la mort,” in Pensées de Blaise Pascal (1847), 315.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (98)  |  Complete (87)  |  Death (302)  |  Man (373)  |  Motion (160)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Rest (93)

Practical politics consists in ignoring facts.
In The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography (1906, 1918), 373.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (733)  |  Ignoring (5)  |  Politics (96)  |  Practical (133)

Professor Sylvester’s first high class at the new university Johns Hopkins consisted of only one student, G. B. Halsted, who had persisted in urging Sylvester to lecture on the modem algebra. The attempt to lecture on this subject led him into new investigations in quantics.
In Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Class (84)  |  First (314)  |  George B. Halsted (8)  |  High (153)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Johns Hopkins (3)  |  Lead (160)  |  Lecture (68)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modem (3)  |  New (496)  |  Persist (11)  |  Professor (54)  |  Student (203)  |  Subject (240)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  University (81)  |  Urge (16)

Pure mathematics is a collection of hypothetical, deductive theories, each consisting of a definite system of primitive, undefined, concepts or symbols and primitive, unproved, but self-consistent assumptions (commonly called axioms) together with their logically deducible consequences following by rigidly deductive processes without appeal to intuition.
In 'Non-Euclidian Geometry of the Fourth Dimension', collected in Henry Parker Manning (ed.), The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained (1910), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Assumption (58)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Call (128)  |  Collection (44)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Concept (146)  |  Consequence (114)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Definite (43)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Follow (124)  |  Hypothetical (5)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Logic (260)  |  Primitive (42)  |  Process (267)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Rigidly (4)  |  Self-Consistent (2)  |  Symbol (73)  |  System (191)  |  Theory (696)  |  Together (79)  |  Undefined (3)  |  Unproved (2)

Quantum mechanics and relativity, taken together, are extraordinarily restrictive, and they therefore provide us with a great logical machine. We can explore with our minds any number of possible universes consisting of all kinds of mythical particles and interactions, but all except a very few can be rejected on a priori grounds because they are not simultaneously consistent with special relativity and quantum mechanics. Hopefully in the end we will find that only one theory is consistent with both and that theory will determine the nature of our particular universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Both (81)  |  Consistent (18)  |  Determine (76)  |  End (195)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Find (408)  |  Great (534)  |  Ground (90)  |  Interaction (31)  |  Kind (140)  |  Logical (55)  |  Machine (157)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mythical (3)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Number (282)  |  Particle (99)  |  Particular (76)  |  Possible (158)  |  Provide (69)  |  Quantum Mechanics (37)  |  Reject (29)  |  Relativity (56)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Simultaneous (18)  |  Special Relativity (5)  |  Theory (696)  |  Together (79)  |  Universe (686)

Science, in its ultimate ideal, consists of a set of propositions arranged in a hierarchy, the lowest level of the hierarchy being concerned with particular facts, and the highest with some general law, governing everything in the universe. The various levels in the hierarchy have a two-fold logical connection, travelling one up, one down; the upward connection proceeds by induction, the downward by deduction.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Connection (111)  |  Deduction (69)  |  Everything (181)  |  Fact (733)  |  General (160)  |  Govern (29)  |  Hierarchy (14)  |  Ideal (72)  |  Induction (60)  |  Law (515)  |  Logical (55)  |  Particular (76)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Set (99)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Universe (686)

So highly did the ancients esteem the power of figures and numbers, that Democritus ascribed to the figures of atoms the first principles of the variety of things; and Pythagoras asserted that the nature of things consisted of numbers.
In De Augmentis, Bk. 3; Advancement of Learning, Bk. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (106)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Assert (21)  |  Atom (280)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Figure (69)  |  First (314)  |  Highly (16)  |  Nature Of Things (9)  |  Number (282)  |  Power (366)  |  Principle (292)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Variety (71)

Tact in audacity consists in knowing how far we may go too far.
In A Call to Order (1926), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Audacity (5)  |  Far (154)  |  Know (556)  |  Tact (6)

The art of drawing conclusions from experiments and observations consists in evaluating probabilities and in estimating whether they are sufficiently great or numerous enough to constitute proofs. This kind of calculation is more complicated and more diff
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Draw (55)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Evaluate (5)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Great (534)  |  Kind (140)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Observation (450)  |  Probability (106)  |  Proof (245)  |  Sufficiently (9)

The art of reasoning consists in getting hold of the subject at the right end, of seizing on the few general ideas that illuminate the whole, and of persistently organizing all subsidiary facts round them.
In 'Presidential Address to the London Branch of the Mathematical Association', Mathematical Gazette (Mar 1913), 7, No. 104, 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (294)  |  End (195)  |  Fact (733)  |  General (160)  |  Hold (94)  |  Idea (580)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Organize (20)  |  Persistent (9)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Right (197)  |  Seize (15)  |  Subject (240)  |  Subsidiary (4)  |  Whole (192)

The dexterous management of terms and being able to fend and prove with them, I know has and does pass in the world for a great part of learning; but it is learning distinct from knowledge, for knowledge consists only in perceiving the habitudes and relations of ideas one to another, which is done without words; the intervention of sounds helps nothing to it. And hence we see that there is least use of distinction where there is most knowledge: I mean in mathematics, where men have determined ideas with known names to them; and so, there being no room for equivocations, there is no need of distinctions.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Determine (76)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Great (534)  |  Habit (112)  |  Help (103)  |  Idea (580)  |  Intervention (12)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Least (74)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mean (101)  |  Name (170)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Need (287)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Part (222)  |  Pass (93)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Prove (109)  |  Relation (154)  |  Room (39)  |  See (369)  |  Sound (90)  |  Term (122)  |  Word (302)  |  World (898)

The game of chess has always fascinated mathematicians, and there is reason to suppose that the possession of great powers of playing that game is in many features very much like the possession of great mathematical ability. There are the different pieces to learn, the pawns, the knights, the bishops, the castles, and the queen and king. The board possesses certain possible combinations of squares, as in rows, diagonals, etc. The pieces are subject to certain rules by which their motions are governed, and there are other rules governing the players. … One has only to increase the number of pieces, to enlarge the field of the board, and to produce new rules which are to govern either the pieces or the player, to have a pretty good idea of what mathematics consists.
In Book review, 'What is Mathematics?', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (May 1912), 18, 386-387.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Bishop (3)  |  Board (12)  |  Castle (5)  |  Certain (126)  |  Chess (23)  |  Combination (91)  |  Diagonal (3)  |  Different (186)  |  Enlarge (27)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (171)  |  Game (61)  |  Good (345)  |  Govern (29)  |  Great (534)  |  Idea (580)  |  Increase (146)  |  King (35)  |  Knight (6)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Motion (160)  |  New (496)  |  Number (282)  |  Pawn (2)  |  Piece (38)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Possess (56)  |  Possession (46)  |  Possible (158)  |  Power (366)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Produce (102)  |  Queen (14)  |  Reason (471)  |  Row (9)  |  Rule (177)  |  Square (24)  |  Subject (240)  |  Suppose (49)

The living human being seems to consist of nothing more than matter and energy. Spirit is merely an assumption.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (58)  |  Energy (214)  |  Human Being (73)  |  Matter (343)  |  Mere (82)  |  Spirit (154)

The more efficient causes of progress seem to consist of a good education during youth whilst the brain is impressible, and of a high standard of excellence, inculcated by the ablest and best men, embodied in the laws, customs and traditions of the nation, and enforced by public opinion. It should, however, be borne in mind, that the enforcement of public opinion depends on our appreciation of the approbation and disapprobation of others; and this appreciation is founded on our sympathy, which it can hardly be doubted was originally developed through natural selection as one of the most important elements of the social instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (26)  |  Bear (67)  |  Best (173)  |  Brain (213)  |  Cause (285)  |  Custom (30)  |  Depend (90)  |  Develop (107)  |  Disapprobation (2)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Education (347)  |  Efficient (24)  |  Element (162)  |  Embody (16)  |  Enforce (8)  |  Excellence (33)  |  Founded (20)  |  Good (345)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (153)  |  Important (205)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Instinct (66)  |  Law (515)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nation (134)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Originally (6)  |  Progress (368)  |  Public (94)  |  Seem (143)  |  Social (108)  |  Standard (55)  |  Sympathy (24)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Whilst (3)  |  Youth (77)

The only difference between elements and compounds consists in the supposed impossibility of proving the so-called elements to be compounds.
'Faraday Lecture: Elements and Compounds', Journal of the Chemical Society (1904), 85, 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Compound (58)  |  Difference (246)  |  Element (162)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Proof (245)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Supposition (37)

The progress of Science consists in observing interconnections and in showing with a patient ingenuity that the events of this ever-shifting world are but examples of a few general relations, called laws. To see what is general in what is particular, and what is permanent in what is transitory, is the aim of scientific thought.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (89)  |  Called (9)  |  Event (116)  |  Example (94)  |  General (160)  |  Ingenuity (27)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Law (515)  |  Observing (2)  |  Particular (76)  |  Patient (125)  |  Permanent (29)  |  Progress (368)  |  Relation (154)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  See (369)  |  Showing (6)  |  Thought (546)  |  Transitory (4)  |  World (898)

The real accomplishment of modern science and technology consists in taking ordinary men, informing them narrowly and deeply and then, through appropriate organization, arranging to have their knowledge combined with that of other specialized but equally ordinary men. This dispenses with the need for genius. The resulting performance, though less inspiring, is far more predictable.
In The New Industrial State (1967), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (80)  |  Appropriate (28)  |  Arrange (20)  |  Combine (35)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Dispense (9)  |  Equally (26)  |  Far (154)  |  Genius (249)  |  Inform (16)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Less (102)  |  Narrowly (4)  |  Need (287)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Organization (84)  |  Performance (33)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Real (149)  |  Result (389)  |  Specialized (8)

The unity of all science consists alone in its method, not in its material.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (106)  |  Material (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Unity (54)

The value of mathematical instruction as a preparation for those more difficult investigations, consists in the applicability not of its doctrines but of its methods. Mathematics will ever remain the past perfect type of the deductive method in general; and the applications of mathematics to the simpler branches of physics furnish the only school in which philosophers can effectually learn the most difficult and important of their art, the employment of the laws of simpler phenomena for explaining and predicting those of the more complex. These grounds are quite sufficient for deeming mathematical training an indispensable basis of real scientific education, and regarding with Plato, one who is … as wanting in one of the most essential qualifications for the successful cultivation of the higher branches of philosophy
In System of Logic, Bk. 3, chap. 24, sect. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (170)  |  Art (294)  |  Basis (91)  |  Branch (107)  |  Complex (95)  |  Cultivation (27)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Deem (6)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Education (347)  |  Effectually (2)  |  Employment (24)  |  Essential (117)  |  Explain (107)  |  Furnish (42)  |  General (160)  |  Ground (90)  |  High (153)  |  Important (205)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Law (515)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Method (239)  |  Past (152)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Physics (348)  |  Plato (76)  |  Predict (21)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Qualification (8)  |  Real (149)  |  Regard (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  School (119)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Simple (178)  |  Successful (40)  |  Sufficient (42)  |  Training (66)  |  Type (52)  |  Value (242)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (176)

The whole of Mathematics consists in the organization of a series of aids to the imagination in the process of reasoning.
In Universal Algebra (1898), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (42)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Organization (84)  |  Process (267)  |  Reason (471)  |  Series (51)  |  Whole (192)

The whole philosophy of medicine consists in working out the histories of diseases, and applying the remedies which may dispel them; and Experience is the sole guide. This we attain by … the suggestions of common sense rather than of speculation.
In The Works of Thomas Sydenham, (1850), Vol. 2, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (77)  |  Attain (45)  |  Common Sense (126)  |  Disease (275)  |  Dispel (5)  |  Experience (342)  |  Guide (65)  |  History (369)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Sole (21)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Suggestion (30)  |  Whole (192)  |  Work (635)

The work of science does not consist of creation but of the discovery of true thoughts.
From the first chapter of an unfinished book, The Thought: A Logical Inquiry (1918), collected in Arthur Sullivan (ed.), Logicism and the Philosophy of Language: Selections from Frege and Russell (2003), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (242)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Science (2067)  |  Thought (546)  |  True (208)  |  Work (635)

There is nothing more odious than the majority; it consists of a few powerful men to lead the way; of accommodating rascals and submissive weaklings; and of a mass of men who trot after them, without in the least knowing their own mind.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (10)  |  Know (556)  |  Lead (160)  |  Majority (42)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Odious (3)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Rascal (3)  |  Submissive (2)

Thinking consists in envisaging, realizing structural features and structural requirements; proceeding in accordance with, and determined by, these requirements; thereby changing the situation in the direction of structural improvements.
In Productive Thinking (1959), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (364)  |  Direction (76)  |  Envisage (2)  |  Feature (44)  |  Improvement (74)  |  Realize (90)  |  Requirement (47)  |  Situation (52)  |  Structural (8)  |  Thinking (231)

True wisdom consists not in seeing what is immediately before our eyes, but in foreseeing what is to come.
Terence
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (222)  |  Foresee (13)  |  Immediately (23)  |  See (369)  |  True (208)  |  Wisdom (182)

We often hear that mathematics consists mainly of “proving theorems.” Is a writer's job mainly that of “writing sentences?”
In Rota's 'Introduction' written (1980) to preface Philip J. Davis and Reuben Hersh, The Mathematical Experience (1981, 2012), xxii.
Science quotes on:  |  Job (43)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Proof (245)  |  Sentence (28)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Writer (46)

When I received my B.S. degree in 1932, only two of the fundamental particles of physics were known. Every bit of matter in the universe was thought to consist solely of protons and electrons.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968). Collected in Yong Zhou (ed.), Nobel Lecture: Physics, 1963-1970 (2013), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Electron (72)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Graduate (13)  |  Know (556)  |  Matter (343)  |  Particle (99)  |  Physics (348)  |  Proton (15)  |  Solely (9)  |  Thought (546)  |  Universe (686)

[Defining Life] the sum of the phenomena proper to organized beings. In consists essentially in this, that organized beings are all, during a certain time, the centres to which foreign substances penetrate and are appropriated, and from which others issue.
Béclard, "Anatomie Générale." In The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine (1865), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (28)  |  Centre (28)  |  Certain (126)  |  Define (49)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Issue (42)  |  Life (1131)  |  Organize (20)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Proper (38)  |  Substance (87)  |  Sum (41)  |  Time (595)

…so slow is moral progress. True, we have the bicycle, the motor-car, the dirigible airship and other marvellous means of breaking our bones; but our morality is not one rung the higher for it all. One would even say that, the farther we proceed in our conquest of matter, the more our morality recedes. The most advanced of our inventions consists in bringing men down with grapeshot and explosives with the swiftness of the reaper mowing the corn.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Bicycle (10)  |  Bone (63)  |  Break (54)  |  Conquest (19)  |  Corn (13)  |  Dirigible (2)  |  Explosive (18)  |  Far (154)  |  High (153)  |  Invention (324)  |  Marvelous (19)  |  Matter (343)  |  Means (176)  |  Moral (124)  |  Morality (42)  |  Motor Car (3)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Progress (368)  |  Reaper (3)  |  Recede (4)  |  Ring (16)  |  Say (228)  |  Slow (56)  |  Swiftness (4)  |  True (208)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.