Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Inner

Inner Quotes (71 quotes)

A collective learning machine achieves its feats by using five elements … (1) conformity enforcers; (2) diversity generators; (3) inner-judges; (4) resource shifters; and (5) intergroup tournaments.
In 'From Social Synapses to Social Ganglions', Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century (2000), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Collective (24)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Element (310)  |  Feat (10)  |  Generator (2)  |  Judge (108)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Machine (257)  |  Resource (63)  |  Shift (44)

A great department of thought must have its own inner life, however transcendent may be the importance of its relations to the outside. No department of science, least of all one requiring so high a degree of mental concentration as Mathematics, can be developed entirely, or even mainly, with a view to applications outside its own range. The increased complexity and specialisation of all branches of knowledge makes it true in the present, however it may have been in former times, that important advances in such a department as Mathematics can be expected only from men who are interested in the subject for its own sake, and who, whilst keeping an open mind for suggestions from outside, allow their thought to range freely in those lines of advance which are indicated by the present state of their subject, untrammelled by any preoccupation as to applications to other departments of science. Even with a view to applications, if Mathematics is to be adequately equipped for the purpose of coping with the intricate problems which will be presented to it in the future by Physics, Chemistry and other branches of physical science, many of these problems probably of a character which we cannot at present forecast, it is essential that Mathematics should be allowed to develop freely on its own lines.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (46)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Application (242)  |  Branch (150)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Cope (6)  |  Degree (276)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Equip (5)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Essential (199)  |  Expect (200)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Former (137)  |  Freely (13)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Important (209)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Least (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Preoccupation (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Range (99)  |  Relation (157)  |  Require (219)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Specialize (3)  |  State (491)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transcendent (2)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

A human being is part of the whole, called by us “Universe”; a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely but the striving for such achievement is, in itself, a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security.
In Letter (4 Mar 1950), replying to a grieving father over the loss of a young son. In Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children (2002), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Circle (110)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Optical (11)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Part (222)  |  Person (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Prison (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Security (47)  |  Separate (143)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Strive (46)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Widen (10)

A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (59)  |  Depend (228)  |  Exert (39)  |  Give In (3)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Measure (232)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remind (13)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)

A man who is ‘of sound mind’ is one who keeps the inner madman under lock and key.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Keep (101)  |  Key (50)  |  Lock (13)  |  Madman (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sound (183)

A mind exclusively bent upon the idea of utility necessarily narrows the range of the imagination. For it is the imagination which pictures to the inner eye of the investigator the indefinitely extending sphere of the possible,—that region of hypothesis and explanation, of underlying cause and controlling law. The area of suggestion and experiment is thus pushed beyond the actual field of vision.
In 'The Paradox of Research', The North American Review (Sep 1908), 188, No. 634, 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Field (364)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Law (894)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Push (62)  |  Range (99)  |  Region (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Utility (49)  |  Vision (123)

A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most.
Anonymous
Widely found in varied accounts, so is most likely proverbial. Seen misattributed (?) to George Bernard Shaw, but Webmaster has not yet found a primary source as verification.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dog (70)  |  Elder (8)  |  Evil (116)  |  Feed (27)  |  Fight (44)  |  Good (889)  |  Inside (26)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mean (809)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Native (38)  |  Native American (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reply (56)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Win (52)

Among all highly civilized peoples the golden age of art has always been closely coincident with the golden age of the pure sciences, particularly with mathematics, the most ancient among them.
This coincidence must not be looked upon as accidental, but as natural, due to an inner necessity. Just as art can thrive only when the artist, relieved of the anxieties of existence, can listen to the inspirations of his spirit and follow in their lead, so mathematics, the most ideal of the sciences, will yield its choicest blossoms only when life’s dismal phantom dissolves and fades away, when the striving after naked truth alone predominates, conditions which prevail only in nations while in the prime of their development.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 191-192. From the original German, “Bei allen Kulturvölkern ist die Blüthezeit der Kunst auch immer zeitlich eng verbunden mit einer Blüthezeit der reinen Wissenschaften, insbesondere der ältesten unter ihnen, der Mathematik.
Dieses Zusammentreffen dürfte auch nicht ein zufälliges, sondern ein natürliches, ein Ergebniss innerer Notwendigkeit sein. Wie die Kunst nur gedeihen kann, wenn der Künstler, unbekümmert um die Bedrängnisse des Daseins, den Eingebungen seines Geistes lauschen und ihnen folgen kann, so kann die idealste Wissenschaft, die Mathematik, erst dann ihre schönsten Blüthen treiben, wenn des Erdenlebens schweres Traumbild sinkt und sinkt und sinkt, wenn das Streben nach der nackten Wahrheit allein bestimmend ist, was nur bei Nationen in der Vollkraft ihrer Entwickelung vorkommt.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Condition (356)  |  Development (422)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Due (141)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fade (10)  |  Follow (378)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessity (191)  |  People (1005)  |  Phantom (9)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Prime (11)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strive (46)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

Art arises in those strange complexities of action that are called human beings. It is a kind of human behavior. As such it is not magic, except as human beings are magical. Nor is it concerned in absolutes, eternities, “forms,” beyond those that may reside in the context of the human being and be subject to his vicissitudes. Art is not an inner state of consciousness, whatever that may mean. Neither is it essentially a supreme form of communication. Art is human behavior, and its values are contained in human behavior.
In Art Is Action: A Discussion of Nine Arts in a Modern World (1939), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Action (327)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Communication (94)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Context (29)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Behavior (9)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Kind (557)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Reside (25)  |  State (491)  |  Strange (157)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Value (365)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Whatever (234)

Chess grips its exponent, shackling the mind and brain so that the inner freedom and independence of even the strongest character cannot remain unaffected.
Einstein commenting on mathematician Emanuel Lasker's fate as world chess champion (1894-1921). As quoted in Daniel Johnson, White King and Red Queen: How the Cold War Was Fought on the Chessboard (2008), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Character (243)  |  Chess (25)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Grip (9)  |  Independence (34)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Remain (349)  |  Shackle (4)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Unaffected (6)

Conscience is the inner voice warning us that someone may be looking.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conscience (50)  |  Looking (189)  |  Someone (22)  |  Voice (52)  |  Warn (5)  |  Warning (17)

Electronic aids, particularly domestic computers, will help the inner migration, the opting out of reality. Reality is no longer going to be the stuff out there, but the stuff inside your head. It's going to be commercial and nasty at the same time, like 'Rite of Spring' in Disney's Fantasia ... our internal devils may destroy and renew us through the technological overload we've invoked.
Interview in Heavy Metal (Apr 1971). Reprinted in Re/Search, No. 8/9 (1984).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Computer (127)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Devil (31)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Electronics (11)  |  Internal (66)  |  Migration (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nasty (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Renew (19)  |  Spring (133)  |  Technological (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

Every great scientist becomes a great scientist because of the inner self-abnegation with which he stands before truth, saying: “Not my will, but thine, be done.” What, then, does a man mean by saying, Science displaces religion, when in this deep sense science itself springs from religion?
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Deep (233)  |  Displace (8)  |  Done (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Religion (361)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Few men live lives of more devoted self-sacrifice than the family physician, but he may become so completely absorbed in work that leisure is unknown…. More than most men he feels the tragedy of isolation—that inner isolation so well expressed in Matthew Arnold’s line “We mortal millions live alone.”
Address to the Canadian Medical Association, Montreal (17 Sep 1902), 'Chauvinism in Medicine', published in The Montreal Medical Journal (1902), 31, 267. Collected in Aequanimitas, with Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 299.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Alone (311)  |  Matthew Arnold (14)  |  Become (815)  |  Completely (135)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Express (186)  |  Family (94)  |  Feel (367)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Live (628)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physician (273)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Sacrifice (5)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Work (1351)

For any one who is pervaded with the sense of causal law in all that happens, who accepts in real earnest the assumption of causality, the idea of a Being who interferes with the sequence of events in the world is absolutely impossible! Neither the religion of fear nor the social-moral religion can have, any hold on him. A God who rewards and punishes is for him unthinkable, because man acts in accordance with an inner and outer necessity, and would, in the eyes of God, be as little responsible as an inanimate object is for the movements which it makes. Science, in consequence, has been accused of undermining morals—but wrongly. The ethical behavior of man is better based on sympathy, education and social relationships, and requires no support from religion. Man’s plight would, indeed, be sad if he had to be kept in order through fear of punishment and hope of rewards after death.
From 'Religion and Science', The New York Times Magazine, (9 Nov 1930), 1. Article in full, reprinted in Edward H. Cotton (ed.), Has Science Discovered God? A Symposium of Modern Scientific Opinion (1931), 101. The wording differs significantly from the version collected in 'Religion And Science', Ideas And Opinions (1954), 39, giving its source as: “Written expressly for the New York Times Magazine. Appeared there November 9, 1930 (pp. 1-4). The German text was published in the Berliner Tageblatt, November 11, 1930.” This variant form of the quote from the book begins, “The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation….” and is also on the Albert Einstein Quotes page on this website. As for why the difference, Webmaster speculates the book form editor perhaps used a revised translation from Einstein’s German article.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accused (3)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Causality (11)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Death (388)  |  Education (378)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  God (757)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inanimate (16)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moral (195)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Outer (13)  |  Plight (4)  |  Punish (9)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religion (361)  |  Require (219)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Reward (68)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Support (147)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Through (849)  |  Undermine (6)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

For they are, in truth, textbooks of life: they gather outer and inner experiences into a general and connected whole.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Connect (125)  |  Connected (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Gather (72)  |  General (511)  |  Life (1795)  |  Outer (13)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

Fortunately analysis is not the only way to resolve inner conflicts. Life itself still remains a very effective therapist.
Our Inner Conflicts: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis (1945, 1999), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Effective (59)  |  Life (1795)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Still (613)  |  Therapist (2)  |  Way (1217)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bind (25)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brief (36)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Dead (59)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Exert (39)  |  Exist (443)  |  First (1283)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myself (212)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Receive (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remind (13)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tie (38)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Wholly (88)

I think at the moment we did not even want to break the seal [on the inner chamber of the tomb of Tutankhamen], for a feeling of intrusion had descended heavily upon us... We felt that we were in the presence of the dead King and must do him reverence, and in imagination could see the doors of the successive shrines open one.
Howard Carter, Arthur Cruttenden Mace, The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen (reprint 1977), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Break (99)  |  Descend (47)  |  Do (1908)  |  Door (93)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intrusion (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Open (274)  |  Presence (63)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Seal (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrine (8)  |  Successive (73)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Tutankhamen (3)  |  Want (497)

If it were possible for us to have so deep an insight into a man's character as shown both in inner and in outer actions, that every, even the least, incentive to these actions and all external occasions which affect them were so known to us that his future conduct could be predicted with as great a certainty as the occurrence of a solar or lunar eclipse, we could nevertheless still assert that the man is free.
Critique of Practical Reason (1788). In L. W. Beck (ed. & trans.), Critique of Practical Reason and Other Writings in Moral Philosophy (1949), 204-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Both (493)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Deep (233)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Free (232)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Incentive (9)  |  Insight (102)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Still (613)

If one proves the equality of two numbers a and b by showing first that “a is less than or equal to b” and then “a is greater than or equal to b”, it is unfair, one should instead show that they are really equal by disclosing the inner ground for their equality.
As quoted, without citation, in biography by Hermann Wehl, Emmy Noether (1935), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Equality (31)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Number (699)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Show (346)  |  Showing (6)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfair (8)

If we compare a mathematical problem with an immense rock, whose interior we wish to penetrate, then the work of the Greek mathematicians appears to us like that of a robust stonecutter, who, with indefatigable perseverance, attempts to demolish the rock gradually from the outside by means of hammer and chisel; but the modern mathematician resembles an expert miner, who first constructs a few passages through the rock and then explodes it with a single blast, bringing to light its inner treasures.
In Die Entwickelung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1869), 9. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 114. From the original German, “Vergleichen wir ein mathematisches Problem mit einem gewaltigen Felsen, in dessen Inneres wir eindringen wollen, so erscheint die Arbeit der griechischen Mathematiker uns als die eines rüstigen Steinhauers, der mit Hammer und Meissel in unermüdlicher Ausdauer den Felsen langsam von aussen her zu zerbröckeln beginnt; der moderne Mathematiker aber als ein trefflicher Minirer, der diesen Felsen zunächst mit wenigen Gängen durchzieht, von denen aus er dann den Felsblock mit einem gewaltigem Schlage zersprengt und die Schätze des Inneren zu Tage fördert.”
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Blast (13)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chisel (2)  |  Compare (69)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demolish (8)  |  Expert (65)  |  Explode (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Greek (107)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Immense (86)  |  Interior (32)  |  Light (607)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Miner (9)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Outside (141)  |  Passage (50)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Problem (676)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Robust (7)  |  Rock (161)  |  Single (353)  |  Through (849)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)

In an age of egoism, it is so difficult to persuade man that of all studies, the most important is that of himself. This is because egoism, like all passions, is blind. The attention of the egoist is directed to the immediate needs of which his senses give notice, and cannot be raised to those reflective needs that reason discloses to us; his aim is satisfaction, not perfection. He considers only his individual self; his species is nothing to him. Perhaps he fears that in penetrating the mysteries of his being he will ensure his own abasement, blush at his discoveries, and meet his conscience. True philosophy, always at one with moral science, tells a different tale. The source of useful illumination, we are told, is that of lasting content, is in ourselves. Our insight depends above all on the state of our faculties; but how can we bring our faculties to perfection if we do not know their nature and their laws! The elements of happiness are the moral sentiments; but how can we develop these sentiments without considering the principle of our affections, and the means of directing them? We become better by studying ourselves; the man who thoroughly knows himself is the wise man. Such reflection on the nature of his being brings a man to a better awareness of all the bonds that unite us to our fellows, to the re-discovery at the inner root of his existence of that identity of common life actuating us all, to feeling the full force of that fine maxim of the ancients: 'I am a man, and nothing human is alien to me.'
Considerations sur les diverses méthodes à suivre dans l'observation des peuples sauvages (1800) The Observation of Savage Peoples, trans. F. C. T. Moore (1969), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Blind (95)  |  Bond (45)  |  Common (436)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Consider (416)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Identity (19)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passion (114)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Studying (70)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Unite (42)  |  Useful (250)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wise Man (15)

In Aristotle the mind, regarded as the principle of life, divides into nutrition, sensation, and faculty of thought, corresponding to the inner most important stages in the succession of vital phenomena.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Divide (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Principle (507)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Stage (143)  |  Succession (77)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vital (85)

In every case the awakening touch has been the mathematical spirit, the attempt to count, to measure, or to calculate. What to the poet or the seer may appear to be the very death of all his poetry and all his visions—the cold touch of the calculating mind,—this has proved to be the spell by which knowledge has been born, by which new sciences have been created, and hundreds of definite problems put before the minds and into the hands of diligent students. It is the geometrical figure, the dry algebraical formula, which transforms the vague reasoning of the philosopher into a tangible and manageable conception; which represents, though it does not fully describe, which corresponds to, though it does not explain, the things and processes of nature: this clothes the fruitful, but otherwise indefinite, ideas in such a form that the strict logical methods of thought can be applied, that the human mind can in its inner chamber evolve a train of reasoning the result of which corresponds to the phenomena of the outer world.
In A History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1896), Vol. 1, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Born (33)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Chamber (7)  |  Cold (112)  |  Conception (154)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Count (105)  |  Create (235)  |  Death (388)  |  Definite (110)  |  Describe (128)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Dry (57)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Figure (160)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Poet (83)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seer (4)  |  Spell (9)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strict (17)  |  Student (300)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)  |  Train (114)  |  Transform (73)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

In human freedom in the philosophical sense I am definitely a disbeliever. Everybody acts not only under external compulsion but also in accordance with inner necessity. Schopenhauer’s saying, that ‘a man can do as he will, but not will as he will,’ has been an inspiration to me since my youth up, and a continual consolation and unfailing well-spring of patience in the face of the hardships of life, my own and others’. This feeling mercifully mitigates the sense of responsibility which so easily becomes paralysing, and it prevents us from taking ourselves and other people too seriously; it conduces to a view of life in which humour, above all, has its due place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Consolation (9)  |  Continual (43)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Easily (35)  |  Everybody (70)  |  External (57)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humour (116)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mitigate (3)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Patience (56)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Place (177)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Schopenhauers (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Spring (133)  |  Unfailing (5)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

In science the new is an advance; but in morals, as contradicting our inner ideals and historic idols, it is ever a retrogression.
Levana, or, The Doctrine of Education translated from the German (1880), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idol (5)  |  Moral (195)  |  New (1216)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Science (3879)

In the year 1902 (while I was attempting to explain to an elementary class in chemistry some of the ideas involved in the periodic law) becoming interested in the new theory of the electron, and combining this idea with those which are implied in the periodic classification, I formed an idea of the inner structure of the atom which, although it contained certain crudities, I have ever since regarded as representing essentially the arrangement of electrons in the atom ... In accordance with the idea of Mendeleef, that hydrogen is the first member of a full period, I erroneously assumed helium to have a shell of eight electrons. Regarding the disposition in the positive charge which balanced the electrons in the neutral atom, my ideas were very vague; I believed I inclined at that time toward the idea that the positive charge was also made up of discrete particles, the localization of which determined the localization of the electrons.
Valence and the Structure of Atoms and Molecules (1923), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Structure (3)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Electron (93)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Interest (386)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Localization (3)  |  Neutral (13)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Period (198)  |  Periodic Law (6)  |  Positive (94)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shell (63)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vague (47)  |  Year (933)

Is there perhaps some magical power in the subject [mathematics] that, although it had fought under the invincible banner of truth, has actually achieved its victories through some inner mysterious strength?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Actually (27)  |  Banner (7)  |  Fight (44)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Power (746)  |  Strength (126)  |  Subject (521)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Victory (39)

It is curious to observe with what different degrees of architectonic skill Providence has endowed birds of the same genus, and so nearly correspondent in their general mode of life! for while the swallow and the house-martin discover the greatest address in raising and securely fixing crusts or shells of loam as cunabula for their young, the bank-martin terebrates a round and regular hole in the sand or earth, which is serpentine, horizontal, and about two feet deep. At the inner end of this burrow does this bird deposit, in a good degree of safety, her rude nest, consisting of fine grasses and feathers, usually goose-feathers, very inartificially laid together.
In Letter to Daines Barrington, (26 Feb 1774), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Bird (149)  |  Crust (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Feather (12)  |  General (511)  |  Genus (25)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  Grass (46)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  House (140)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nest (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Providence (18)  |  Regular (46)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sand (62)  |  Shell (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Young (227)

It is popular to believe that the age of the individual and, above all, of the free individual, is past in science. There are many administrators of science and a large component of the general population who believe that mass attacks can do anything, and even that ideas are obsolete. Behind this drive to the mass attack there are a number of strong psychological motives. Neither the public or the big administrator has too good an understanding of the inner continuity of science, but they both have seen its world-shaking consequences, and they are afraid of it. Both of them wish to decerebrate the scientist, even as the Byzantine State emasculated its civil servants. Moreover, the great administrator who is not sure of his own intellectual level can aggrandize himself only by cutting his scientific employees down to size.
In I am a Mathematician (1956), Epilogue, 363-364.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (11)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Attack (84)  |  Behind (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Civil (26)  |  Component (48)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Cutting (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Free (232)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Large (394)  |  Mass (157)  |  Motive (59)  |  Number (699)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Past (337)  |  Population (110)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Servant (39)  |  Size (60)  |  State (491)  |  Strong (174)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

It is the task of science, as a collective human undertaking, to describe from the external side, (on which alone agreement is possible), such statistical regularity as there is in a world “in which every event has a unique aspect, and to indicate where possible the limits of such description. It is not part of its task to make imaginative interpretation of the internal aspect of reality—what it is like, for example, to be a lion, an ant or an ant hill, a liver cell, or a hydrogen ion. The only qualification is in the field of introspective psychology in which each human being is both observer and observed, and regularities may be established by comparing notes. Science is thus a limited venture. It must act as if all phenomena were deterministic at least in the sense of determinable probabilities. It cannot properly explain the behaviour of an amoeba as due partly to surface and other physical forces and partly to what the amoeba wants to do, with out danger of something like 100 per cent duplication. It must stick to the former. It cannot introduce such principles as creative activity into its interpretation of evolution for similar reasons. The point of view indicated by a consideration of the hierarchy of physical and biological organisms, now being bridged by the concept of the gene, is one in which science deliberately accepts a rigorous limitation of its activities to the description of the external aspects of events. In carrying out this program, the scientist should not, however, deceive himself or others into thinking that he is giving an account of all of reality. The unique inner creative aspect of every event necessarily escapes him.
In 'Gene and Organism', American Naturalist, (1953), 87, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Account (192)  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creative (137)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Former (137)  |  Gene (98)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Internal (66)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Ion (21)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lion (22)  |  Liver (19)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Surface (209)  |  Task (147)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Unique (67)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (36)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (212)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

Laws, written, if not on stone tables, yet on the azure of infinitude, in the inner heart of God’s creation, certain as life, certain as death, are there, and thou shalt not disobey them.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 232:11.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Certain (550)  |  Creation (327)  |  Death (388)  |  God (757)  |  Heart (229)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Stone (162)  |  Table (104)

Learning how to access a continuity of common sense can be one of your most efficient accomplishments in this decade. Can you imagine common sense surpassing science and technology in the quest to unravel the human stress mess? In time, society will have a new measure for confirming truth. It’s inside the people-not at the mercy of current scientific methodology. Let scientists facilitate discovery, but not invent your inner truth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Access (20)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Current (118)  |  Decade (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inside (26)  |  Invent (51)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Let (61)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mess (13)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  People (1005)  |  Quest (39)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Stress (22)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Will (2355)

Mathematic stands forth as that which unites, mediates between Man and Nature, Inner and Outer world, Thought and Perception, [as no other subject does].
In Die Erziehung der Menschheit (1826). Adapted and translated in William Henry Herford, 'The School: Mathematic', The Student’s Froebel (1894), Vol. 1, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mediate (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Perception (97)  |  Stand (274)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unite (42)  |  World (1774)

Mathematics, like dialectics, is an organ of the inner higher sense; in its execution it is an art like eloquence. Both alike care nothing for the content, to both nothing is of value but the form. It is immaterial to mathematics whether it computes pennies or guineas, to rhetoric whether it defends truth or error.
From Wilhelm Meislers Wanderjahre (1829), Zweites Buch. Collected in Goethe’s Werke (1830), Vol. 22, 252. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 36-37. The same book has another translation on p.202: “Mathematics, like dialectics, is an organ of the higher sense, in its execution it is an art like eloquence. To both nothing but the form is of value; neither cares anything for content. Whether mathematics considers pennies or guineas, whether rhetoric defends truth or error, is perfectly immaterial to either.” From the original German, “Die Mathematik ist, wie die Dialektik, ein Organ des inneren höheren Sinnes, in der Ausübung ist sie eine Kunst wie die Beredsamkeit. Für beide hat nichts Wert als die Form; der Gehalt ist ihnen gleichgültig. Ob die Mathematik Pfennige oder oder Guineen berechne, die Rhetorik Wahres oder Falsches verteidige, ist beiden vollkommen gleich.”
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Art (657)  |  Both (493)  |  Care (186)  |  Compute (18)  |  Content (69)  |  Defend (30)  |  Dialectic (5)  |  Eloquence (7)  |  Error (321)  |  Execution (25)  |  Form (959)  |  Guinea (2)  |  High (362)  |  Immaterial (6)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organ (115)  |  Penny (5)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Sense (770)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)

Nature uncovers the inner secrets of nature in two ways: one by the force of bodies operating outside it; the other by the very movements of its innards. The external actions are strong winds, rains, river currents, sea waves, ice, forest fires, floods; there is only one internal force—earthquake.
About the Layers of the Earth and other Works on Geology (1757), trans. A. P. Lapov (1949), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Current (118)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Forest (150)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice (54)  |  Internal (66)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wind (128)

One of the most curious and interesting reptiles which I met with in Borneo was a large tree-frog, which was brought me by one of the Chinese workmen. He assured me that he had seen it come down in a slanting direction from a high tree, as if it flew. On examining it, I found the toes very long and fully webbed to their very extremity, so that when expanded they offered a surface much larger than the body. The forelegs were also bordered by a membrane, and the body was capable of considerable inflation. The back and limbs were of a very deep shining green colour, the undersurface and the inner toes yellow, while the webs were black, rayed with yellow. The body was about four inches long, while the webs of each hind foot, when fully expanded, covered a surface of four square inches, and the webs of all the feet together about twelve square inches. As the extremities of the toes have dilated discs for adhesion, showing the creature to be a true tree frog, it is difficult to imagine that this immense membrane of the toes can be for the purpose of swimming only, and the account of the Chinaman, that it flew down from the tree, becomes more credible. This is, I believe, the first instance known of a “flying frog,” and it is very interesting to Darwinians as showing that the variability of the toes which have been already modified for purposes of swimming and adhesive climbing, have been taken advantage of to enable an allied species to pass through the air like the flying lizard. It would appear to be a new species of the genus Rhacophorus, which consists of several frogs of a much smaller size than this, and having the webs of the toes less developed.
Malay Archipelago
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Adhesion (6)  |  Adhesive (2)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ally (6)  |  Already (222)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assure (15)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Black (42)  |  Body (537)  |  Border (9)  |  Borneo (3)  |  Bring (90)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Climb (35)  |  Color (137)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creature (233)  |  Credible (3)  |  Curious (91)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disk (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Enable (119)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extremity (7)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Foot (60)  |  Frog (38)  |  Fully (21)  |  Genus (25)  |  Green (63)  |  High (362)  |  Hind (3)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inch (9)  |  Inflation (5)  |  Instance (33)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Less (103)  |  Limb (8)  |  Lizard (7)  |  Long (790)  |  Meet (31)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Modify (15)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Offer (141)  |  Pass (238)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reptile (29)  |  See (1081)  |  Several (32)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Through (849)  |  Toe (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  True (212)  |  Underside (2)  |  Variability (5)  |  Web (16)  |  Workman (13)  |  Yellow (30)

Putting on the spectacles of science in expectation of finding an answer to everything looked at signifies inner blindness.
The Voice of the Coyote (1947, 1961), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Look (582)  |  Science (3879)  |  Signify (17)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)

Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that this is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not bring us any closer to the secrets of the “Old One.” I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing at dice.
Letter to Max Born (4 Dec 1926). Collected in The Born-Einstein Letters: Correspondence between Albert Einstein and Max and Hedwig Born from 1916-1955 (1971), 91. Also seen as “God does not play dice [with the universe].”
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Closer (43)  |  Dice (21)  |  God (757)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Old (481)  |  Playing (42)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Say (984)  |  Secret (194)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)

Reality is a fabrication slapped together by an often bumbling inner team. ...The proclamation that "there can be no such thing as an objective fact" has a great deal of validity.
In 'A Trip Through the Perception Factory', Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century (2000),70.
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Fabrication (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Great (1574)  |  Objective (91)  |  Proclamation (3)  |  Reality (261)  |  Slap (3)  |  Team (15)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Validity (47)

Scientific work, especially mathematical work which is purely conceptual, may indeed possess the appearance of beauty, because of the inner coherence which it shares with fine art, or may resemble a piece of architecture.
From 'Characters of the Beautiful', Beauty, Chap. 3, collected in Collected Works Of Samuel Alexander (2000), 51-52.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Possess (156)  |  Purely (109)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Share (75)  |  Work (1351)

Since science's competence extends to observable and measurable phenomena, not to the inner being of things, and to the means, not to the ends of human life, it would be nonsense to expect that the progress of science will provide men with a new type of metaphysics, ethics, or religion.
'Science and Ontology', Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (1949), 5, 200.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Competence (11)  |  End (590)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extend (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  New (1216)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Observable (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Type (167)  |  Will (2355)

Since the discovery of secret things and in the investigation of hidden causes, stronger reasons are obtained from sure experiments and demonstrated arguments than from probable conjectures and the opinions of philosophical speculators of the common sort; therefore to the end that the noble substance of that great loadstone, our common mother (the earth), still quite unknown, and also the forces extraordinary and exalted of this globe may the better be understood, we have decided first to begin with the common stony and ferruginous matter, and magnetic bodies, and the parts of the earth that we may handle and may perceive with the senses; then to proceed with plain magnetic experiments, and to penetrate to the inner parts of the earth.
On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies and on the Great Magnet the Earth: A New Physiology, Demonstrated with many Arguments and Experiments (1600), trans. P. Fleury Mottelay (1893), Author’s Preface, xlvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  Common (436)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handle (28)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mother (114)  |  Noble (90)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reason (744)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  Still (613)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unknown (182)

Sometime in my early teens, I started feeling an inner urgency, ups and downs of excitement and frustration, caused by such unlikely occupations as reading Granville’s course of calculus ... I found this book in the attic of a friend’s apartment. Among other standard stuff, it contained the notorious epsilon-delta definition of continuous functions. After struggling with this definition for some time (it was the hot Crimean summer, and I was sitting in the shadow of a dusty apple tree), I got so angry that I dug a shallow grave for the book between the roots, buried it there, and left in disdain. Rain started in an hour. I ran back to the tree and exhumed the poor thing. Thus, I discovered that I loved it, regardless.
'Mathematics as Profession and vocation', in V. Arnold et al. (eds.), Mathematics: Frontiers and Perspectives (2000), 153. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 79.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anger (20)  |  Angry (8)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Apple (40)  |  Attic (3)  |  Back (390)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Burial (7)  |  Bury (16)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Definition (221)  |  Dig (21)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Down (456)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Friend (168)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Function (228)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hour (186)  |  Leave (130)  |  Love (309)  |  Notorious (8)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Rain (62)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Root (120)  |  Run (174)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Sometime (4)  |  Standard (57)  |  Start (221)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Summer (54)  |  Teen (2)  |  Teenager (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Urgency (12)

The advance of scientific knowledge does not seem to make either our universe or our inner life in it any less mysterious.
The Sciences and Philosophy: Gifford Lectures, University of Glasgow, 1927 & 1925 (1929), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Universe (857)

The basic thesis of gestalt theory might be formulated thus: there are contexts in which what is happening in the whole cannot be deduced from the characteristics of the separate pieces, but conversely; what happens to a part of the whole is, in clearcut cases, determined by the laws of the inner structure of its whole.
Lecture at the Kantgesellschaft (Kant Society), Berlin (17 Dec 1924), 'Über Gestalttheorie', as taken down in shorthand. Translated by N. Nairn-Allison in Social Research (1944), 11, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Case (99)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Context (29)  |  Conversely (2)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Determine (144)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Law (894)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Whole (738)

The desire for truth so prominent in the quest of science, a reaching out of the spirit from its isolation to something beyond, a response to beauty in nature and art, an Inner Light of conviction and guidance—are these as much a part of our being as our sensitivity to sense impressions?
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 42-43.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Desire (204)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Impression (114)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Light (607)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Quest (39)  |  Response (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Something (719)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)

The history of civilization proves beyond doubt just how sterile the repeated attempts of metaphysics to guess at nature’s laws have been. Instead, there is every reason to believe that when the human intellect ignores reality and concentrates within, it can no longer explain the simplest inner workings of life’s machinery or of the world around us.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Explain (322)  |  Guess (61)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Repeated (5)  |  Simplest (10)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Working (20)  |  World (1774)

The hypothesis that man is not free is essential to the application of scientific method to the study of human behavior. The free inner man who is held responsible for the behavior of the external biological organism is only a prescientific substitute for the kinds of causes which are discovered in the course of a scientific analysis.
In Science and Human Behavior (1953), 447.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Application (242)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Essential (199)  |  External (57)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Behavior (9)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Organism (220)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Study (653)  |  Substitute (46)

The importance of C.F. Gauss for the development of modern physical theory and especially for the mathematical fundament of the theory of relativity is overwhelming indeed; also his achievement of the system of absolute measurement in the field of electromagnetism. In my opinion it is impossible to achieve a coherent objective picture of the world on the basis of concepts which are taken more or less from inner psychological experience.
Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Basis (173)  |  Concept (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Electromagnetism (18)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Objective (91)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Relativity (88)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  World (1774)

The individual on his own is stable only so long as he is possessed of self-esteem. The maintenance of self-esteem is a continuous task which taxes all of the individual’s powers and inner resources. We have to prove our worth and justify our existence anew each day. When, for whatever reason, self-esteem is unattainable, the autonomous individual becomes a highly explosive entity. He turns away from an unpromising self and plunges into the pursuit of pride—the explosive substitute for self-esteem. All social disturbances and upheavals have their roots in crises of individual self-esteem, and the great endeavor in which the masses most readily unite is basically a search for pride.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 18
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anew (18)  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Basically (4)  |  Become (815)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Entity (35)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Highly (16)  |  Individual (404)  |  Justify (24)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Mass (157)  |  Most (1731)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resource (63)  |  Root (120)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Esteem (6)  |  Social (252)  |  Stable (30)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Task (147)  |  Tax (26)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  Unite (42)  |  Unpromising (2)  |  Upheaval (4)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Worth (169)

The inner circle of creative mathematicians have the well-kept trade secret that in a great many cases theorems come first and axioms second.
In 'The Narrow Mathematician', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jun-Jul 1962), 69, No. 6, 464.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Case (99)  |  Circle (110)  |  Creative (137)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Many (4)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Trade (31)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (80)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Summer (54)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Try (283)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)

The most important human endeavor is the striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance and even our very existence depend on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to life.
In a letter to a minister in Brooklyn, N.Y. (20 Nov 1950), first paragraph, as quoted in Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffmann (eds.), Albert Einstein: The Human Side (1979, 1981), 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Balance (77)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Existence (456)  |  Give (202)  |  Human (1468)  |  Important (209)  |  Life (1795)  |  Morality (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Strive (46)

The mystic and the physicist arrive at the same conclusion; one starting from the inner realm, the other from the outer world. The harmony between their views confirms the ancient Indian wisdom that Brahman, the ultimate reality without, is identical to Atman, the reality within.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Brahman (2)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Identical (53)  |  Indian (27)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realm (85)  |  Start (221)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  View (488)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Within (7)  |  Without (13)  |  World (1774)

The Primal Plant is going be the strangest creature in the world, which Nature herself must envy me. With this model and the key to it, it will be possible to go on for ever inventing plants and know that their existence is logical; that is to say, if they do not actually exist, they could, for they are not the shadowy phantoms of a vain imagination, but possess an inner necessity and truth. The same law will be applicable to all other living organisms.
To Herder, 17 May 1787. Italian Journey (1816-17), trans. W. H. Auden and Elizabeth Mayer (1970), 310-11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Creature (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Envy (15)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Say (984)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The unavoidable conclusion is that the unprecedented meekness of the majority is responsible for the increase in violence. Social stability is the product of an equilibrium between a vigorous majority and violent minorities. Disorder does not come from an increased inner pressure or from the interaction of explosive ingredients. There is no reason to believe that the nature of the violent minorities is now greatly different from what it was in the past. What has changed is the will and ability of the majority to react.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Belief (578)  |  Change (593)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Different (577)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Increase (210)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Majority (66)  |  Meekness (2)  |  Minority (21)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Past (337)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Product (160)  |  React (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Social (252)  |  Stability (25)  |  Unavoidable (3)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Violence (34)  |  Violent (17)  |  Will (2355)

The work of the inventor consists of conceptualizing, combining, and ordering what is possible according to the laws of nature. This inner working out which precedes the external has a twofold characteristic: the participation of the subconscious in the inventing subject; and that encounter with an external power which demands and obtains complete subjugation, so that the way to the solution is experienced as the fitting of one's own imagination to this power.
Philosophie der Technik (1927). 'Technology in Its Proper Sphere' translated by William Carroll. In Carl Mitcham (ed.) and Robert Mackey (ed.), Philosophy and Technology: Readings in the Philosophical Problems of Technology, (1972), Vol. 14, 321. In David Lovekin, Technique, Discourse, and Consciousness (1991), 73.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consist (223)  |  Demand (123)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Experience (467)  |  External (57)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Internal (66)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Order (632)  |  Participation (15)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subconscious (4)  |  Subject (521)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  Working (20)

The world is not as it was when it came from its Maker’s hands. It has been modified by many great revolutions, brought about by an inner mechanism of which we very imperfectly comprehend the movements; but of which we gain a glimpse by studying their effects: and their many causes still acting on the surface of our globe with undiminished power, which are changing, and will continue to change it, as long as it shall last.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1841), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Continue (165)  |  Effect (393)  |  Gain (145)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modification (55)  |  Movement (155)  |  Power (746)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

There have, however, always been men of high and disciplined spirituality who have insisted on their direct experience of something greater than themselves. Their conviction of the reality of a spiritual life apart from and transcending the life of the body may not lend itself to scientific proof or disproof; nevertheless the remarkable transformation in personality seen in those who rightfully lay claim to such experience is as objective as tomorrow's sunrise. Millions of lesser men draw strength from the contacts they can make through prayer and meditation with this aspect of the inner life.
at a convention of scientists in 1967 at the University of Notre Dame
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Body (537)  |  Claim (146)  |  Contact (65)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Direct (225)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Objective (91)  |  Personality (62)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Proof (287)  |  Reality (261)  |  Religion (361)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Strength (126)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Transformation (69)

Though much new light is shed by ... studies in radioactivity, the nucleus of the atom, with its hoard of energy, thus continues to present us with a fascinating mystery. ... Our assault on atoms has broken down the outer fortifications. We feel that we know the fundamental rules according to which the outer part of the atom is built. The appearance and properties of the electron atmosphere are rather familiar. Yet that inner citadel, the atomic nucleus, remains unconquered, and we have reason to believe that within this citadel is secreted a great treasure. Its capture may form the main objective of the physicists’ next great drive.
'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assault (12)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Broken (56)  |  Built (7)  |  Capture (10)  |  Citadel (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hoard (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Main (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Objective (91)  |  Outer (13)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rule (294)  |  Secret (194)  |  Study (653)  |  Treasure (57)

To write the true natural history of the world, we should need to be able to follow it from within. It would thus appear no longer as an interlocking succession of structural types replacing one another, but as an ascension of inner sap spreading out in a forest of consolidated instincts. Right at its base, the living world is constituted by conscious clothes in flesh and bone.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 151. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Base (117)  |  Bone (95)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forest (150)  |  History (673)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Interlocking (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Need (290)  |  Right (452)  |  Sap (3)  |  Spreading (5)  |  Structural (29)  |  Succession (77)  |  True (212)  |  Type (167)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

Truth and falsity, indeed understanding, is not necessarily something purely intellectual, remote from feelings and attitudes. ... It is in the total conduct of men rather than in their statements that truth or falsehood lives, more in what a man does, in his real reaction to other men and to things, in his will to do them justice, to live at one with them. Here lies the inner connection between truth and justice. In the realm of behavior and action, the problem recurs as to the difference between piece and part.
From 'On Truth', collected in Mary Henle (ed.), Documents of Gestalt Psychology (1961), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Connection (162)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Piece (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Real (149)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recur (4)  |  Remote (83)  |  Something (719)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Describe (128)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We are told that “Mathematics is that study which knows nothing of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of causation.” I think no statement could have been made more opposite to the facts of the case; that mathematical analysis is constantly invoking the aid of new principles, new ideas, and new methods, not capable of being defined by any form of words, but springing direct from the inherent powers and activities of the human mind, and from continually renewed introspection of that inner world of thought of which the phenomena are as varied and require as close attention to discern as those of the outer physical world (to which the inner one in each individual man may, I think, be conceived to stand somewhat in the same relation of correspondence as a shadow to the object from which it is projected, or as the hollow palm of one hand to the closed fist which it grasps of the other), that it is unceasingly calling forth the faculties of observation and comparison, that one of its principal weapons is induction, that it has frequent recourse to experimental trial and verification, and that it affords a boundless scope for the exercise of the highest efforts of the imagination and invention.
In Presidential Address to British Association, Exeter British Association Report (1869), pp. 1-9, in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 654.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Afford (17)  |  Aid (97)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Case (99)  |  Causation (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Continually (16)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Define (49)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discern (33)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fist (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Palm (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Principal (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Relation (157)  |  Renew (19)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Scope (45)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unceasingly (2)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verification (31)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

We now live in an age in which science is a court from which there is no appeal. And this issue this time around, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, is not the evolution of the species, which can seem a remote business, but the nature of our own precious inner selves.
Tom Wolfe
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Business (149)  |  Century (310)  |  Court (33)  |  Evolution (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Issue (42)  |  Live (628)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Precious (41)  |  Remote (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Species (401)  |  Time (1877)  |  Twenty-First (2)

We receive experience from nature in a series of messages. From these messages we extract a content of information: that is, we decode the messages in some way. And from this code of information we then make a basic vocabulary of concepts and a basic grammar of laws, which jointly describe the inner organization that nature translates into the happenings and the appearances we meet.
The Identity of Man. Quoted in Richard Dawkins, The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing (2008), 176-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Basic (138)  |  Code (31)  |  Concept (221)  |  Describe (128)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extract (40)  |  Happening (58)  |  Information (166)  |  Law (894)  |  Message (49)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organization (114)  |  Receive (114)  |  Series (149)  |  Translate (19)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Way (1217)

What is exact about mathematics but exactness? And is not this a consequence of the inner sense of truth?
In 'Sprüche in Prosa', Natur, 6, 948.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Sense (770)  |  Truth (1057)

…nature seems very conversant with the rules of pure mathematics, as our own mathematicians have formulated them in their studies, out of their own inner consciousness and without drawing to any appreciable extent on their experience of the outer world.
In The Mysterious Universe (1930), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Conversant (6)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outer (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Rule (294)  |  Study (653)  |  World (1774)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.