Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index G > Category: Greatly

Greatly Quotes (12 quotes)

All government, in its essence, is organized exploitation, and in virtually all its existing forms it is the implacable enemy of every industrious and well-disposed man ... The typical politician is not only a rascal but also a jackass, so he greatly values the puerile notoriety and adulation that sensible men try to avoid.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (52)  |  Enemy (63)  |  Essence (54)  |  Exist (147)  |  Exploitation (11)  |  Form (308)  |  Government (93)  |  Implacable (3)  |  Industrious (8)  |  Jackass (3)  |  Notoriety (2)  |  Organize (20)  |  Politician (26)  |  Rascal (3)  |  Sensible (25)  |  Try (141)  |  Typical (13)  |  Value (240)  |  Virtually (6)

Goethe said that he who cannot draw on 3,000 years of learning is living hand to mouth. It could just as well be said that individuals who do tap deeply into this rich cultural legacy are wealthy indeed. Yet the paradox is that much of this wisdom is buried in a sea of lesser books or like lost treasure beneath an ocean of online ignorance and trivia. That doesn’t mean that with a little bit of diligence you can’t tap into it. Yet many people, perhaps most, never take advantage of all this human experience. They aren’t obtaining knowledge beyond what they need to know for work or to get by. As a result, their view of our amazing world is diminished and their lives greatly circumscribed.
In An Embarrassment of Riches: Tapping Into the World's Greatest Legacy of Wealth (2013), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (73)  |  Amazing (21)  |  Arent (5)  |  Beneath (16)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Bit (22)  |  Book (257)  |  Bury (16)  |  Circumscribe (2)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Diligence (16)  |  Diminish (16)  |  Draw (55)  |  Experience (338)  |  Goethe (2)  |  Hand (141)  |  Human (548)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Individual (215)  |  Know (547)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Learn (281)  |  Legacy (11)  |  Lesser (5)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Lose (93)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mouth (21)  |  Need (283)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ocean (148)  |  Online (4)  |  Paradox (43)  |  People (388)  |  Result (376)  |  Rich (61)  |  Say (228)  |  Sea (187)  |  Tap (10)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Trivia (2)  |  View (171)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wisdom (180)  |  Work (626)  |  World (892)  |  Year (299)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (65)  |  Adhere (3)  |  Anticipate (10)  |  Appear (115)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (61)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (106)  |  Board (12)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (83)  |  Companion (13)  |  Consequence (110)  |  Constant (56)  |  Contain (67)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (33)  |  Development (276)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Direction (74)  |  Discover (196)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Doom (15)  |  Effort (143)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (12)  |  Error (275)  |  Example (92)  |  Explain (105)  |  Field (170)  |  Figure (68)  |  Final (49)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (405)  |  First (313)  |  Follow (123)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Forest (107)  |  Formula (79)  |  Full (63)  |  Function (128)  |  Genius (243)  |  Give (200)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (141)  |  Hear (60)  |  Help (101)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (69)  |  Independent (65)  |  Intention (28)  |  Journal (19)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (2)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Late (52)  |  Lead (158)  |  Learn (281)  |  Lecture (67)  |  Life (1124)  |  Likely (33)  |  Listen (39)  |  Listener (5)  |  Little (184)  |  Manifest (20)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mere (78)  |  Mind (743)  |  Mode (40)  |  Moment (106)  |  New (483)  |  Next (35)  |  Notable (5)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (91)  |  Path (84)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (43)  |  Pioneer (27)  |  Place (174)  |  Pleasure (130)  |  Point (122)  |  Possible (155)  |  Prime (10)  |  Principle (285)  |  Professor (54)  |  Quality (93)  |  Rapidly (13)  |  Read (144)  |  Real (148)  |  Reason (454)  |  Report (37)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (92)  |  Result (376)  |  Right (196)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (155)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Say (228)  |  Seem (143)  |  Several (31)  |  Small (161)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (227)  |  Soon (34)  |  Sound (88)  |  Spring (70)  |  Start (97)  |  Stop (75)  |  Subject (235)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (48)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (99)  |  Term (120)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theory (690)  |  Theory Of Numbers (5)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Understand (326)  |  Universe (683)  |  Weakness (35)  |  Work (626)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (153)

Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailing cultural patterns and the types of organisation which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (6)  |  Anthropology (56)  |  Behavior (60)  |  Biological (35)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Condemn (13)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Cruel (12)  |  Cultural (23)  |  Culture (102)  |  Depend (87)  |  Differ (22)  |  Fate (46)  |  Ground (90)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Improve (54)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Lot (29)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Modern (159)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Predominate (5)  |  Prevail (16)  |  Primitive (41)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Society (227)  |  Strive (43)  |  Teach (179)  |  Type (51)

Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (63)  |  Dare (30)  |  Fail (58)

The American, by nature, is optimistic. He is experimental, an inventor and a builder who builds best when called upon to build greatly. Arouse his will to believe in himself, give him a great goal to believe in, and he will create the means to reach it.
Given with date 1 Jan 1960 in Brian M. Thomsen, The Dream That Will Not Die: Inspiring Words of John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy (2010), 79. Webmaster has not seen a primary document for this quote. Although it is widely circulated, the origin is usually never cited. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Arouse (11)  |  Belief (503)  |  Best (172)  |  Build (117)  |  Builder (12)  |  Creation (239)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Goal (100)  |  Great (524)  |  Inventor (55)  |  Means (171)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Optimism (12)  |  Reach (119)

The art of discovering the causes of phenomena, or true hypothesis, is like the art of deciphering, in which an ingenious conjecture greatly shortens the road.
In Gottfried Leibniz and Alfred Fideon Langley (trans.), 'Leibniz’s Critique of Locke', New Essays Concerning Human Understanding (1896), Book 4, Chap. 12, 526.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (284)  |  Cause (283)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Discover (196)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Ingenious (25)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Road (63)  |  Shorten (5)  |  True (201)

The opinion of Bacon on this subject [geometry] was diametrically opposed to that of the ancient philosophers. He valued geometry chiefly, if not solely, on account of those uses, which to Plato appeared so base. And it is remarkable that the longer Bacon lived the stronger this feeling became. When in 1605 he wrote the two books on the Advancement of Learning, he dwelt on the advantages which mankind derived from mixed mathematics; but he at the same time admitted that the beneficial effect produced by mathematical study on the intellect, though a collateral advantage, was “no less worthy than that which was principal and intended.” But it is evident that his views underwent a change. When near twenty years later, he published the De Augmentis, which is the Treatise on the Advancement of Learning, greatly expanded and carefully corrected, he made important alterations in the part which related to mathematics. He condemned with severity the pretensions of the mathematicians, “delidas et faslum mathematicorum.” Assuming the well-being of the human race to be the end of knowledge, he pronounced that mathematical science could claim no higher rank than that of an appendage or an auxiliary to other sciences. Mathematical science, he says, is the handmaid of natural philosophy; she ought to demean herself as such; and he declares that he cannot conceive by what ill chance it has happened that she presumes to claim precedence over her mistress.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (67)  |  Admit (44)  |  Advancement (40)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Alteration (25)  |  Ancient (103)  |  Appear (115)  |  Appendage (2)  |  Assume (37)  |  Auxiliary (6)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Base (71)  |  Become (172)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Book (257)  |  Carefully (12)  |  Chance (159)  |  Change (363)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Claim (70)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Conceive (36)  |  Condemn (13)  |  Correct (83)  |  De (3)  |  Declare (27)  |  Derive (33)  |  Diametrically (2)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Effect (165)  |  End (195)  |  Expand (22)  |  Feel (165)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Handmaid (5)  |  Happen (82)  |  High (152)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Important (202)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Intend (16)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Late (52)  |  Learn (281)  |  Less (102)  |  Live (269)  |  Long (172)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Mix (19)  |  Natural Philosophy (28)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Oppose (23)  |  Part (220)  |  Philosopher (164)  |  Plato (73)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Presume (8)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Principal (28)  |  Produce (100)  |  Pronounce (5)  |  Publish (33)  |  Rank (32)  |  Relate (19)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (155)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2043)  |  Severity (6)  |  Solely (9)  |  Strong (72)  |  Study (461)  |  Subject (235)  |  Time (594)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Value (240)  |  View (171)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Write (153)  |  Year (299)

The scientific world-picture vouchsafes a very complete understanding of all that happens–it makes it just a little too understandable. It allows you to imagine the total display as that of a mechanical clockwork which, for all that science knows, could go on just the same as it does, without there being consciousness, will, endeavor, pain and delight and responsibility connected with it–though they actually are. And the reason for this disconcerting situation is just this: that for the purpose of constructing the picture of the external world, we have used the greatly simplifying device of cutting our own personality out, removing it; hence it is gone, it has evaporated, it is ostensibly not needed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Allow (44)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Complete (84)  |  Connect (30)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Construct (40)  |  Cut (39)  |  Delight (64)  |  Device (28)  |  Disconcerting (3)  |  Display (24)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  External (55)  |  Happen (82)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Know (547)  |  Little (184)  |  Mechanical (48)  |  Need (283)  |  Pain (100)  |  Personality (47)  |  Picture (75)  |  Purpose (193)  |  Reason (454)  |  Remove (26)  |  Responsibility (55)  |  Same (155)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Simplify (11)  |  Situation (52)  |  Total (36)  |  Understand (326)  |  Understandable (4)  |  Vouchsafe (2)  |  World (892)

The unavoidable conclusion is that the unprecedented meekness of the majority is responsible for the increase in violence. Social stability is the product of an equilibrium between a vigorous majority and violent minorities. Disorder does not come from an increased inner pressure or from the interaction of explosive ingredients. There is no reason to believe that the nature of the violent minorities is now greatly different from what it was in the past. What has changed is the will and ability of the majority to react.
In 'Thoughts on the Present', First Things, Last Things (1971), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Belief (503)  |  Change (363)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Different (178)  |  Disorder (23)  |  Equilibrium (18)  |  Explosive (18)  |  Increase (145)  |  Ingredient (14)  |  Inner (39)  |  Interaction (31)  |  Majority (42)  |  Meekness (2)  |  Minority (16)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Past (150)  |  Pressure (34)  |  Product (82)  |  React (7)  |  Reason (454)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Social (108)  |  Stability (20)  |  Unavoidable (3)  |  Unprecedented (8)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Violence (23)  |  Violent (17)

The world is full of signals that we don’t perceive. Tiny creatures live in a different world of unfamiliar forces. Many animals of our scale greatly exceed our range of perception for sensations familiar to us ... What an imperceptive lot we are. Surrounded by so much, so fascinating and so real, that we do not see (hear, smell, touch, taste) in nature, yet so gullible and so seduced by claims for novel power that we mistake the tricks of mediocre magicians for glimpses of a psychic world beyond our ken. The paranormal may be a fantasy; it is certainly a haven for charlatans. But ‘parahuman’ powers of perception lie all about us in birds, bees, and bacteria.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Bacterium (5)  |  Bee (27)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Bird (119)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Charlatan (8)  |  Claim (70)  |  Creature (154)  |  Different (178)  |  Exceed (9)  |  Familiar (42)  |  Fantasy (9)  |  Fascinating (22)  |  Force (249)  |  Full (63)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Hear (60)  |  Ken (2)  |  Lie (115)  |  Live (269)  |  Lot (29)  |  Magician (13)  |  Mediocre (7)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Novel (19)  |  Paranormal (3)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Perception (61)  |  Power (358)  |  Psychic (6)  |  Range (57)  |  Real (148)  |  Scale (62)  |  Seduce (4)  |  See (369)  |  Sensation (28)  |  Signal (18)  |  Smell (18)  |  Surround (29)  |  Taste (48)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Touch (76)  |  Trick (24)  |  Unfamiliar (8)  |  World (892)

Very great charm of shadow and light is to be found in the faces of those who sit in the doors of dark houses. The eye of the spectator sees that part of the face which is in shadow lost in the darkness of the house, and that part of the face which is lit draws its brilliancy from the splendor of the sky. From this intensification of light and shade the face gains greatly in relief and beauty by showing the subtlest shadows in the light part and the subtlest lights in the dark part.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (239)  |  Brilliancy (3)  |  Charm (26)  |  Dark (76)  |  Darkness (43)  |  Door (38)  |  Draw (55)  |  Eye (218)  |  Face (108)  |  Find (405)  |  Gain (67)  |  Great (524)  |  House (43)  |  Intensification (2)  |  Light (345)  |  Lose (93)  |  Part (220)  |  Relief (18)  |  See (369)  |  Shade (22)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Show (90)  |  Sit (47)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spectator (9)  |  Splendor (12)  |  Subtl (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.