Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Effort

Effort Quotes (227 quotes)

... [I]nfectious disease is merely a disagreeable instance of a widely prevalent tendency of all living creatures to save themselves the bother of building, by their own efforts, the things they require. Whenever they find it possible to take advantage of the constructive labors of others, this is the path of least resistance. The plant does the work with its roots and its green leaves. The cow eats the plant. Man eats both of them; and bacteria (or investment bankers) eat the man. ...
Rats, Lice and History (1935).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Cow (39)  |  Creature (233)  |  Disagreeable (5)  |  Disease (328)  |  Eat (104)  |  Find (998)  |  Green (63)  |  Investment (13)  |  Labor (107)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possible (552)  |  Require (219)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Root (120)  |  Save (118)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1351)

...That day in the account of creation, or those days that are numbers according to its recurrence, are beyond the experience and knowledge of us mortal earthbound men. And if we are able to make any effort towards an understanding of those days, we ought not to rush forward with an ill considered opinion, as if no other reasonable and plausible interpretation could be offered.
iv.44
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creation (327)  |  Earthbound (4)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forward (102)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Number (699)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Recurrence (5)  |  Rush (18)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Decus et pretium recte petit experiens vir.
The man who makes the attempt justly aims at honour and reward.
Horace
Epistles bk. 1, no. 17, 1. 42. In Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetiea, trans. H. Rushton Fairclough (1926), 364-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Honour (56)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reward (68)

Theologus esse volebam: diu angebar: Deus ecce mea opera etiam in astronomia celebratur.
I wanted to become a theologian. For a long time I was restless. Now, however, behold how through my effort God is being celebrated in astronomy.
Letter to Michael Maestlin (3 Oct 1595). Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937- ), Vol. 13, letter 23, l. 256-7, p. 40. As translated in Owen Gingerich, 'Johannes Kepler' article in Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.) Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1973), Vol. 7, 291. Also seen translated as “I wanted to become a theologian; for a long time I was unhappy. Now, behold, God is praised by my work even in astronomy.”
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  God (757)  |  Long (790)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)

A fateful process is set in motion when the individual is released “to the freedom of his own impotence” and left to justify his existence by his own efforts. The autonomous individual, striving to realize himself and prove his worth, has created all that is great in literature, art, music, science and technology. The autonomous individual, also, when he can neither realize himself nor justify his existence by his own efforts, is a breeding call of frustration, and the seed of the convulsions which shake our world to its foundations.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Breed (24)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Create (235)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fateful (2)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Frustration (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  Justify (24)  |  Leave (130)  |  Literature (103)  |  Motion (310)  |  Music (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Realize (147)  |  Release (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Seed (93)  |  Set (394)  |  Shake (41)  |  Strive (46)  |  Technology (257)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

A garden requires patient labor and attention. Plants do not grow merely to satisfy ambitions or to fulfill good intentions. They thrive because some one expended effort on them.
In Philip Dorf, Liberty Hyde Bailey: An Informal Biography: a Pioneer Educator in Horticulture (1956), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  Attention (190)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expend (3)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Garden (60)  |  Good (889)  |  Good Intention (2)  |  Grow (238)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Intention (46)  |  Labor (107)  |  Merely (316)  |  Patient (199)  |  Plant (294)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Thrive (18)

A hundred years ago … an engineer, Herbert Spencer, was willing to expound every aspect of life, with an effect on his admiring readers which has not worn off today.
Things do not happen quite in this way nowadays. This, we are told, is an age of specialists. The pursuit of knowledge has become a profession. The time when a man could master several sciences is past. He must now, they say, put all his efforts into one subject. And presumably, he must get all his ideas from this one subject. The world, to be sure, needs men who will follow such a rule with enthusiasm. It needs the greatest numbers of the ablest technicians. But apart from them it also needs men who will converse and think and even work in more than one science and know how to combine or connect them. Such men, I believe, are still to be found today. They are still as glad to exchange ideas as they have been in the past. But we cannot say that our way of life is well-fitted to help them. Why is this?
In 'The Unification of Biology', New Scientist (11 Jan 1962), 13, No. 269, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Combine (57)  |  Connect (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Follow (378)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Help (105)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Past (337)  |  Profession (99)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Several (32)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technician (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

A mathematical problem should be difficult in order to entice us, yet not completely inaccessible, lest it mock at our efforts. It should be to us a guide post on the mazy paths to hidden truths, and ultimately a reminder of our pleasure in the successful solution.
In Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Completely (135)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hide (69)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Lest (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mock (7)  |  Order (632)  |  Path (144)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Post (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Solution (267)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Successful (123)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimately (55)

A scientist's accomplishments are equal to the integral of his ability integrated over the hours of his effort.
J. O. Hirschfelder, in essay on Eyring, 'A Forecast for Theoretical Chemistry', Journal of Chemical Education, 1966, 45, 457.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Hour (186)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integrated (10)  |  Scientist (820)

A … difference between most system-building in the social sciences and systems of thought and classification of the natural sciences is to be seen in their evolution. In the natural sciences both theories and descriptive systems grow by adaptation to the increasing knowledge and experience of the scientists. In the social sciences, systems often issue fully formed from the mind of one man. Then they may be much discussed if they attract attention, but progressive adaptive modification as a result of the concerted efforts of great numbers of men is rare.
The Study of Man (1941), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Attention (190)  |  Both (493)  |  Building (156)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concert (7)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Difference (337)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modification (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Number (699)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)

After a tremendous task has been begun in our time, first by Copernicus and then by many very learned mathematicians, and when the assertion that the earth moves can no longer be considered something new, would it not be much better to pull the wagon to its goal by our joint efforts, now that we have got it underway, and gradually, with powerful voices, to shout down the common herd, which really does not weigh arguments very carefully?
Letter to Galileo (13 Oct 1597). In James Bruce Ross (ed.) and Mary Martin (ed., trans.), 'Comrades in the Pursuit of Truth', The Portable Renaissance Reader (1953, 1981), 599. As quoted and cited in Merry E. Wiesner, Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789 (2013), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Common (436)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copernicus_Nicolaud (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  Goal (145)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Herd (15)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Pull (43)  |  Shout (25)  |  Something (719)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Voice (52)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Weigh (49)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Link (43)  |  Magic (86)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Unlock (10)

All disease, at some period or other of its course, is more or less a reparative process, not necessarily accompanied with suffering: an effort of nature to remedy a process of poisoning or of decay, which has taken place weeks, months, sometimes years beforehand, unnoticed.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Course (409)  |  Decay (53)  |  Disease (328)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Poison (40)  |  Process (423)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)

Almost daily we shudder as prophets of doom announce the impending end of civilization and universe. We are being asphyxiated, they say, by the smoke of the industry; we are suffocating in the ever growing mountain of rubbish. Every new project depicts its measureable effects and is denounced by protesters screaming about catastrophe, the upsetting of the land, the assault on nature. If we accepted this new mythology we would have to stop pushing roads through the forest, harnessing rivers to produce the electricity, breaking grounds to extract metals, enriching the soil with chemicals, killing insects, combating viruses … But progress—basically, an effort to organise a corner of land and make it more favourable for human life—cannot be baited. Without the science of pomiculture, for example, trees will bear fruits that are small, bitter, hard, indigestible, and sour. Progress is desirable.
Anonymous
Uncredited. In Lachman Mehta, Stolen Treasure (2012), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Announce (13)  |  Assault (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Corner (57)  |  Daily (87)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  End (590)  |  Extract (40)  |  Forest (150)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Ground (217)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Impending (4)  |  Industry (137)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mining (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Progress (465)  |  Project (73)  |  Prophet (21)  |  River (119)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sour (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Tree (246)  |  Universe (857)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)

An experiment differs from an observation in this, that knowledge gained through observation seems to appear of itself, while that which an experiment brings us is the fruit of an effort that we make, with the object of knowing whether something exists or does not exist.
Traité sur l'expérience en médecine (1774), Vol. 1, 45. In Claude Bernard, Henry C. Greene, L. J. Henderson, An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1957), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Differ (85)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Gain (145)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Something (719)  |  Through (849)

Another great and special excellence of mathematics is that it demands earnest voluntary exertion. It is simply impossible for a person to become a good mathematician by the happy accident of having been sent to a good school; this may give him a preparation and a start, but by his own individual efforts alone can he reach an eminent position.
In Conflict of Studies (1873), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Alone (311)  |  Become (815)  |  Demand (123)  |  Earnest (2)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Individual (404)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Person (363)  |  Position (77)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Reach (281)  |  School (219)  |  Send (22)  |  Simply (53)  |  Special (184)  |  Start (221)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Voluntary (4)

Ardent desire for knowledge, in fact, is the one motive attracting and supporting investigators in their efforts; and just this knowledge, really grasped and yet always flying before them, becomes at once their sole torment and their sole happiness. Those who do not know the torment of the unknown cannot have the joy of discovery which is certainly the liveliest that the mind of man can ever feel.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 221-222.
Science quotes on:  |  Ardent (6)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Flying (72)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lively (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Sole (49)  |  Support (147)  |  Torment (18)  |  Unknown (182)

As I look back over my efforts, I would characterize my contributions as being largely in the realm of model building. ... I perceive myself as rather uninhibited, with a certain mathematical facility and more interest in the broad aspect of a problem than the delicate nuances. I am more interested in discovering what is over the next rise than in assiduously cultivating the beautiful garden close at hand.
'Men, Mines and Molecules', Annual Review of Physical Chemistry, 1977, 28, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Back (390)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Garden (60)  |  Interest (386)  |  Look (582)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Next (236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rise (166)

As never before, the work of the engineer is basic to the kind of society to which our best efforts are committed. Whether it be city planning, improved health care in modern facilities, safer and more efficient transportation, new techniques of communication, or better ways to control pollution and dispose of wastes, the role of the engineer—his initiative, creative ability, and hard work—is at the root of social progress.
Remarks for National Engineers Week (1971). As quoted in Consulting Engineer (1971), 36, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Basic (138)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Care (186)  |  City (78)  |  Communication (94)  |  Control (167)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  Improve (58)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Kind (557)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Planning (20)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Progress (465)  |  Role (86)  |  Root (120)  |  Safety (54)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Progress (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Technique (80)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Attaching significance to invariants is an effort to recognize what, because of its form or colour or meaning or otherwise, is important or significant in what is only trivial or ephemeral. A simple instance of failing in this is provided by the poll-man at Cambridge, who learned perfectly how to factorize a²-b² but was floored because the examiner unkindly asked for the factors of p²–q².
In 'Recent Developments in Invariant Theory', The Mathematical Gazette (Dec 1926), 13, No. 185, 217. [Note: A poll-man is a student who takes the ordinary university degree, without honours. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Color (137)  |  Ephemeral (4)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  Important (209)  |  Instance (33)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Provide (69)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Simple (406)  |  Student (300)  |  Trivial (57)

Before an experiment can be performed, it must be planned—the question to nature must be formulated before being posed. Before the result of a measurement can be used, it must be interpreted—nature's answer must be understood properly. These two tasks are those of the theorist, who finds himself always more and more dependent on the tools of abstract mathematics. Of course, this does not mean that the experimenter does not also engage in theoretical deliberations. The foremost classical example of a major achievement produced by such a division of labor is the creation of spectrum analysis by the joint efforts of Robert Bunsen, the experimenter, and Gustav Kirchoff, the theorist. Since then, spectrum analysis has been continually developing and bearing ever richer fruit.
'The Meaning and Limits of Exact Science', Science (30 Sep 1949), 110, No. 2857, 325. Advance reprinting of chapter from book Max Planck, Scientific Autobiography (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bearing (9)  |  Being (1278)  |  Robert Bunsen (8)  |  Classical (45)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Creation (327)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Development (422)  |  Division (65)  |  Engage (39)  |  Example (94)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Find (998)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Himself (461)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Joint (31)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Labor (107)  |  Major (84)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Plan (117)  |  Produced (187)  |  Properly (20)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Richness (14)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Task (147)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)

Bertrand Russell had given a talk on the then new quantum mechanics, of whose wonders he was most appreciative. He spoke hard and earnestly in the New Lecture Hall. And when he was done, Professor Whitehead, who presided, thanked him for his efforts, and not least for “leaving the vast darkness of the subject unobscured.”
Quoted in Robert Oppenheimer, The Open Mind (1955), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Earnestness (3)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thank (46)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wonder (236)

Besides it is an error to believe that rigour is the enemy of simplicity. On the contrary we find it confirmed by numerous examples that the rigorous method is at the same time the simpler and the more easily comprehended. The very effort for rigor forces us to find out simpler methods of proof.
'Mathematical Problems', Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Jul 1902), 8, 441.
Science quotes on:  |  Confirm (57)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Error (321)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Time (1877)

But without effort [God] sets in motion all things by mind and thought.
Quoted in Arthur Fairbanks (ed. And trans.), The First Philosophers of Greece (1898), 69, fragment 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  God (757)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Set (394)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)

By God’s mercy British and American science outpaced all German efforts. … This revelation of the secrets of nature, long mercifully withheld from man, should arouse the most solemn reflections in the mind and conscience of every human being capable of comprehension. We must indeed pray that these awful agencies will be made to conduce to peace among the nations, and that instead of wreaking measureless havoc upon the entire globe, may become a perennial fountain of world prosperity.
[Concerning use of the atomic bomb.]
Statement drafted by Churchill following the use of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Due to the change in government, the statement was released by Clement Attlee (6 Aug 1945). In Sir Winston Churchill, Victory: War Speeches by the Right Hon. Winston Churchill (1946), 289.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agency (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Arousal (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Awful (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  British (41)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Fountain (16)  |  German (36)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Havoc (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Peace (108)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Chief Seattle, of the Indians that inhabited the Seattle area, wrote a wonderful paper that has to do with putting oneself in tune with the universe. He said, “Why should I lament the disappearance of my people! All things end, and the white man will find this out also.” And this goes for the universe. One can be at peace with that. This doesn’t mean that one shouldn’t participate in efforts to correct the situation. But underlying the effort to change must be an “at peace.” To win a dog sled race is great. To lose is okay too.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Area (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Chief (97)  |  Correct (86)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  End (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indian (27)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Lament (11)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Must (1526)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Paper (182)  |  Participate (8)  |  Peace (108)  |  People (1005)  |  Race (268)  |  Say (984)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sled (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Universe (857)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Write (230)

Confined to its true domain, mathematical reasoning is admirably adapted to perform the universal office of sound logic: to induce in order to deduce, in order to construct. … It contents itself to furnish, in the most favorable domain, a model of clearness, of precision, and consistency, the close contemplation of which is alone able to prepare the mind to render other conceptions also as perfect as their nature permits. Its general reaction, more negative than positive, must consist, above all, in inspiring us everywhere with an invincible aversion for vagueness, inconsistency, and obscurity, which may always be really avoided in any reasoning whatsoever, if we make sufficient effort.
In Synthèse Subjective (1856), 98. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 202-203. From the original French, “Bornée à son vrai domaine, la raison mathématique y peut admirablement remplir l’office universel de la saine logique: induire pour déduire, afin de construire. … Elle se contente de former, dans le domaine le plus favorable, un type de clarté, de précision, et de consistance, dont la contemplation familière peut seule disposer l’esprit à rendre les autres conceptions aussi parfaites que le comporte leur nature. Sa réaction générale, plus négative que positive, doit surtout consister à nous inspirer partout une invincible répugnance pour le vague, l’incohérence, et l’obscurité, que nous pouvons réellement éviter envers des pensées quelconques, si nous y faisons assez d’efforts.”
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Close (69)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confine (26)  |  Consist (223)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Content (69)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Domain (69)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Furnish (96)  |  General (511)  |  Inconsistent (9)  |  Induce (22)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Logic (12)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negative (63)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Office (71)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Permit (58)  |  Positive (94)  |  Precision (68)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Render (93)  |  Sound (183)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  True (212)  |  Universal (189)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Constant muscular activity was natural for the child, and, therefore, the immense effort of the drillmaster teachers to make children sit still was harmful and useless.
Quoted in Bill McKibben, Maybe One: A Personal and Enviromental Argument for Single-Child Families (1998), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Constant (144)  |  Education (378)  |  Immense (86)  |  Natural (796)  |  Still (613)  |  Teacher (143)

Disease is largely a removable evil. It continues to afflict humanity, not only because of incomplete knowledge of its causes and lack of individual and public hygiene, but also because it is extensively fostered by harsh economic and industrial conditions and by wretched housing in congested communities. ... The reduction of the death rate is the principal statistical expression and index of human social progress. It means the saving and lengthening of lives of thousands of citizens, the extension of the vigorous working period well into old age, and the prevention of inefficiency, misery, and suffering. These advances can be made by organized social effort. Public health is purchasable. (1911)
Quoted in Evelynn Maxine Hammonds, Childhood's Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diphtheria in New York City, 1880-1930(1999), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Affliction (6)  |  Age (499)  |  Cause (541)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Community (104)  |  Condition (356)  |  Congestion (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Evil (116)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Foster (12)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Hygiene (12)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Incompleteness (2)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Misery (30)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Period (198)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Principal (63)  |  Progress (465)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Progress (3)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wretched (8)

Energy is the inherent effort of every multiplicity to become unity.
Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1904, 1913), 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Energy (344)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Unity (78)

Euler calculated without any apparent effort, just as men breathe, as eagles sustain themselves in the air.
In Oeuvres, t. 2 (1854), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Themselves (433)

Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. An insurrection has consequently begun of science talents and courage against rank and birth, which have fallen into contempt. It has failed in its first effort, because the mobs of the cities, the instrument used for its accomplishment, debased by ignorance, poverty and vice, could not be restrained to rational action. But the world will soon recover from the panic of this first catastrophe.
Letter to John Adams (Monticello, 1813). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 49. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 4, 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  Birth (147)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Courage (69)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mob (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rational (90)  |  Read (287)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Talent (94)  |  Vice (40)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Every one who has seriously investigated a novel question, who has really interrogated Nature with a view to a distinct answer, will bear me out in saying that it requires intense and sustained effort of imagination.
In The Principles of Success in Literature (1901), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Bear (159)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intense (20)  |  Interrogation (4)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Question (621)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Serious (91)  |  Sustain (46)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

Faced with the admitted difficulty of managing the creative process, we are doubling our efforts to do so. Is this because science has failed to deliver, having given us nothing more than nuclear power, penicillin, space travel, genetic engineering, transistors, and superconductors? Or is it because governments everywhere regard as a reproach activities they cannot advantageously control? They felt that way about the marketplace for goods, but trillions of wasted dollars later, they have come to recognize the efficiency of this self-regulating system. Not so, however, with the marketplace for ideas.
Quoted in Martin Moskovits (ed.), Science and Society, the John C. Polanyi Nobel Lareates Lectures (1995), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (167)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Fail (185)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Idea (843)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Power (12)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Regulating (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  System (537)  |  Transistor (5)  |  Travel (114)  |  Way (1217)

Finally, two days ago, I succeeded - not on account of my hard efforts, but by the grace of the Lord. Like a sudden flash of lightning, the riddle was solved. I am unable to say what was the conducting thread that connected what I previously knew with what made my success possible.
Quoted in H. Eves, Mathematical Circles Squared, (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Connect (125)  |  Flash (49)  |  Grace (31)  |  Hard (243)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Lord (93)  |  Possible (552)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Thread (32)  |  Two (937)

Food is at present obtained almost entirely from the energy of the sunlight. The radiation from the sun produces from the carbonic acid in the air more or less complicated carbon compounds which serve us in plants and vegetables. We use the latent chemical energy of these to keep our bodies warm, we convert it into muscular effort. We employ it in the complicated process of digestion to repair and replace the wasted cells of our bodies. … If the gigantic sources of power become available, food would be produced without recourse to sunlight. Vast cellars, in which artificial radiation is generated, may replace the cornfields and potato patches of the world.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 396-397.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Air (347)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbonic Acid (4)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Energy (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Compound (113)  |  Convert (22)  |  Corn (19)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Employ (113)  |  Energy (344)  |  Field (364)  |  Food (199)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Latent (12)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Muscular (2)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Patch (8)  |  Plant (294)  |  Potato (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Repair (11)  |  Replace (31)  |  Source (93)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wasted (2)  |  World (1774)

For many centuries chemists labored to change lead into precious gold, and eventually found that precious uranium turned to lead without any human effort at all.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Gold (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lead (384)  |  Precious (41)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Turn (447)  |  Uranium (20)

For strictly scientific or technological purposes all this is irrelevant. On a pragmatic view, as on a religious view, theory and concepts are held in faith. On the pragmatic view the only thing that matters is that the theory is efficacious, that it “works” and that the necessary preliminaries and side issues do not cost too much in time and effort. Beyond that, theory and concepts go to constitute a language in which the scientistic matters at issue can be formulated and discussed.
In Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1994), 'Slow Neutron Spectroscopy and the Grand Atlas of the Physical World', Nobel Lectures: Physics 1991-1995 (1997), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Cost (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Faith (203)  |  Language (293)  |  Matter (798)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Side (233)  |  Technological (61)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

Fortunate Newton…! Nature to him was an open book, whose letters he could read without effort.
In 'Foreword' to Isaac Newton, Opticks (1952), lix.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Letter (109)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Open (274)  |  Read (287)

Genius is an immense capacity for taking trouble.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (100)  |  Genius (284)  |  Immense (86)  |  Trouble (107)

Genius unexerted is no more genius than a bushel of acorns is a forest of oaks.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Acorn (4)  |  Bushel (3)  |  Forest (150)  |  Genius (284)  |  More (2559)  |  Oak (14)

Gifford Pinchot is the man to whom the nation owes most for what has been accomplished as regards the preservation of the natural resources of our country. He led, and indeed during its most vital period embodied, the fight for the preservation through use of our forests … He was the foremost leader in the great struggle to coordinate all our social and governmental forces in the effort to secure the adoption of a rational and far-seeing policy for securing the conservation of all our national resources. … I believe it is but just to say that among the many, many public officials who under my administration rendered literally invaluable service to the people of the United States, he, on the whole, stood first.
'The Natural Resources of the Nation' Autobiography (1913), ch. 11. Quoted in Douglas M. Johnston, The International Law of Fisheries (1987), 44
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Far-Seeing (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Invaluable (11)  |  Leader (43)  |  Literally (30)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  Owe (71)  |  People (1005)  |  Period (198)  |  Gifford Pinchot (14)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regard (305)  |  Render (93)  |  Say (984)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Service (110)  |  Social (252)  |  State (491)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Vital (85)  |  Whole (738)

God has no intention of setting a limit to the efforts of man to conquer space.
Pius XII
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conquer (37)  |  God (757)  |  Intention (46)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Space (500)

Grouches are nearly always pinheads, small men who have never made any effort to improve their mental capacity.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (100)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Never (1087)  |  Small (477)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bearable (2)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Corpse (6)  |  Crown (38)  |  Death (388)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Defy (11)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Form (959)  |  Hero (42)  |  History (673)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Render (93)  |  Represent (155)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Statue (16)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)

How can you shorten the subject? That stern struggle with the multiplication table, for many people not yet ended in victory, how can you make it less? Square root, as obdurate as a hardwood stump in a pasture nothing but years of effort can extract it. You can’t hurry the process. Or pass from arithmetic to algebra; you can’t shoulder your way past quadratic equations or ripple through the binomial theorem. Instead, the other way; your feet are impeded in the tangled growth, your pace slackens, you sink and fall somewhere near the binomial theorem with the calculus in sight on the horizon. So died, for each of us, still bravely fighting, our mathematical training; except for a set of people called “mathematicians”—born so, like crooks.
In Too Much College: Or, Education Eating up Life, with Kindred Essays in Education and Humour (1939), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Brave (12)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Crook (2)  |  Die (86)  |  End (590)  |  Equation (132)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fight (44)  |  Foot (60)  |  Growth (187)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Impede (4)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pace (14)  |  Pass (238)  |  Past (337)  |  Pasture (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Process (423)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Root (120)  |  Set (394)  |  Shorten (5)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sink (37)  |  Square (70)  |  Square Root (12)  |  Stern (3)  |  Still (613)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Stump (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Table (104)  |  Tangle (6)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Through (849)  |  Training (80)  |  Victory (39)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

Human consciousness is just about the last surviving mystery. A mystery is a phenomenon that people don't know how to think about—yet. There have been other great mysteries: the mystery of the origin of the universe, the mystery of life and reproduction, the mystery of the design to be found in nature, the mysteries of time, space, and gravity. These were not just areas of scientific ignorance, but of utter bafflement and wonder. We do not yet have the final answers to any of the questions of cosmology and particle physics, molecular genetics and evolutionary theory, but we do know how to think about them. The mysteries haven't vanished, but they have been tamed. They no longer overwhelm our efforts to think about the phenomena, because now we know how to tell the misbegotten questions from the right questions, and even if we turn out to be dead wrong about some of the currently accepted answers, we know how to go about looking for better answers. With consciousness, however, we are still in a terrible muddle. Consciousness stands alone today as a topic that often leaves even the most sophisticated thinkers tongue-tied and confused. And, as with all the earlier mysteries, there are many who insist—and hope—that there will never be a demystification of consciousness.
Consciousness Explained (1991), 21-22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bafflement (3)  |  Better (486)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Final (118)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Looking (189)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Topic (21)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wrong (234)

Humans are not by nature the fact-driven, rational beings we like to think we are. We get the facts wrong more often than we think we do. And we do so in predictable ways: we engage in wishful thinking. We embrace information that supports our beliefs and reject evidence that challenges them. Our minds tend to take shortcuts, which require some effort to avoid … [and] more often than most of us would imagine, the human mind operates in ways that defy logic.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Defy (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Engage (39)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Information (166)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reject (63)  |  Require (219)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Support (147)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wishful (6)  |  Wrong (234)

I am glad that the life of pandas is so dull by human standards, for our efforts at conservation have little moral value if we preserve creatures only as human ornaments; I shall be impressed when we show solicitude for warty toads and slithering worms.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dull (54)  |  Glad (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Moral (195)  |  Ornament (20)  |  Panda (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Show (346)  |  Slither (2)  |  Standard (57)  |  Toad (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Worm (42)

I am more fond of achieving than striving. My theories must prove to be facts or be discarded as worthless. My efforts must soon be crowned with success, or discontinued.
The Rest of My Life, ch. 4 (1937).Wells wrote, in addition to other works, the popular 'Fleming Stone' detective series.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Crown (38)  |  Discard (29)  |  Discontinue (3)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fond (12)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Prove (250)  |  Soon (186)  |  Strive (46)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Worthless (21)

I am pleased, however, to see the efforts of hypothetical speculation, because by the collisions of different hypotheses, truth may be elicited and science advanced in the end.
Letter (5 Sep 1822) to Mr. George F. Hopkins. Collected in The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Correspondence (1854), Vol. 7, 260.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Collision (15)  |  Different (577)  |  Elicit (2)  |  End (590)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Hypothetical (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  See (1081)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Truth (1057)

I came to realize that exaggerated concern about what others are doing can be foolish. It can paralyze effort, and stifle a good idea. One finds that in the history of science almost every problem has been worked out by someone else. This should not discourage anyone from pursuing his own path.
From Theodore von Karman and Lee Edson (ed.), The Wind and Beyond: Theodore von Karman, Pioneer in Aviation and Pathfinder in Science (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Path (144)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stifle (5)  |  Work (1351)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I cannot tell you the efforts to which I was condemned to understand something of the diagrams of Descriptive Geometry, which I detest.
Epigraph, without citation, in E.T. Bell, Men of Mathematics (1937, 1965), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Detest (5)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Something (719)  |  Tell (340)  |  Understand (606)

I have always considered my work a joint effort. I was fortunate to have worked on great ideas and with very intelligent people. I may have developed a few equations no one had thought of before but that was nothing unusual—everybody did that.
In interview with Laurel M. Sheppard, 'An Interview with Mary Ross: First Native American Woman Engineer Aerospace Pioneer Returns to her Native American Roots', on website of Lash Publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (416)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equation (132)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Joint (31)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Work (1351)

I have decided today that the United States should proceed at once with the development of an entirely new type of space transportation system designed to help transform the space frontier of the 1970s into familiar territory, easily accessible for human endeavor in the 1980s and ’90s. This system will center on a space vehicle that can shuttle repeatedly from Earth to orbit and back. It will revolutionize transportation into near space, by routinizing it. It will take the astronomical costs out of astronautics. In short, it will go a long way toward delivering the rich benefits of practical space utilization and the valuable spin-offs from space efforts into the daily lives of Americans and all people.
Statement by President Nixon (5 Jan 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cost (86)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Design (195)  |  Development (422)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Orbit (81)  |  People (1005)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Revolutionize (8)  |  Routine (25)  |  Short (197)  |  Shuttle (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spin-Off (2)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Territory (24)  |  Today (314)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Type (167)  |  United States (23)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Value (365)  |  Vehicle (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves–this critical basis I call the ideal of a pigsty. The ideals that have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth. Without the sense of kinship with men of like mind, without the occupation with the objective world, the eternally unattainable in the field of art and scientific endeavors, life would have seemed empty to me. The trite objects of human efforts–possessions, outward success, luxury–have always seemed to me contemptible.
In 'What I Believe,' Forum and Century (1930).
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Call (769)  |  Cheerfully (2)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Courage (69)  |  Critical (66)  |  Ease (35)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Give (202)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Kindness (14)  |  Kinship (4)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Objective (91)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Outward (7)  |  Possession (65)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Success (302)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trite (4)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

I must confess, I am dreading today’s elections, … because no matter what the outcome, our government will still be a giant bonfire of partisanship. It is ironic since whenever I have met with our elected officials they are invariably thoughtful, well-meaning people. And yet collectively 90% of their effort seems to be focused on how to stick it to the other party.
On Sergey Brin’s Google+ page (6 Nov 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bonfire (2)  |  Confess (42)  |  Dread (13)  |  Election (7)  |  Focus (35)  |  Giant (67)  |  Government (110)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Irony (8)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meet (31)  |  Must (1526)  |  Official (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Partisan (5)  |  Party (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Politics (112)  |  Stick (24)  |  Still (613)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Today (314)  |  Well-Meaning (3)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)

I never allow myself to become discouraged under any circumstances. … After we had conducted thousands of experiments on a certain project without solving the problem, … we had learned something. For we had learned for a certainty that the thing couldn’t be done that way, and that we would have to try some other way. We sometimes learn a lot from our failures if we have put into the effort the best thought and work we are capable of.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lot (151)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Problem (676)  |  Project (73)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

I never could do anything with figures, never had any talent for mathematics, never accomplished anything in my efforts at that rugged study, and to-day the only mathematics I know is multiplication, and the minute I get away up in that, as soon as I reach nine times seven— [He lapsed into deep thought, trying to figure nine times seven. Mr. McKelway whispered the answer to him.] I’ve got it now. It’s eighty-four. Well, I can get that far all right with a little hesitation. After that I am uncertain, and I can’t manage a statistic.
Speech at the New York Association for Promoting the Interests of the Blind (29 Mar 1906). In Mark Twain and William Dean Howells (ed.), Mark Twain’s Speeches? (1910), 323.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Deep (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Minute (125)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Reach (281)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Whisper (11)

I said that there is something every man can do, if he can only find out what that something is. Henry Ford has proved this. He has installed in his vast organization a system for taking hold of a man who fails in one department, and giving him a chance in some other department. Where necessary every effort is made to discover just what job the man is capable of filling. The result has been that very few men have had to be discharged, for it has been found that there was some kind of work each man could do at least moderately well. This wonderful system adopted by my friend Ford has helped many a man to find himself. It has put many a fellow on his feet. It has taken round pegs out of square holes and found a round hole for them. I understand that last year only 120 workers out of his force of 50,000 were discharged.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chance (239)  |  Department (92)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Henry Ford (21)  |  Friend (168)  |  Himself (461)  |  Job (82)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Result (677)  |  Something (719)  |  Square (70)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I shall devote all my efforts to bring light into the immense obscurity that today reigns in Analysis. It so lacks any plan or system, that one is really astonished that so many people devote themselves to it—and, still worse, it is absolutely devoid of any rigour.
In Oeuvres (1826), Vol. 2, 263. As translated and cited in Ernst Hairer and Gerhard Wanner Analysis by Its History (2008), 188. From the original French, “Je consacrerai toutes mes forces à répandre de la lumière sur l’immense obscurité qui règne aujourd’hui dans l’Analyse. Elle est tellement dépourvue de tout plan et de tout système, qu’on s’étonne seulement qu’il y ait tant de gens qui s’y livrent—et ce qui pis est, elle manque absolument de rigueur.”
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Badly (32)  |  Bring (90)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Devote (35)  |  Immense (86)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Really (78)  |  Reign (23)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Today (314)

I think science has enjoyed an extraordinary success because it has such a limited and narrow realm in which to focus its efforts. Namely, the physical universe.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Focus (35)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Namely (11)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Physical (508)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)

I went to the trash pile at Tuskegee Institute and started my laboratory with bottles, old fruit jars and any other thing I found I could use. ... [The early efforts were] worked out almost wholly on top of my flat topped writing desk and with teacups, glasses, bottles and reagents I made myself.
Manuscript fragment, no date, Box 1, George Washington Carver Papers. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Bottle (15)  |  Desk (13)  |  Early (185)  |  Flat (33)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Jar (9)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Made (14)  |  Myself (212)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Research (664)  |  Start (221)  |  Teacup (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Top (96)  |  Trash (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

I wish, my dear Kepler, that we could have a good laugh together at the extraordinary stupidity of the mob. What do you think of the foremost philosophers of this University? In spite of my oft-repeated efforts and invitations, they have refused, with the obstinacy of a glutted adder, to look at the planets or the Moon or my glass [telescope].
Opere ed Nas. X, 423. As cited in Alan Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 99. Galileo wished others to use his telescope to see for themselves the moons of Jupiter which he had himself first seen in Jan 1610. If you have a primary source for this letter giving the date it was written, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Adder (3)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Foremost (11)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Look (582)  |  Mob (9)  |  Moon (237)  |  Obstinacy (3)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Spite (55)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  University (121)  |  Wish (212)

If Darwin were alive today the insect world would delight and astound him with its impressive verification of his theories of the survival of the fittest. Under the stress of intensive chemical spraying the weaker members of the insect populations are being weeded out… . Only the strong and fit remain to defy our efforts to control them.
In Silent Spring (1952, 1962), 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Astound (7)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Control (167)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Defy (11)  |  Delight (108)  |  Entomology (9)  |  Fit (134)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Population (110)  |  Remain (349)  |  Spray (4)  |  Stress (22)  |  Strong (174)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Verification (31)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weed (18)  |  World (1774)

If experiments are performed thousands of times at all seasons and in every place without once producing the effects mentioned by your philosophers, poets, and historians, this will mean nothing and we must believe their words rather our own eyes? But what if I find for you a state of the air that has all the conditions you say are required, and still the egg is not cooked nor the lead ball destroyed? Alas! I should be wasting my efforts... for all too prudently you have secured your position by saying that 'there is needed for this effect violent motion, a great quantity of exhalations, a highly attenuated material and whatever else conduces to it.' This 'whatever else' is what beats me, and gives you a blessed harbor, a sanctuary completely secure.
'The Assayer' (1623), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beat (41)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Completely (135)  |  Condition (356)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Effect (393)  |  Egg (69)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  Lead (384)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mention (82)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Required (108)  |  Sanctuary (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Season (47)  |  Secured (18)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

If gold medals and prizes were awarded to institutions instead of individuals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital of 30 years ago would have qualified. The ruling board and administrative structure of that hospital did not falter in their support of the quixotic objective of treating end-stage renal disease despite a long list of tragic failures that resulted from these early efforts.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 558.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (11)  |  Award (13)  |  Board (12)  |  Brigham Hospital (2)  |  Disease (328)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Gold (97)  |  Gold Medal (2)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Individual (404)  |  Institution (69)  |  Long (790)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Objective (91)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Renal (4)  |  Result (677)  |  Stage (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Support (147)  |  Tragic (17)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Year (933)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Despair (40)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fit (134)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Help (105)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humble (50)  |  Humility (28)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Industry (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If my efforts have led to greater success than usual, this is due, I believe, to the fact that during my wanderings in the field of medicine, I have strayed onto paths where the gold was still lying by the wayside. It takes a little luck to be able to distinguish gold from dross, but that is all.
'Robert Koch', Journal of Outdoor Life (1908), 5, 164-9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Due (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greater (288)  |  Little (707)  |  Luck (42)  |  Lying (55)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Path (144)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)

If we are industrious, we shall never starve; for, ‘at the workingman’s house hunger looks in, but dares not enter.’ Nor will the bailiff or the constable enter, for ‘industry pays debts, while despair increaseth them.’
Published in Poor Richard's Almanac. Collected in Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (1834), 477.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Dare (50)  |  Debt (13)  |  Despair (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  House (140)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Industry (137)  |  Look (582)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pay (43)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Will (2355)  |  Workingman (2)

If you have great talents, industry will improve them; if moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiencies. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour; nothing is ever to be attained without it.
From 'A Discourse Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy, on the Distribution of Prizes' (11 Dec 1769), in Seven Discourses Delivered in the Royal Academy (1778), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Attain (125)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Deny (66)  |  Direct (225)  |  Great (1574)  |  Industry (137)  |  Labour (98)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Supply (93)  |  Talent (94)  |  Will (2355)

If, unwarned by my example, any man shall undertake and shall succeed in really constructing an engine embodying in itself the whole of the executive department of mathematical analysis upon different principles or by simpler mechanical means, I have no fear of leaving my reputation in his charge, for he alone will be fully able to appreciate the nature of my efforts and the value of their results.
In Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1864), 450.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Charge (59)  |  Construct (124)  |  Department (92)  |  Different (577)  |  Embody (16)  |  Engine (98)  |  Example (94)  |  Executive (3)  |  Fear (197)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Result (677)  |  Simpler (8)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Value (365)  |  Warning (17)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

In a sense, of course, probability theory in the form of the simple laws of chance is the key to the analysis of warfare;… My own experience of actual operational research work, has however, shown that its is generally possible to avoid using anything more sophisticated. … In fact the wise operational research worker attempts to concentrate his efforts in finding results which are so obvious as not to need elaborate statistical methods to demonstrate their truth. In this sense advanced probability theory is something one has to know about in order to avoid having to use it.
In 'Operations Research', Physics Today (Nov 1951), 19. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Advanced (11)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Chance (239)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finding (30)  |  Form (959)  |  Key (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Wise (131)  |  Work (1351)

In its efforts to learn as much as possible about nature, modern physics has found that certain things can never be “known” with certainty. Much of our knowledge must always remain uncertain. The most we can know is in terms of probabilities.
In The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1963), Vol. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Remain (349)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncertain (44)

In New England they once thought blackbirds useless, and mischievous to the corn. They made efforts to destroy them. The consequence was, the blackbirds were diminished; but a kind of worm, which devoured their grass, and which the blackbirds used to feed on, increased prodigiously; then, finding their loss in grass much greater than their saving in corn, they wished again for their blackbirds.
Letter to Richard Jackson, 5 May 1753. In Albert Henry Smyth, The Writings of Benjamin Franklin (1905), Vol. 3, 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Corn (19)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Devour (29)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Grass (46)  |  Greater (288)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mischievous (11)  |  New (1216)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wish (212)  |  Worm (42)

In other branches of science, where quick publication seems to be so much desired, there may possibly be some excuse for giving to the world slovenly or ill-digested work, but there is no such excuse in mathematics. The form ought to be as perfect as the substance, and the demonstrations as rigorous as those of Euclid. The mathematician has to deal with the most exact facts of Nature, and he should spare no effort to render his interpretation worthy of his subject, and to give to his work its highest degree of perfection. “Pauca sed matura” was Gauss’s motto.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467. [The Latin motto translates as “Few, but ripe”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Branch (150)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Desire (204)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exact (68)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Give (202)  |  High (362)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motto (28)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Publication (101)  |  Quick (13)  |  Render (93)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Slovenly (2)  |  Spare (9)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Worthy (34)

In spite of what moralists say, the, animals are scarcely less wicked or less unhappy than we are ourselves. The arrogance of the strong, the servility of the weak, low rapacity, ephemeral pleasure purchased by great effort, death preceded by long suffering, all belong to the animals as they do to men.
Recueil des Éloges Historiques 1819-27, Vol. 1, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Belong (162)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Long (790)  |  Low (80)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strong (174)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Weak (71)

Is it absurd to imagine that our social behavior, from amoeba to man, is also planned and dictated, from stored Information, by the cells? And that the time has come for men to be entrusted with the task, through heroic efforts, of bringing life to other worlds?
From Nobel Prize Lecture (Dec 1974), 'The Coming Age of the Cell'. Collected in Jan Lindsten (ed.) Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1971-1980 (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Cell (138)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Hero (42)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Information (166)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Social (252)  |  Store (48)  |  Task (147)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  World (1774)

It is above all the duty of the methodical text-book to adapt itself to the pupil’s power of comprehension, only challenging his higher efforts with the increasing development of his imagination, his logical power and the ability of abstraction. This indeed constitutes a test of the art of teaching, it is here where pedagogic tact becomes manifest. In reference to the axioms, caution is necessary. It should be pointed out comparatively early, in how far the mathematical body differs from the material body. Furthermore, since mathematical bodies are really portions of space, this space is to be conceived as mathematical space and to be clearly distinguished from real or physical space. Gradually the student will become conscious that the portion of the real space which lies beyond the visible stellar universe is not cognizable through the senses, that we know nothing of its properties and consequently have no basis for judgments concerning it. Mathematical space, on the other hand, may be subjected to conditions, for instance, we may condition its properties at infinity, and these conditions constitute the axioms, say the Euclidean axioms. But every student will require years before the conviction of the truth of this last statement will force itself upon him.
In Methodisches Lehrbuch der Elementar-Mathemalik (1904), Teil I, Vorwort, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Caution (24)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Development (422)  |  Differ (85)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Duty (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Force (487)  |  Furthermore (2)  |  Gradually (102)  |  High (362)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Instance (33)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pedagogy (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Property (168)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stellar (4)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tact (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Test (211)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

It is easy to make out three areas where scientists will be concentrating their efforts in the coming decades. One is in physics, where leading theorists are striving, with the help of experimentalists, to devise a single mathematical theory that embraces all the basic phenomena of matter and energy. The other two are in biology. Biologists—and the rest of us too—would like to know how the brain works and how a single cell, the fertilized egg cell, develops into an entire organism
Article 'The View From Mars', in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences: Research Facilities of the Future (1994), 735, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cell (138)  |  Coming (114)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Decade (59)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devise (14)  |  Easy (204)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entire (47)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Fertilized (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Strive (46)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

It is exceptional that one should be able to acquire the understanding of a process without having previously acquired a deep familiarity with running it, with using it, before one has assimilated it in an instinctive and empirical way. Thus any discussion of the nature of intellectual effort in any field is difficult, unless it presupposes an easy, routine familiarity with that field. In mathematics this limitation becomes very severe.
In 'The Mathematician', Works of the Mind (1947), 1, No. 1. Collected in James Roy Newman (ed.), The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 4, 2053.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Deep (233)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Easy (204)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Field (364)  |  Instinctive (4)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Previously (11)  |  Process (423)  |  Routine (25)  |  Running (61)  |  Severe (16)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)

It is for these reasons that I regard the decision last year to shift our efforts in space from low to high gear as among the most important decisions that will be made during my incumbency in the office of the Presidency.
Address at Rice University in Houston (12 Sep 1962). On website of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (91)  |  Gear (4)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  Last (426)  |  Low (80)  |  Most (1731)  |  Office (71)  |  President (31)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shift (44)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Race (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

It is impossible for us adequately to conceive the boldness of the measure which aimed at universal education through the establishment of free schools. ... it had no precedent in the world's history ... But time has ratified its soundness. Two centuries proclaim it to be as wise as it was courageous, as beneficient as it was disinterested. ... The establishment of free schools was one of those grand mental and moral experiments whose effects could not be developed and made manifest in a single generation. ... The sincerity of our gratitude must be tested by our efforts to perpetuate and improve what they established. The gratitude of the lips only is an unholy offering.
Tenth Report of the Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education (1946). Life and Works of Horace Mann (1891), Vol. 4, 111-112.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Develop (268)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Free (232)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Precedent (7)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  School (219)  |  Sincerity (6)  |  Single (353)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

It is interesting to note how many fundamental terms which the social sciences are trying to adopt from physics have as a matter of historical fact originated in the social field. Take, for instance, the notion of cause. The Greek aitia or the Latin causa was originally a purely legal term. It was taken over into physics, developed there, and in the 18th century brought back as a foreign-born kind for the adoration of the social sciences. The same is true of the concept of law of nature. Originally a strict anthropomorphic conception, it was gradually depersonalized or dehumanized in the natural sciences and then taken over by the social sciences in an effort to eliminate final causes or purposes from the study of human affairs. It is therefore not anomalous to find similar transformations in the history of such fundamental concepts of statistics as average and probability. The concept of average was developed in the Rhodian laws as to the distribution of losses in maritime risks. After astronomers began to use it in correcting their observations, it spread to other physical sciences; and the prestige which it thus acquired has given it vogue in the social field. The term probability, as its etymology indicates, originates in practical and legal considerations of probing and proving.
The Statistical View of Nature (1936), 327-8.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Adoration (4)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Greek (107)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Latin (38)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Matter (798)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observation (555)  |  Originate (36)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Probability (130)  |  Purely (109)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Risk (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Spread (83)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Trying (144)  |  Use (766)

It is interesting to observe the result of habit in the peculiar shape and size of the giraffe (Camelo-pardalis): this animal, the largest of the mammals, is known to live in the interior of Africa in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, so that it is obliged to browse on the leaves on the trees and to make constant efforts to reach them. From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is lengthened to such a degree that the giraffe, without standing up on its hind legs, attains a height of six metres (nearly 20 feet).
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 256, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 122.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arid (6)  |  Attain (125)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Constant (144)  |  Degree (276)  |  Giraffe (4)  |  Habit (168)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interior (32)  |  Known (454)  |  Largest (39)  |  Leg (34)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Neck (15)  |  Observe (168)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tree (246)

It is not merely as an investigator and discoverer, but as a high-principled and unassuming man, that Scheele merits our warmest admiration. His aim and object was the discovery of truth. The letters of the man reveal to us in the most pleasant way his high scientific ideal, his genuinely philosophic temper, and his simple mode of thought. “It is the truth alone that we desire to know, and what joy there is in discovering it!” With these words he himself characterizes his own efforts.
From History of Chemistry (1899). As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alone (311)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Merit (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Carl Wilhelm Scheele (5)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Temper (9)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

It is not possible to find in all geometry more difficult and more intricate questions or more simple and lucid explanations [than those given by Archimedes]. Some ascribe this to his natural genius; while others think that incredible effort and toil produced these, to all appearance, easy and unlaboured results. No amount of investigation of yours would succeed in attaining the proof, and yet, once seen, you immediately believe you would have discovered it; by so smooth and so rapid a path he leads you to the conclusion required.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Attain (125)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easy (204)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Possible (552)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Smooth (32)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Think (1086)  |  Toil (25)

It is one of the laws of life that each acquisition has its cost. No organism can exercise power without yielding up part of its substance. The physiological law of Transfer of Energy is the basis of human success and happiness. There is no action without expenditure of energy and if energy be not expended the power to generate it is lost. This law shows itself in a thousand ways in the life of man. The arm which is not used becomes palsied. The wealth which comes by chance weakens and destroys. The good which is unused turns to evil. The charity which asks no effort cannot relieve the misery she creates.
In The Strength of Being Clean: A Study of the Quest for Unearned Happiness (1900), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Action (327)  |  Arm (81)  |  Ask (411)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Charity (11)  |  Cost (86)  |  Create (235)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expend (3)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misery (30)  |  Organism (220)  |  Palsy (3)  |  Part (222)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Power (746)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Show (346)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weaken (4)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Yield (81)

It is the destiny of wine to be drunk, and it is the destiny of glucose to be oxidized. But it was not oxidized immediately: its drinker kept it in his liver for more than a week, well curled up and tranquil, as a reserve aliment for a sudden effort; an effort that he was forced to make the following Sunday, pursuing a bolting horse. Farewell to the hexagonal structure: in the space of a few instants the skein was unwound and became glucose again, and this was dragged by the bloodstream all the way to a minute muscle fiber in the thigh, and here brutally split into two molecules of lactic acid, the grim harbinger of fatigue: only later, some minutes after, the panting of the lungs was able to supply the oxygen necessary to quietly oxidize the latter. So a new molecule of carbon dioxide returned to the atmosphere, and a parcel of the energy that the sun had handed to the vine-shoot passed from the state of chemical energy to that of mechanical energy, and thereafter settled down in the slothful condition of heat, warming up imperceptibly the air moved by the running and the blood of the runner. 'Such is life,' although rarely is it described in this manner: an inserting itself, a drawing off to its advantage, a parasitizing of the downward course of energy, from its noble solar form to the degraded one of low-temperature heat. In this downward course, which leads to equilibrium and thus death, life draws a bend and nests in it.
The Periodic Table (1975), trans. Raymond Rosenthal (1984), 192-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Air (347)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Blood (134)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Energy (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Heat (174)  |  Horse (74)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Lactic Acid (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liver (19)  |  Low (80)  |  Lung (34)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Minute (125)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nest (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pass (238)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Running (61)  |  Settled (34)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supply (93)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Two (937)  |  Warming (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Wine (38)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Church (56)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Countless (36)  |  Deep (233)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  False (100)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (113)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surround (30)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

It is this ideal of progress through cumulative effort rather than through genius—progress by organised effort, progress which does not wait for some brilliant stroke, some lucky discovery, or the advent of some superman, has been the chief gift of science to social philosophy.
Address to 48th annual summer convention of the American Institute of Electriccal Engineers, Cleveland (21 Jun 1932), abridged in 'The Rôle of the Engineer', The Electrical Journal (1932), 109, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gift (104)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Organization (114)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Superman (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Wait (58)

It must be conceded that a theory has an important advantage if its basic concepts and fundamental hypotheses are 'close to experience,' and greater confidence in such a theory is certainly justified. There is less danger of going completely astray, particularly since it takes so much less time and effort to disprove such theories by experience. Yet more and more, as the depth of our knowledge increases, we must give up this advantage in our quest for logical simplicity in the foundations of physical theory...
'On the Generalized Theory of Gravitation', Scientific American (Apr 1950), 13. In David H. Levy (Ed.), The Scientific American Book of the Cosmos (2000), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Astray (11)  |  Basic (138)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Danger (115)  |  Depth (94)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Experience (467)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Increase (210)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Proof (287)  |  Quest (39)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

It must happen that in some cases the author is not understood, or is very imperfectly understood; and the question is what is to be done. After giving a reasonable amount of attention to the passage, let the student pass on, reserving the obscurity for future efforts. … The natural tendency of solitary students, I believe, is not to hurry away prematurely from a hard passage, but to hang far too long over it; the just pride that does not like to acknowledge defeat, and the strong will that cannot endure to be thwarted, both urge to a continuance of effort even when success seems hopeless. It is only by experience we gain the conviction that when the mind is thoroughly fatigued it has neither the power to continue with advantage its course in .an assigned direction, nor elasticity to strike out a new path; but that, on the other hand, after being withdrawn for a time from the pursuit, it may return and gain the desired end.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Amount (151)  |  Assign (13)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Continuance (2)  |  Continue (165)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Course (409)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Endure (20)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  Hang (45)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Let (61)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passage (50)  |  Path (144)  |  Power (746)  |  Premature (20)  |  Pride (78)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Return (124)  |  Seem (145)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strike (68)  |  Strong (174)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Urge (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Withdraw (9)

It usually develops that after much laborious and frustrating effort the investigator of environmental physiology succeeds in proving that the animal in question can actually exist where it lives. It is always somewhat discouraging for an investigator to realize that his efforts can be made to appear so trite, but this statement does not belittle the ecological physiologist. If his data assist the understanding of the ways in which an animal manages to live where it does, he makes an important contribution to the study of distribution, for the present is necessarily a key to the past.”
From 'The role of physiology in the distribution of terrestrial vertebrates', collected in C.L. Hubbs (ed.), Zoogeography: Publ. 51 (1958), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appear (118)  |  Assist (9)  |  Belittle (2)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Data (156)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exist (443)  |  Frustrate (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Key (50)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Live (628)  |  Manage (23)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Past (337)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Present (619)  |  Prove (250)  |  Question (621)  |  Realize (147)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Trite (4)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Usually (176)  |  Way (1217)

Last year, I co-sponsored the Highlands Conservation Act and in a bipartisan effort we passed the bill through Congress.
Sue Kelly
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Bill (14)  |  Congress (19)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Highland (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Pass (238)  |  Sponsor (5)  |  Through (849)  |  Year (933)

Magic and all that is ascribed to it is a deep presentiment of the powers of science. The shoes of swiftness, the sword of sharpness, the power of subduing the elements, of using the secret virtues of minerals, of understanding the voices of birds, are the obscure efforts of the mind in a right direction.
From 'History', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Deep (233)  |  Direction (175)  |  Element (310)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Power (746)  |  Presentiment (2)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Swiftness (4)  |  Sword (15)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Using (6)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Voice (52)

Man has risen, not fallen. He can choose to develop his capacities as the highest animal and to try to rise still farther, or he can choose otherwise. The choice is his responsibility, and his alone. There is no automatism that will carry him upward without choice or effort and there is no trend solely in the right direction. Evolution has no purpose; man must supply this for himself. The means to gaining right ends involve both organic evolution and human evolution, but human choice as to what are the right ends must be based on human evolution.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Automatism (2)  |  Basis (173)  |  Both (493)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Carry (127)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Direction (175)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farther (51)  |  Highest (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Involve (90)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organic (158)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Still (613)  |  Supply (93)  |  Trend (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Upward (43)  |  Will (2355)

Mankind lies groaning, half-crushed beneath the weight of its own progress. Men do not sufficiently realize that their future is in their own hands. Theirs is the task of determining first of all whether they want to go on living or not. Theirs the responsibility, then, for deciding if they want merely to live, or intend to make just the extra effort required for fulfilling, even on their refractory planet, the essential function of the universe, which is a machine for the making of gods.
The Two Sources of Morality and Religion, trans. by R. Ashley Audra and Cloudesley Brereton (1935), 275.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Crush (18)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Merely (316)  |  Planet (356)  |  Progress (465)  |  Realize (147)  |  Refractory (3)  |  Required (108)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Task (147)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Weight (134)

Mathematicians may flatter themselves that they possess new ideas which mere human language is as yet unable to express. Let them make the effort to express these ideas in appropriate words without the aid of symbols, and if they succeed they will not only lay us laymen under a lasting obligation, but, we venture to say, they will find themselves very much enlightened during the process, and will even be doubtful whether the ideas as expressed in symbols had ever quite found their way out of the equations into their minds.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Equation (132)  |  Express (186)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Possess (156)  |  Process (423)  |  Say (984)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Mathematics, including not merely Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and the higher Calculus, but also the applied Mathematics of Natural Philosophy, has a marked and peculiar method or character; it is by preeminence deductive or demonstrative, and exhibits in a nearly perfect form all the machinery belonging to this mode of obtaining truth. Laying down a very small number of first principles, either self-evident or requiring very little effort to prove them, it evolves a vast number of deductive truths and applications, by a procedure in the highest degree mathematical and systematic.
In Education as a Science (1879), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Character (243)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Down (456)  |  Evident (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Little (707)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (699)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Preeminence (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Prove (250)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Small (477)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vast (177)

Men give me some credit for genius. All the genius I have lies in this: When I have a subject in hand, I study it profoundly. Day and night it is before me. I explore it in all its bearings. My mind becomes pervaded with it. Then the effort which I have made is what people are pleased to call the fruit of genius. It is the fruit of labor and thought.
Attributed as a comment to a friend. In J. C. Thomas, Manual of Useful Information (1893), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Genius (284)  |  Labor (107)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  People (1005)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)

Most, if not all, of the great ideas of modern mathematics have had their origin in observation. Take, for instance, the arithmetical theory of forms, of which the foundation was laid in the diophantine theorems of Fermat, left without proof by their author, which resisted all efforts of the myriad-minded Euler to reduce to demonstration, and only yielded up their cause of being when turned over in the blow-pipe flame of Gauss’s transcendent genius; or the doctrine of double periodicity, which resulted from the observation of Jacobi of a purely analytical fact of transformation; or Legendre’s law of reciprocity; or Sturm’s theorem about the roots of equations, which, as he informed me with his own lips, stared him in the face in the midst of some mechanical investigations connected (if my memory serves me right) with the motion of compound pendulums; or Huyghen’s method of continued fractions, characterized by Lagrange as one of the principal discoveries of that great mathematician, and to which he appears to have been led by the construction of his Planetary Automaton; or the new algebra, speaking of which one of my predecessors (Mr. Spottiswoode) has said, not without just reason and authority, from this chair, “that it reaches out and indissolubly connects itself each year with fresh branches of mathematics, that the theory of equations has become almost new through it, algebraic geometry transfigured in its light, that the calculus of variations, molecular physics, and mechanics” (he might, if speaking at the present moment, go on to add the theory of elasticity and the development of the integral calculus) “have all felt its influence”.
In 'A Plea for the Mathematician', Nature, 1, 238 in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 655-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Authority (95)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blow (44)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chair (24)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Compound (113)  |  Connect (125)  |  Construction (112)  |  Continue (165)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Double (15)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  Equation (132)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Flame (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Christiaan Huygens (10)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inform (47)  |  Instance (33)  |  Integral (26)  |  Integral Calculus (6)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Karl Jacobi (10)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Laid (7)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Adrien-Marie Legendre (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Lip (4)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Periodicity (6)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Resist (15)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Root (120)  |  Say (984)  |  Serve (59)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  William Spottiswoode (3)  |  Star (427)  |  Stare (9)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Transcendent (2)  |  Transfigure (2)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variation (90)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Mr. [Granville T.] Woods says that he has been frequently refused work because of the previous condition of his race, but he has had great determination and will and never despaired because of disappointments. He always carried his point by persistent efforts. He says the day is past when colored boys will be refused work only because of race prejudice. There are other causes. First, the boy has not the nerve to apply for work after being refused at two or three places. Second, the boy should have some knowledge of mechanics. The latter could be gained at technical schools, which should be founded for the purpose. And these schools must sooner or later be established, and thereby, we should be enabled to put into the hands of our boys and girls the actual means of livelihood.
From William J. Simmons, Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising (1887), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  African American (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cause (541)  |  Color (137)  |  Condition (356)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Establishment (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Point (580)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

Much of his [Clifford’s] best work was actually spoken before it was written. He gave most of his public lectures with no visible preparation beyond very short notes, and the outline seemed to be filled in without effort or hesitation. Afterwards he would revise the lecture from a shorthand writer’s report, or sometimes write down from memory almost exactly what he had said. It fell out now and then, however, that neither of these things was done; in such cases there is now no record of the lecture at all.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Down (456)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Note (34)  |  Outline (11)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Record (154)  |  Revise (6)  |  Short (197)  |  Shorthand (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Visible (84)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

Music is the effort we make to explain to ourselves how our brains work. We listen to Bach transfixed because this is listening to a human mind.
The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1980), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Music (129)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Work (1351)

My internal and external life depend so much on the work of others that I must make an extreme effort to give as much as I receive.
Quoted, without citation, in Floyd Merrell, Unthinking Thinking: Jorge Luis Borges, Mathematics, and the New Physics, 241. Webmaster has not found any other source for this quote, and cautions doubt about its authenticity. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  External (57)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Giving (11)  |  Internal (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Receive (114)  |  Work (1351)

Nature has but one plan of operation, invariably the same in the smallest things as well as in the largest, and so often do we see the smallest masses selected for use in Nature, that even enormous ones are built up solely by fitting these together. Indeed, all Nature’s efforts are devoted to uniting the smallest parts of our bodies in such a way that all things whatsoever, however diverse they may be, which coalesce in the structure of living things construct the parts by means of a sort of compendium.
'On the Developmental Process', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 2, 843.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Building (156)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Compendium (5)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Thing (3)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Part (222)  |  Plan (117)  |  Sameness (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Uniting (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Nature! … She is the only artist; working-up the most uniform material into utter opposites; arriving, without a trace of effort, at perfection, at the most exact precision, though always veiled under a certain softness.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Artist (90)  |  Certain (550)  |  Exact (68)  |  Forming (42)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Precision (68)  |  Softness (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Utter (7)  |  Veil (26)

Neil and Buzz, I am talking to you by telephone from the Oval Office at the White House, and this certainly has to be the most historic telephone call ever made. Because of what you have done, the heavens have become a part of man’s world. As you talk to us from the Sea of Tranquility, it inspires us to redouble our efforts to bring peace and tranquility to Earth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Neil Armstrong (16)  |  Become (815)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Historic (7)  |  House (140)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Office (71)  |  Part (222)  |  Peace (108)  |  Sea (308)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Telephone (27)  |  Tranquility (8)  |  White (127)  |  White House (4)  |  World (1774)

Never look for a psychological explanation unless every effort to find a cultural one has been exhausted.
Final summary statement of his lectures on psychological aspects of culture. As quoted by Margaret Mead (who was a student of Benedict), in Ruth Benedict, 'Search: 1920-1930', An Anthropologist at Work (1959, 2011), 16. Mead explains: “‘Psychological’ referred to the innate, generic characteristics of the mind; ‘cultural’ referred to the behavior learned as a member of a given society.”
Science quotes on:  |  Cultural (25)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  Look (582)  |  Never (1087)  |  Psychological (42)

No one keeps his enthusiasm automatically. Enthusiasm must be nourished with new actions, new aspirations, new efforts, new visions.
Papyrus
Papyrus
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Automatically (5)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Keep (101)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Nourish (16)  |  Vision (123)

Nothing could be more admirable than the manner in which for forty years he [Joseph Black] performed this useful and dignified office. His style of lecturing was as nearly perfect as can well be conceived; for it had all the simplicity which is so entirely suited to scientific discourse, while it partook largely of the elegance which characterized all he said or did … I have heard the greatest understandings of the age giving forth their efforts in its most eloquent tongues—have heard the commanding periods of Pitt’s majestic oratory—the vehemence of Fox’s burning declamation—have followed the close-compacted chain of Grant’s pure reasoning—been carried away by the mingled fancy, epigram, and argumentation of Plunket; but I should without hesitation prefer, for mere intellectual gratification (though aware how much of it is derived from association), to be once more allowed the privilege which I in those days enjoyed of being present while the first philosopher of his age was the historian of his own discoveries, and be an eyewitness of those experiments by which he had formerly made them, once more performed with his own hands.
In 'Philosophers of the Time of George III', The Works of Henry, Lord Brougham, F.R.S. (1855), Vol. I, 19-21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Burning (48)  |  Compact (13)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fancy (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Grant (73)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Historian (54)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Lecture (105)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Present (619)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)  |  Year (933)

Of all investments into the future, the conquest of space demands the greatest efforts and the longest-term commitment… but it also offers the greatest reward: none less than a universe.
As quoted, without citation, in David William English, The Air Up There (2003), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Demand (123)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Investment (13)  |  Less (103)  |  Offer (141)  |  Reward (68)  |  Space (500)  |  Term (349)  |  Universe (857)

Of all the frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called 'the greatest evil in the world.' The friction which results from ignorance ... can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and the unification of the heterogeneous elements of humanity. No effort could be better spent.
'The Problem of Increasing Human Energy', The Century (Jun 1900), 211. Collected in The Century (1900), Vol. 60, 211
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Buddha_Gautama (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Element (310)  |  Evil (116)  |  Friction (14)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Retardation (5)  |  Spent (85)  |  Spread (83)  |  Unification (11)  |  World (1774)

Of what significance is one’s one existence, one is basically unaware. What does a fish know about the water in which he swims all his life? The bitter and the sweet come from outside. The hard from within, from one’s own efforts. For the most part I do what my own nature drives me to do. It is embarrassing to earn such respect and love for it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Basically (4)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drive (55)  |  Earn (7)  |  Embarrassing (3)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fish (120)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outside (141)  |  Part (222)  |  Respect (207)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Swim (30)  |  Unaware (5)  |  Water (481)

One of the gladdest moments of human life, methinks, is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands. Shaking off with one mighty effort the fetters of habit, the leaden weight of routine, the cloak of many cares and the slavery of home, man feel once more happy.
In Zanzibar: City, Island, and Coast (1872), Vol. 1, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Cloak (5)  |  Departure (9)  |  Distant (33)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happy (105)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Journey (42)  |  Land (115)  |  Leaden (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Routine (25)  |  Shake (41)  |  Slavery (13)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Weight (134)

One word characterises the most strenuous of the efforts for the advancement of science that I have made perseveringly during fifty-five years; that word is failure. I know no more of electric and magnetic force, or of the relation between ether, electricity and ponderable matter, or of chemical affinity, than I knew and tried to teach to my students of natural philosophy fifty years ago in my first session as Professor.
Address (16 Jun 1896), at Celebration for his Jubilee as Professor, at Glasgow University. Printed in The Electrician (19 Jun 1896), 37, 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Affinity (2)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Ether (35)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Know (1518)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Persevere (5)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Ponderable (4)  |  Professor (128)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strenuous (5)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

One would like to see mankind spend the balance of the century in a total effort to clean up and groom the surface of the globe – wipe out the jungles, turn deserts and swamps into arable land, terrace barren mountains, regulate rivers, eradicate all pests, control the weather, and make the whole land mass a fit habitation for Man. The globe should be our and not nature’s home, and we no longer nature’s guests.
In The Temper of Our Time (1967), 94.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Century (310)  |  Clean (50)  |  Clean Up (4)  |  Control (167)  |  Desert (56)  |  Eradicate (5)  |  Fit (134)  |  Globe (47)  |  Guest (5)  |  Habitation (7)  |  Home (170)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Regulate (8)  |  River (119)  |  See (1081)  |  Spend (95)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swamp (7)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Weather (44)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wipe Out (3)

Only those who regard healing as the ultimate goal of their efforts can, therefore, be designated as physicians.
'Standpoints in Scientific Medicine', Disease, Life, and Man: Selected Essays (1958), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Goal (145)  |  Healing (25)  |  Physician (273)  |  Regard (305)  |  Ultimate (144)

Organization is simply the means by which the acts of ordinary men can be made to add up to extraordinary results. To this idea of progress that does not wait on some lucky break, some chance discovery, or some rare stroke of genius, but instead is achieved through systematic, cumulative effort, the engineer has contributed brilliantly.
In A Professional Guide for Young Engineers (1949, 1967), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Act (272)  |  Add (40)  |  Break (99)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Genius (284)  |  Idea (843)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Simply (53)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Through (849)  |  Waiting (43)

Our immediate interests are after all of but small moment. It is what we do for the future, what we add to the sum of man's knowledge, that counts most. As someone has said, 'The individual withers and the world is more and more.' Man dies at 70, 80, or 90, or at some earlier age, but through his power of physical reproduction, and with the means that he has to transmit the results of effort to those who come after him, he may be said to be immortal.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 360.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Count (105)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Future (429)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Result (677)  |  Small (477)  |  Successor (14)  |  Sum (102)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmission (34)  |  World (1774)

Philosophy dwells aloft in the Temple of Science, the divinity of its inmost shrine; her dictates descend among men, but she herself descends not : whoso would behold her must climb with long and laborious effort, nay, still linger in the forecourt, till manifold trial have proved him worthy of admission into the interior solemnities.
In James Wood, Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893), 347:42.
Science quotes on:  |  Admission (17)  |  Descend (47)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Interior (32)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Linger (14)  |  Long (790)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Must (1526)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shrine (8)  |  Still (613)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Trial (57)

Precedents are treated by powerful minds as fetters with which to bind down the weak, as reasons with which to mistify the moderately informed, and as reeds which they themselves fearlessly break through whenever new combinations and difficult emergencies demand their highest efforts.
A Word to the Wise (1833), 3-6. Quoted in Anthony Hyman (ed.), Science and Reform: Selected Works of Charles Babbage (1989), 202.
Science quotes on:  |  Break (99)  |  Combination (144)  |  Demand (123)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Down (456)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Inform (47)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precedent (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (849)  |  Weak (71)  |  Whenever (81)

Proposition VIII. When two Undulations, from different Origins, coincide either perfectly or very nearly in Direction, their joint effect is a Combination of the Motions belonging to each.
'On the Theory of Light and Colours' (read in 1801), Philosophical Transactions (1802), 92, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Belonging (37)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effect (393)  |  Joint (31)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Origin (239)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Two (937)  |  Undulation (4)

Psychology … tells us that we rarely work through reasons and evidence in a systematic way; weighing information carefully and suspending the impulse to draw conclusions. Instead, much of the time we use mental shortcuts or rules of thumb that save us mental effort. These habits often work reasonably well, but they also can lead us to conclusions we might dismiss if we applied more thought.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Careful (24)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Draw (137)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Habit (168)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Information (166)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mental (177)  |  More (2559)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Rule Of Thumb (3)  |  Save (118)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas. One seeks the most general ideas of operation which will bring together in simple, logical and unified form the largest possible circle of formal relationships. In this effort toward logical beauty spiritual formulas are discovered necessary for the deeper penetration into the laws of nature.
In letter (1 May 1935), Letters to the Editor, 'The Late Emmy Noether: Professor Einstein Writes in Appreciation of a Fellow-Mathematician', New York Times (4 May 1935), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Circle (110)  |  Deep (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Largest (39)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Operation (213)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Reaching the Moon by three-man vessels in one long bound from Earth is like casting a thin thread across space. The main effort, in the coming decades, will be to strengthen this thread; to make it a cord, a cable, and, finally, a broad highway.
In 'The Coming Decades in Space', Boy’s Life (Jun 1972), 8. Reprinted in The Beginning and the End (1977), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Bound (119)  |  Broad (27)  |  Cable (11)  |  Cast (66)  |  Casting (10)  |  Coming (114)  |  Cord (3)  |  Decade (59)  |  Earth (996)  |  Finally (26)  |  Highway (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Main (28)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Reach (281)  |  Space (500)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Thin (16)  |  Thread (32)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Will (2355)

Religion and science ... constitute deep-rooted and ancient efforts to find richer experience and deeper meaning than are found in the ordinary biological and social satisfactions. As pointed out by Whitehead, religion and science have similar origins and are evolving toward similar goals. Both started from crude observations and fanciful concepts, meaningful only within a narrow range of conditions for the people who formulated them of their limited tribal experience. But progressively, continuously, and almost simultaneously, religious and scientific concepts are ridding themselves of their coarse and local components, reaching higher and higher levels of abstraction and purity. Both the myths of religion and the laws of science, it is now becoming apparent, are not so much descriptions of facts as symbolic expressions of cosmic truths.
'On Being Human,' A God Within, Scribner (1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Coarse (4)  |  Component (48)  |  Concept (221)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Crude (31)  |  Deep (233)  |  Description (84)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  High (362)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Local (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Myth (56)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Observation (555)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Progressively (3)  |  Purity (14)  |  Range (99)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rich (62)  |  Rid (13)  |  Root (120)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Social (252)  |  Start (221)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Toward (45)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whitehead (2)

Science and technology, and the various forms of art, all unite humanity in a single and interconnected system. As science progresses, the worldwide cooperation of scientists and technologists becomes more and more of a special and distinct intellectual community of friendship, in which, in place of antagonism, there is growing up a mutually advantageous sharing of work, a coordination of efforts, a common language for the exchange of information, and a solidarity, which are in many cases independent of the social and political differences of individual states.
In The Medvedev Papers (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Advantageous (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Community (104)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Form (959)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Growing (98)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Language (293)  |  More (2559)  |  Political (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sharing (11)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Special (184)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Technologist (7)  |  Technology (257)  |  Unite (42)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worldwide (16)

Science has been arranging, classifying, methodizing, simplifying, everything except itself. It has made possible the tremendous modern development of power of organization which has so multiplied the effective power of human effort as to make the differences from the past seem to be of kind rather than of degree. It has organized itself very imperfectly. Scientific men are only recently realizing that the principles which apply to success on a large scale in transportation and manufacture and general staff work to apply them; that the difference between a mob and an army does not depend upon occupation or purpose but upon human nature; that the effective power of a great number of scientific men may be increased by organization just as the effective power of a great number of laborers may be increased by military discipline.
'The Need for Organization in Scientific Research', in Bulletin of the National Research Council: The National Importance of Scientific and Industrial Research (Oct 1919), Col 1, Part 1, No. 1, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Army (33)  |  Classification (97)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Effective (59)  |  Everything (476)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Kind (557)  |  Laborer (7)  |  Large (394)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Military (40)  |  Mob (9)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organization (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Success (302)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Work (1351)

Science is not a sacred cow—but there are a large number of would-be sacred cowherds busily devoting quantities of time, energy and effort to the task of making it one, so they can be sacred cowherds.
From 'Introduction', to Prologue to Analog (1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Cow (39)  |  Energy (344)  |  Large (394)  |  Making (300)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Number (699)  |  Research (664)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)

Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is often much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone.
From his second Nobel Prize Banquet speech (10 Dec 1972). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1972 (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Combine (57)  |  Effective (59)  |  Individual (404)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Several (32)  |  Together (387)  |  Work (1351)

Science is a field which grows continuously with ever expanding frontiers. Further, it is truly international in scope. … Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is often much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone.
From his second Nobel Prize Banquet speech (10 Dec 1972). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1972 (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Combination (144)  |  Effective (59)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  Field (364)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Grow (238)  |  Individual (404)  |  International (37)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Scope (45)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Work (1351)

Science is the search for truth. It is not a game in which one tries to beat his opponent, to do harm to others. We need to have the spirit of science in international affairs, to make the conduct of international affairs the effort to find the right solution, the just solution of international problems, not the effort by each nation to get the better of other nations, to do harm to them when it is possible.
In No More War! (1958).
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Beat (41)  |  Better (486)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Game (101)  |  Harm (39)  |  International (37)  |  Nation (193)  |  Need (290)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)

Science quickens and cultivates directly the faculty of observation, which in very many persons lies almost dormant through life, the power of accurate and rapid generalizations, and the mental habit of method and arrangement; it accustoms young persons to trace the sequence of cause and effect; it familiarizes then with a kind of reasoning which interests them, and which they can promptly comprehend; and it is perhaps the best corrective for that indolence which is the vice of half-awakened minds, and which shrinks from any exertion that is not, like an effort of memory, merely mechanical.
Anonymous
Report of the Royal Commission on Education (1861), Parliamentary Papers (1864), Vol 20, 32-33, as cited in Paul White, Thomas Huxley: Making the "Man of Science" (2003), 77, footnote. Also quoted in John Lubbock, The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Awakening (11)  |  Best (459)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Corrective (2)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Familiarization (2)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Habit (168)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)  |  Person (363)  |  Power (746)  |  Promptness (2)  |  Quickening (4)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vice (40)  |  Young (227)

Scientists and particularly the professional students of evolution are often accused of a bias toward mechanism or materialism, even though believers in vitalism and in finalism are not lacking among them. Such bias as may exist is inherent in the method of science. The most successful scientific investigation has generally involved treating phenomena as if they were purely materialistic, rejecting any metaphysical hypothesis as long as a physical hypothesis seems possible. The method works. The restriction is necessary because science is confined to physical means of investigation and so it would stultify its own efforts to postulate that its subject is not physical and so not susceptible to its methods.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Confinement (4)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involved (90)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Professional (70)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Stultify (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitalism (5)  |  Work (1351)

Since the beginning of physics, symmetry considerations have provided us with an extremely powerful and useful tool in our effort to understand nature. Gradually they have become the backbone of our theoretical formulation of physical laws.
Particle Physics and an Introduction to Field Theory (1981), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Backbone (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Physics (533)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Useful (250)

Since the seventeenth century, physical intuition has served as a vital source for mathematical porblems and methods. Recent trends and fashions have, however, weakened the connection between mathematics and physics; mathematicians, turning away from their roots of mathematics in intuition, have concentrated on refinement and emphasized the postulated side of mathematics, and at other times have overlooked the unity of their science with physics and other fields. In many cases, physicists have ceased to appreciate the attitudes of mathematicians. This rift is unquestionably a serious threat to science as a whole; the broad stream of scientific development may split into smaller and smaller rivulets and dry out. It seems therefore important to direct our efforts towards reuniting divergent trends by classifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts.
As co-author with David Hilbert, in Methods of Mathematical Physics (1937, 1989), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Century (310)  |  Classification (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Connection (162)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Divergent (6)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Dry (57)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (364)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Overlooking (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recent (77)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Rift (3)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serious (91)  |  Serving (15)  |  Side (233)  |  Source (93)  |  Stream (81)  |  Threat (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trend (22)  |  Turning (5)  |  Unity (78)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Vital (85)  |  Weakening (2)  |  Whole (738)

Some persons have contended that mathematics ought to be taught by making the illustrations obvious to the senses. Nothing can be more absurd or injurious: it ought to be our never-ceasing effort to make people think, not feel.
Seven Lectures on Shakespeare and Milton (1856) 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Contend (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Injurious (14)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Sense (770)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)

Some years ago John Kenneth Galbraith wrote in an essay on his efforts at writing a history of economics: “As one approaches the present, one is filled with a sense of hopelessness; in a year and possibly even a month, there is now more economic comment in the supposedly serious literature than survives from the whole of the thousand years commonly denominated as the Middle Ages … anyone who claims to be familiar with it all is a confessing liar.” I believe that all physicists would subscribe to the same sentiments regarding their own professional literature. I do at any rate.
In H. Henry Stroke, 'The Physical Review Then and Now', Physical Review: The First Hundred Years: a Selection of Seminal Papers and Commentaries, Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Claim (146)  |  Comment (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Essay (27)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Fill (61)  |  John Kenneth Galbraith (11)  |  History (673)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Liar (6)  |  Literature (103)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Professional (70)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Serious (91)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Whole (738)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

Standing now in diffused light, with the wind at my back, I experience suddenly a feeling of completeness–not a feeling of having achieved something or of being stronger than everyone who was ever here before, not a feeling of having arrived at the ultimate point, not a feeling of supremacy. Just a breath of happiness deep inside my mind and my breast. The summit seemed suddenly to me to be a refuge, and I had not expected to find any refuge up here. Looking at the steep, sharp ridges below us, I have the impression that to have come later would have been too late. Everything we now say to one another, we only say out of embarrassment. I don’t think anymore. As I pull the tape recorder, trancelike, from my rucksack, and switch it on wanting to record a few appropriate phrases, tears again well into my eyes. “Now we are on the summit of Everest,” I begin, “it is so cold that we cannot take photographs…” I cannot go on, I am immediately shaken with sobs. I can neither talk nor think, feeling only how this momentous experience changes everything. To reach only a few meters below the summit would have required the same amount of effort, the same anxiety and burden of sorrow, but a feeling like this, an eruption of feeling, is only possible on the summit itself.
In Everest: Expedition to the Ultimate (1979), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Amount (151)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Anymore (5)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Below (24)  |  Breast (9)  |  Breath (59)  |  Burden (27)  |  Change (593)  |  Cold (112)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Deep (233)  |  Diffuse (4)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Everest (10)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inside (26)  |  Late (118)  |  Light (607)  |  Looking (189)  |  Meter (9)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Momentous (5)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Pull (43)  |  Reach (281)  |  Record (154)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Rucksack (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Shake (41)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Stand (274)  |  Steep (5)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Summit (25)  |  Supremacy (4)  |  Switch (10)  |  Talk (100)  |  Tape (5)  |  Tear (42)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Want (497)  |  Wind (128)

Stem cells are probably going to be extremely useful. But it isn’t a given, and even if it were, I don’t think the end justifies the means. I am not against stem cells, I think it’s great. Blanket objection is not very reasonable to me—any effort to control scientific advances is doomed to fail. You cannot stop the human mind from working.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Control (167)  |  Doom (32)  |  End (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Justification (48)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Objection (32)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)  |  Stop (80)  |  Think (1086)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Working (20)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (327)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Group (78)  |  High (362)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Involve (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Line (91)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Purely (109)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rose (34)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Solve (130)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (14)  |  Superior (81)  |  Tension (24)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Universal (189)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

The act of discovery, the act of being confronted with a new phenomenon, is a very passionate and very exciting moment in everyone’s life. It’s the reward for many, many years of effort and, also, of failures.
From 'Asking Nature', collected in Lewis Wolpert and Alison Richards (eds.), Passionate Minds: The Inner World of Scientists (1997), 197.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Being (1278)  |  Confront (17)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Failure (161)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Reward (68)  |  Year (933)

The advancement of science is slow; it is effected only by virtue of hard work and perseverance. And when a result is attained, should we not in recognition connect it with the efforts of those who have preceded us, who have struggled and suffered in advance? Is it not truly a duty to recall the difficulties which they vanquished, the thoughts which guided them; and how men of different nations, ideas, positions, and characters, moved solely by the love of science, have bequeathed to us the unsolved problem? Should not the last comer recall the researches of his predecessors while adding in his turn his contribution of intelligence and of labor? Here is an intellectual collaboration consecrated entirely to the search for truth, and which continues from century to century.
[Respecting how the work of prior researchers had enabled his isolation of fluorine.]
Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1897). In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to July 1897 (1898), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Duty (68)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fluorine (5)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Love (309)  |  Nation (193)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Position (77)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Research (664)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Slow (101)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truly (116)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Work (1351)

The alchemists of past centuries tried hard to make the elixir of life: ... Those efforts were in vain; it is not in our power to obtain the experiences and the views of the future by prolonging our lives forward in this direction. However, it is well possible in a certain sense to prolong our lives backwards by acquiring the experiences of those who existed before us and by learning to know their views as well as if we were their contemporaries. The means for doing this is also an elixir of life.
Foreword to Die Entwicklung der Chemie in der neueren Zeit (1873), trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemist (22)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elixir (5)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forward (102)  |  Future (429)  |  Hard (243)  |  History (673)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Past (337)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Sense (770)  |  Vain (83)  |  View (488)

The bird which is drawn to the water by its need of finding there the prey on which it lives, separates the digits of its feet in trying to strike the water and move about on the surface. The skin which unites these digits at their base acquires the habit of being stretched by these continually repeated separations of the digits; thus in course of time there are formed large webs which unite the digits of ducks, geese, etc., as we actually find them. In the same way efforts to swim, that is to push against the water so as to move about in it, have stretched the membranes between the digits of frogs, sea-tortoises, the otter, beaver, etc.
On the other hand, a bird which is accustomed to perch on trees and which springs from individuals all of whom had acquired this habit, necessarily has longer digits on its feet and differently shaped from those of the aquatic animals that I have just named. Its claws in time become lengthened, sharpened and curved into hooks, to clasp the branches on which the animal so often rests.
We find in the same way that the bird of the water-side which does not like swimming and yet is in need of going to the water's edge to secure its prey, is continually liable to sink into the mud. Now this bird tries to act in such a way that its body should not be immersed in the liquid, and hence makes its best efforts to stretch and lengthen its legs. The long-established habit acquired by this bird and all its race of continually stretching and lengthening its legs, results in the individuals of this race becoming raised as though on stilts, and gradually obtaining long, bare legs, denuded of feathers up to the thighs and often higher still.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 249-50, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Bare (33)  |  Base (117)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Claw (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Duck (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Find (998)  |  Foot (60)  |  Form (959)  |  Frog (38)  |  Goose (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otter (2)  |  Perch (7)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Skin (47)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

The Commissioner of Patents may be likened to a wine merchant. He has in his office the wine of human progress of every kind and quality—wine, one may say, produced from the fermentation of the facts of the world through the yeast of human effort. Sometimes the yeast is “wild” and sometimes the “must” is poor, and while it all lies there shining with its due measure of the sparkle of divine effort, it is but occasionally that one finds a wine whose bouquet is the result of a pure culture on the true fruit of knowledge. But it is this true, pure wine of discovery that is alone of lasting significance.
In Some Chemical Problems of Today (1911), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bouquet (2)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Due (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Lie (364)  |  Measure (232)  |  Must (1526)  |  Office (71)  |  Patent (33)  |  Poor (136)  |  Produced (187)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quality (135)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Shining (35)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wine (38)  |  World (1774)  |  Yeast (7)

The constructions of the mathematical mind are at the same time free and necessary. The individual mathematician feels free to define his notions and set up his axioms as he pleases. But the question is will he get his fellow-mathematician interested in the constructs of his imagination. We cannot help the feeling that certain mathematical structures which have evolved through the combined efforts of the mathematical community bear the stamp of a necessity not affected by the accidents of their historical birth. Everybody who looks at the spectacle of modern algebra will be struck by this complementarity of freedom and necessity.
In 'A Half-Century of Mathematics',The American Mathematical Monthly (Oct 1951), 58, No. 8, 538-539.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Affect (19)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Bear (159)  |  Birth (147)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combine (57)  |  Community (104)  |  Complementarity (5)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Define (49)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interest (386)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Notion (113)  |  Please (65)  |  Question (621)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Strike (68)  |  Structure (344)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

The desire to economize time and mental effort in arithmetical computations, and to eliminate human liability to error is probably as old as the science of arithmetic itself.
Opening of proposal submitted to I.B.M., 'Proposed Automatic Calculating Machine' (1937). As quoted by I. Bernard Cohen, in Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (2000), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Computation (24)  |  Desire (204)  |  Economize (2)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Error (321)  |  Human (1468)  |  Liability (6)  |  Mental (177)  |  Old (481)  |  Probably (49)  |  Science (3879)  |  Time (1877)

The difference between a good observer and one who is not good is that the former is quick to take a hint from the facts, from his early efforts to develop skill in handling them, and quick to acknowledge the need to revise or alter the conceptual framework of his thinking. The other—the poor observer—continues dogmatically onward with his original thesis, lost in a maze of correlations, long after the facts have shrieked in protest against the interpretation put upon them.
In The Social Problems of an Industrial Civilization (1945).
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Against (332)  |  Alter (62)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Early (185)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Former (137)  |  Framework (31)  |  Good (889)  |  Hint (21)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Protest (9)  |  Skill (109)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Thinking (414)

The disaster was caused neither by carelessness nor human failure. Unknown natural factors that we are still unable to explain today have made a mockery of all our efforts. The very substance intended to provide food and life to millions of our countrymen and which we have produced and supplied for years has suddenly become a cruel enemy for reasons we are as yet unable to fathom. It has reduced our site to rubble.
From the memorial service for the hundreds of people killed by the explosion of the ammonia fertilizer factory at Oppau, Germany. At the time, the explosive nature of ammonium nitrate was not understood.
BASF corporate history webpage.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Become (815)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Factory (20)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Fertilizer (12)  |  Food (199)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Kill (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  People (1005)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reason (744)  |  Service (110)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Year (933)

The effort of the economist is to see, to picture the interplay of economic elements. The more clearly cut these elements appear in his vision, the better; the more elements he can grasp and hold in his mind at once, the better. The economic world is a misty region. The first explorers used unaided vision. Mathematics is the lantern by which what before was dimly visible now looms up in firm, bold outlines. The old phantasmagoria disappear. We see better. We also see further.
In Mathematical Investigations in the Theory of Value and Prices (1892), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Better (486)  |  Bold (22)  |  Clear (100)  |  Cut (114)  |  Dim (8)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economist (17)  |  Element (310)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hold (95)  |  Interplay (7)  |  Lantern (8)  |  Loom (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Outline (11)  |  Phantasmagoria (3)  |  Picture (143)  |  Region (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Unaided (2)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

The effort to eliminate synthetic pesticides because of unsubstantiated fears about residues in food will make fruits and vegetables more expensive, decrease consumption, and thus increase cancer rates. The levels of synthetic pesticide residues are trivial in comparison to natural chemicals, and thus their potential for cancer causation is extremely low. [Ames believes that “to eat your veggies” is the best way to prevent cancer.]
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has written a similar sentiment in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Causation (14)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Consumption (14)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Eat (104)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Expense (16)  |  Fear (197)  |  Food (199)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Increase (210)  |  Level (67)  |  Low (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Potential (69)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Rate (29)  |  Residue (9)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

The effort to reconcile science and religion is almost always made, not by theologians, but by scientists unable to shake off altogether the piety absorbed with their mother’s milk.
In Minority Report: H.L. Mencken’s Notebooks (1956), 166.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Milk (22)  |  Mother (114)  |  Piety (4)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Shake (41)  |  Theologian (22)

The effort to understand the universe is one of the very few things that lifts human life above the level of farce, and gives it some of the grace of tragedy.
In The First Three Minutes (1977), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Farce (5)  |  Grace (31)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)

The efforts of most human-beings are consumed in the struggle for their daily bread, but most of those who are, either through fortune or some special gift, relieved of this struggle are largely absorbed in further improving their worldly lot. Beneath the effort directed toward the accumulation of worldly goods lies all too frequently the illusion that this is the most substantial and desirable end to be achieved; but there is, fortunately, a minority composed of those who recognize early in their lives that the most beautiful and satisfying experiences open to humankind are not derived from the outside, but are bound up with the development of the individual's own feeling, thinking and acting. The genuine artists, investigators and thinkers have always been persons of this kind. However inconspicuously the life of these individuals runs its course, none the less the fruits of their endeavors are the most valuable contributions which one generation can make to its successors.
In letter (1 May 1935), Letters to the Editor, 'The Late Emmy Noether: Professor Einstein Writes in Appreciation of a Fellow-Mathematician', New York Times (4 May 1935), 12.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Acting (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Bound (119)  |  Bread (39)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Gift (104)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Inconspicuous (3)  |  Individual (404)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Lot (151)  |  Minority (21)  |  Most (1731)  |  Emmy Noether (7)  |  Nonetheless (2)  |  Open (274)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Run (174)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Special (184)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Successor (14)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Value (365)

The efforts of the great philosopher [Newton] were always superhuman; the questions which he did not solve were incapable of solution in his time
In 'Eulogy on Laplace', Smithsonian Report (1874), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1574)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Superhuman (5)  |  Time (1877)

The elegance of a mathematical theorem is directly proportional to the number of independent ideas one can see in the theorem and inversely proportional to the effort it takes to see them.
In Mathematical Discovery: On Understanding, Learning, and Teaching Problem Solving (1981). As cited, with no more details, in Yi Ma, An Invitation to 3-D Vision (2004), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Elegance (37)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independence (34)  |  Inversely Proportional (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Proportion (136)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Taking (9)  |  Theorem (112)

The essence of modernity is that progress no longer waits on genius; instead we have learned to put our faith in the organized efforts of ordinary men. Science is as old as the race, but the effective organization of science is new. Ancient science, like placer mining, was a pursuit of solitary prospectors. Nuggets of truth were found, but the total wealth of knowledge increased slowly. Modern man began to transform this world when he began to mine the hidden veins of knowledge systematically.
In School and Society (1930), 31, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Effective (59)  |  Essence (82)  |  Faith (203)  |  Finding (30)  |  Genius (284)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Increased (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  Modern (385)  |  New (1216)  |  Nugget (3)  |  Old (481)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prospector (4)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Total (94)  |  Transform (73)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vein (25)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Wealth (94)  |  World (1774)

The final results [of work on the theory of relativity] appear almost simple; any intelligent undergraduate can understand them without much trouble. But the years of searching in the dark for a truth that one feels, but cannot express; the intense effort and the alternations of confidence and misgiving, until one breaks through to clarity and understanding, are only known to him who has himself experienced them.
Concluding remark of George Gibson lecture at the University of Glasgow, 'The Origins of the General Theory of Relativity', (20 Jun 1933). Published by Glasgow University as The Origins of the General Theory of Relativity: Being the First Lecture on the George A. Gibson Foundation in the University of Glasgow, Delivered on June 20th, 1933 (1933), 11. Also quoted in 'No Hitching Posts' The Atlantic (1936), 157, 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternation (5)  |  Appear (118)  |  Break (99)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Dark (140)  |  Experience (467)  |  Express (186)  |  Feel (367)  |  Final (118)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intense (20)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Search (162)  |  Simple (406)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Through (849)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The glory of medicine is that it is constantly moving forward, that there is always more to learn. The ills of today do not cloud the horizon of tomorrow, but act as a spur to greater effort.
Address 'The Aims and Ideals of the American Medical Association', collected in Proceedings of the 66th Annual Meeting of the National Education Association of the United States (1928), 163. As cited in epigraph to Thomas M. Habermann (ed.), Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine Review (2006), Foreward.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Do (1908)  |  Forward (102)  |  Glory (58)  |  Greater (288)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Ill (12)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Moving (11)  |  Spur (4)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)

The great testimony of history shows how often in fact the development of science has emerged in response to technological and even economic needs, and how in the economy of social effort, science, even of the most abstract and recondite kind, pays for itself again and again in providing the basis for radically new technological developments. In fact, most people—when they think of science as a good thing, when they think of it as worthy of encouragement, when they are willing to see their governments spend substance upon it, when they greatly do honor to men who in science have attained some eminence—have in mind that the conditions of their life have been altered just by such technology, of which they may be reluctant to be deprived.
In 'Contemporary World', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1948), 4, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Basis (173)  |  Condition (356)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Pay (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Providing (5)  |  Radical (25)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Response (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Social (252)  |  Spend (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Willing (44)  |  Worthy (34)

The greatest human evils are not those that individuals perform in private, the tiny transgressions against some arbitrary social standard we call sins. The ultimate evils are the mass murders that occur in revolution and war, the large-scale savageries that arise when one agglomeration of humans tries to dominate another: the deeds of the social group. … only group efforts can save us from the sporadic insanities of the group.
In 'The Clint Eastwood Conundrum', The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition Into the Forces of History (1997), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Arise (158)  |  Call (769)  |  Deed (34)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Evil (116)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Group (78)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insanity (8)  |  Large (394)  |  Mass (157)  |  Occur (150)  |  Perform (121)  |  Private (23)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Savage (29)  |  Save (118)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sin (42)  |  Social (252)  |  Sporadic (2)  |  Standard (57)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Transgression (3)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  War (225)

The heat produced in maximal muscular effort, continued for twenty minutes, would be so great that, if it were not promptly dissipated, it would cause some of the albuminous substances of the body to become stiff, like a hard-boiled egg.
Science quotes on:  |  Albumin (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cause (541)  |  Egg (69)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Heat (174)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Produced (187)  |  Stiff (3)  |  Substance (248)

The history of chemistry is properly divided into the mythologic, the obscure, and the certain. The first period exhibits it from its infancy, deformed by fictions, until the destruction of the library of Alexandria by the Arabs. —The second, though freed in some measure from these absurdities, yet is still clothed in numberless enigmas and allegorical expressions.— The third period commences at the middle of the seventeenth century, with the first establishment of societies and academies of science; of which the wise associates, in many places uniting their efforts, determined to pursue the study of Natural Philosophy by observation and experiments, and candidly to publish their attempts in a general account of their transactions.
In Essays, Physical and Chemical (1791), 4, translated from the original Latin.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Academy (35)  |  Account (192)  |  Alexandria (2)  |  Allegory (7)  |  Arab (4)  |  Associate (25)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Candid (3)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Divided (50)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fiction (22)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Library (48)  |  Measure (232)  |  Myth (56)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Observation (555)  |  Period (198)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Wise (131)

The longing to behold this pre-established harmony [of phenomena and theoretical principles] is the source of the inexhaustible patience and perseverance with which Planck has devoted himself ... The state of mind which enables a man to do work of this kind is akin to that of the religious worshiper or the lover; the daily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from the heart.
Address (1918) for Max Planck's 60th birthday, at Physical Society, Berlin, 'Principles of Research' in Essays in Science (1934), 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Daily (87)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heart (229)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Intention (46)  |  Kind (557)  |  Longing (19)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Patience (56)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Principle (507)  |  Program (52)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Research (664)  |  State (491)  |  State Of Mind (4)  |  Straight (73)  |  Theory (970)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worship (32)

The main duty of the historian of mathematics, as well as his fondest privilege, is to explain the humanity of mathematics, to illustrate its greatness, beauty and dignity, and to describe how the incessant efforts and accumulated genius of many generations have built up that magnificent monument, the object of our most legitimate pride as men, and of our wonder, humility and thankfulness, as individuals.
In The Study of the History of Mathematics (1936), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Duty (68)  |  Explain (322)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genius (284)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Historian (54)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Humility (28)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Individual (404)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Monument (45)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Pride (78)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Thankfulness (2)  |  Wonder (236)

The maladies that affect the clerks aforesaid arise from three causes. First, constant sitting, secondly, the incessant movement of the the hand and always in the same direction, thirdly, the strain on the mind from the effort not to disfigure the books by errors or cause loss to their employers when they add, subtract, or do other sums in arithmetic. The diseases brought about by sitting constantly are easily understood; they are obstructions of the viscera, e.g. the liver and spleen, indigestion in the stomach, numbness of the legs, a considerable hindrance in the circulation of the blood, and an unhealthy habit.
De Morbis Artificum (1713), supplement, ch. 2, translated by W.C. Wright (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Blood (134)  |  Book (392)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Clerk (13)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constant (144)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Health (193)  |  Indigestion (5)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liver (19)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sum (102)  |  Understood (156)  |  Viscera (2)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not.
In Presidential Address to the 60th Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (Sep 1890), published in Report of the Annual Meeting (1891), 60, 725.
Science quotes on:  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Good (889)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Really (78)  |  Require (219)  |  Step (231)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (90)  |  Trust (66)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not; he must take care not to be the slave of his symbols, but always to have before his mind the realities which they merely serve to express. For these and other reasons it seems to me of the highest importance that a mathematician should be trained in no narrow school; a wide course of reading in the first few years of his mathematical study cannot fail to influence for good the character of the whole of his subsequent work.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Character (243)  |  Course (409)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Express (186)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Require (219)  |  School (219)  |  Seem (145)  |  Serve (59)  |  Slave (37)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (90)  |  Train (114)  |  Trust (66)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (933)

The moment one has offered an original explanation for a phenomenon which seems satisfactory, that moment affection for his intellectual child springs into existence, and as the explanation grows into a definite theory his parental affections cluster about his offspring and it grows more and more dear to him. ... There springs up also unwittingly a pressing of the theory to make it fit the facts and a pressing of the facts to make them fit the theory... To avoid this grave danger, the method of multiple working hypotheses is urged. It differs from the simple working hypothesis in that it distributes the effort and divides the affections... In developing the multiple hypotheses, the effort is to bring up into view every rational exploration of the phenomenon in hand and to develop every tenable hypothesis relative to its nature, cause or origin, and to give to all of these as impartially as possible a working form and a due place in the investigation. The investigator thus becomes the parent of a family of hypotheses; and by his parental relations to all is morally forbidden to fasten his affections unduly upon anyone. ... Each hypothesis suggests its own criteria, its own method of proof, its own method of developing the truth, and if a group of hypotheses encompass the subject on all sides, the total outcome of means and of methods is full and rich.
'Studies for Students. The Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses', Journal of Geology (1897), 5, 840-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Danger (115)  |  Definite (110)  |  Develop (268)  |  Differ (85)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Divide (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Form (959)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Origin (239)  |  Parent (76)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rational (90)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spring (133)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tenable (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)

The moral principle inherent in evolution, that nothing can be gained in this world without an effort; the ethical principle inherent in evolution is that only the best has the right to survive; the spiritual principle in evolution is the evidence of beauty, of order, and of design in the daily myriad of miracles to which we owe our existence.
'Evolution and Religion', New York Times (5 Mar 1922), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Best (459)  |  Daily (87)  |  Design (195)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Gain (145)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Moral (195)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Owe (71)  |  Principle (507)  |  Right (452)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  World (1774)

The nucleic acids, as constituents of living organisms, are comparable In importance to proteins. There is evidence that they are Involved In the processes of cell division and growth, that they participate In the transmission of hereditary characters, and that they are important constituents of viruses. An understanding of the molecular structure of the nucleic acids should be of value In the effort to understand the fundamental phenomena of life.
[Co-author with American chemist, B. Corey (1897-1971)]
'A Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), 39, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Division (65)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Importance (286)  |  Involved (90)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Organism (220)  |  Participation (15)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Protein (54)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Virus (27)

The overwhelming astonishment, the queerest structure we know about so far in the whole universe, the greatest of all cosmological scientific puzzles, confounding all our efforts to comprehend it, is the earth.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Cosmological (11)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Earth (996)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Structure (344)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)

The overwhelming astonishment, the queerest structure we know about so far in the whole universe, the greatest of all cosmological scientific puzzles, confounding all our efforts to comprehend it, is the earth. We are only now beginning to appreciate how strange and splendid it is, how it catches the breath, the loveliest object afloat around the sun, enclosed in its own blue bubble of atmosphere, manufacturing and breathing its own oxygen, fixing its own nitrogen from the air into its own soil, generating its own weather at the surface of its rain forests, constructing its own carapace from living parts: chalk cliffs, coral reefs, old fossils from earlier forms of life now covered by layers of new life meshed together around the globe, Troy upon Troy.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler’s Ninth Symphony (1984), 22-23.
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (4)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Blue (56)  |  Breath (59)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Catch (31)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Construct (124)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Cosmological (11)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Cover (37)  |  Early (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enclose (2)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Generate (16)  |  Geology (220)  |  Globe (47)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Know (1518)  |  Layer (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Lovely (10)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Mesh (3)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  New (1216)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Part (222)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Queer (9)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Soil (86)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Strange (157)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surface (209)  |  Together (387)  |  Troy (3)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weather (44)  |  Whole (738)

The progress of science depends less than is usually believed on the efforts and performance of the individual genius ... many important discoveries have been made by men of ordinary talents, simply because chance had made them, at the proper time and in the proper place and circumstances, recipients of a body of doctrines, facts and techniques that rendered almost inevitable the recognition of an important phenomenon. It is surprising that some historian has not taken malicious pleasure in writing an anthology of 'one discovery' scientists. Many exciting facts have been discovered as a result of loose thinking and unimaginative experimentation, and described in wrappings of empty words. One great discovery does not betoken a great scientist; science now and then selects insignificant standard bearers to display its banners.
Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1986), 368
Science quotes on:  |  Banner (7)  |  Body (537)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Display (56)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Malicious (8)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Performance (48)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Proper (144)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Select (44)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Talent (94)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

The real question is, Did God use evolution as His plan? If it could be shown that man, instead of being made in the image of God, is a development of beasts we would have to accept it, regardless of its effort, for truth is truth and must prevail. But when there is no proof we have a right to consider the effect of the acceptance of an unsupported hypothesis.
'God and Evolution', New York Times (26 Feb 1922), 84. Rebuttals were printed a few days later from Henry Fairfield Osborn and Edwin Grant Conklin.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Beast (55)  |  Being (1278)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Development (422)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evolution (590)  |  God (757)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Image (96)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plan (117)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unsupported (3)  |  Use (766)

The research worker, in his efforts to express the fundamental laws of Nature in mathematical form, should strive mainly for mathematical beauty. He should take simplicity into consideration in a subordinate way to beauty It often happens that the requirements of simplicity and beauty are the same, but where they clash, the latter must take precedence.
From Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1939), 59 122. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Law (894)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Way (1217)

The so-called Marxian dialectic is simply an effort by third-rate men to give an air of profundity to balderdash. Christianity has gone the same way. There are some sound ideas in it, but its advocates always add a lot of preposterous nonsense. The result is theology.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Advocate (18)  |  Air (347)  |  Call (769)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Dialectic (5)  |  Give (202)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lot (151)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Preposterous (8)  |  Profundity (6)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Simply (53)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Sound (183)  |  Theology (52)  |  Third-Rate (2)  |  Way (1217)

The student should read his author with the most sustained attention, in order to discover the meaning of every sentence. If the book is well written, it will endure and repay his close attention: the text ought to be fairly intelligible, even without illustrative examples. Often, far too often, a reader hurries over the text without any sincere and vigorous effort to understand it; and rushes to some example to clear up what ought not to have been obscure, if it had been adequately considered. The habit of scrupulously investigating the text seems to me important on several grounds. The close scrutiny of language is a very valuable exercise both for studious and practical life. In the higher departments of mathematics the habit is indispensable: in the long investigations which occur there it would be impossible to interpose illustrative examples at every stage, the student must therefore encounter and master, sentence by sentence, an extensive and complicated argument.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequately (3)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attention (190)  |  Author (167)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Clear (100)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consider (416)  |  Department (92)  |  Discover (553)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Endure (20)  |  Example (94)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Fairly (4)  |  Far (154)  |  Ground (217)  |  Habit (168)  |  High (362)  |  Hurry (15)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Occur (150)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Practical (200)  |  Read (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scrupulous (6)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Several (32)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Stage (143)  |  Student (300)  |  Studious (5)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Text (14)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

The study of mathematics is apt to commence in disappointment. The important applications of the science, the theoretical interest of its ideas, and the logical rigour of its methods all generate the expectation of a speedy introduction to processes of interest. We are told that by its aid the stars are weighed and the billions of molecules in a drop of water are counted. Yet, like the ghost of Hamlet's father, this great science eludes the efforts of our mental weapons to grasp it.
Opening to An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Billion (95)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Count (105)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Drop (76)  |  Elude (10)  |  Eluding (2)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Father (110)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Grasping (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Process (423)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speedy (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weigh (49)

The study of mathematics is apt to commence in disappointment. … We are told that by its aid the stars are weighed and the billions of molecules in a drop of water are counted. Yet, like the ghost of Hamlet's father, this greatest science eludes the efforts of our mental weapons to grasp it.
Opening of Chap 1, in An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apt (9)  |  Billion (95)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Count (105)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Drop (76)  |  Elude (10)  |  Father (110)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Study (653)  |  Water (481)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weighing (2)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abnormality (2)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Burden (27)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cost (86)  |  Development (422)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Domination (12)  |  Drain (11)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Incident (4)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Negative (63)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Policy (24)  |  Possession (65)  |  Predator (6)  |  Price (51)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Regard (305)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universality (22)  |  Victory (39)  |  View (488)

The word, “Vitamine,” served as a catchword which meant something even to the uninitiated, and it was not by mere accident that just at that time, research developed so markedly in this direction. Our view as to the fortunate choice of this name is strengthened, on the one hand, because it has become popular (and a badly chosen catchword, like a folksong without feeling, can never become popular), and on the other, because of the untiring efforts of other workers to introduce a varied nomenclature, for example, “accessory food factors, food hormones, water-soluble B and fat-soluble A, nutramine, and auximone” (for plants). Some of these designations are certainly not better, while others are much worse than “Vitamine.”
The Vitamines translated by Harry Ennis Dubin (1922), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Badly (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Catchword (3)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Choice (110)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Designation (13)  |  Develop (268)  |  Direction (175)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Food (199)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Hormone (10)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nomencalture (4)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Popularity (2)  |  Research (664)  |  Soluble (5)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Vitamin (13)  |  Water (481)  |  Word (619)

There is no substitute for honest, thorough, scientific effort to get correct data (no matter how much of it clashes with preconceived ideas). There is no substitute for actually reaching a correct claim of reasoning. Poor data and good reasoning give poor results. Good data and poor reasoning give poor results. Poor data and poor reasoning give rotten results.
In 'Right Answers—A Short Guide for Obtaining Them,' Computers and Automation, September 1969.
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (146)  |  Data (156)  |  Good (889)  |  Honest (50)  |  Idea (843)  |  Matter (798)  |  Poor (136)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Thorough (40)

There is now a feeling that the pieces of physics are falling into place, not because of any single revolutionary idea or because of the efforts of any one physicist, but because of a flowering of many seeds of theory, most of them planted long ago.
In 'The Forces of Nature', Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (Jan 1976), 29:4, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Feeling (250)  |  Flowering (2)  |  Idea (843)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Piece (38)  |  Plant (294)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Seed (93)  |  Single (353)  |  Theory (970)

There’s no value in digging shallow wells in a hundred places. Decide on one place and dig deep ... If you leave that to dig another well, all the first effort is wasted and there is no proof you won’t hit rock again.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 258
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Digging (11)  |  First (1283)  |  Hit (20)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Leave (130)  |  Place (177)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shallow (8)  |  Value (365)  |  Waste (101)

These changes—the more rapid pulse, the deeper breathing, the increase of sugar in the blood, the secretion from the adrenal glands—were very diverse and seemed unrelated. Then, one wakeful night, after a considerable collection of these changes had been disclosed, the idea flashed through my mind that they could be nicely integrated if conceived as bodily preparations for supreme effort in flight or in fighting. Further investigation added to the collection and confirmed the general scheme suggested by the hunch.
The Way of an Investigator: A Scientist's Experiences in Medical Research (1945), 59-60.
Science quotes on:  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Blood (134)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Change (593)  |  Collection (64)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flight (98)  |  General (511)  |  Gland (14)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Increase (210)  |  Integrated (10)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Through (849)

This has been far more than three men on a mission to the Moon; more still than the efforts of a government and industry team; more, even, than the efforts of one nation. We feel this stands as a symbol of the insatiable curiosity of all mankind to explore the unknown.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Government (110)  |  Industry (137)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mission (21)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Team (15)  |  Unknown (182)

This is the way federal land management should work. Cooperation, not confrontation, should be the hallmark of conservation efforts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Confrontation (8)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Federal (6)  |  Hallmark (5)  |  Land (115)  |  Management (21)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

This science [experimental science] alone, therefore, knows how to test perfectly what can be done by nature, what by the effort of art, what by trickery, what the incantations, conjurations, invocations, deprecations, sacrifices that belong to magic mean and dream of, and what is in them, so that all falsity may be removed and the truth alone of art and nature may be retained. This science alone teaches us how to view the mad acts of magicians, that they may be not ratified but shunned, just as logic considers sophistical reasoning.
In Opus Majus (1267).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Art (657)  |  Belong (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Dream (208)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Incantation (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mad (53)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Retain (56)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Science (3879)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)

Those of us who saw the dawn of the Atomic Age that early morning at Alamogordo … know now that when man is willing to make the effort, he is capable of accomplishing virtually anything.
In And Now It Can Be Told: The Story Of The Manhattan Project (1962), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Age (499)  |  Alamogordo (2)  |  Anything (9)  |  Atomic Age (6)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Early (185)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Morning (94)  |  Saw (160)  |  Willing (44)

Those who have taken upon them to lay down the law of nature as a thing already searched out and understood, whether they have spoken in simple assurance or professional affectation, have therein done philosophy and the sciences great injury. For as they have been successful in inducing belief, so they have been effective in quenching and stopping inquiry; and have done more harm by spoiling and putting an end to other men's efforts than good by their own. Those on the other hand who have taken a contrary course, and asserted that absolutely nothing can be known — whether it were from hatred of the ancient sophists, or from uncertainty and fluctuation of mind, or even from a kind of fullness of learning, that they fell upon this opinion — have certainly advanced reasons for it that are not to be despised; but yet they have neither started from true principles nor rested in the just conclusion, zeal and affectation having carried them much too far...
Now my method, though hard to practice, is easy to explain; and it is this. I propose to establish progressive stages of certainty. The evidence of the sense, helped and guarded by a certain process of correction, I retain. But the mental operation which follows the act of sense I for the most part reject; and instead of it I open and lay out a new and certain path for the mind to proceed in, starting directly from the simple sensuous perception.
Novum Organum (1620)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Already (222)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Correction (40)  |  Course (409)  |  Down (456)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effective (59)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retain (56)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Start (221)  |  Successful (123)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understood (156)

Those who knew that the judgements of many centuries had reinforced the opinion that the Earth is placed motionless in the middle of heaven, as though at its centre, if I on the contrary asserted that the Earth moves, I hesitated for a long time whether to bring my treatise, written to demonstrate its motion, into the light of day, or whether it would not be better to follow the example of the Pythagoreans and certain others, who used to pass on the mysteries of their philosophy merely to their relatives and friends, not in writing but by personal contact, as the letter of Lysis to Hipparchus bears witness. And indeed they seem to me to have done so, not as some think from a certain jealousy of communicating their doctrines, but so that their greatest splendours, discovered by the devoted research of great men, should not be exposed to the contempt of those who either find it irksome to waste effort on anything learned, unless it is profitable, or if they are stirred by the exhortations and examples of others to a high-minded enthusiasm for philosophy, are nevertheless so dull-witted that among philosophers they are like drones among bees.
'To His Holiness Pope Paul III', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bee (40)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contact (65)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drone (4)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Hipparchus (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Waste (101)  |  Witness (54)  |  Writing (189)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Nature has scattered the seeds of life
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Through the animal and vegetable kingdoms, Nature has scattered the seeds of life abroad with the most profuse and liberal hand; but has been comparatively sparing in the room and the nourishment necessary to rear them. The germs of existence contained in this spot of earth, if they could freely develop themselves, would fill millions of worlds in the course of a few thousand years. Necessity, that imperious all-pervading law of nature, restrains them within the prescribed bounds. The race of plants and the race of animals shrink under this great restrictive law; and man cannot by any efforts of reason escape from it.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bound (119)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fill (61)  |  Freely (13)  |  Germ (53)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Million (114)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Pervading (7)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prescribed (3)  |  Profuse (3)  |  Race (268)  |  Rear (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Room (40)  |  Scattered (5)  |  Seed (93)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Sparing (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Time will soon destroy the works of famous painters and sculptors, but the Indian arrowhead will balk his efforts and Eternity will have to come to his aid. They are not fossil bones, but, as it were, fossil thoughts, forever reminding me of the mind that shaped them… . Myriads of arrow-points lie sleeping in the skin of the revolving earth, while meteors revolve in space. The footprint, the mind-print of the oldest men.
(28 Mar 1859). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: XII: March, 2, 1859-November 30, 1859 (1906), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Arrow (20)  |  Arrowhead (4)  |  Bone (95)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Famous (10)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Indian (27)  |  Lie (364)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Painter (29)  |  Point (580)  |  Print (17)  |  Remind (13)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Revolving (2)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Shape (72)  |  Skin (47)  |  Sleeping (2)  |  Soon (186)  |  Space (500)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To arrive at the simplest truth, as Newton knew and practiced, requires years of contemplation. Not activity Not reasoning. Not calculating. Not busy behaviour of any kind. Not reading. Not talking. Not making an effort. Not thinking. Simply bearing in mind what it is one needs to know. And yet those with the courage to tread this path to real discovery are not only offered practically no guidance on how to do so, they are actively discouraged and have to set about it in secret, pretending meanwhile to be diligently engaged in the frantic diversions and to conform with the deadening personal opinions which are continually being thrust upon them.
In 'Appendix 1', The Laws of Form (1969), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Actively (3)  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Conform (13)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continual (43)  |  Courage (69)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engage (39)  |  Frantic (2)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Personal (67)  |  Practically (10)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Tread (17)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Year (933)

To master anything—from football to relativity—requires effort. But it does not require unpleasant effort, drudgery.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Drudgery (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Football (10)  |  Master (178)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Require (219)  |  Unpleasant (12)

To use Newton’s words, our efforts up till this moment have but turned over a pebble or shell here and there on the beach, with only a forlorn hope that under one of them was the gem we were seeking. Now we have the sieve, the minds, the hands, the time, and, particularly, the dedication to find those gems—no matter in which favorite hiding place the children of distant worlds have placed them.
[Co-author with Dava Sobel.]
In Frank Drake and Dava Sobel, Is Anyone Out There? (1993), 236.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Author (167)  |  Beach (21)  |  Children (200)  |  Dedication (11)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Find (998)  |  Forlorn (5)  |  Gem (16)  |  Hide (69)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Hope (299)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Shell (63)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Tragically isolated, imprisoned in his own “self,” man has made a desperate effort to “leap beyond his shadow,” to embrace the external world. From this effort was born science….
In Einstein and the Universe; A Popular Exposition of the Famous Theory (1922), 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Born (33)  |  Desperate (5)  |  Embrace (46)  |  External (57)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Leap (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Tragic (17)  |  World (1774)

Two lights for guidance. The first, our little glowing atom of community, with all that it signifies. The second, the cold light of the stars, symbol of the hypercosmical reality, with its crystal ecstasy. Strange that in this light, in which even the dearest love is frostily asserted, and even the possible defeat of our half-waking world is contemplated without remission of praise, the human crisis does not lose but gains significance. Strange, that it seems more, not less, urgent to play some part in this struggle, this brief effort of animalcules striving to win for their race some increase of lucidity before the ultimate darkness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Assert (66)  |  Atom (355)  |  Brief (36)  |  Cold (112)  |  Community (104)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Glow (14)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Human (1468)  |  Increase (210)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Lose (159)  |  Love (309)  |  Lucidity (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Part (222)  |  Play (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Praise (26)  |  Race (268)  |  Reality (261)  |  Remission (3)  |  Second (62)  |  Seem (145)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Strange (157)  |  Strive (46)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Waking (17)  |  Win (52)  |  World (1774)

Until its results have gone through the painful process of publication, preferably in a refereed journal of high standards, scientific research is just play. Publication is an indispensable part of science. “Publish or perish” is not an indictment of the system of academia; it is a partial prescription for creativity and innovation. Sustained and substantial publication favors creativity. Novelty of conception has a large component of unpredictability. ... One is often a poor judge of the relative value of his own creative efforts. An artist’s ranking of his own works is rarely the same as that of critics or of history. Most scientists have had similar experiences. One’s supply of reprints for a pot-boiler is rapidly exhausted, while a major monograph that is one’s pride and joy goes unnoticed. The strategy of choice is to increase the odds favoring creativity by being productive.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 233-234.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academia (4)  |  Artist (90)  |  Being (1278)  |  Choice (110)  |  Component (48)  |  Conception (154)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critic (20)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experience (467)  |  Favor (63)  |  Favored (5)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Journal (30)  |  Joy (107)  |  Judge (108)  |  Large (394)  |  Major (84)  |  Monograph (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Odds (6)  |  Often (106)  |  Painful (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Perish (50)  |  Play (112)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preferably (2)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Pride (78)  |  Process (423)  |  Productive (32)  |  Publication (101)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Referee (7)  |  Relative (39)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Similar (36)  |  Standard (57)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Supply (93)  |  Sustain (46)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)

We all have a tendency to think that the world must conform to our prejudices. The opposite view involves some effort of thought, and most people would die sooner than think–in fact they do so.
In The ABC of Relativity (1925), 166. A paraphrase from this quote is often seen as, “Most people would rather die than think; many do.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conform (13)  |  Die (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Involve (90)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opposite (104)  |  People (1005)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

We are told that “Mathematics is that study which knows nothing of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of causation.” I think no statement could have been made more opposite to the facts of the case; that mathematical analysis is constantly invoking the aid of new principles, new ideas, and new methods, not capable of being defined by any form of words, but springing direct from the inherent powers and activities of the human mind, and from continually renewed introspection of that inner world of thought of which the phenomena are as varied and require as close attention to discern as those of the outer physical world (to which the inner one in each individual man may, I think, be conceived to stand somewhat in the same relation of correspondence as a shadow to the object from which it is projected, or as the hollow palm of one hand to the closed fist which it grasps of the other), that it is unceasingly calling forth the faculties of observation and comparison, that one of its principal weapons is induction, that it has frequent recourse to experimental trial and verification, and that it affords a boundless scope for the exercise of the highest efforts of the imagination and invention.
In Presidential Address to British Association, Exeter British Association Report (1869), pp. 1-9, in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 654.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Afford (17)  |  Aid (97)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Case (99)  |  Causation (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Continually (16)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Define (49)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discern (33)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fist (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Inner (71)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Palm (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Principal (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Relation (157)  |  Renew (19)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Scope (45)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unceasingly (2)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verification (31)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

We can see our forests vanishing, our water-powers going to waste, our soil being carried by floods into the sea; and the end of our coal and our iron is in sight. But our larger wastes of human effort, which go on every day through such of our acts as are blundering, ill-directed, or inefficient, … are less visible, less tangible, and are but vaguely appreciated.
In The Principles of Scientific Management (1911), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Carry (127)  |  Coal (57)  |  Direct (225)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  End (590)  |  Flood (50)  |  Forest (150)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inefficient (3)  |  Iron (96)  |  Power (746)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Vague (47)  |  Vanish (18)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Visible (84)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Power (6)

We have before us the restoration of that ancient land whose name was a synonym for abundance, prosperity, and grandeur for many generations. Records as old as those of Egypt and as well attested tell of fertile lands and teeming populations, mighty kings and warriors, sages and wise men, over periods of thousands of years. ... A land such as this is worth resuscitating. Once we have apprehended the true cause of its present desolate and abandoned condition, we are on our way to restoring it to its ancient fertility. A land which so readily responded to ancient science, and gave a return which sufficed for the maintenance of a Persian Court in all its splendor, will surely respond to the efforts of modern science and return manifold the money and talent spent on its regeneration.
From The Restoration of the Ancient Irrigation Works on the Tigris: or, The Re-creation of Chaldea (1903), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apprehend (5)  |  Attest (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Condition (356)  |  Court (33)  |  Desolation (3)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  King (35)  |  Land (115)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Money (170)  |  Name (333)  |  Old (481)  |  Period (198)  |  Persian (4)  |  Population (110)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Record (154)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Restoration (4)  |  Return (124)  |  Sage (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spent (85)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Surely (101)  |  Synonym (2)  |  Talent (94)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wise (131)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

We may, I think, draw a yet higher and deeper teaching from the phenomena of degeneration. We seem to learn from it the absolute necessity of labour and effort, of struggle and difficulty, of discomfort and pain, as the condition of all progress, whether physical or mental, and that the lower the organism the more need there is of these ever-present stimuli, not only to effect progress, but to avoid retrogression. And if so, does not this afford us the nearest attainable solution of the great problem of the origin of evil? What we call evil is the essential condition of progress in the lower stages of the development of conscious organisms, and will only cease when the mind has become so thoroughly healthy, so well balanced, and so highly organised, that the happiness derived from mental activity, moral harmony, and the social affections, will itself be a sufficient stimulus to higher progress and to the attainment of a more perfect life.
In 'Two Darwinian Essays', Nature (1880), 22, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Activity (210)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evil (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pain (136)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Social (252)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Will (2355)

We were about to abandon our efforts when the book of M. Mouillard fell into our hands, and we (since then) continued our investigations with the results before you.
From interview with M. Frank St. Lahm, L’Aerophile (Jul 1910). Quoted and cited in book review for L.P. Mouillard, Le Vol Sans Battement (Flight Without Flapping), in Journal of the United States Artillery (1912), 37, No. 2, 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Book (392)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Result (677)

What intellectual phenomenon can be older, or more oft repeated, than the story of a large research program that impaled itself upon a false central assumption accepted by all practitioners? Do we regard all people who worked within such traditions as dishonorable fools? What of the scientists who assumed that the continents were stable, that the hereditary material was protein, or that all other galaxies lay within the Milky Way? These false and abandoned efforts were pursued with passion by brilliant and honorable scientists. How many current efforts, now commanding millions of research dollars and the full attention of many of our best scientists, will later be exposed as full failures based on false premises?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Assume (38)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attention (190)  |  Base (117)  |  Best (459)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Central (80)  |  Command (58)  |  Continent (76)  |  Current (118)  |  Dishonorable (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Failure (161)  |