Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Practically

Practically Quotes (9 quotes)

A complete theory of evolution must acknowledge a balance between ‘external’ forces of environment imposing selection for local adaptation and ‘internal’ forces representing constraints of inheritance and development. Vavilov placed too much emphasis on internal constraints and downgraded the power of selection. But Western Darwinians have erred equally in practically ignoring (while acknowledging in theory) the limits placed on selection by structure and development–what Vavilov and the older biologists would have called ‘laws of form.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (13)  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Balance (43)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Call (68)  |  Complete (43)  |  Constraint (8)  |  Darwinian (5)  |  Development (228)  |  Downgrade (2)  |  Emphasis (14)  |  Environment (138)  |  Equally (18)  |  Err (4)  |  Evolution (482)  |  External (45)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Ignore (22)  |  Impose (17)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Internal (18)  |  Law (418)  |  Limit (86)  |  Local (15)  |  Old (104)  |  Place (111)  |  Power (273)  |  Represent (27)  |  Selection (27)  |  Structure (191)  |  Theory (582)  |  Western (14)

Can any thoughtful person admit for a moment that, in a society so constituted that these overwhelming contrasts of luxury and privation are looked upon as necessities, and are treated by the Legislature as matters with which it has practically nothing do, there is the smallest probability that we can deal successfully with such tremendous social problems as those which involve the marriage tie and the family relation as a means of promoting the physical and moral advancement of the race? What a mockery to still further whiten the sepulchre of society, in which is hidden ‘all manner of corruption,’ with schemes for the moral and physical advancement of the race!
In 'Human Selection', Fortnightly Review (1890),48, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (22)  |  Advancement (36)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corruption (9)  |  Deal (25)  |  Family (37)  |  Further (6)  |  Hidden (34)  |  Involve (27)  |  Legislature (3)  |  Luxury (12)  |  Manner (35)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mockery (2)  |  Moment (61)  |  Moral (100)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Person (114)  |  Physical (94)  |  Privation (4)  |  Probability (83)  |  Problem (362)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Race (76)  |  Relation (96)  |  Scheme (20)  |  Sepulchre (3)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Successfully (2)  |  Thoughtful (10)  |  Tie (21)  |  Treated (2)  |  Tremendous (11)

FORTRAN —’the infantile disorder’—, by now nearly 20 years old, is hopelessly inadequate for whatever computer application you have in mind today: it is now too clumsy, too risky, and too expensive to use. PL/I —’the fatal disease’— belongs more to the problem set than to the solution set. It is practically impossible to teach good programming to students that have had a prior exposure to BASIC: as potential programmers they are mentally mutilated beyond hope of regeneration. The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be regarded as a criminal offence. APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new generation of coding bums.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Basic (52)  |  Belong (33)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Bum (3)  |  Carry (35)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Code (12)  |  Computer (84)  |  Create (98)  |  Criminal (14)  |  Cripple (2)  |  Disease (257)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Expensive (5)  |  Exposure (5)  |  Fatal (10)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Good (228)  |  Hope (129)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Infantile (4)  |  Language (155)  |  Mentally (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Mutilated (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  New (340)  |  Offence (4)  |  Old (104)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Potential (34)  |  Prior (5)  |  Problem (362)  |  Program (32)  |  Programmer (3)  |  Regard (58)  |  Regeneration (4)  |  Risky (4)  |  Set (56)  |  Solution (168)  |  Student (131)  |  Teach (102)  |  Technique (41)  |  Today (86)  |  Year (214)

I do not think that, practically or morally, we can defend a policy of saving every distinctive local population of organisms. I can cite a good rationale for the preservation of species, for each species is a unique and separate natural object that, once lost, can never be reconstituted. But subspecies are distinctive local populations of species with broader geographic range. Subspecies are dynamic, interbreedable, and constantly changing: what then are we saving by declaring them all inviolate?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Cite (5)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Declare (18)  |  Defend (20)  |  Distinctive (8)  |  Dynamic (11)  |  Geographic (2)  |  Good (228)  |  Local (15)  |  Lose (53)  |  Natural (128)  |  Object (110)  |  Organism (126)  |  Policy (23)  |  Population (71)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Range (38)  |  Rationale (5)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Save (46)  |  Separate (46)  |  Species (181)  |  Subspecies (2)  |  Think (205)  |  Unique (24)

It is still believed, apparently, that there is some thing mysteriously laudable about achieving viable offspring. I have searched the sacred and profane scriptures, for many years, but have yet to find any ground for this notion. To have a child is no more creditable than to have rheumatism–and no more discreditable. Ethically, it is absolutely meaningless. And practically, it is mainly a matter of chance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (24)  |  Achieve (36)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Belief (400)  |  Chance (122)  |  Child (189)  |  Creditable (2)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Find (248)  |  Ground (63)  |  Mainly (6)  |  Matter (270)  |  Meaningless (15)  |  Notion (32)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Profane (6)  |  Rheumatism (3)  |  Sacred (15)  |  Scripture (9)  |  Search (85)  |  Year (214)

It is the structure of the universe that has taught this knowledge to man. That structure is an ever existing exhibition of every principle upon which every part of mathematical science is founded. The offspring of this science is mechanics; for mechanics are no other than the principles of science appplied practically.
In The Age of Reason: Being an Investigation of True and Fabulous Theology (27 Jan O.S. 1794), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Exhibition (2)  |  Existing (9)  |  Founded (10)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mechanics (44)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Part (146)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Structure (191)  |  Taught (4)  |  Universe (563)

No! What we need are not prohibitory marriage laws, but a reformed society, an educated public opinion which will teach individual duty in these matters. And it is to the women of the future that I look for the needed reformation. Educate and train women so that they are rendered independent of marriage as a means of gaining a home and a living, and you will bring about natural selection in marriage, which will operate most beneficially upon humanity. When all women are placed in a position that they are independent of marriage, I am inclined to think that large numbers will elect to remain unmarried—in some cases, for life, in others, until they encounter the man of their ideal. I want to see women the selective agents in marriage; as things are, they have practically little choice. The only basis for marriage should be a disinterested love. I believe that the unfit will be gradually eliminated from the race, and human progress secured, by giving to the pure instincts of women the selective power in marriage. You can never have that so long as women are driven to marry for a livelihood.
In 'Heredity and Pre-Natal Influences. An Interview With Dr. Alfred Russel Wallace', Humanitarian (1894), 4, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Basis (60)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bring (53)  |  Case (64)  |  Choice (64)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Driven (3)  |  Duty (51)  |  Educate (7)  |  Educated (6)  |  Elect (2)  |  Encounter (14)  |  Future (229)  |  Gaining (2)  |  Giving (11)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Home (58)  |  Human (445)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Independent (41)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Large (82)  |  Law (418)  |  Life (917)  |  Little (126)  |  Livelihood (8)  |  Living (44)  |  Long (95)  |  Love (164)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Marry (6)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mean (63)  |  Natural (128)  |  Need (211)  |  Number (179)  |  Operate (12)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Other (25)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Progress (317)  |  Public (82)  |  Pure (62)  |  Race (76)  |  Reformation (4)  |  Remain (77)  |  Rendered (2)  |  See (197)  |  Selection (27)  |  Selective (5)  |  Society (188)  |  Teach (102)  |  Thing (37)  |  Think (205)  |  Train (25)  |  Unfit (9)  |  Want (120)  |  Woman (94)

Of possible quadruple algebras the one that had seemed to him by far the most beautiful and remarkable was practically identical with quaternions, and that he thought it most interesting that a calculus which so strongly appealed to the human mind by its intrinsic beauty and symmetry should prove to be especially adapted to the study of natural phenomena. The mind of man and that of Nature’s God must work in the same channels.
As quoted in W. E. Byerly (writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, but a former student at a Peirce lecture on Hamilton's new calculus of quaternions), 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (18)  |  Algebra (36)  |  Appeal (30)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Calculus (23)  |  Channel (17)  |  God (454)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Identical (17)  |  Intrinsic (10)  |  Mind Of Man (3)  |  Natural (128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Prove (60)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Same (92)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Study (331)  |  Symmetry (26)

We must remember that all our [models of flying machine] inventions are but developments of crude ideas; that a commercially successful result in a practically unexplored field cannot possibly be got without an enormous amount of unremunerative work. It is the piled-up and recorded experience of many busy brains that has produced the luxurious travelling conveniences of to-day, which in no way astonish us, and there is no good reason for supposing that we shall always be content to keep on the agitated surface of the sea and air, when it is possible to travel in a superior plane, unimpeded by frictional disturbances.
Paper to the Royal Society of New South Wales (4 Jun 1890), as quoted in Octave Chanute, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 2226.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Amount (20)  |  Astonish (3)  |  Brain (181)  |  Busy (21)  |  Commercially (3)  |  Content (39)  |  Convenience (25)  |  Crude (14)  |  Development (228)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Enormous (33)  |  Experience (268)  |  Field (119)  |  Flying Machine (6)  |  Good (228)  |  Idea (440)  |  Invention (283)  |  Model (64)  |  Plane (15)  |  Possible (100)  |  Produce (63)  |  Reason (330)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (53)  |  Result (250)  |  Sea (143)  |  Successful (20)  |  Superior (30)  |  Supposing (3)  |  Surface (74)  |  Today (86)  |  Travel (40)  |  Travelling (3)  |  Unexplored (11)  |  Work (457)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.