Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Absolutely

Absolutely Quotes (24 quotes)

... an informed appraisal of life absolutely require(s) a full understanding of life’s arena–the universe. ... By deepening our understanding of the true nature of physical reality, we profoundly reconfigure our sense of ourselves and our experience of the universe.
The Fabric of the Cosmos
Science quotes on:  |  Appraisal (2)  |  Arena (3)  |  Deepen (5)  |  Experience (268)  |  Full (38)  |  Inform (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  Physical (94)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Reality (140)  |  Require (33)  |  Sense (240)  |  True (120)  |  Understand (189)  |  Universe (563)

A theory is scientific only if it can be disproved. But the moment you try to cover absolutely everything the chances are that you cover nothing.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (122)  |  Cover (23)  |  Disprove (15)  |  Everything (120)  |  Moment (61)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Theory (582)  |  Try (103)

An extremely healthy dose of skepticism about the reliability of science is an absolutely inevitable consequence of any scientific study of its track record.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (76)  |  Dose (12)  |  Extremely (10)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Inevitable (17)  |  Reliability (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Study (2)  |  Skepticism (18)  |  Track Record (3)

Bowing to the reality of harried lives, Rudwick recognizes that not everyone will read every word of the meaty second section; he even explicitly gives us permission to skip if we get ‘bogged down in the narrative.’ Readers absolutely must not do such a thing; it should be illegal. The publisher should lock up the last 60 pages, and deny access to anyone who doesn’t pass a multiple-choice exam inserted into the book between parts two and three.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Access (12)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Bog (5)  |  Book (181)  |  Bow (9)  |  Deny (29)  |  Down (44)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Exam (2)  |  Explicitly (2)  |  Give (117)  |  Insert (2)  |  Live (186)  |  Lock (9)  |  Narrative (6)  |  Page (18)  |  Part (146)  |  Pass (60)  |  Permission (5)  |  Publisher (2)  |  Read (83)  |  Reader (22)  |  Reality (140)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Second (33)  |  Section (5)  |  Skip (2)  |  Word (221)

Curves that have no tangents are the rule. … Those who hear of curves without tangents, or of functions without derivatives, often think at first that Nature presents no such complications. … The contrary however is true. … Consider, for instance, one of the white flakes that are obtained by salting a solution of soap. At a distance its contour may appear sharply defined, but as we draw nearer its sharpness disappears. The eye can no longer draw a tangent at any point. … The use of a magnifying glass or microscope leaves us just as uncertain, for fresh irregularities appear every time we increase the magnification. … An essential characteristic of our flake … is that we suspect … that any scale involves details that absolutely prohibit the fixing of a tangent.
(1906). As quoted “in free translation” in Benoit B. Mandelbrot, The Fractal Geometry of Nature (1977, 1983), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (55)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Complication (20)  |  Contour (2)  |  Curve (16)  |  Defined (3)  |  Derivative (4)  |  Detail (65)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Distance (54)  |  Essential (87)  |  Eye (159)  |  Fixing (2)  |  Flake (5)  |  Fresh (21)  |  Function (90)  |  Increase (107)  |  Involve (27)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Magnification (8)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nearer (8)  |  Rule (135)  |  Scale (49)  |  Sharply (3)  |  Sharpness (4)  |  Soap (11)  |  Solution (168)  |  Suspect (12)  |  Tangent (3)  |  Uncertain (11)

I am absolutely convinced that no wealth in the world can help humanity forward, even in the hands of the most devoted worker. The example of great and pure individuals is the only thing that can lead us to noble thoughts and deeds. Money only appeals to selfishness and irresistibly invites abuse. Can anyone imagine Moses, Jesus or Ghandi armed with the moneybags of Carnegie?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Appeal (30)  |  Arm (17)  |  Convinced (16)  |  Deed (17)  |  Devote (23)  |  Example (57)  |  Forward (21)  |  Great (300)  |  Hand (103)  |  Help (68)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Imagine (40)  |  Individual (177)  |  Invite (8)  |  Jesus (8)  |  Lead (101)  |  Money (125)  |  Moses (6)  |  Noble (41)  |  Pure (62)  |  Selfishness (8)  |  Thought (374)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Worker (23)  |  World (667)

I need scarcely say that the beginning and maintenance of life on earth is absolutely and infinitely beyond the range of sound speculation in dynamical science.
In lecture, 'The Sun's Heat' delivered to the Friday Evening Discourse in Physical Science at the Royal Institution in London. Collected in Popular Lectures and Addresses (1889), Vol. 1, 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Dynamical (2)  |  Earth (487)  |  Infinitely (8)  |  Life (917)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Range (38)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sound (59)  |  Speculation (77)

If it were possible to have a life absolutely free from every feeling of sin, what a terrifying vacuum it would be!
In The Burning Brand: Diaries 1935-1950 (1961), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Feeling (79)  |  Free (59)  |  Life (917)  |  Possible (100)  |  Sin (27)  |  Terrifying (3)  |  Vacuum (29)

If we knew all the laws of Nature, we should need only one fact or the description of one actual phenomenon to infer all the particular results at that point. Now we know only a few laws, and our result is vitiated, not, of course, by any confusion or irregularity in Nature, but by our ignorance of essential elements in the calculation. Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect, but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws which we have not detected, is still more wonderful. The particular laws are as our points of view, as to the traveler, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form. Even when cleft or bored through, it is not comprehended in its entireness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Bored (2)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Commonly (7)  |  Comprehend (19)  |  Concur (2)  |  Confine (9)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Confusion (34)  |  Description (72)  |  Detect (9)  |  Element (129)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Form (210)  |  Great (300)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Infer (10)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Instance (18)  |  Irregularity (10)  |  Know (321)  |  Law (418)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Notion (32)  |  Number (179)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Outline (6)  |  Particular (54)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Point (72)  |  Really (50)  |  Result (250)  |  Seemingly (7)  |  Step (67)  |  Traveler (18)  |  Vary (14)  |  View (115)  |  Wonderful (37)

In defining an element let us not take an external boundary, Let us say, e.g., the smallest ponderable quantity of yttrium is an assemblage of ultimate atoms almost infinitely more like each other than they are to the atoms of any other approximating element. It does not necessarily follow that the atoms shall all be absolutely alike among themselves. The atomic weight which we ascribe to yttrium, therefore, merely represents a mean value around which the actual weights of the individual atoms of the “element” range within certain limits. But if my conjecture is tenable, could we separate atom from atom, we should find them varying within narrow limits on each side of the mean.
Address to Annual General Meeting of the Chemical Society (28 Mar 1888), printed in Journal of the Chemical Society (1888), 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Alike (10)  |  Approximation (16)  |  Ascribe (11)  |  Assemblage (6)  |  Atom (251)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Definition (152)  |  Element (129)  |  External (45)  |  Find (248)  |  Individual (177)  |  Infinitely (8)  |  Limit (86)  |  Mean (63)  |  Narrow (33)  |  Ponderable (3)  |  Quantity (35)  |  Range (38)  |  Separate (46)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Value (180)  |  Variation (50)  |  Yttrium (3)

It is still believed, apparently, that there is some thing mysteriously laudable about achieving viable offspring. I have searched the sacred and profane scriptures, for many years, but have yet to find any ground for this notion. To have a child is no more creditable than to have rheumatism–and no more discreditable. Ethically, it is absolutely meaningless. And practically, it is mainly a matter of chance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Belief (400)  |  Chance (122)  |  Child (189)  |  Creditable (2)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Find (248)  |  Ground (63)  |  Mainly (6)  |  Matter (270)  |  Meaningless (15)  |  Notion (32)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Practically (9)  |  Profane (6)  |  Rheumatism (3)  |  Sacred (15)  |  Scripture (9)  |  Search (85)  |  Year (214)

Men in general are very slow to enter into what is reckoned a new thing; and there seems to be a very universal as well as great reluctance to undergo the drudgery of acquiring information that seems not to be absolutely necessary.
In The Commercial and Political Atlas: Representing, by Means of Stained Copper Charts, the Progress of the Commerce, Revenues, Expenditure and Debts of England During the Whole of the Eighteenth Century (1786, 1801), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiring (5)  |  Drudgery (4)  |  Generality (22)  |  Information (102)  |  Necessary (89)  |  New (340)  |  Reluctance (4)  |  Slow (36)  |  Undergo (10)  |  Universal (70)

My passion for social justice has often brought me into conflict with people, as did my aversion to any obligation and dependence I do not regard as absolutely necessary. I always have a high regard for the individual and have an insuperable distaste for violence and clubmanship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aversion (7)  |  Bring (53)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Distaste (3)  |  High (78)  |  Individual (177)  |  Insuperable (3)  |  Justice (24)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Obligation (13)  |  Often (69)  |  Passion (54)  |  People (269)  |  Regard (58)  |  Social (93)  |  Violence (20)

One reason why mathematics enjoys special esteem, above all other sciences, is that its laws are absolutely certain and indisputable, while those of other sciences are to some extent debatable and in constant danger of being overthrown by newly discovered facts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (84)  |  Constant (40)  |  Danger (62)  |  Discover (115)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Esteem (8)  |  Extent (30)  |  Fact (609)  |  Indisputable (6)  |  Law (418)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Newly (3)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Reason (330)  |  Science (1699)  |  Special (51)

Philosophers say a great deal about what is absolutely necessary for science, and it is always, so far as one can see, rather naive, and probably wrong.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (25)  |  Far (77)  |  Great (300)  |  Naive (8)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Probably (21)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Wrong (116)

The aim of science is to apprehend this purely intelligible world as a thing in itself, an object which is what it is independently of all thinking, and thus antithetical to the sensible world.... The world of thought is the universal, the timeless and spaceless, the absolutely necessary, whereas the world of sense is the contingent, the changing and moving appearance which somehow indicates or symbolizes it.
'Outlines of a Philosophy of Art,' Essays in the Philosophy of Art, Indiana University Press (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Antithetical (2)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Apprehend (2)  |  Change (291)  |  Contingent (8)  |  Independently (4)  |  Indicate (10)  |  Intelligible (10)  |  Move (58)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Object (110)  |  Purely (15)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Spaceless (2)  |  Symbolize (2)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Timeless (5)  |  Universal (70)  |  World (667)

The critical mathematician has abandoned the search for truth. He no longer flatters himself that his propositions are or can be known to him or to any other human being to be true; and he contents himself with aiming at the correct, or the consistent. The distinction is not annulled nor even blurred by the reflection that consistency contains immanently a kind of truth. He is not absolutely certain, but he believes profoundly that it is possible to find various sets of a few propositions each such that the propositions of each set are compatible, that the propositions of each set imply other propositions, and that the latter can be deduced from the former with certainty. That is to say, he believes that there are systems of coherent or consistent propositions, and he regards it his business to discover such systems. Any such system is a branch of mathematics.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Aim (58)  |  Belief (400)  |  Blur (4)  |  Branch (61)  |  Business (71)  |  Certain (84)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Consistent (10)  |  Contain (37)  |  Content (39)  |  Correct (53)  |  Critical (34)  |  Deduce (8)  |  Discover (115)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Find (248)  |  Former (18)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Immanently (2)  |  Imply (12)  |  Kind (99)  |  Know (321)  |  Latter (13)  |  Long (95)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Possible (100)  |  Profoundly (11)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Regard (58)  |  Say (126)  |  Search (85)  |  Set (56)  |  System (141)  |  True (120)  |  Truth (750)  |  Various (25)

The United States is the most powerful technically advanced country in the world to-day. Its influence on the shaping of international relations is absolutely incalculable. But America is a large country and its people have so far not shown much interest in great international problems, among which the problem of disarmament occupies first place today. This must be changed, if only in the essential interests of the Americans. The last war has shown that there are no longer any barriers between the continents and that the destinies of all countries are closely interwoven. The people of this country must realize that they have a great responsibility in the sphere of international politics. The part of passive spectator is unworthy of this country and is bound in the end to lead to disaster all round.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  America (74)  |  American (34)  |  Barrier (19)  |  Bind (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Closely (8)  |  Continent (39)  |  Country (121)  |  Destiny (26)  |  Disarmament (3)  |  Disaster (36)  |  End (141)  |  Essential (87)  |  Far (77)  |  First (174)  |  Great (300)  |  Influence (110)  |  Interest (170)  |  International (18)  |  Interwoven (6)  |  Large (82)  |  Lead (101)  |  Long (95)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Part (146)  |  Passive (5)  |  People (269)  |  Place (111)  |  Politics (77)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Problem (362)  |  Realize (43)  |  Relation (96)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Round (15)  |  Shape (52)  |  Show (55)  |  Spectator (6)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Technically (2)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Today (86)  |  Unworthy (8)  |  Usa (6)  |  War (144)  |  World (667)

There will one day spring from the brain of science a machine or force so fearful in its potentialities, so absolutely terrifying, that even man, the fighter, who will dare torture and death in order to inflict torture and death, will be appalled, and so abandon war forever.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Brain (181)  |  Dare (22)  |  Death (270)  |  Fearful (6)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Force (194)  |  Forever (42)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Machine (133)  |  Order (167)  |  Potentiality (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spring (47)  |  Terrify (9)  |  Torture (13)  |  War (144)

We don't know what we are talking about. Many of us believed that string theory was a very dramatic break with our previous notions of quantum theory. But now we learn that string theory, well, is not that much of a break. The state of physics today is like it was when we were mystified by radioactivity. They were missing something absolutely fundamental. We are missing perhaps something as profound as they were back then.
Closing address to the 23rd Solvay Conference in Physics, Brussels, Belgium (Dec 2005). Quoted in Ashok Sengupta, Chaos, Nonlinearity, Complexity: The Dynamical Paradigm of Nature (2006), vii. Cite in Alfred B. Bortz, Physics: Decade by Decade (2007), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Break (33)  |  Dramatic (5)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Missing (7)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Notion (32)  |  Physics (301)  |  Previous (8)  |  Profound (46)  |  Quantum Theory (55)  |  Radioactivity (26)  |  State (96)  |  String Theory (10)  |  Talking (10)  |  Today (86)

We reverence ancient Greece as the cradle of western science. Here for the first time the world witnessed the miracle of a logical system which proceeded from step to step with such precision that every single one of its propositions was absolutely indubitable—I refer to Euclid’s geometry. This admirable triumph of reasoning gave the human intellect the necessary confidence in itself for its subsequent achievements. If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker.
From 'On the Method of Theoretical Physics', in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Admirable (11)  |  Ancient (68)  |  Born (14)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Enthusiasm (28)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Failed (3)  |  First (174)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Greece (7)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Kindle (4)  |  Logic (187)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Precision (38)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Single (72)  |  Step (67)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  System (141)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)  |  Western (14)  |  World (667)

What beauty. I saw clouds and their light shadows on the distant dear earth…. The water looked like darkish, slightly gleaming spots…. When I watched the horizon, I saw the abrupt, contrasting transition from the earth’s light-colored surface to the absolutely black sky. I enjoyed the rich color spectrum of the earth. It is surrounded by a light blue aureole that gradually darkens, becomes turquoise, dark blue, violet, and finally coal black.
Describing his view while making the first manned orbit of the earth (12 Apr 1961). As quoted in Don Knefel, Writing and Life: A Rhetoric for Nonfiction with Readings (1986), 93. Front Cover
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (3)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Black (27)  |  Blue (30)  |  Cloud (44)  |  Coal (41)  |  Color (78)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Dark (49)  |  Distant (16)  |  Earth (487)  |  Enjoy (23)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Horizon (13)  |  Light (246)  |  Rich (48)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Sky (68)  |  Space Flight (21)  |  Spectrum (23)  |  Spot (11)  |  Surface (74)  |  Surround (17)  |  Transition (15)  |  Violet (4)  |  Watch (39)  |  Water (244)

[In my early youth, walking with my father,] “See that bird?” he says. “It’s a Spencer’s warbler.” (I knew he didn’t know the real name.) “Well, in Italian, it’s a Chutto Lapittida. In Portuguese, it’s a Bom da Peida. In Chinese, it’s a Chung-long-tah, and in Japanese, it’s a Katano Tekeda. You can know the name of that bird in all the languages of the world, but when you’re finished, you’ll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird. You’ll only know about humans in different places, and what they call the bird. So let’s look at the bird and see what it’s doing—that’s what counts.” (I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something.)
In 'The Making of a Scientist', What Do You Care What Other People Think?": Further Adventures of a Curious Character (2001), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (96)  |  Count (34)  |  Difference (208)  |  Father (44)  |  Human (445)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Language (155)  |  Learn (160)  |  Name (118)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Observation (418)  |  World (667)

[Quantum mechanics is] a phenomenon which is impossible, absolutely impossible, to explain in any classical way.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Classical (11)  |  Explain (61)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Quantum Mechanics (31)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.