Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Astonished

Astonished Quotes (9 quotes)

Although the ocean’s surface seems at first to be completely homogeneous, after half a month we began to differentiate various seas and even different parts of oceans by their characteristic shades. We were astonished to discover that, during an flight, you have to learn anew not only to look, but also to see. At first the finest nuances of color elude you, but gradually your vision sharpens and your color perception becomes richer, and the planet spreads out before you with all its indescribable beauty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anew (8)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Become (172)  |  Begin (108)  |  Characteristic (96)  |  Color (99)  |  Completely (32)  |  Different (186)  |  Differentiate (13)  |  Discover (199)  |  Elude (3)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (314)  |  Flight (65)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Half (56)  |  Homogeneous (6)  |  Indescribable (2)  |  Learn (288)  |  Month (31)  |  Nuance (4)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Part (222)  |  Perception (64)  |  Planet (263)  |  Rich (61)  |  Sea (188)  |  See (369)  |  Seem (143)  |  Shade (22)  |  Sharpen (16)  |  Spread (34)  |  Surface (101)  |  Various (47)  |  Vision (94)

Archimedes … had stated that given the force, any given weight might be moved, and even boasted, we are told, relying on the strength of demonstration, that if there were another earth, by going into it he could remove this. Hiero being struck with amazement at this, and entreating him to make good this problem by actual experiment, and show some great weight moved by a small engine, he fixed accordingly upon a ship of burden out of the king’s arsenal, which could not be drawn out of the dock without great labor and many men; and, loading her with many passengers and a full freight, sitting himself the while far off with no great endeavor, but only holding the head of the pulley in his hand and drawing the cords by degrees, he drew the ship in a straight line, as smoothly and evenly, as if she had been in the sea. The king, astonished at this, and convinced of the power of the art, prevailed upon Archimedes to make him engines accommodated to all the purposes, offensive and defensive, of a siege. … the apparatus was, in most opportune time, ready at hand for the Syracusans, and with it also the engineer himself.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (10)  |  According (9)  |  Actual (48)  |  Amazement (12)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Art (294)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Boast (21)  |  Burden (27)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cord (3)  |  Defensive (2)  |  Degree (82)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Draw (55)  |  Earth (638)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Engine (29)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Far (154)  |  Fix (25)  |  Force (249)  |  Freight (3)  |  Full (63)  |  Give (201)  |  Good (345)  |  Great (534)  |  Hand (142)  |  Head (81)  |  Hiero (2)  |  Hold (94)  |  King (35)  |  Labor (73)  |  Load (11)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Move (94)  |  Offensive (4)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Power (366)  |  Prevail (17)  |  Problem (497)  |  Pulley (2)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Ready (38)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remove (26)  |  Sea (188)  |  Ship (44)  |  Show (93)  |  Siege (2)  |  Sit (47)  |  Small (163)  |  Smoothly (2)  |  State (137)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Strength (81)  |  Strike (40)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Tell (110)  |  Time (595)  |  Weight (77)

Before the introduction of the Arabic notation, multiplication was difficult, and the division even of integers called into play the highest mathematical faculties. Probably nothing in the modern world could have more astonished a Greek mathematician than to learn that, under the influence of compulsory education, the whole population of Western Europe, from the highest to the lowest, could perform the operation of division for the largest numbers. This fact would have seemed to him a sheer impossibility. … Our modern power of easy reckoning with decimal fractions is the most miraculous result of a perfect notation.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Arabic (3)  |  Compulsory (7)  |  Decimal (15)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Division (34)  |  Easy (102)  |  Education (347)  |  Europe (43)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fraction (13)  |  Greek (73)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Influence (140)  |  Integer (10)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Modern (162)  |  Modern World (4)  |  Multiplication (23)  |  Notation (23)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Number (282)  |  Operation (121)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perform (38)  |  Population (79)  |  Power (366)  |  Probably (48)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Result (389)  |  Whole (192)

Ever since I was a boy, I've been fascinated by crazy science and such things as perpetual motion machines and logical paradoxes. I’ve always enjoyed keeping up with those ideas. I suppose I didn’t get into it seriously until I wrote my first book, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science. I was influenced by the Dianetics movement, now called Scientology, which was then promoted by John Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction. I was astonished at how rapidly the thing had become a cult.
In Scot Morris, 'Interview: Martin Gardner', Omni, 4, No. 4 (Jan 1982), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Boy (46)  |  Crazy (17)  |  Cult (4)  |  Enjoy (39)  |  Fad (4)  |  Fallacy (26)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  First (314)  |  Idea (580)  |  Influence (140)  |  Logical (55)  |  Machine (157)  |  Paradox (43)  |  Perpetual Motion (9)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Write (154)

I am very astonished that the scientific picture of the real world around me is deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart, that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. Science sometimes pretends to answer questions in these domains, but the answers are very often so silly that we are not inclined to take them seriously.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Bad (99)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Bitter (14)  |  Blue (56)  |  Consistent (18)  |  Deficient (3)  |  Delight (66)  |  Domain (42)  |  Eternity (49)  |  Experience (342)  |  Factual (8)  |  Ghastly (4)  |  Give (201)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Heart (139)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Information (122)  |  Know (556)  |  Lot (29)  |  Magnificently (2)  |  Matter (343)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (242)  |  Pain (101)  |  Physical (134)  |  Picture (77)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Question (404)  |  Real World (14)  |  Really (78)  |  Red (35)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Silent (28)  |  Silly (12)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Sweet (14)  |  Tell (110)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Word (302)

I shall devote all my efforts to bring light into the immense obscurity that today reigns in Analysis. It so lacks any plan or system, that one is really astonished that so many people devote themselves to it—and, still worse, it is absolutely devoid of any rigour.
In Oeuvres (1826), Vol. 2, 263. As translated and cited in Ernst Hairer and Gerhard Wanner Analysis by Its History (2008), 188. From the original French, “Je consacrerai toutes mes forces à répandre de la lumière sur l’immense obscurité qui règne aujourd’hui dans l’Analyse. Elle est tellement dépourvue de tout plan et de tout système, qu’on s’étonne seulement qu’il y ait tant de gens qui s’y livrent—et ce qui pis est, elle manque absolument de rigueur.”
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Badly (15)  |  Bring (90)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Devote (35)  |  Effort (144)  |  Immense (42)  |  Lack (77)  |  Light (347)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  People (390)  |  Plan (87)  |  Really (78)  |  Reign (12)  |  Rigour (16)  |  System (191)  |  Today (117)

If we look at the problems raised by Aristotle, we are astonished at his gift of observation. What wonderful eyes the Greeks had for many things! Only they committed the mistake of being overhasty, of passing straightway from the phenomenon to the explanation of it, and thereby produced certain theories that are quite inadequate. But this is the mistake of all times, and still made in our own day.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Commit (21)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Eye (222)  |  Gift (61)  |  Greek (73)  |  Hasty (6)  |  Inadequate (14)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Observation (450)  |  Pass (93)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Theory (696)  |  Wonderful (60)

Such is the respect for physicians that most people are astonished when one of them falls sick—and yet they do.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Illness (24)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Physician (243)  |  Respect (86)  |  Sick (27)

To be astonished at anything is the first movement of the mind towards discovery.
In Louis Descour, trans. by A.F. & B.H. Wedd, Pasteur and His Work (1922), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (680)  |  Mind (760)  |  Movement (83)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.