Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Suppose

Suppose Quotes (49 quotes)


Primo enim paranda est Historia Naturalis et Experimentalis, suffidens et bona; quod fundamentum rei est: neque enim fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat.
For first of all we must prepare a Natural and Experimental History, sufficient and good; and this is the foundation of all; for we are not to imagine or suppose, but to discover, what nature does or may be made to do.
In Novum Organum, Book 2, Aphorism 10. As translated in Francis Bacon and James Spedding with ‎Robert Leslie Ellis (eds.), 'The New Organon', The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the Philosophical Works (1858), Vol. 4, 127. Also seen in epigraphs as a shorter quote, “Non fingendum, aut excogitandum, sed inveniendum, quid natura faciat aut ferat,” which can also be translated as “We have not to imagine or to think out, but to find out what Nature does or produces.”
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (196)  |  Experiment (600)  |  First (313)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Good (345)  |  History (368)  |  Imagine (74)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Prepare (34)  |  Sufficient (40)

Absolute space, that is to say, the mark to which it would be necessary to refer the earth to know whether it really moves, has no objective existence…. The two propositions: “The earth turns round” and “it is more convenient to suppose the earth turns round” have the same meaning; there is nothing more in the one than in the other.
From La Science et l’Hypothèse (1908), 141, as translated by George Bruce Halsted in Science and Hypothesis (1905), 85-86. From the original French, “L’espace absolu, c’est-à-dire le repère auquel il faudrait rapporter la terre pour savoir si réellement elle tourne, n’a aucune existence objective. … Ces deux propositions: ‘la terre tourne’, et: ‘il est plus commode de supposer que la terre tourne’, ont un seul et même sens; il n’y a rien de plus dans l’une que dans l’autre.”
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (97)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Earth (635)  |  Existence (296)  |  Know (547)  |  Move (94)  |  Necessary (147)  |  Objective (63)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Really (78)  |  Reference Frame (2)  |  Space (257)  |  Turn (118)

Calculus required continuity, and continuity was supposed to require the infinitely little; but nobody could discover what the infinitely little might be.
In 'Recent Work on the Principles of Mathematics The International Monthly (Jul 1901), 4, No. 1, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculus (48)  |  Continuity (30)  |  Discover (196)  |  Infinite (128)  |  Little (184)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Require (79)

Everyone makes for himself a clear idea of the motion of a point, that is to say, of the motion of a corpuscle which one supposes to be infinitely small, and which one reduces by thought in some way to a mathematical point.
Théorie Nouvelle de la Rotation des Corps (1834). As translated by Charles Thomas Whitley in Outlines of a New Theory of Rotatory Motion (1834), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (97)  |  Corpuscle (9)  |  Idea (577)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Motion (158)  |  Point (122)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Small (161)  |  Thought (536)

Evolutionists sometimes take as haughty an attitude toward the next level up the conventional ladder of disciplines: the human sciences. They decry the supposed atheoretical particularism of their anthropological colleagues and argue that all would be well if only the students of humanity regarded their subject as yet another animal and therefore yielded explanatory control to evolutionary biologists.
From book review, 'The Ghost of Protagoras', The New York Review of Books (22 Jan 1981), 27, No. 21 & 22. Collected in An Urchin in the Storm: Essays about Books and Ideas (1987, 2010), 64. The article reviewed two books: John Tyler Bonner, The Evolution of Culture and Peter J. Wilson, The Promising Primate.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (356)  |  Anthropological (2)  |  Argue (23)  |  Atheoretical (2)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Biologist (41)  |  Colleague (23)  |  Control (111)  |  Conventional (18)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Haughty (2)  |  Human (548)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Ladder (11)  |  Level (67)  |  Next (35)  |  Regard (93)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Student (201)  |  Subject (235)  |  Toward (45)  |  Yield (35)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Calculation (98)  |  Character (115)  |  Chief (37)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Desk (13)  |  Drive (55)  |  First (313)  |  Force (249)  |  Fund (12)  |  Institution (39)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (188)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Observation (445)  |  Observe (75)  |  Professional (37)  |  Project (31)  |  Raise (34)  |  Scientific (232)  |  Second (59)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spend (43)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Time (594)

For that which can shewn only in a certain Light is questionable. Truth, ’tis suppos’d, may bear all Lights: and one of those principal Lights or natural Mediums, by which Things are to be view’d, in order to a thorow Recognition, is Ridicule it-self.
Also seen in short form: “Ridicule is the test of truth.”
In 'An Essay on the Freedom of Wit and Humour', Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times (1723), Vol. 1, 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (125)  |  Light (345)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Ridicule (17)  |  Truth (914)  |  View (171)

For what is thought to be a ‘system’ is after all, just conventional, and I do not see how one is supposed to divide up the world objectively so that one can make statements about parts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conventional (18)  |  Divide (40)  |  Objectively (5)  |  Part (220)  |  See (369)  |  Statement (72)  |  System (191)  |  Thought (536)  |  World (892)

From this fountain (the free will of God) it is those laws, which we call the laws of nature, have flowed, in which there appear many traces of the most wise contrivance, but not the least shadow of necessity. These therefore we must not seek from uncertain conjectures, but learn them from observations and experimental. He who is presumptuous enough to think that he can find the true principles of physics and the laws of natural things by the force alone of his own mind, and the internal light of his reason, must either suppose the world exists by necessity, and by the same necessity follows the law proposed; or if the order of Nature was established by the will of God, the [man] himself, a miserable reptile, can tell what was fittest to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (101)  |  Appear (115)  |  Call (127)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Establish (55)  |  Exist (147)  |  Experimental (20)  |  Find (405)  |  Fit (48)  |  Flow (42)  |  Follow (123)  |  Force (249)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Free Will (12)  |  God (535)  |  Internal (23)  |  Law (513)  |  Learn (281)  |  Least (74)  |  Light (345)  |  Mind (743)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Natural (167)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Necessity (142)  |  Observation (445)  |  Order (239)  |  Physics (346)  |  Presumptuous (3)  |  Principle (285)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reptile (26)  |  Same (155)  |  Seek (104)  |  Shadow (52)  |  Tell (110)  |  Think (341)  |  Trace (51)  |  True (201)  |  Uncertain (14)  |  Wise (60)  |  World (892)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (19)  |  Artificial (32)  |  Carry (59)  |  Circuit (15)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (85)  |  Concept (143)  |  Consistently (4)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Deduction (68)  |  Deposit (11)  |  Depth (50)  |  Design (113)  |  Discovery (676)  |  Distinguish (61)  |  Earth (635)  |  Field (170)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Functional (10)  |  Granite (7)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (249)  |  Inclination (23)  |  Intuition (57)  |  Investigator (35)  |  Matter (340)  |  Opponent (11)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (276)  |  Primeval (10)  |  Process (261)  |  Raise (34)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (149)  |  Rock (125)  |  Romanticist (2)  |  Satisfactory (16)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Sea (187)  |  Study (461)  |  System (191)  |  Variety (69)  |  Abraham Werner (5)  |  Working (20)

However, if we consider that all the characteristics which have been cited are only differences in degree of structure, may we not suppose that this special condition of organization of man has been gradually acquired at the close of a long period of time, with the aid of circumstances which have proved favorable? What a subject for reflection for those who have the courage to enter into it!
In Recherches sur l'Organization des corps vivans (1802), as translated in Alpheus Spring Packard, Lamarck, the Founder of Evolution: His Life and Work (1901), 363. Packard's italics.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (41)  |  Characteristic (94)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Close (66)  |  Condition (160)  |  Courage (55)  |  Difference (246)  |  Enter (30)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Favorable (11)  |  Gradual (26)  |  Long (172)  |  Organization (84)  |  Period (64)  |  Prove (108)  |  Reflection (59)  |  Special (74)  |  Structure (221)  |  Subject (235)  |  Time (594)

I have never understood why it should be considered derogatory to the Creator to suppose that he has a sense of humour.
Dean Inge
In 'Confessio Fidei', collected in Outspoken Essays: Second Series (1922), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Creator (52)  |  Derogatory (2)  |  Sense Of Humor (3)

If a nonnegative quantity was so small that it is smaller than any given one, then it certainly could not be anything but zero. To those who ask what the infinitely small quantity in mathematics is, we answer that it is actually zero. Hence there are not so many mysteries hidden in this concept as they are usually believed to be. These supposed mysteries have rendered the calculus of the infinitely small quite suspect to many people. Those doubts that remain we shall thoroughly remove in the following pages, where we shall explain this calculus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Belief (503)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Doubt (159)  |  Explain (105)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mystery (151)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Remove (26)  |  Render (30)  |  Small (161)  |  Suspect (16)  |  Zero (19)

In a University we are especially bound to recognise not only the unity of science itself, but the communion of the workers in science. We are too apt to suppose that we are congregated here merely to be within reach of certain appliances of study, such as museums and laboratories, libraries and lecturers, so that each of us may study what he prefers. I suppose that when the bees crowd round the flowers it is for the sake of the honey that they do so, never thinking that it is the dust which they are carrying from flower to flower which is to render possible a more splendid array of flowers, and a busier crowd of bees, in the years to come. We cannot, therefore, do better than improve the shining hour in helping forward the cross-fertilization of the sciences.
'The Telephone', Nature, 15, 1878. In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 743-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (27)  |  Communion (3)  |  Congregation (3)  |  Dust (49)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Flower (76)  |  Honey (10)  |  Laboratory (131)  |  Lecturer (8)  |  Library (40)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Museum (24)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Science (2043)  |  Study (461)  |  Unity (53)  |  University (80)  |  Worker (30)

It is not impossible to suppose that in this case our luminary was taken in the act…
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (115)  |  Case (98)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Luminary (3)

It is reasonable to suppose that if we could apply selection to the human race we could also produce modifications or variations of men.
From Paper (13 Nov 1883) presented to the National Academy of Sciences at New Haven, printed in ed in 'Upon the Formation of a Deaf variety of the Human Race', Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (1884), 2, 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (76)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Modification (35)  |  Produce (100)  |  Selection (32)  |  Variation (61)

It is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it to be true.
In Sceptical Essays (1928), ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (503)  |  Ground (90)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Truth (914)  |  Undesirable (3)

It sometimes strikes me that the whole of science is a piece of impudence; that nature can afford to ignore our impertinent interference. If our monkey mischief should ever reach the point of blowing up the earth by decomposing an atom, and even annihilated the sun himself, I cannot really suppose that the universe would turn a hair.
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, ch. 14 (1929, rev 1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (16)  |  Annihilate (6)  |  Atom (280)  |  Blow (22)  |  Decompose (7)  |  Earth (635)  |  Hair (25)  |  Ignore (30)  |  Impertinent (2)  |  Interference (12)  |  Mischief (6)  |  Monkey (40)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Piece (38)  |  Point (122)  |  Reach (119)  |  Really (78)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Strike (39)  |  Sun (276)  |  Turn (118)  |  Universe (683)  |  Whole (189)

It would appear that Deductive and Demonstrative Sciences are all, without exception, Inductive Sciences: that their evidence is that of experience, but that they are also, in virtue of the peculiar character of one indispensable portion of the general formulae according to which their inductions are made, Hypothetical Sciences. Their conclusions are true only upon certain suppositions, which are, or ought to be, approximations to the truth, but are seldom, if ever, exactly true; and to this hypothetical character is to be ascribed the peculiar certainty, which is supposed to be inherent in demonstration.
In System of Logic, Bk. 2, chap. 6, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Appear (115)  |  Approximation (22)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Certain (125)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Character (115)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Deductive (10)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Demonstrative (3)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exception (39)  |  Experience (338)  |  Formula (79)  |  General (156)  |  Hypothetical (5)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Induction (59)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Inherent (30)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Peculiar (43)  |  Portion (24)  |  Science (2043)  |  Seldom (28)  |  Supposition (36)  |  True (201)  |  Truth (914)  |  Virtue (61)

Let no one suppose that the words doctor and patient can disguise from the parties the fact that they are employer and employee.
In 'Preface on Doctors', The Doctor's Dilemma (1909, 1911), lxxxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Disguise (10)  |  Doctor (101)  |  Employee (3)  |  Fact (725)  |  Let (61)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Party (18)  |  Patient (125)  |  Word (299)

Mathematicians pretend to count by means of a system supposed to satisfy the so-called Peano axioms. In fact, the piano has only 88 keys; hence, anyone counting with these axioms is soon played out.
In Mathematics Made Difficult (1971). As quoted in Michael Stueben and Diane Sandford, Twenty Years Before the Blackboard (1998), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (52)  |  Count (48)  |  Fact (725)  |  Key (50)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Means (171)  |  Giuseppe Peano (2)  |  Piano (12)  |  Play (110)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Soon (34)  |  System (191)

Mathematics, from the earliest times to which the history of human reason can reach, has followed, among that wonderful people of the Greeks, the safe way of science. But it must not be supposed that it was as easy for mathematics as for logic, in which reason is concerned with itself alone, to find, or rather to make for itself that royal road. I believe, on the contrary, that there was a long period of tentative work (chiefly still among the Egyptians), and that the change is to be ascribed to a revolution, produced by the happy thought of a single man, whose experiments pointed unmistakably to the path that had to be followed, and opened and traced out for the most distant times the safe way of a science. The history of that intellectual revolution, which was far more important than the passage round the celebrated Cape of Good Hope, and the name of its fortunate author, have not been preserved to us. … A new light flashed on the first man who demonstrated the properties of the isosceles triangle (whether his name was Thales or any other name), for he found that he had not to investigate what he saw in the figure, or the mere concepts of that figure, and thus to learn its properties; but that he had to produce (by construction) what he had himself, according to concepts a priori, placed into that figure and represented in it, so that, in order to know anything with certainty a priori, he must not attribute to that figure anything beyond what necessarily follows from what he has himself placed into it, in accordance with the concept.
In Critique of Pure Reason, Preface to the Second Edition, (1900), 690.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Alone (101)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Author (61)  |  Belief (503)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Celebrate (14)  |  Certainty (129)  |  Change (363)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Concept (143)  |  Concern (108)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Demonstrate (50)  |  Distant (32)  |  Early (61)  |  Easy (98)  |  Egyptian (4)  |  Experiment (600)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (68)  |  Find (405)  |  First (313)  |  Flash (34)  |  Follow (123)  |  Fortunate (10)  |  Greek (71)  |  Happy (46)  |  History (368)  |  Human (548)  |  Important (202)  |  Intellectual (120)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Isosceles Triangle (3)  |  Know (547)  |  Learn (281)  |  Light (345)  |  Logic (247)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mere (78)  |  Name (165)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  New (483)  |  Open (66)  |  Order (239)  |  Passage (20)  |  Path (84)  |  People (388)  |  Period (64)  |  Place (174)  |  Point (122)  |  Preserve (51)  |  Produce (100)  |  Property (123)  |  Reach (119)  |  Reason (454)  |  Represent (41)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Round (26)  |  Royal Road (3)  |  Safe (27)  |  Science (2043)  |  See (369)  |  Single (119)  |  Tentative (8)  |  Thales (9)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Trace (51)  |  Unmistakably (2)  |  Wonderful (59)  |  Work (626)

Nobody supposes that doctors are less virtuous than judges; but a judge whose salary and reputation depended on whether the verdict was for plaintiff or defendant, prosecutor or prisoner, would be as little trusted as a general in the pay of the enemy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Defendant (2)  |  Depend (87)  |  Doctor (101)  |  Enemy (63)  |  General (156)  |  Judge (61)  |  Less (102)  |  Little (184)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Nobody (49)  |  Pay (43)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Reputation (28)  |  Salary (5)  |  Trust (49)  |  Verdict (3)  |  Virtuous (3)

Science is not illusion. But it would be an illusion to suppose that we could get anywhere else what it cannot give us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anywhere (13)  |  Give (200)  |  Illusion (43)  |  Science (2043)

Science is often regarded as the most objective and truth-directed of human enterprises, and since direct observation is supposed to be the favored route to factuality, many people equate respectable science with visual scrutiny–just the facts ma’am, and palpably before my eyes. But science is a battery of observational and inferential methods, all directed to the testing of propositions that can, in principle, be definitely proven false ... At all scales, from smallest to largest, quickest to slowest, many well-documented conclusions of science lie beyond the strictly limited domain of direct observation. No one has ever seen an electron or a black hole, the events of a picosecond or a geological eon.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Battery (8)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Black Hole (14)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Direct (82)  |  Domain (40)  |  Electron (72)  |  Enterprise (32)  |  Eon (11)  |  Equate (3)  |  Event (115)  |  Eye (218)  |  Fact (725)  |  Factuality (2)  |  False (98)  |  Favored (5)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (548)  |  Inferential (2)  |  Large (130)  |  Lie (115)  |  Limit (123)  |  Method (230)  |  Objective (63)  |  Observation (445)  |  Observational (2)  |  Often (106)  |  Palpably (2)  |  People (388)  |  Principle (285)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Prove (108)  |  Quick (13)  |  Regard (93)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Route (15)  |  Scale (62)  |  Science (2043)  |  Scrutiny (14)  |  See (369)  |  Slow (55)  |  Small (161)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Test (124)  |  Visual (15)

Scientists are supposed to live in ivory towers. Their darkrooms and their vibration-proof benches are supposed to isolate their activities from the disturbances of common life. What they tell us is supposed to be for the ages, not for the next election. But the reality may be otherwise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (128)  |  Age (174)  |  Bench (4)  |  Common (118)  |  Disturbance (21)  |  Election (7)  |  Isolate (21)  |  Life (1124)  |  Live (269)  |  Next (35)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Reality (188)  |  Scientist (519)  |  Tell (110)

Suppose physics soon succeeds, as Stephen Hawking and a few other physicists hope and believe, in reducing physics to a single equation or a small set of equations that will “explain” all of nature’s fundamental laws. We can then ask the unanswerable question, "Why this set of equations?”
In Introduction, The Night Is Large: Collected Essays 1938-1995 (1996), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (157)  |  Belief (503)  |  Equation (93)  |  Explain (105)  |  Fundamental (158)  |  Stephen W. Hawking (56)  |  Hope (174)  |  Law (513)  |  Nature (1211)  |  Physicist (160)  |  Physics (346)  |  Question (404)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Set (97)  |  Single (119)  |  Small (161)  |  Succeed (26)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (65)  |  Accurate (32)  |  Acquire (38)  |  Act (115)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Angle (19)  |  Arithmetic (115)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (284)  |  Attention (115)  |  Badly (15)  |  Base (71)  |  Best (172)  |  Calculus (48)  |  Case (98)  |  Clear (97)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (157)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Country (144)  |  Curve (32)  |  Data (120)  |  Deal (49)  |  Deduce (22)  |  Deep (121)  |  Department (47)  |  Desire (140)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Direct (82)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (47)  |  Draw (55)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (38)  |  Enter (30)  |  Erroneous (4)  |  Error (275)  |  Evidence (181)  |  Exact (64)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Expect (44)  |  False (98)  |  First (313)  |  Follower (10)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (90)  |  Furnish (40)  |  Future (284)  |  General (156)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Give (200)  |  God (535)  |  Good (345)  |  Habit (107)  |  High (152)  |  Ignorant (36)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Inference (31)  |  Instance (32)  |  Know (547)  |  Lawyer (21)  |  Learn (281)  |  Least (74)  |  Legitimate (14)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Likely (33)  |  Line (89)  |  Little (184)  |  Live (269)  |  Logic (247)  |  Logical (54)  |  Long (172)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mere (78)  |  Mind (743)  |  Moral (123)  |  Myself (36)  |  Need (283)  |  Number (276)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (73)  |  Political (36)  |  Portal (4)  |  Premise (25)  |  Primary (39)  |  Principle (285)  |  Probability (106)  |  Problem (490)  |  Process (261)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Proposition (80)  |  Pure Science (23)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Question (404)  |  Reason (454)  |  Reduce (53)  |  Region (35)  |  Relate (19)  |  Relation (149)  |  Respect (86)  |  Right (196)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Same (155)  |  Save (56)  |  School (117)  |  Science (2043)  |  Simply (52)  |  Small (161)  |  Social (108)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (88)  |  Space (257)  |  Stand (107)  |  Start (97)  |  Statesman (18)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (235)  |  Success (248)  |  Surface (101)  |  System (191)  |  Systematic (32)  |  Task (83)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Together (77)  |  Topic (12)  |  Training (64)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (201)  |  Truth (914)  |  Try (141)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (80)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (10)  |  Value Of Mathematics (55)  |  Variation (61)  |  Want (175)  |  Weigh (14)  |  Whole (189)  |  World (892)  |  Write (153)

Suppose we loosely define a religion as any discipline whose foundations rest on an element of faith, irrespective of any element of reason which may be present. Quantum mechanics for example would be a religion under this definition. But mathematics would hold the unique position of being the only branch of theology possessing a rigorous demonstration of the fact that it should be so classified.
Concluding remark in 'Consistency and Completeness—A Résumé', The American Mathematical Monthly (May 1956), 63, No.5, 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (102)  |  Classification (85)  |  Definition (191)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Discipline (53)  |  Element (162)  |  Example (92)  |  Fact (725)  |  Faith (157)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Irrespective (3)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Position (75)  |  Possessing (3)  |  Quantum Mechanics (37)  |  Reason (454)  |  Religion (239)  |  Rest (93)  |  Rigorous (21)  |  Theology (40)  |  Unique (41)

Supposing is good, but finding out is better.
Mark Twain in Eruption: hitherto unpublished pages about men and events (1940), 324. In Caroline Thomas Harnsberger, Mark Twain at Your Fingertips (1948), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Quip (80)  |  Research (589)

The Epicureans, according to whom animals had no creation, doe suppose that by mutation of one into another, they were first made; for they are the substantial part of the world; like as Anaxagoras and Euripides affirme in these tearmes: nothing dieth, but in changing as they doe one for another they show sundry formes.
Plutarch
Fom Morals, translated by Philemon Holland, The Philosophie, Commonlie Called, the Moral Written by the Learned Philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea (1603), 846. As cited in Harris Hawthorne Wilder, History of the Human Body (1909), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Anaxagoras (10)  |  Animal (356)  |  Change (363)  |  Creation (239)  |  Epicurean (2)  |  Euripides (4)  |  Evolution (533)  |  Form (308)  |  Mutation (30)  |  Sundry (4)

The first successes were such that one might suppose all the difficulties of science overcome in advance, and believe that the mathematician, without being longer occupied in the elaboration of pure mathematics, could turn his thoughts exclusively to the study of natural laws.
From Preface to Traité de calcul différentiel et de calcul intégral (1864-70), i. Quoted in address to the section of Algebra and Analysis, International Congress of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), 'On the Development of Mathematical Analysis and its Relation to Certain Other Sciences,' as translated by M.W. Haskell in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (May 1905), 11, 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (162)  |  Belief (503)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Elaboration (7)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Natural Law (31)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Overcome (13)  |  Pure Mathematics (63)  |  Science (2043)  |  Study (461)  |  Success (248)  |  Thought (536)  |  Turn (118)

The game of chess has always fascinated mathematicians, and there is reason to suppose that the possession of great powers of playing that game is in many features very much like the possession of great mathematical ability. There are the different pieces to learn, the pawns, the knights, the bishops, the castles, and the queen and king. The board possesses certain possible combinations of squares, as in rows, diagonals, etc. The pieces are subject to certain rules by which their motions are governed, and there are other rules governing the players. … One has only to increase the number of pieces, to enlarge the field of the board, and to produce new rules which are to govern either the pieces or the player, to have a pretty good idea of what mathematics consists.
In Book review, 'What is Mathematics?', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (May 1912), 18, 386-387.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (107)  |  Bishop (3)  |  Board (12)  |  Castle (5)  |  Certain (125)  |  Chess (23)  |  Combination (91)  |  Consist (45)  |  Diagonal (3)  |  Different (178)  |  Enlarge (26)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  Feature (43)  |  Field (170)  |  Game (61)  |  Good (345)  |  Govern (28)  |  Great (524)  |  Idea (577)  |  Increase (145)  |  King (32)  |  Knight (6)  |  Learn (281)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Motion (158)  |  New (483)  |  Number (276)  |  Pawn (2)  |  Piece (38)  |  Play (110)  |  Player (8)  |  Possess (53)  |  Possession (45)  |  Possible (155)  |  Power (358)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Produce (100)  |  Queen (14)  |  Reason (454)  |  Row (9)  |  Rule (173)  |  Square (23)  |  Subject (235)

The human understanding is moved by those things most which strike and enter the mind simultaneously and suddenly, and so fill the imagination; and then it feigns and supposes all other things to be somehow, though it cannot see how, similar to those few things by which it is surrounded.
Translation of Novum Organum, XLVII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Fill (61)  |  Human (548)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Mind (743)  |  Similar (35)  |  Simultaneous (17)  |  Strike (39)  |  Sudden (32)  |  Surround (29)  |  Understanding (325)

The more the subject is examined the more complex must we suppose the constitution of matter in order to explain the remarkable effects observed.
In Radio-activity (1905), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (94)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Effect (165)  |  Examine (44)  |  Explain (105)  |  Matter (340)  |  Observe (75)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Subject (235)

The surest way to health, say what they will,
Is never to suppose we shall be ill;
Most of the ills which we poor mortals know
From doctors and imagination flow.
In 'Night: An Epistle to Robert Lloyd', Poems of Charles Churchill (1822), Vol. 1, 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (101)  |  Flow (42)  |  Health (153)  |  Ill (12)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Say (228)  |  Surest (5)

This [the fact that the pursuit of mathematics brings into harmonious action all the faculties of the human mind] accounts for the extraordinary longevity of all the greatest masters of the Analytic art, the Dii Majores of the mathematical Pantheon. Leibnitz lived to the age of 70; Euler to 76; Lagrange to 77; Laplace to 78; Gauss to 78; Plato, the supposed inventor of the conic sections, who made mathematics his study and delight, who called them the handles or aids to philosophy, the medicine of the soul, and is said never to have let a day go by without inventing some new theorems, lived to 82; Newton, the crown and glory of his race, to 85; Archimedes, the nearest akin, probably, to Newton in genius, was 75, and might have lived on to be 100, for aught we can guess to the contrary, when he was slain by the impatient and ill mannered sergeant, sent to bring him before the Roman general, in the full vigour of his faculties, and in the very act of working out a problem; Pythagoras, in whose school, I believe, the word mathematician (used, however, in a somewhat wider than its present sense) originated, the second founder of geometry, the inventor of the matchless theorem which goes by his name, the pre-cognizer of the undoubtedly mis-called Copernican theory, the discoverer of the regular solids and the musical canon who stands at the very apex of this pyramid of fame, (if we may credit the tradition) after spending 22 years studying in Egypt, and 12 in Babylon, opened school when 56 or 57 years old in Magna Græcia, married a young wife when past 60, and died, carrying on his work with energy unspent to the last, at the age of 99. The mathematician lives long and lives young; the wings of his soul do not early drop off, nor do its pores become clogged with the earthy particles blown from the dusty highways of vulgar life.
In Presidential Address to the British Association, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2 (1908), 658.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (67)  |  Act (115)  |  Action (184)  |  Age (174)  |  Aid (41)  |  Akin (5)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Apex (4)  |  Archimedes (53)  |  Art (284)  |  Aught (2)  |  Babylon (5)  |  Become (172)  |  Belief (503)  |  Blow (22)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (127)  |  Called (9)  |  Canon (3)  |  Carry (59)  |  Clog (5)  |  Conic Section (7)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Copernican Theory (3)  |  Credit (20)  |  Crown (26)  |  Delight (64)  |  Die (81)  |  Discoverer (15)  |  Drop (39)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Early (61)  |  Earthy (2)  |  Egypt (22)  |  Energy (214)  |  Leonhard Euler (34)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Fact (725)  |  Faculty (65)  |  Fame (37)  |  Founder (15)  |  Full (63)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (73)  |  General (156)  |  Genius (243)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Glory (57)  |  Great (524)  |  Guess (48)  |  Handle (16)  |  Harmonious (9)  |  Highway (13)  |  Human Mind (80)  |  Impatient (3)  |  Invent (50)  |  Inventor (55)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (24)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (61)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1124)  |  Live (269)  |  Long (172)  |  Longevity (6)  |  Manner (57)  |  Marry (8)  |  Master (93)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Musical (7)  |  Name (165)  |  New (483)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Old (147)  |  Open (66)  |  Originate (21)  |  Pantheon (2)  |  Particle (99)  |  Past (150)  |  Philosophy (257)  |  Plato (73)  |  Pore (7)  |  Present (174)  |  Probably (47)  |  Problem (490)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Pythagoras (34)  |  Race (103)  |  Regular (13)  |  Roman (27)  |  Say (228)  |  School (117)  |  Second (59)  |  Send (22)  |  Sense (315)  |  Sergeant (2)  |  Solid (50)  |  Soul (163)  |  Spend (43)  |  Stand (107)  |  Study (461)  |  Theorem (88)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Undoubtedly (3)  |  Vigour (12)  |  Vulgar (15)  |  Wide (27)  |  Wife (23)  |  Wing (48)  |  Word (299)  |  Work (626)  |  Year (299)  |  Young (98)

Those intervening ideas, which serve to show the agreement of any two others, are called proofs; and where the agreement or disagreement is by this means plainly and clearly perceived, it is called demonstration; it being shown to the understanding, and the mind made to see that it is so. A quickness in the mind to find out these intermediate ideas, (that shall discover the agreement or disagreement of any other) and to apply them right, is, I suppose, that which is called sagacity.
In An Essay concerning Human Understanding, Bk. 6, chaps. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (39)  |  Apply (76)  |  Call (127)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Disagreement (12)  |  Discover (196)  |  Find Out (20)  |  Idea (577)  |  Intermediate (20)  |  Intervene (7)  |  Means (171)  |  Mind (743)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (77)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Plainly (5)  |  Proof (243)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Right (196)  |  Sagacity (8)  |  See (369)  |  Serve (57)  |  Show (90)  |  Understand (326)

To suppose that so perfect a system as that of Euclid’s Elements was produced by one man, without any preceding model or materials, would be to suppose that Euclid was more than man. We ascribe to him as much as the weakness of human understanding will permit, if we suppose that the inventions in geometry, which had been made in a tract of preceding ages, were by him not only carried much further, but digested into so admirable a system, that his work obscured all that went before it, and made them be forgot and lost.
In Essay on the Powers of the Human Mind (1812), Vol. 2, 368.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Age (174)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Carry (59)  |  Digest (8)  |  Element (162)  |  Euclid (52)  |  Far (154)  |  Forget (63)  |  Geometry (215)  |  Human (548)  |  Invention (318)  |  Lose (93)  |  Material (154)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (123)  |  Model (80)  |  Obscure (31)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Permit (30)  |  Precede (20)  |  Produce (100)  |  System (191)  |  Tract (5)  |  Understand (326)  |  Weakness (35)  |  Work (626)

Vagueness is very much more important in the theory of knowledge than you would judge it to be from the writings of most people. Everything is vague to a degree you do not realize till you have tried to make it precise, and everything precise is so remote from everything that we normally think, that you cannot for a moment suppose that is what we really mean when we say what we think.
In The Philosophy of Logical Atomism (1918, 1919), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Important (202)  |  Judge (61)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Moment (106)  |  Normal (27)  |  Precise (33)  |  Remote (39)  |  Theory (690)  |  Think (341)  |  Vague (25)  |  Writing (79)

We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita: Vishnu is trying to pursue the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that one way or another. There was a great deal of solemn talk that this was the end of the great wars of the century.
At the first atomic bomb test (16 Jul 1945), in Len Giovanitti and Fred Freed, The Decision to Drop the Bomb (1965), 197
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Century (130)  |  Cry (18)  |  Death (302)  |  Destroyer (4)  |  Duty (68)  |  End (195)  |  Great (524)  |  Hindu (3)  |  Impress (16)  |  Know (547)  |  Laugh (28)  |  Line (89)  |  People (388)  |  Prince (13)  |  Pursue (21)  |  Remember (81)  |  Same (155)  |  Scripture (11)  |  Silent (28)  |  Solemn (10)  |  Talk (99)  |  Thought (536)  |  Try (141)  |  War (161)  |  World (892)

Were I disposed to consider the comparative merit of each of them [facts or theories in medical practice], I should derive most of the evils of medicine from supposed facts, and ascribe all the remedies which have been uniformly and extensively useful, to such theories as are true. Facts are combined and rendered useful only by means of theories, and the more disposed men are to reason, the more minute and extensive they become in their observations.
Quoted in John Edmonds Stock, Memoirs of the life of Thomas Beddoes (1810), 401.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Consider (80)  |  Derive (33)  |  Dispose (9)  |  Evil (78)  |  Fact (725)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Merit (32)  |  Observation (445)  |  Reason (454)  |  Remedy (54)  |  Theory (690)  |  Truth (914)  |  Usefulness (77)

What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly? ... wearying himself with climbing upon every ascent, ... bruising himself with continual falls, and at last breaking his neck? And all this, from an imagination that it would be glorious to have the eyes of people looking up at him, and mighty happy to eat, and drink, and sleep, at the top of the highest trees in the kingdom.
In A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1732), 168. This was written before Montgolfier brothers, pioneer balloonists, were born.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Brain (209)  |  Break (54)  |  Climb (34)  |  Day (41)  |  Drink (36)  |  Eating (21)  |  Extravagant (4)  |  Eye (218)  |  Fall (119)  |  Flight (63)  |  Glory (57)  |  Highest (18)  |  Imagination (268)  |  Look (52)  |  Neck (12)  |  Night (117)  |  People (388)  |  Silly (12)  |  Sleep (57)  |  Study (461)  |  Top (34)  |  Tree (170)

Who ever thought up the word “Mammogram?” Every time I hear it, I think I’m supposed to put my breast in an envelope and send it to someone.
Jan King
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Breast (9)  |  Envelope (5)  |  Hear (60)  |  Send (22)  |  Someone (21)  |  Think (341)  |  Thought (536)  |  Time (594)  |  Word (299)

You’re aware the boy failed my grade school math class, I take it? And not that many years later he’s teaching college. Now I ask you: Is that the sorriest indictment of the American educational system you ever heard? [pauses to light cigarette.] No aptitude at all for long division, but never mind. It’s him they ask to split the atom. How he talked his way into the Nobel prize is beyond me. But then, I suppose it’s like the man says, it’s not what you know...
Karl Arbeiter (former teacher of Albert Einstein)
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Aptitude (17)  |  Ask (157)  |  Atom (280)  |  Aware (31)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Boy (46)  |  Cigarette (22)  |  Class (83)  |  College (35)  |  Educational (7)  |  Fail (58)  |  Grade (11)  |  Hear (60)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Know (547)  |  Late (52)  |  Light (345)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mind (743)  |  Nobel Prize (28)  |  Pause (6)  |  Say (228)  |  School (117)  |  Sorry (16)  |  Split (13)  |  System (191)  |  Talk (99)  |  Teach (179)  |  Year (299)

[S]uppose you make a hole in an ordinary evacuated electric light bulb and allow the air molecules to pass in at the rate of 1,000,000 a second, the bulb will become full of air in approximately 100,000,000 years.
In Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Atomic Theory', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (188)  |  Approximate (10)  |  Atomic Size (2)  |  Bulb (3)  |  Full (63)  |  Hole (16)  |  Light (345)  |  Million (111)  |  Molecule (131)  |  Ordinary (71)  |  Pass (91)  |  Rate (29)  |  Second (59)  |  Year (299)

[The word] genius is derived from gignere, gigno; I bring forth, I produce; it always supposes invention, and this quality, is the only one which belongs to all the different kinds of genius.
From the original French, “Celui de génie dérive de gignere, gigno; j’enfante, je produis; il suppose toujours invention: & cette qualité est la seule qui appartienne à tous les génies différents,” in 'Du Génie', L’Esprit (1758), Discourse 4, 476. English version from Claude Adrien Helvétius and William Mudford (trans.), 'Of Genius', De l’Esprit or, Essays on the Mind and its several Faculties (1759), Essay 4, Chap. 1, 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Derive (33)  |  Different (178)  |  Genius (243)  |  Invention (318)  |  Kind (138)  |  Produce (100)  |  Quality (93)  |  Word (299)

~~[Orphan]~~ The question is, are we happy to suppose that our grandchildren may never be able to see an elephant except in a picture book?
Appears in various online sources attributed to David Attenborough, but always with no citation. No primary source, so far, found by Webmaster.Perhaps it comes from one of the so many interviews and documentaries he has done for TV and radio. For now, Webmaster regards it as an orphan quote that needs a primary source. Or it might not be a quote of his, and best attributed to Anonymous. Can you help identify the primary source?
Science quotes on:  |  Book (257)  |  Elephant (22)  |  Grandchild (2)  |  Happy (46)  |  Picture (75)  |  Question (404)  |  See (369)

“She can’t do Subtraction.” said the White Queen. “Can you do Division? Divide a loaf by a knife—what's the answer to that?”
“I suppose-” Alice was beginning, but the Red Queen answered for her.
“Bread-and-butter, of course.”
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 189-190.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice (6)  |  Answer (249)  |  Beginning (122)  |  Divide (40)  |  Division (33)  |  Knife (10)  |  Loaf (3)  |  Red Queen (2)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  White Queen (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.