Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Fail

Fail Quotes (185 quotes)

A distinguished writer [Siméon Denis Poisson] has thus stated the fundamental definitions of the science:
“The probability of an event is the reason we have to believe that it has taken place, or that it will take place.”
“The measure of the probability of an event is the ratio of the number of cases favourable to that event, to the total number of cases favourable or contrary, and all equally possible” (equally like to happen).
From these definitions it follows that the word probability, in its mathematical acceptation, has reference to the state of our knowledge of the circumstances under which an event may happen or fail. With the degree of information which we possess concerning the circumstances of an event, the reason we have to think that it will occur, or, to use a single term, our expectation of it, will vary. Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge. A perfect acquaintance with all the circumstances affecting the occurrence of an event would change expectation into certainty, and leave neither room nor demand for a theory of probabilities.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 243-244. The Poisson quote is footnoted as from Recherches sur la Probabilité des Jugemens.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  All (4108)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demand (123)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Event (216)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happen (274)  |  Information (166)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Siméon-Denis Poisson (7)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probability (130)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Writer (86)

A man who speaks out honestly and fearlessly that which he knows, and that which he believes, will always enlist the good will and the respect, however much he may fail in winning the assent, of his fellow men.
Reflection #295, Thomas Henry Huxley and Henrietta A. Huxley (ed.), Aphorisms and Reflections from the Works of T.H. Huxley (1907).
Science quotes on:  |  Assent (12)  |  Belief (578)  |  Enlist (2)  |  Fearless (6)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Good (889)  |  Goodwill (6)  |  Honestly (10)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Respect (207)  |  Speak (232)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)  |  Winning (19)

A man with a conviction is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts or figures and he questions your sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point.
First sentences in When Prophecy Fails (1956), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (45)  |  Change (593)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Disagree (11)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Hard (243)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Source (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Turn (447)

A very small cause which escapes our notice determines a considerable effect that we cannot fail to see, and then we say that the effect is due to chance. If we knew exactly the laws of nature and the situation of the universe at the initial moment, we could predict exactly the situation of that same universe at a succeeding moment.
In 'Chance', Science et Méthode (1908). Quoted in Richard Kautz, Chaos: The Science of Predictable Random Motion (2011), 167 as translated in Science and Method by F. Maitland (1918).
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Determine (144)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (393)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Initial (17)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notice (77)  |  Predict (79)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Situation (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Universe (857)

According to Herr Cook's observation, the inhabitants of New Guinea have something they set light to which burns up almost like gunpowder. They also put it into hollow staves, and from a distance you could believe they are shooting. But it does not produce so much as a bang. Presumably they are trying to imitate the Europeans. They have failed to realize its real purpose.
Aphorism 27 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 48.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Bang (29)  |  Burn (87)  |  Distance (161)  |  Europe (43)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Light (607)  |  New (1216)  |  New Guinea (3)  |  Observation (555)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Realize (147)  |  Rifle (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Trying (144)

All attempts to adapt our ethical code to our situation in the technological age have failed.
Max Born
My Life & My Views (1968), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Code (31)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Situation (113)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)

Although [Charles Darwin] would patiently go on repeating experiments where there was any good to be gained, he could not endure having to repeat an experiment which ought, if complete care had been taken, to have told its story at first—and this gave him a continual anxiety that the experiment should not be wasted; he felt the experiment to be sacred, however slight a one it was. He wished to learn as much as possible from an experiment, so that he did not confine himself to observing the single point to which the experiment was directed, and his power of seeing a number of other things was wonderful. ... Any experiment done was to be of some use, and ... strongly he urged the necessity of keeping the notes of experiments which failed, and to this rule he always adhered.
In Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1908), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Care (186)  |  Complete (204)  |  Continual (43)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Note (34)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Single (353)  |  Story (118)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonderful (149)

Among innumerable footsteps of divine providence to be found in the works of nature, there is a very remarkable one to be observed in the exact balance that is maintained, between the numbers of men and women; for by this means is provided, that the species never may fail, nor perish, since every male may have its female, and of proportionable age. This equality of males and females is not the effect of chance but divine providence, working for a good end.
'An Argument for Divine Providence, taken from the Constant Regularity observ’d in the Births of both Sexes', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1710-12, 27,186.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Balance (77)  |  Chance (239)  |  Divine (112)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Equality (31)  |  Female (50)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Good (889)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Observed (149)  |  Perish (50)  |  Providence (18)  |  Species (401)  |  Work (1351)

Among the older records, we find chapter after chapter of which we can read the characters, and make out their meaning: and as we approach the period of man’s creation, our book becomes more clear, and nature seems to speak to us in language so like our own, that we easily comprehend it. But just as we begin to enter on the history of physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us—a leaf has been torn out from nature's record, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Language (293)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tear (42)  |  Torn (17)

An age is called Dark, not because the light fails to shine, but because people refuse to see.
From Space: A Novel (1983), 709. As cited by David G. Anderson, 'Archaic Mounds and Southeastern Tribal Societies', in Jon L. Gibson, Philip J. Carr (ed.), Signs of Power: The Rise of Cultural Complexity in the Southeast (2004), 297. A footnote by Anderson explains that Michener described the supernova of 1054 A.D. which blazed for 23 days and was recorded around the world, except in western Europe where religious dogma insisted the heavens were immutable. The quote above was Michener’s comment on that “refusal to see.”.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Call (769)  |  Called (9)  |  Dark (140)  |  Failing (5)  |  Light (607)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shining (35)

An experiment is never a failure solely because it fails to achieve predicted results. An experiment is a failure only when it also fails adequately to test the hypothesis in question, when the data it produces don’t prove anything one way or another.
In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values (1974), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Data (156)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Never (1087)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Production (183)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Prove Anything (7)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Sole (49)  |  Test (211)  |  Way (1217)

An induction shock results in a contraction or fails to do so according to its strength; if it does so at all, it produces in the muscle at that time the maximal contraction that can result from stimuli of any strength.
Über die Eigentümlichkeiten der Reizbarkeit welche die Muskelfasern des Herzen zeigen', Ber. süchs. Akad. Wiss., Math.-nat Klasse, 1871, 23, 652-689. Trans. Edwin Clarke and C. D. O'Malley, The Human Brain and Spinal Cord (1968), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Induction (77)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Result (677)  |  Shock (37)  |  Strength (126)  |  Time (1877)

An inventor fails 999 times, and if he succeeds once, he’s in. He treats his failures simply as practice shots.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Failure (161)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Practice (204)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)

An inventor is simply a fellow who doesn’t take his education too seriously. You see, from the time a person is six years old until he graduates form college he has to take three or four examinations a year. If he flunks once, he is out. But an inventor is almost always failing. He tries and fails maybe a thousand times. It he succeeds once then he’s in. These two things are diametrically opposite. We often say that the biggest job we have is to teach a newly hired employee how to fail intelligently. We have to train him to experiment over and over and to keep on trying and failing until he learns what will work.
In 'How Can We Develop Inventors?' presented to the Annual meeting of the American Society of Society Engineers. Reprinted in Mechanical Engineering (Apr 1944). Collected in Prophet of Progress: Selections from the Speeches of Charles F. Kettering (1961), 108.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  College (66)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Form (959)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Learn (629)  |  Old (481)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Person (363)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

And as for Mixed Mathematics, I may only make this prediction, that there cannot fail to be more kinds of them, as nature grows further disclosed.
In Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Collected in The Works of Francis Bacon (1765), Vol. 1, 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Disclosed (2)  |  Grow (238)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mixed (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Prediction (82)

Any frontal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to defend their most precious possession: their ignorance.
Quote appears in Henry Wysham Lanier, The Golden Book Magazine (Feb 1933), 17, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Bound (119)  |  Defend (30)  |  Frontal (2)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Mass (157)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possession (65)  |  Precious (41)  |  Ready (39)

As a rule, software systems do not work well until they have been used, and have failed repeatedly, in real applications.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Do (1908)  |  Real (149)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Rule (294)  |  Software (13)  |  System (537)  |  Work (1351)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Describe (128)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Goethe (3)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Magic (86)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (267)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

Attaching significance to invariants is an effort to recognize what, because of its form or colour or meaning or otherwise, is important or significant in what is only trivial or ephemeral. A simple instance of failing in this is provided by the poll-man at Cambridge, who learned perfectly how to factorize a²-b² but was floored because the examiner unkindly asked for the factors of p²–q².
In 'Recent Developments in Invariant Theory', The Mathematical Gazette (Dec 1926), 13, No. 185, 217. [Note: A poll-man is a student who takes the ordinary university degree, without honours. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Color (137)  |  Effort (227)  |  Ephemeral (4)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Factor (46)  |  Form (959)  |  Important (209)  |  Instance (33)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Provide (69)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Simple (406)  |  Student (300)  |  Trivial (57)

Ay, driven no more by passion's gale,
Nor impulse unforeseen,
Humanity shall faint and fail,
And on her ruins will prevail
The Conquering Machine!
Responsibility begone!
Let Freedom's flag be furled;
Oh, coming ages, hasten on,
And bring the true Automaton,
The monarch of the world.
'The Conquering Machine', Dreams to Sell (1887), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Coming (114)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Machine (257)  |  More (2559)  |  Passion (114)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Unforeseen (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Believe and act as if it were impossible to fail.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Failure (161)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Success (302)

Bohr’s standpoint, that a space-time description is impossible, I reject a limine. Physics does not consist only of atomic research, science does not consist only of physics, and life does not consist only of science. The aim of atomic research is to fit our empirical knowledge concerning it into our other thinking. All of this other thinking, so far as it concerns the outer world, is active in space and time. If it cannot be fitted into space and time, then it fails in its whole aim and one does not know what purpose it really serves.
Letter to Willy Wien (25 Aug 1926). Quoted in Walter Moore, Schrödinger: Life and Thought (1989), 226.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Active (76)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consist (223)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fit (134)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reject (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

But nothing ever put 'Hoppy' in the shade. No one could fail to recognize in the little figure... the authentic gold of intellectual inspiration, the Fundator et Primus Abbas of biochemistry in England.
Co-author with D. M. Needham,
'F. G. Hopkins' Personal Influence'. In J. Needham and E. Baldwin (eds.), Hopkins and Biochemistry, 1861-1947 (1949), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Authentic (8)  |  Author (167)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biography (240)  |  Figure (160)  |  Gold (97)  |  Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins (11)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Little (707)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Shade (31)

Clearly it is not reason that has failed. What has failed—as it has always failed—is the attempt to achieve certainty, to reach an absolute, to find the course of human events to a final end. ... It is not reason that has promised to eliminate risk in human undertakings; it is the emotional needs of men.
In The Quest For Identity (1958), 135.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Course (409)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Emotion (100)  |  End (590)  |  Event (216)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Need (290)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Risk (61)  |  Undertaking (16)

Colleague reader, please read this to your uncertain teenager con brio! Tell him or her that (1) experiments often fail, and (2) they don't always fail.
[Co-author with Dick Teresi]
In Leon M. Lederman and Dick Teresi, The God Particle: If the Universe is the Answer, What is the Question? (1993), 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Please (65)  |  Read (287)  |  Reader (40)  |  Success (302)  |  Teenager (4)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Uncertain (44)

Commenting on Archimedes, for whom he also had a boundless admiration, Gauss remarked that he could not understand how Archimedes failed to invent the decimal system of numeration or its equivalent (with some base other than 10). … This oversight Gauss regarded as the greatest calamity in the history of science.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Base (117)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comment (11)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Invent (51)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remark (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Understand (606)

Despite the recurrence of events in which the debris-basin system fails in its struggle to contain the falling mountains, people who live on the front line are for the most part calm and complacent. It appears that no amount of front-page or prime-time attention will ever prevent such people from masking out the problem.
The Control of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Appear (118)  |  Attention (190)  |  Calm (31)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Contain (68)  |  Despite (7)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Front (16)  |  Line (91)  |  Live (628)  |  Mask (12)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recurrence (5)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

Do not expect to be hailed as a hero when you make your great discovery. More likely you will be a ratbag—maybe failed by your examiners. Your statistics, or your observations, or your literature study, or your something else will be patently deficient. Do not doubt that in our enlightened age the really important advances are and will be rejected more often than acclaimed. Nor should we doubt that in our own professional lifetime we too will repudiate with like pontifical finality the most significant insight ever to reach our desk.
Theories of the Earth and Universe (1988), 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Career (75)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Examiner (5)  |  Expect (200)  |  Finality (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hero (42)  |  Insight (102)  |  Literature (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Patently (4)  |  Professional (70)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Repudiate (7)  |  Significant (74)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Will (2355)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Education has, thus, become the chief problem of the world, its one holy cause. The nations that see this will survive, and those that fail to do so will slowly perish. There must be re-education of the will and of the heart as well as of the intellect, and the ideals of service must supplant those of selfishness and greed. ... Never so much as now is education the one and chief hope of the world.
Confessions of a Psychologist (1923). Quoted in Bruce A. Kimball, The True Professional Ideal in America: A History (1996), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chief (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Greed (14)  |  Heart (229)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hope (299)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perish (50)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Service (110)  |  Survive (79)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Error, never can be consistent, nor can truth fail of having support from the accurate examination of every circumstance.
'Theory of the Earth', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1788), 1, 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Error (321)  |  Examination (98)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Support (147)  |  Truth (1057)

Even in Europe a change has sensibly taken place in the mind of man. Science has liberated the ideas of those who read and reflect, and the American example has kindled feelings of right in the people. An insurrection has consequently begun of science talents and courage against rank and birth, which have fallen into contempt. It has failed in its first effort, because the mobs of the cities, the instrument used for its accomplishment, debased by ignorance, poverty and vice, could not be restrained to rational action. But the world will soon recover from the panic of this first catastrophe.
Letter to John Adams (Monticello, 1813). In Thomas Jefferson and John P. Foley (ed.), The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia (1900), 49. From Paul Leicester Ford (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1892-99). Vol 4, 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Action (327)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  Birth (147)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Courage (69)  |  Effort (227)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mob (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rational (90)  |  Read (287)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Talent (94)  |  Vice (40)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Every failure teaches a man something, to wit, that he will probably fail again next time.
In A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 617.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  Man (2251)  |  Next (236)  |  Probably (49)  |  Something (719)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)

Every farm woodland, in addition to yielding lumber, fuel, and posts, should provide its owner a liberal education. This crop of wisdom never fails, but it is not always harvested.
In A Sand County Almanac: and Sketches Here and There (1949, 1989), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Crop (25)  |  Education (378)  |  Farm (26)  |  Forestry (16)  |  Fuel (32)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Lumber (5)  |  Never (1087)  |  Post (6)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Woodland (2)  |  Yield (81)

Every great advance of science opens our eyes to facts which we had failed before to observe, and makes new demands on our powers of interpretation.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Demand (123)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  New (1216)  |  Observe (168)  |  Open (274)  |  Power (746)  |  Science (3879)

Every great improvement has come after repeated failures. Virtually nothing comes out right the first time. Failures, repeated failures, are finger posts on the road to achievement. One fails forward toward success.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Right (452)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)

Every physical fact, every expression of nature, every feature of the earth, the work of any and all of those agents which make the face of the world what it is, and as we see it, is interesting and instructive. Until we get hold of a group of physical facts, we do not know what practical bearings they may have, though right-minded men know that they contain many precious jewels, which science, or the expert hand of philosophy will not fail top bring out, polished, and bright, and beautifully adapted to man's purposes.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 209-210. Maury was in particular referring to the potential use of deep-sea soundings.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bright (79)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Expert (65)  |  Expression (175)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feature (44)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Polish (15)  |  Practical (200)  |  Precious (41)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Top (96)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Every variety of philosophical and theological opinion was represented there [The Metaphysical Society], and expressed itself with entire openness; most of my colleagues were -ists of one sort or another; and, however kind and friendly they might be, I, the man without a rag of a label to cover himself with, could not fail to have some of the uneasy feelings which must have beset the historical fox when, after leaving the trap in which his tail remained, he presented himself to his normally elongated companions. So I took thought, and invented what I conceived to be the appropriate title of “agnostic” .
'Agnosticism' (1889). In Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 5, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (9)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Companion (19)  |  Express (186)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Himself (461)  |  Historical (70)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Openness (7)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Society (326)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thought (953)  |  Variety (132)

Every well established truth is an addition to the sum of human power, and though it may not find an immediate application to the economy of every day life, we may safely commit it to the stream of time, in the confident anticipation that the world will not fail to realize its beneficial results.
In 'Report of the Secretary', Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution for 1856 (1857), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Application (242)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Commit (41)  |  Confident (25)  |  Economy (55)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Life (1795)  |  Power (746)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sum (102)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Faced with a new mutation in an organism, or a fundamental change in its living conditions, the biologist is frequently in no position whatever to predict its future prospects. He has to wait and see. For instance, the hairy mammoth seems to have been an admirable animal, intelligent and well-accoutered. Now that it is extinct, we try to understand why it failed. I doubt that any biologist thinks he could have predicted that failure. Fitness and survival are by nature estimates of past performance.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Hairy (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Performance (48)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Prospect (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Survival (94)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)

Faced with the admitted difficulty of managing the creative process, we are doubling our efforts to do so. Is this because science has failed to deliver, having given us nothing more than nuclear power, penicillin, space travel, genetic engineering, transistors, and superconductors? Or is it because governments everywhere regard as a reproach activities they cannot advantageously control? They felt that way about the marketplace for goods, but trillions of wasted dollars later, they have come to recognize the efficiency of this self-regulating system. Not so, however, with the marketplace for ideas.
Quoted in Martin Moskovits (ed.), Science and Society, the John C. Polanyi Nobel Lareates Lectures (1995), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (167)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetic Engineering (15)  |  Good (889)  |  Government (110)  |  Idea (843)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Power (12)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Regulating (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  System (537)  |  Transistor (5)  |  Travel (114)  |  Way (1217)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Famine … the most dreadful resource of nature.
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Famine seems to be the last, the most dreadful resource of nature. The power of population is so superior to the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race. The vices of mankind are active and able ministers of depopulation. They are the precursors in the great army of destruction; and often finish the dreadful work themselves. But should they fail in this war of extermination, sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague, advance in terrific array, and sweep off their thousands and ten thousands. Should success be still incomplete, gigantic inevitable famine stalks in the rear, and with one mighty blow, levels the population with the food of the world.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 140, and in new enlarged edition (1803), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Army (33)  |  Array (5)  |  Blow (44)  |  Death (388)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  Earth (996)  |  Epidemic (7)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Failure (161)  |  Famine (15)  |  Finish (59)  |  Food (199)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Inevitability (9)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Minister (9)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Plague (41)  |  Population (110)  |  Power (746)  |  Precursor (5)  |  Premature (20)  |  Production (183)  |  Race (268)  |  Resource (63)  |  Season (47)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Stalk (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Subsistence (9)  |  Success (302)  |  Superior (81)  |  Superiority (19)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Terrific (4)  |  Themself (3)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Vice (40)  |  War (225)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Fires from beneath, and meteors from above,
Portentous, unexampled, unexplain'd,
Have kindled beacons in the skies; and th' old
And crazy earth has had her shaking fits
More frequent, and foregone her usual rest.
Is it a time to wrangle, when the props
And pillars of our planet seem to fail,
And nature, with a dim and sickly eye,
To wait the close of all?
Alluding the meteors of 17 Aug 1883.
'The Time-Piece,' Task, Book ii, lines 58-66. In William Cowper, Henry Francis Cary, The Poetical Works of William Cowper (1863), 52-53.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fit (134)  |  Meteor (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rest (280)  |  Time (1877)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Cease (79)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cling (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forever (103)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Light (607)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shift (44)  |  Witness (54)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plato (76)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Type (167)  |  Virus (27)

From our best qualities come our worst. From our urge to pull together comes our tendency to pull apart. From our devotion to higher good comes our propensity to the foulest atrocities. From out commitment to ideals come our excuse to hate. Since the beginning of history, we have been blinded by evil’s ability to don a selfless disguise. We have failed to see that our finest qualities often lead us to the actions we most abhor—murder, torture, genocide, and war.
In 'Who is Lucifer?', The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition Into the Forces of History (1997), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhor (6)  |  Ability (152)  |  Action (327)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Best (459)  |  Blind (95)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disguise (11)  |  Don (2)  |  Evil (116)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Finest (3)  |  Foul (15)  |  Good (889)  |  Hate (64)  |  History (673)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Lead (384)  |  Most (1731)  |  Murder (13)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Pull (43)  |  Pull Together (2)  |  Quality (135)  |  See (1081)  |  Selfless (2)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Together (387)  |  Torture (29)  |  Urge (17)  |  War (225)  |  Worst (57)

Generality of points of view and of methods, precision and elegance in presentation, have become, since Lagrange, the common property of all who would lay claim to the rank of scientific mathematicians. And, even if this generality leads at times to abstruseness at the expense of intuition and applicability, so that general theorems are formulated which fail to apply to a single special case, if furthermore precision at times degenerates into a studied brevity which makes it more difficult to read an article than it was to write it; if, finally, elegance of form has well-nigh become in our day the criterion of the worth or worthlessness of a proposition,—yet are these conditions of the highest importance to a wholesome development, in that they keep the scientific material within the limits which are necessary both intrinsically and extrinsically if mathematics is not to spend itself in trivialities or smother in profusion.
In Die Entwickdung der Mathematik in den letzten Jahrhunderten (1884), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Apply (160)  |  Article (22)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Claim (146)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Expense (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Formulate (15)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Lead (384)  |  Limit (280)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Profusion (3)  |  Property (168)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rank (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Smother (3)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triviality (2)  |  View (488)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Worth (169)  |  Worthless (21)  |  Write (230)

Genuine religion has its root deep down in the heart of humanity and in the reality of things. It is not surprising that by our methods we fail to grasp it: the actions of the Deity make no appeal to any special sense, only a universal appeal; and our methods are, as we know, incompetent to detect complete uniformity. There is a principle of Relativity here, and unless we encounter flaw or jar or change, nothing in us responds; we are deaf and blind therefore to the Immanent Grandeur, unless we have insight enough to recognise in the woven fabric of existence, flowing steadily from the loom in an infinite progress towards perfection, the ever-growing garment of a transcendent God.
Continuity: The Presidential Address to the British Association (1913), 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Blind (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deity (22)  |  Detect (44)  |  Down (456)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Garment (13)  |  Genuine (52)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Growing (98)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loom (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reality (261)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Sense (770)  |  Special (184)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Universal (189)

Geology is intimately related to almost all the physical sciences, as is history to the moral. An historian should, if possible, be at once profoundly acquainted with ethics, politics, jurisprudence, the military art, theology; in a word, with all branches of knowledge, whereby any insight into human affairs, or into the moral and intellectual nature of man, can be obtained. It would be no less desirable that a geologist should be well versed in chemistry, natural philosophy, mineralogy, zoology, comparative anatomy, botany; in short, in every science relating to organic and inorganic nature. With these accomplishments the historian and geologist would rarely fail to draw correct and philosophical conclusions from the various monuments transmitted to them of former occurrences.
Principles of Geology (1830-3), Vol. 1, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Art (657)  |  Botany (57)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Draw (137)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Military (40)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Monument (45)  |  Moral (195)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Man (8)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organic (158)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Theology (52)  |  Various (200)  |  Word (619)  |  Zoology (36)

Groves hated the weather, and the weathermen; they represented chaos and the messengers of chaos. Weather violated boundaries, ignored walls and gates, failed to adhere to deadlines, disobeyed orders. Weather caused delays. The weather forecasters had opposed the [atomic bomb] test date for months—it was set within a window of unfavorable conditions: thunderstorms, rain, high winds, inversion layers. Groves had overridden them. … Groves saw it as a matter of insubordination when the weather forecasters refused to forecast good weather for the test.
In Atomic Spaces: Living on the Manhattan Project (1999), 312. For the attitude of Groves toward the weather see his, 'Some Recollections of July 16, 1945', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Jun 1970), 26, No. 6, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Condition (356)  |  Delay (20)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Gate (32)  |  Good (889)  |  Leslie Richard Groves (13)  |  High (362)  |  Layer (40)  |  Matter (798)  |  Month (88)  |  Order (632)  |  Rain (62)  |  Represent (155)  |  Saw (160)  |  Schedule (5)  |  Set (394)  |  Test (211)  |  Thunderstorm (5)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Wall (67)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)  |  Window (58)

Habit is a powerful means of advancement, and the habit of eternal vigilance and diligence, rarely fails to bring a substantial reward.
Quoted, without citation, in front matter to T. A. Edison Foundation, Lewis Howard Latimer: A Black Inventor: a Biography and Related Experiments You Can Do (1973). If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Habit (168)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Reward (68)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Vigilance (5)

Hardly a year passes that fails to find a new, oft-times exotic, research method or technique added to the armamentarium of political inquiry. Anyone who cannot negotiate Chi squares, assess randomization, statistical significance, and standard deviations
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Assess (4)  |  Chi (2)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Method (505)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  New (1216)  |  Pass (238)  |  Political (121)  |  Research (664)  |  Significance (113)  |  Square (70)  |  Standard Deviation (3)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Technique (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

Heraclitus son of Bloson (or, according to some, of Herakon) of Ephesus. This man was at his prime in the 69th Olympiad. He grew up to be exceptionally haughty and supercilious, as is clear also from his book, in which he says: “Learning of many things does not teach intelligence; if so it would have taught Hesiod and Pythagoras, and again Xenophanes and Hecataeus.” … Finally he became a misanthrope, withdrew from the world, and lived in the mountains feeding on grasses and plants. However, having fallen in this way into a dropsy he came down to town and asked the doctors in a riddle if they could make a drought out of rainy weather. When they did not understand he buried himself in a cow-stall, expecting that the dropsy would be evaporated off by the heat of the manure; but even so he failed to effect anything, and ended his life at the age of sixty.
Diogenes Laertius 9.1. In G. S. Kirk, E. Raven, and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Age (499)  |  Ask (411)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Cow (39)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Down (456)  |  Drought (13)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Heat (174)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misanthrope (2)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Plant (294)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Supercilious (2)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weather (44)  |  World (1774)

How do we discover the individual laws of Physics, and what is their nature? It should be remarked, to begin with, that we have no right to assume that any physical law exists, or if they have existed up to now, that they will continue to exist in a similar manner in the future. It is perfectly conceivable that one fine day Nature should cause an unexpected event to occur which would baffle us all; and if this were to happen we would be powerless to make any objection, even if the result would be that, in spite of our endeavors, we should fail to introduce order into the resulting confusion. In such an event, the only course open to science would be to declare itself bankrupt. For this reason, science is compelled to begin by the general assumption that a general rule of law dominates throughout Nature.
Max Planck, Walter Henry Johnston, The Universe in the Light of Modern Physics (1931), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Begin (260)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Declare (45)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Event (216)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Happen (274)  |  Individual (404)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Similar (36)  |  Spite (55)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Will (2355)

I am patriot enough to take pains to bring this usefull invention [smallpox inoculation] into fashion in England, and I should not fail to write to some of our Doctors very particularly about it, if I knew anyone of 'em that I thought had Virtue enough to destroy such a considerable branch of Revenue for the good of Mankind, but that Distemper is too beneficial to them not to expose to all their Resentment the hardy wight that should undertake to put an end to it.
Letter to Sarah Chiswell (1 Apr 1717). In Robert Halsband (ed.), The Complete Letters of the Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1965), Vol. 1, 339.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Branch (150)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Distemper (5)  |  Doctor (187)  |  End (590)  |  England (40)  |  Enough (340)  |  Expose (23)  |  Good (889)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Pain (136)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Resentment (6)  |  Revenue (3)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Thought (953)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Write (230)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Omit (11)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I do hate sums. There is no greater mistake than to call arithmetic an exact science. There are permutations and aberrations discernible to minds entirely noble like mine; subtle variations which ordinary accountants fail to discover; hidden laws of number which it requires a mind like mine to perceive. For instance, if you add a sum from the bottom up, and then from the top down, the result is always different. Again if you multiply a number by another number before you have had your tea, and then again after, the product will be different. It is also remarkable that the Post-tea product is more likely to agree with other people’s calculations than the Pre-tea result.
Letter to Mrs Arthur Severn (Jul 1878), collected in The Letters of a Noble Woman (Mrs. La Touche of Harristown) (1908), 50. Also in 'Gleanings Far and Near', Mathematical Gazette (May 1924), 12, 95.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aberration (8)  |  Accountant (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Call (769)  |  Different (577)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hide (69)  |  Law (894)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Noble (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Product (160)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tea (12)  |  Top (96)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)

I do not believe that a moral philosophy can ever be founded on a scientific basis. … The valuation of life and all its nobler expressions can only come out of the soul’s yearning toward its own destiny. Every attempt to reduce ethics to scientific formulas must fail. Of that I am perfectly convinced.
In 'Science and God: A Dialogue', Forum and Century (June 1930), 83, 374. Einstein’s dialogue was with James Murphy and J.W.N. Sullivan. Excerpted in David E. Rowe and Robert J. Schulmann, Einstein on Politics: His Private Thoughts and Public Stands on Nationalism, Zionism, War, Peace, and the Bomb (2007), 230. The book introduces this quote as Einstein’s reply when Murphy asked, in the authors’ words, “how far he thought modern science might be able to go toward establishing practical ideals of life on the ruins of religious ideals.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Basis (173)  |  Belief (578)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Expression (175)  |  Failure (161)  |  Formula (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nobler (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Soul (226)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Yearning (12)

I had … during many years, followed a golden rule, namely, that whenever a published fact, a new observation or thought came across me, which was opposed by my general results, to make a memorandum of it without fail and at once; for I had found by experience that such facts and thoughts were far more apt to escape from memory than favorable ones.
In The Autobiography of Charles Darwin with original omissions restored, edited by Nora Barlow (1958).
Science quotes on:  |  Escape (80)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Golden (45)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Year (933)

I have before mentioned mathematics, wherein algebra gives new helps and views to the understanding. If I propose these it is not to make every man a thorough mathematician or deep algebraist; but yet I think the study of them is of infinite use even to grown men; first by experimentally convincing them, that to make anyone reason well, it is not enough to have parts wherewith he is satisfied, and that serve him well enough in his ordinary course. A man in those studies will see, that however good he may think his understanding, yet in many things, and those very visible, it may fail him. This would take off that presumption that most men have of themselves in this part; and they would not be so apt to think their minds wanted no helps to enlarge them, that there could be nothing added to the acuteness and penetration of their understanding.
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Add (40)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apt (9)  |  Convince (41)  |  Course (409)  |  Deep (233)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experimental (192)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Help (105)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Part (222)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Propose (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

I have failed in finding parasites in mosquitoes fed on malaria patients, but perhaps I am not using the proper kind of mosquito.
Letter to his wife (14 Aug 1897). In Memoirs, With a Full Account of the Great Malaria Problem and its Solution (1923), 221.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Find (998)  |  Kind (557)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Patient (199)  |  Proper (144)  |  Using (6)

I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

I publish this Essay in its present imperfect state, in order to prevent the furacious attempts of the prowling plagiary, and the insidious pretender to chymistry, from arrogating to themselves, and assuming my invention, in plundering silence: for there are those, who, if they can not be chymical, never fail by stratagem, and mechanical means, to deprive industry of the fruits, and fame of her labours.
Preface to An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), vii-viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Essay (27)  |  Fame (50)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Industry (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Plagiarism (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Publication (101)  |  Silence (56)  |  State (491)  |  Themselves (433)

I read them. Not to grade them. No, I read them to see how I am doing. Where am I failing? What don’t they understand? Why do they give wrong answers? Why do they have some point of view that I don’t think is right? Where am I failing? Where do I need to build up.
In The Essential Deming.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Build (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Grade (11)  |  Monitor (7)  |  Need (290)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Read (287)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  View (488)  |  Why (491)  |  Wrong (234)

I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.
'Stephen Hawking: "There is no heaven; it's a fairy story"', interview in newspaper The Guardian (15 May 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  Brain (270)  |  Broken (56)  |  Component (48)  |  Computer (127)  |  Dark (140)  |  Down (456)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fairy Story (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  People (1005)  |  Regard (305)  |  Stop (80)  |  Story (118)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

I said that there is something every man can do, if he can only find out what that something is. Henry Ford has proved this. He has installed in his vast organization a system for taking hold of a man who fails in one department, and giving him a chance in some other department. Where necessary every effort is made to discover just what job the man is capable of filling. The result has been that very few men have had to be discharged, for it has been found that there was some kind of work each man could do at least moderately well. This wonderful system adopted by my friend Ford has helped many a man to find himself. It has put many a fellow on his feet. It has taken round pegs out of square holes and found a round hole for them. I understand that last year only 120 workers out of his force of 50,000 were discharged.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chance (239)  |  Department (92)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Henry Ford (21)  |  Friend (168)  |  Himself (461)  |  Job (82)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Result (677)  |  Something (719)  |  Square (70)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I shall conclude, for the time being, by saying that until Philosophers make observations (especially of mountains) that are longer, more attentive, orderly, and interconnected, and while they fail to recognize the two great agents, fire and water, in their distinct affects, they will not be able to understand the causes of the great natural variety in the disposition, structure, and other matter that can be observed in the terrestrial globe in a manner that truly corresponds to the facts and to the phenomena of Nature.
'Aleune Osservazioni Orittologiche fatte nei Monti del Vicentino', Giomale d’Italia, 1769, 5, 411, trans. Ezio Vaccari.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fire (189)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Structure (344)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Variety (132)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

I should rejoice to see mathematics taught with that life and animation which the presence and example of her young and buoyant sister [natural and experimental science] could not fail to impart, short roads preferred to long ones.
From Presidential Address (1869) to the British Association, Exeter, Section A, collected in Collected Mathematical Papers of Lames Joseph Sylvester (1908), Vol. 2, 657.
Science quotes on:  |  Animation (6)  |  Buoyant (5)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Impart (23)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Road (64)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Mathematics (10)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Sister (8)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Young (227)

I sought excitement and, taking chances, I was all ready to fail in order to achieve something large.
On the official Raymond Loewry website. Also quoted in part in Society of Industrial Artists and Designers, Designer (1980).
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Chance (239)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Failure (161)  |  Large (394)  |  Order (632)  |  Ready (39)  |  Risk (61)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Something (719)

I specifically paused to show that, if there were such machines with the organs and shape of a monkey or of some other non-rational animal, we would have no way of discovering that they are not the same as these animals. But if there were machines that resembled our bodies and if they imitated our actions as much as is morally possible, we would always have two very certain means for recognizing that, none the less, they are not genuinely human. The first is that they would never be able to use speech, or other signs composed by themselves, as we do to express our thoughts to others. For one could easily conceive of a machine that is made in such a way that it utters words, and even that it would utter some words in response to physical actions that cause a change in its organs—for example, if someone touched it in a particular place, it would ask what one wishes to say to it, or if it were touched somewhere else, it would cry out that it was being hurt, and so on. But it could not arrange words in different ways to reply to the meaning of everything that is said in its presence, as even the most unintelligent human beings can do. The second means is that, even if they did many things as well as or, possibly, better than anyone of us, they would infallibly fail in others. Thus one would discover that they did not act on the basis of knowledge, but merely as a result of the disposition of their organs. For whereas reason is a universal instrument that can be used in all kinds of situations, these organs need a specific disposition for every particular action.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 5, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Ask (411)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cry (29)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Response (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Situation (113)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speech (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

I tried and failed. I tried again and again and succeeded.
[Epitaph from Gail Borden's gravestone.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Epitaph (19)  |  Failure (161)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)

If a photographic plate under the center of a lens focused on the heavens is exposed for hours, it comes to reveal stars so far away that even the most powerful telescopes fail to reveal them to the naked eye. In a similar way, time and concentration allow the intellect to perceive a ray of light in the darkness of the most complex problem.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Complex (188)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Eye (419)  |  Far (154)  |  Focus (35)  |  Focused (2)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hour (186)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lens (14)  |  Light (607)  |  Most (1731)  |  Naked Eye (12)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Photographic (2)  |  Plate (6)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Problem (676)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

If a solution fails to appear … and yet we feel success is just around the corner, try resting for a while. … Like the early morning frost, this intellectual refreshment withers the parasitic and nasty vegetation that smothers the good seed. Bursting forth at last is the flower of truth.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Burst (39)  |  Corner (57)  |  Early (185)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flower (106)  |  Frost (14)  |  Good (889)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Last (426)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nasty (7)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Refreshment (3)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seed (93)  |  Solution (267)  |  Success (302)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Vegetation (23)

If it were possible to transfer the methods of physical or of biological science directly to the study of man, the transfer would long ago have been made ... We have failed not for lack of hypotheses which equate man with the rest of the universe, but for lack of a hypothesis (short of animism) which provides for the peculiar divergence of man ... Let me now state my belief that the peculiar factor in man which forbids our explaining his actions upon the ordinary plane of biology is a highly specialized and unstable biological complex, and that this factor is none other than language.
Linguistics as a Science (1930), 555.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Complex (188)  |  Divergence (6)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Lack (119)  |  Language (293)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Universe (857)

If one in twenty does not seem high enough odds, we may, if we prefer it, draw the line at one in fifty (the 2 per cent. point), or one in a hundred (the 1 per cent. point). Personally, the writer prefers to set a low standard of significance at the 5 per cent. point, and ignore entirely all results which fail to reach this level. A scientific fact should be regarded as experimentally established only if a properly designed experiment rarely fails to give this level of significance.
'The Arrangement of Field Experiments', The Journal of the Ministry of Agriculture, 1926, 33, 504.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Design (195)  |  Draw (137)  |  Enough (340)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Low (80)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  Significance (113)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Writer (86)

If the experiment works, you must be using the wrong experiment. An experiment has a tendency to fail
Anonymous
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Must (1526)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

If the world has begun with a single quantum, the notions of space and would altogether fail to have any meaning at the beginning; they would only begin to have a sensible meaning when the original quantum had been divided into a sufficient number of quanta. If this suggestion is correct, the beginning of the world happened a little before the beginning of space and time. I think that such a beginning of the world is far enough from the present order of Nature to be not at all repugnant. It may be difficult to follow up the idea in detail as we are not yet able to count the quantum packets in every case. For example, it may be that an atomic nucleus must be counted as a unique quantum, the atomic number acting as a kind of quantum number. If the future development of quantum theory happens to turn in that direction, we could conceive the beginning of the universe in the form of a unique atom, the atomic weight of which is the total mass of the universe. This highly unstable atom would divide in smaller and smaller atoms by a kind of super-radioactive process.
In 'The Beginning of the World from the Point of View of Quantum Theory', Nature (1931), 127, 706.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Count (105)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Enough (340)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Mass (157)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Number (2)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unique (67)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

In completing one discovery we never fail to get an imperfect knowledge of others.
Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air (1774), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)

In the realm of science all attempts to find any evidence of supernatural beings, of metaphysical conceptions, as God, immortality, infinity, etc., thus far have failed, and if we are honest we must confess that in science there exists no God, no immortality, no soul or mind as distinct from the body.
In 'Religion and Modern Science', The Christian Register (16 Nov 1922), 101, 1089. The article is introduced as “the substance of an address to the Laymen’s League in All Soul’s Church (5 Nov 1922).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confess (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exist (443)  |  Failed (3)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Honest (50)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Realm (85)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soul (226)  |  Supernatural (25)

In the school of political projectors, I was but ill entertained, the professors appearing, in my judgment, wholly out of their senses; which is a scene that never fails to make me melancholy. These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, and eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employment persons qualified to exercise them; with many other wild impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive, and confirmed in me the old observation, that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 6, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chimera (9)  |  Choose (112)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Employment (32)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extravagance (3)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Merit (50)  |  Minister (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Prince (13)  |  Professor (128)  |  Projector (3)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Scene (36)  |  Scheme (57)  |  School (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Service (110)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wisdom (221)

In this respect mathematics fails to reproduce with complete fidelity the obvious fact that experience is not composed of static bits, but is a string of activity, or the fact that the use of language is an activity, and the total meanings of terms are determined by the matrix in which they are embedded.
In The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Bit (22)  |  Complete (204)  |  Compose (17)  |  Determine (144)  |  Embed (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Static (8)  |  String (21)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Total (94)  |  Use (766)

It doesn't matter if you try and try and try again, and fail. It does matter if you try and fail, and fail to try again.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  Matter (798)  |  Try (283)

It has often been said that, to make discoveries, one must be ignorant. This opinion, mistaken in itself, nevertheless conceals a truth. It means that it is better to know nothing than to keep in mind fixed ideas based on theories whose confirmation we constantly seek, neglecting meanwhile everything that fails to agree with them.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Better (486)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everything (476)  |  Failing (5)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.
Speech, 'The Strenuous Life' (10 Apr 1899), as governor of New York, before the Hamilton Club, Chicago, Illinois. In The Works of Theodore Roosevelt (1926), Vol. 13, Chap.1, 320. Also excerpted in 'Practical Talks by Practical Men: The Strenuous Life', Illustrated World (1904), 2, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  Hard (243)  |  Never (1087)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Try (283)  |  Worse (24)

It is imperative in the design process to have a full and complete understanding of how failure is being obviated in order to achieve success. Without fully appreciating how close to failing a new design is, its own designer may not fully understand how and why a design works. A new design may prove to be successful because it has a sufficiently large factor of safety (which, of course, has often rightly been called a “factor of ignorance”), but a design's true factor of safety can never be known if the ultimate failure mode is unknown. Thus the design that succeeds (ie, does not fail) can actually provide less reliable information about how or how not to extrapolate from that design than one that fails. It is this observation that has long motivated reflective designers to study failures even more assiduously than successes.
In Design Paradigms: Case Histories of Error and Judgment in Engineering (1994), 31. books.google.comHenry Petroski - 1994
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Design (195)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Factor (46)  |  Failure (161)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Information (166)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Safety (54)  |  Study (653)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

It is not a disgrace to fail. Failing is one of the greatest arts in the world.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Failure (161)  |  Greatest (328)  |  World (1774)

It is now necessary to indicate more definitely the reason why mathematics not only carries conviction in itself, but also transmits conviction to the objects to which it is applied. The reason is found, first of all, in the perfect precision with which the elementary mathematical concepts are determined; in this respect each science must look to its own salvation .... But this is not all. As soon as human thought attempts long chains of conclusions, or difficult matters generally, there arises not only the danger of error but also the suspicion of error, because since all details cannot be surveyed with clearness at the same instant one must in the end be satisfied with a belief that nothing has been overlooked from the beginning. Every one knows how much this is the case even in arithmetic, the most elementary use of mathematics. No one would imagine that the higher parts of mathematics fare better in this respect; on the contrary, in more complicated conclusions the uncertainty and suspicion of hidden errors increases in rapid progression. How does mathematics manage to rid itself of this inconvenience which attaches to it in the highest degree? By making proofs more rigorous? By giving new rules according to which the old rules shall be applied? Not in the least. A very great uncertainty continues to attach to the result of each single computation. But there are checks. In the realm of mathematics each point may be reached by a hundred different ways; and if each of a hundred ways leads to the same point, one may be sure that the right point has been reached. A calculation without a check is as good as none. Just so it is with every isolated proof in any speculative science whatever; the proof may be ever so ingenious, and ever so perfectly true and correct, it will still fail to convince permanently. He will therefore be much deceived, who, in metaphysics, or in psychology which depends on metaphysics, hopes to see his greatest care in the precise determination of the concepts and in the logical conclusions rewarded by conviction, much less by success in transmitting conviction to others. Not only must the conclusions support each other, without coercion or suspicion of subreption, but in all matters originating in experience, or judging concerning experience, the results of speculation must be verified by experience, not only superficially, but in countless special cases.
In Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 105. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Care (186)  |  Carry (127)  |  Case (99)  |  Chain (50)  |  Check (24)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Coercion (3)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Computation (24)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Convince (41)  |  Correct (86)  |  Countless (36)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Detail (146)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fare (5)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (202)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Thought (7)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Less (103)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metaphysic (6)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Originate (36)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Reach (281)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Reward (68)  |  Rid (13)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Rule (294)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Single (353)  |  Soon (186)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Support (147)  |  Survey (33)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmit (11)  |  True (212)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Use (766)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

It is one of the signs of the times that modern chemists hold themselves bound and consider themselves in a position to give an explanation for everything, and when their knowledge fails them to make sure of supernatural explanations. Such a treatment of scientific subjects, not many degrees removed from a belief in witches and spirit-rapping, even Wislicenus considers permissible.
In H. Kolbe, 'Sign of the Times', Journal für Praktische Chemie (1877), 15, 473. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Consider (416)  |  Degree (276)  |  Everything (476)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Modern (385)  |  Permissible (8)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Johannes Wislicenus (4)  |  Witch (4)

It is strange, but the longer I live the more I am governed by the feeling of Fatalism, or rather predestination. The feeling or free-will, said to be innate in man, fails me more and more. I feel so deeply that however much I may struggle, I cannot change fate one jot. I am now almost resigned. I work because I feel I am at the worst. I can neither wish nor hope for anything. You have no idea how indifferent I am to everything.
In Letter to Anna Carlotta, collected in Anna Charlotte Leffler, Sonya Kovalevsky: A Biography (1895), 133, as translated by A. De Furuhjelm and A.M. Clive Bayley.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fatalism (2)  |  Fate (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Govern (64)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Innate (14)  |  Jot (3)  |  Live (628)  |  Longer (10)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Resign (4)  |  Strange (157)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worst (57)

It’s not the critic who counts; not the man which points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again … who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.
In Joseph A. Califano, Jr., Inside: A Public and Private Life (2005), 356.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Arena (4)  |  Belong (162)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cold (112)  |  Count (105)  |  Credit (20)  |  Critic (20)  |  Dare (50)  |  Daring (17)  |  Deed (34)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Dust (64)  |  End (590)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Face (212)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marred (3)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Short (197)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spend (95)  |  Strive (46)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Timidity (5)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Valiantly (2)  |  Victory (39)  |  Worst (57)

It’s pretty hard to tell what does bring happiness. Poverty and wealth have both failed.
Unverified. Need primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Both (493)  |  Bring (90)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hard (243)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Tell (340)  |  Wealth (94)

Let him look at that dazzling light hung aloft as an eternal lamp to lighten the universe; let him behold the earth, a mere dot compared with the vast circuit which that orb describes, and stand amazed to find that the vast circuit itself is but a very fine point compared with the orbit traced by the stars as they roll their course on high. But if our vision halts there, let imagination pass beyond; it will fail to form a conception long before Nature fails to supply material. The whole visible world is but an imperceptible speck in the ample bosom of Nature. No notion comes near it. Though we may extend our thought beyond imaginable space, yet compared with reality we bring to birth mere atoms. Nature is an infinite sphere whereof the centre is everywhere, the circumference nowhere. In short, imagination is brought to silence at the thought, and that is the most perceptible sign of the all-power of God.
Let man reawake and consider what he is compared with the reality of things; regard himself lost in this remote corner of Nature; and from the tiny cell where he lodges, to wit the Universe, weigh at their true worth earth, kingdoms, towns, himself. What is a man face to face with infinity?
Pensées (1670), Section 1, aphorism 43. In H. F. Stewart (ed.), Pascal’s Pensées (1950), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aloft (5)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Ample (4)  |  Atom (355)  |  Behold (18)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Cell (138)  |  Centre (28)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Circumference (23)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Corner (57)  |  Course (409)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Describe (128)  |  Dot (16)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extend (128)  |  Face (212)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Halt (9)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imperceptibility (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Light (607)  |  Lodge (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Orb (20)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Reality (261)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remote (83)  |  Roll (40)  |  Short (197)  |  Sign (58)  |  Silence (56)  |  Space (500)  |  Speck (23)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Town (27)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Visibility (6)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

Man masters nature not by force but by understanding. That is why science has succeeded where magic failed: because it has looked for no spell to cast on nature.
Lecture, 'The Creative Mind' (26 Feb 1953) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Printed in Science and Human Values (1959), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Cast (66)  |  Force (487)  |  Look (582)  |  Magic (86)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Philosophy Of Science (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

May every young scientist remember … and not fail to keep his eyes open for the possibility that an irritating failure of his apparatus to give consistent results may once or twice in a lifetime conceal an important discovery.
Commenting on the discovery of thoron gas because one of Rutherford’s students had found his measurements of the ionizing property of thorium were variable. His results even seemed to relate to whether the laboratory door was closed or open. After considering the problem, Rutherford realized a radioactive gas was emitted by thorium, which hovered close to the metal sample, adding to its radioactivity—unless it was dissipated by air drafts from an open door. (Thoron was later found to be argon.)
In Barbara Lovett Cline, Men Who Made a New Physics (1987), 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Argon (3)  |  Closed (38)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Door (93)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Failure (161)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hover (8)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Metal (84)  |  Open (274)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Problem (676)  |  Property (168)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Result (677)  |  Sample (19)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Thorium (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  Young (227)

Men of science, fit to teach, hardly exist. There is no demand for such men. The sciences make up life; they are important to life. The highly educated man fails to understand the simplest things of science, and has no peculiar aptitude for grasping them. I find the grown-up mind coming back to me with the same questions over and over again.
Giving Evidence (18 Nov 1862) to the Public Schools Commission. As quoted in John L. Lewis, 125 Years: The Physical Society & The Institute of Physics (1999), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Back (390)  |  Coming (114)  |  Demand (123)  |  Educated (12)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Important (209)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)

More and more of out colleagues fail to understand our work because of the high specialization of research problems. We must not be discouraged if the products of our labor are not read or even known to exist. The joy of research must be found in doing since every other harvest is uncertain.
Letter to Dr. E. B. Krumhaar (11 Oct 1933), in Journal of Bacteriology (Jan 1934), 27, No. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Colleague (50)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Failure (161)  |  Harvest (27)  |  High (362)  |  Joy (107)  |  Known (454)  |  Labor (107)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Product (160)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

My judgment is that research in 'Star Wars' is going to fail, and I believe this so strongly that I'm willing to stake my professional reputation on this. I don't believe anybody is going to build this thing.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Belief (578)  |  Build (204)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Research (664)  |  Star (427)  |  Star Wars (2)  |  Take (10)  |  Thing (1915)  |  War (225)  |  Willing (44)

Nature never “fails.” Nature complies with its own laws. Nature is the law. When Man lacks understanding of Nature’s laws and a Man-contrived structure buckles unexpectedly, it does not fail. It only demonstrates that Man did not understand Nature’s laws and behaviors. Nothing failed. Man’s knowledge or estimating was inadequate.
In "How Little I Know", in Saturday Review (12 Nov 1966), 152. Excerpted in Buckminster Fuller and Answar Dil, Humans in Universe (1983), 31.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Failure (161)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Structure (344)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unexpected (52)

Nature seems to take advantage of the simple mathematical representations of the symmetry laws. When one pauses to consider the elegance and the beautiful perfection of the mathematical reasoning involved and contrast it with the complex and far-reaching physical consequences, a deep sense of respect for the power of the symmetry laws never fails to develop.
Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1957). In Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1981-1990) (1998), 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Symmetry (43)

Neurosis has an abosolute genius for malingering. There is no illness which cannot counterfeit perfectly … If it is capable of deceiving the doctor, how should it fail to deceive the patient.
'Le Côté de Guermantes', À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27).
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (168)  |  Counterfeit (2)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Genius (284)  |  Illness (34)  |  Neurosis (9)  |  Patient (199)

Nothing, however, is more common than energy in money-making, quite independent of any higher object than its accumulation. A man who devotes himself to this pursuit, body and soul, can scarcely fail to become rich. Very little brains will do; spend less than you earn; add guinea to guinea; scrape and save; and the pile of gold will gradually rise.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1859, 1861), 301-302.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Become (815)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Common (436)  |  Devote (35)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earn (7)  |  Energy (344)  |  Gold (97)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Guinea (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Pile (12)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rich (62)  |  Rise (166)  |  Save (118)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spend (95)  |  Will (2355)

Now length of Fame (our second life) is lost,
And bare threescore is all ev’n that can boast;
Our sons their fathers’ failing language see.
In An Essay on Criticism (1749), 64. Note: first published anonymously in 1711 when Pope was 22 years old.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bare (33)  |  Boast (22)  |  Fame (50)  |  Father (110)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lost (34)  |  See (1081)  |  Son (24)

Obvious facts are apt to be over-rated. System-makers see the gravitation of history, and fail to observe its chemistry, of greater though less evident power.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Less (103)  |  Maker (34)  |  Observe (168)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Power (746)  |  Rat (37)  |  See (1081)  |  System (537)

Only the impossible is worth attempting. In everything else one is sure to fail.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Everything (476)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Worth (169)

Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Dare (50)  |  Greatly (12)

Our contemporary culture, primed by population growth and driven by technology, has created problems of environmental degradation that directly affect all of our senses: noise, odors and toxins which bring physical pain and suffering, and ugliness, barrenness, and homogeneity of experience which bring emotional and psychological suffering and emptiness. In short, we are jeopardizing our human qualities by pursuing technology as an end rather than a means. Too often we have failed to ask two necessary questions: First, what human purpose will a given technology or development serve? Second, what human and environmental effects will it have?
Report of the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution (7 Aug 1969). 'Environmental Quality: Summary and Discussion of Major Provisions', U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Legal Compilation, (Jan 1973), Water, Vol. 3, 1365. EPA website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Barrenness (2)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Culture (143)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Drive (55)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  End (590)  |  Environment (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Noise (37)  |  Odor (10)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physical (508)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Technology (257)  |  Toxin (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Ugliness (3)  |  Will (2355)

Owing to his lack of knowledge, the ordinary man cannot attempt to resolve conflicting theories of conflicting advice into a single organized structure. He is likely to assume the information available to him is on the order of what we might think of as a few pieces of an enormous jigsaw puzzle. If a given piece fails to fit, it is not because it is fraudulent; more likely the contradictions and inconsistencies within his information are due to his lack of understanding and to the fact that he possesses only a few pieces of the puzzle. Differing statements about the nature of things, differing medical philosophies, different diagnoses and treatments—all of these are to be collected eagerly and be made a part of the individual's collection of puzzle pieces. Ultimately, after many lifetimes, the pieces will fit together and the individual will attain clear and certain knowledge.
'Strategies of Resort to Curers in South India', contributed in Charles M. Leslie (ed.), Asian Medical Systems: A Comparative Study (1976), 185.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Availability (10)  |  Available (78)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Collection (64)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Due (141)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Few (13)  |  Fit (134)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Jigsaw (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Owing (39)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Piece (38)  |  Possession (65)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Single (353)  |  Statement (142)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

Persons possessing great intellect and a capacity for excelling in the creative arts and also in the sciences are generally likely to have heavier brains than the ordinary individual. Arguing from this we might expect to find a corresponding lightness in the brain of the criminal, but this is not always the case ... Many criminals show not a single anomaly in their physical or mental make-up, while many persons with marked evidences of morphological aberration have never exhibited the criminal tendency.
Every attempt to prove crime to be due to a constitution peculiar only to criminals has failed signally. It is because most criminals are drawn from the ranks of the low, the degraded, the outcast, that investigators were ever deceived into attempting to set up a 'type' of criminal. The social conditions which foster the great majority of crimes are more needful of study and improvement.
From study of known normal brains we have learned that there is a certain range of variation. No two brains are exactly alike, and the greatest source of error in the assertions of Benedict and Lombroso has been the finding of this or that variation in a criminal’s brains, and maintaining such to be characteristic of the 'criminal constitution,' unmindful of the fact that like variations of structure may and do exist in the brains of normal, moral persons.
Address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia (28 Dec 1904), as quoted in 'Americans of Future Will Have Best Brains', New York Times (29 Dec 1904), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aberration (8)  |  Alike (60)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Crime (38)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Foster (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Low (80)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prove (250)  |  Range (99)  |  Rank (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)

Physical science comes nearest to that complete system of exact knowledge which all sciences have before them as an ideal. Some fall far short of it. The physicist who inveighs against the lack of coherence and the indefiniteness of theological theories, will probably speak not much less harshly of the theories of biology and psychology. They also fail to come up to his standard of methodology. On the other side of him stands an even superior being—the pure mathematician—who has no high opinion of the methods of deduction used in physics, and does not hide his disapproval of the laxity of what is accepted as proof in physical science. And yet somehow knowledge grows in all these branches. Wherever a way opens we are impelled to seek by the only methods that can be devised for that particular opening, not over-rating the security of our finding, but conscious that in this activity of mind we are obeying the light that is in our nature.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 77-78.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Activity (210)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Complete (204)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Fall (230)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Method (505)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Open (274)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Proof (287)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Security (47)  |  Seek (213)  |  Short (197)  |  Side (233)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Superior (81)  |  System (537)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Will (2355)

Preferring a search for objective reality over revelation is another way of satisfying religious hunger. It is an endeavor almost as old as civilization and intertwined with traditional religion, but it follows a very different course—a stoic’s creed, an acquired taste, a guidebook to adventure plotted across rough terrain. It aims to save the spirit, not by surrender but by liberation of the human mind. Its central tenet, as Einstein knew, is the unification of knowledge. When we have unified enough certain knowledge, we will understand who we are and why we are here. If those committed to the quest fail, they will be forgiven. When lost, they will find another way.
In Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge (1998), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Aim (165)  |  Central (80)  |  Certain (550)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Creed (27)  |  Different (577)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Enough (340)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Objective (91)  |  Old (481)  |  Quest (39)  |  Reality (261)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Save (118)  |  Search (162)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Taste (90)  |  Terrain (5)  |  Understand (606)  |  Unification (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Progress is made by trial and failure; the failures are generally a hundred times more numerous than the successes; yet they are usually left unchronicled. The reason is that the investigator feels that even though he has failed in achieving an expected result, some other more fortunate experimenter may succeed, and it is unwise to discourage his attempts.
From 'Radium and its Products', Harper’s Magazine (Dec 1904), 110, No. 655, 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieving (3)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expected (5)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Failed (3)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Investigator (67)  |  More (2559)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Other (2236)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unwise (4)  |  Usually (176)

Reason has seldom failed us because it has seldom been tried.
In 'Philosophy, Religion, and So Forth', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (1989), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Reason (744)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Try (283)

Remember a networked learning machine’s most basic rule: strengthen the connections to those who succeed, weaken them to those who fail.
In 'The Conformity Police', Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century (2000), 83.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basic (138)  |  Connection (162)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Machine (257)  |  Most (1731)  |  Network (21)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rule (294)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Weaken (4)

Remember that [scientific thought] is the guide of action; that the truth which it arrives at is not that which we can ideally contemplate without error, but that which we may act upon without fear; and you cannot fail to see that scientific thought is not an accompaniment or condition of human progress, but human progress itself.
'Aims and Instruments of Scientific Thought,' a lecture delivered to the British Association on 19 Aug 1872. In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays, by the Late William Kingdon Clifford (1886), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Condition (356)  |  Error (321)  |  Fear (197)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remember (179)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  See (1081)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)

Science and technology were developing at a prodigious speed, and it seemed natural to assume that they would go on developing. This failed to happen, partly because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly regimented society.
In 1984 (1949), Book 2, Chapter 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Cause (541)  |  Depend (228)  |  Develop (268)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Habit (168)  |  Happen (274)  |  Impoverish (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Natural (796)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Progress (465)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Society (326)  |  Speed (65)  |  Survive (79)  |  Technical (43)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  War (225)

Science is a magnificent force, but it is not a teacher of morals. It can perfect machinery, but it adds no moral restraints to protect society from the misuse of the machine. It can also build gigantic intellectual ships, but it constructs no moral rudders for the control of storm tossed human vessel. It not only fails to supply the spiritual element needed but some of its unproven hypotheses rob the ship of its compass and thus endangers its cargo.
Proposed summation written for the Scopes Monkey Trial (1925), in Genevieve Forbes Herrick and John Origen Herrick ,The Life of William Jennings Bryan (1925), 405. This speech was prepared for delivery at the trial, but was never heard there, as both sides mutually agreed to forego arguments to the jury.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Compass (34)  |  Construct (124)  |  Control (167)  |  Danger (115)  |  Element (310)  |  Failure (161)  |  Force (487)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Misuse (13)  |  Moral (195)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Rudder (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Ship (62)  |  Society (326)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Storm (51)  |  Supply (93)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Toss (7)  |  Unproven (5)  |  Vessel (63)

Science is but a feeble means for motivating life. It enlightens men, but fails to arouse them to deeds of self-sacrifice and devotion. … It dispels ignorance, but it never launched a crusade. It gives aid in the struggle with the hard surroundings of life, but it does not inform us to what end we struggle, or whether the struggle is worth while. … Intelligence can do little more than direct.
As quoted by M.G. Mellon in his retiring Presidential Address to the Winter Meeting of the Indiana Academy of Science at the University of Notre Dame (30 Oct 1942), 'Science, Scientists, and Society', printed in Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science (1943), 52, 15. No source citation given.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Crusade (5)  |  Deed (34)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Directing (5)  |  Dispelling (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Failing (5)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Hard (243)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Inform (47)  |  Informing (5)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Sacrifice (5)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Worth (169)

Science is the golden road out of poverty and backwardness for emerging nations. The corollary, one that the United States sometimes fails to grasp, is that abandoning science is the road back into poverty and backwardness.
In 'With Science on Our Side', Washington Post (9 Jan 1994).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Back (390)  |  Corollary (5)  |  Emerging (2)  |  Golden (45)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Nation (193)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  United States (31)

Skepticism and debate are always welcome and are critically important to the advancement of science, [but] skepticism that fails to account for evidence is no virtue.
Letter (21 Jun 2017) to climate change skeptic, U.S. Energy Secretary, Rick Perry. As quoted in Dino Grandoni, 'The Energy 202: Trump takes on Wind Energy, Talks Solar-Powered Border Wall in Iowa Speech', Washington Post (22 Jun 2017).
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Critical (66)  |  Debate (38)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Importance (286)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Welcome (16)

So far as modern science is concerned, we have to abandon completely the idea that by going into the realm of the small we shall reach the ultimate foundations of the universe. I believe we can abandon this idea without any regret. The universe is infinite in all directions, not only above us in the large but also below us in the small. If we start from our human scale of existence and explore the content of the universe further and further, we finally arrive, both in the large and in the small, at misty distances where first our senses and then even our concepts fail us.
To the German Society of Scientists and Physicists, Braunschweig, Germany (Sep 1896). As quoted in Anton Z. Capri, Quips, Quotes, and Quanta: An Anecdotal History of Physics (2011), 20. Wiechert was reporting his measurement of the mass of the moving particles in a cathode ray beam (electrons).
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Below (24)  |  Both (493)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concern (228)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exploration (134)  |  First (1283)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Large (394)  |  Misty (6)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Reach (281)  |  Realm (85)  |  Regret (30)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Start (221)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)

Some filosifers think that a fakkilty’s granted
The minnit it’s felt to be thoroughly wanted.…
That the fears of a monkey whose holt chanced to fail
Drawed the vertibry out to a prehensile tail.
Satire, from 'Biglow Papers', as quoted in Horatio Hackett Newman (ed.), Readings in Evolution, Genetics, and Eugenics (1921), 330.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Draw (137)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  Grant (73)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Tail (18)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Want (497)

Sometimes my courage fails me and I think I ought to stop working, live in the country and devote myself to gardening. But I am held by a thousand bonds, and I don't know when I shall be able to arrange things otherwise. Nor do I know whether, even by writing scientific books, I could live without the laboratory.
Letter to her sister Bronya, September 1927. In Eve Curie, Madame Curie (1938), 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrange (30)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Bond (45)  |  Book (392)  |  Country (251)  |  Courage (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Live (628)  |  Myself (212)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Writing (189)

Stem cells are probably going to be extremely useful. But it isn’t a given, and even if it were, I don’t think the end justifies the means. I am not against stem cells, I think it’s great. Blanket objection is not very reasonable to me—any effort to control scientific advances is doomed to fail. You cannot stop the human mind from working.
From Cornelia Dean, 'A Conversation with Joseph E. Murray', New York Times (25 Sep 2001), F5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Control (167)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Justification (48)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Objection (32)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)  |  Stop (80)  |  Think (1086)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Working (20)

Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.
As quoted in Carla Lind, Wright Style (1992), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Close (69)  |  Love (309)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Study (653)  |  Will (2355)

That radioactive elements created by us are found in nature is an astounding event in the history of the earth. And of the Human race. To fail to consider its importance and its consequences would be a folly for which humanity would have to pay a terrible price. When public opinion has been created in the countries concerned and among all the nations, an opinion informed of the dangers involved in going on with the tests and led by the reason which this information imposes, then the statesmen may reach an agreement to stop the experiments.
In 'Excerpts from Message by Schweitzer', New York Times (24 Apr 1957), 4, translated from a letter issued by Schweitzer through the Nobel Committee, asking that public opinion demand an end to nuclear tests.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Danger (115)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Folly (43)  |  History (673)  |  History Of The Earth (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inform (47)  |  Information (166)  |  Involved (90)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Price (51)  |  Public Opinion (2)  |  Race (268)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Stop (80)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Test (211)

The air of caricature never fails to show itself in the products of reason applied relentlessly and without correction. The observation of clinical facts would seem to be a pursuit of the physician as harmless as it is indispensable. [But] it seemed irresistibly rational to certain minds that diseases should be as fully classifiable as are beetles and butterflies. This doctrine … bore perhaps its richest fruit in the hands of Boissier de Sauvauges. In his Nosologia Methodica published in 1768 … this Linnaeus of the bedside grouped diseases into ten classes, 295 genera, and 2400 species.
In 'General Ideas in Medicine', The Lloyd Roberts lecture at House of the Royal Society of Medicine (30 Sep 1935), British Medical Journal (5 Oct 1935), 2, 609. In The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Correction (40)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Genus (25)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physician (273)  |  Product (160)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Richness (14)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)

The Astronomer’s Drinking Song
Astronomers! What can avail
Those who calumniate us;
Experiment can never fail
With such an apparatus…
A Budget of Paradoxes
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poem (96)  |  Song (37)

The Christian church, in its attitude toward science, shows the mind of a more or less enlightened man of the Thirteenth Century. It no longer believes that the earth is flat, but it is still convinced that prayer can cure after medicine fails.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Century (310)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cure (122)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Flat (33)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Still (613)  |  Thirteenth (2)  |  Toward (45)

The dispute between evolutionists and creation scientists offers textbook writers and teachers a wonderful opportunity to provide students with insights into the philosophy and methods of science. … What students really need to know is … how scientists judge the merit of a theory. Suppose students were taught the criteria of scientific theory evaluation and then were asked to apply these criteria … to the two theories in question. Wouldn’t such a task qualify as authentic science education? … I suspect that when these two theories are put side by side, and students are given the freedom to judge their merit as science, creation theory will fail ignominiously (although natural selection is far from faultless). … It is not only bad science to allow disputes over theory to go unexamined, but also bad education.
In Building a Bridge to the 18th Century: How the Past Can Improve Our Future (1999), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Apply (160)  |  Ask (411)  |  Authentic (8)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bad Science (5)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Education (378)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fault (54)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Insight (102)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Merit (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Selection (128)  |  Side (233)  |  Student (300)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Task (147)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Writer (86)

The Earth Speaks, clearly, distinctly, and, in many of the realms of Nature, loudly, to William Jennings Bryan, but he fails to hear a single sound. The earth speaks from the remotest periods in its wonderful life history in the Archaeozoic Age, when it reveals only a few tissues of its primitive plants. Fifty million years ago it begins to speak as “the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creatures that hath life.” In successive eons of time the various kinds of animals leave their remains in the rocks which compose the deeper layers of the earth, and when the rocks are laid bare by wind, frost, and storm we find wondrous lines of ascent invariably following the principles of creative evolution, whereby the simpler and more lowly forms always precede the higher and more specialized forms.
The earth speaks not of a succession of distinct creations but of a continuous ascent, in which, as the millions of years roll by, increasing perfection of structure and beauty of form are found; out of the water-breathing fish arises the air-breathing amphibian; out of the land-living amphibian arises the land-living, air-breathing reptile, these two kinds of creeping things resembling each other closely. The earth speaks loudly and clearly of the ascent of the bird from one kind of reptile and of the mammal from another kind of reptile.
This is not perhaps the way Bryan would have made the animals, but this is the way God made them!
The Earth Speaks to Bryan (1925), 5-6. Osborn wrote this book in response to the Scopes Monkey Trial, where William Jennings Bryan spoke against the theory of evolution. They had previously been engaged in the controversy about the theory for several years. The title refers to a Biblical verse from the Book of Job (12:8), “Speak to the earth and it shall teach thee.”
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Air (347)  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breath (59)  |  Breathing (23)  |  William Jennings Bryan (20)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creature (233)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eon (11)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fish (120)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Frost (14)  |  God (757)  |  Hear (139)  |  History (673)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Kind (557)  |  Land (115)  |  Layer (40)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Period (198)  |  Plant (294)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Realm (85)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remains (9)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Single (353)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Storm (51)  |  Structure (344)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Year (933)

The enthusiasm of Sylvester for his own work, which manifests itself here as always, indicates one of his characteristic qualities: a high degree of subjectivity in his productions and publications. Sylvester was so fully possessed by the matter which for the time being engaged his attention, that it appeared to him and was designated by him as the summit of all that is important, remarkable and full of future promise. It would excite his phantasy and power of imagination in even a greater measure than his power of reflection, so much so that he could never marshal the ability to master his subject-matter, much less to present it in an orderly manner.
Considering that he was also somewhat of a poet, it will be easier to overlook the poetic flights which pervade his writing, often bombastic, sometimes furnishing apt illustrations; more damaging is the complete lack of form and orderliness of his publications and their sketchlike character, … which must be accredited at least as much to lack of objectivity as to a superfluity of ideas. Again, the text is permeated with associated emotional expressions, bizarre utterances and paradoxes and is everywhere accompanied by notes, which constitute an essential part of Sylvester’s method of presentation, embodying relations, whether proximate or remote, which momentarily suggested themselves. These notes, full of inspiration and occasional flashes of genius, are the more stimulating owing to their incompleteness. But none of his works manifest a desire to penetrate the subject from all sides and to allow it to mature; each mere surmise, conceptions which arose during publication, immature thoughts and even errors were ushered into publicity at the moment of their inception, with utmost carelessness, and always with complete unfamiliarity of the literature of the subject. Nowhere is there the least trace of self-criticism. No one can be expected to read the treatises entire, for in the form in which they are available they fail to give a clear view of the matter under contemplation.
Sylvester’s was not a harmoniously gifted or well-balanced mind, but rather an instinctively active and creative mind, free from egotism. His reasoning moved in generalizations, was frequently influenced by analysis and at times was guided even by mystical numerical relations. His reasoning consists less frequently of pure intelligible conclusions than of inductions, or rather conjectures incited by individual observations and verifications. In this he was guided by an algebraic sense, developed through long occupation with processes of forms, and this led him luckily to general fundamental truths which in some instances remain veiled. His lack of system is here offset by the advantage of freedom from purely mechanical logical activity.
The exponents of his essential characteristics are an intuitive talent and a faculty of invention to which we owe a series of ideas of lasting value and bearing the germs of fruitful methods. To no one more fittingly than to Sylvester can be applied one of the mottos of the Philosophic Magazine:
“Admiratio generat quaestionem, quaestio investigationem investigatio inventionem.”
In Mathematische Annalen (1898), 50, 155-160. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 176-178.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Applied (177)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creative (137)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Develop (268)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Error (321)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Genius (284)  |  Germ (53)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inception (3)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lack (119)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mature (16)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasional (22)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Owe (71)  |  Owing (39)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Production (183)  |  Promise (67)  |  Proximate (4)  |  Publication (101)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Read (287)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  Summit (25)  |  Surmise (7)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Value (365)  |  Veil (26)  |  Verification (31)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

The fact remains that, if the supply of energy failed, modern civilization would come to an end as abruptly as does the music of an organ deprived of wind.
Matter and Energy (1911), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Energy Conservation (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Future (429)  |  Modern (385)  |  Music (129)  |  Organ (115)  |  Problem (676)  |  Remain (349)  |  Supply (93)  |  Wind (128)

The great enemy of communication, we find, is the illusion of it. We have talked enough; but we have not listened. And by not listening we have failed to concede the immense complexity of our society–and thus the great gaps between ourselves and those with whom we seek understanding.
In magazine article, 'Is Anybody Listening?', Fortune magazine (Sep 1950), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Communication (94)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Gap (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Immense (86)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Seek (213)  |  Society (326)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Talk (100)  |  Understanding (513)

The greatest spiritual revolutionary Western history, Saint Francis, proposed what he thought was an alternative Christian view of nature and man’s relation to it: he tried to substitute the idea of the equality of creatures, including man, for the idea of man’s limitless rule of creation. He failed. Both our present science and our present technology are so tinctured with orthodox Christian arrogance toward nature that no solution for our ecologic crisis can be expected from them alone. Since the roots of our trouble are so largely religious, the remedy must also be essentially religious, whether we call it that or not. We must rethink and refeel our nature and destiny. The profoundly religious, but heretical, sense of the primitive Franciscans for the spiritual autonomy of all parts of nature may point a direction. I propose Francis as a patron saint for ecologists.
In The Historical Roots of our Ecologic Crisis (1967), 1207.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Autonomy (6)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Christian (43)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Direction (175)  |  Ecologist (9)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Equality (31)  |  Expect (200)  |  Greatest (328)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Relation (157)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Root (120)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saint (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sense (770)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  View (488)  |  Western (45)

The hypothetical character of continual creation has been pointed out, but why is it more of a hypothesis to say that creation is taking place now than that it took place in the past? On the contrary, the hypothesis of continual creation is more fertile in that it answers more questions and yields more results, and results that are, at least in principle, observable. To push the entire question of creation into the past is to restrict science to a discussion of what happened after creation while forbidding it to examine creation itself. This is a counsel of despair to be taken only if everything else fails.
From Cosmology (), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Character (243)  |  Continual (43)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Creation (327)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Everything (476)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Why (491)  |  Yield (81)

The increasing technicality of the terminology employed is also a serious difficulty. It has become necessary to learn an extensive vocabulary before a book in even a limited department of science can be consulted with much profit. This change, of course, has its advantages for the initiated, in securing precision and concisement of statement; but it tends to narrow the field in which an investigator can labour, and it cannot fail to become, in the future, a serious impediment to wide inductive generalisations.
Year Book of Science (1892), preface, from review in Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (14 Apr 1892), 65, 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Conciseness (3)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Employ (113)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Failure (161)  |  Field (364)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Precision (68)  |  Profit (52)  |  Science (3879)  |  Serious (91)  |  Statement (142)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Wide (96)

The investigation of the truth is in one way hard, in another easy. An indication of this is found in the fact that no one is able to attain the truth adequately, while, on the other hand, no one fails entirely, but every one says something true about the nature of things, and while individually they contribute little or nothing to the truth, by the union of all a considerable amount is amassed. Therefore, since the truth seems to be like the proverbial door, which no one can fail to hit, in this way it is easy, but the fact that we can have a whole truth and not the particular part we aim at shows the difficulty of it. Perhaps, as difficulties are of two kinds, the cause of the present difficulty is not in the facts but in us.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 993a, 30-993b, 9. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1569-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Amass (6)  |  Amount (151)  |  Attain (125)  |  Cause (541)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Door (93)  |  Easy (204)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hard (243)  |  Indication (33)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Proverbial (8)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Union (51)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

The lives of scientists, considered as Lives, almost always make dull reading. For one thing, the careers of the famous and the merely ordinary fall into much the same pattern, give or take an honorary degree or two, or (in European countries) an honorific order. It could be hardly otherwise. Academics can only seldom lead lives that are spacious or exciting in a worldly sense. They need laboratories or libraries and the company of other academics. Their work is in no way made deeper or more cogent by privation, distress or worldly buffetings. Their private lives may be unhappy, strangely mixed up or comic, but not in ways that tell us anything special about the nature or direction of their work. Academics lie outside the devastation area of the literary convention according to which the lives of artists and men of letters are intrinsically interesting, a source of cultural insight in themselves. If a scientist were to cut his ear off, no one would take it as evidence of a heightened sensibility; if a historian were to fail (as Ruskin did) to consummate his marriage, we should not suppose that our understanding of historical scholarship had somehow been enriched.
'J.B.S: A Johnsonian Scientist', New York Review of Books (10 Oct 1968), reprinted in Pluto's Republic (1982), and inThe Strange Case of the Spotted Mice and Other Classic Essays on Science (1996), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  According (237)  |  Artist (90)  |  Career (75)  |  Cogent (6)  |  Comic (4)  |  Company (59)  |  Consider (416)  |  Convention (14)  |  Culture (143)  |  Cut (114)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devastation (6)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distress (9)  |  Dull (54)  |  Ear (68)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Enrichment (7)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fame (50)  |  Historian (54)  |  Historical (70)  |  Insight (102)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  Letter (109)  |  Library (48)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literary (13)  |  Live (628)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Privacy (7)  |  Privation (5)  |  Reading (133)  |  John Ruskin (25)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensibility (4)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Special (184)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

The man or corporation who has not determined at the outset to do good to others while doing good to himself will fail in the end.
As quoted in Edward J. Wheeler (ed.), 'The Demeanor of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Under Fire,' Current Opinion (Jul 1914), 57, No. 1, 21. This quote was one out of a collation in the article, “from his many talks to the Bible Class he formerly conducted and from various interviews.”
Science quotes on:  |  Corporation (6)  |  Determine (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outset (7)  |  Will (2355)

The mathematician of to-day admits that he can neither square the circle, duplicate the cube or trisect the angle. May not our mechanicians, in like manner, be ultimately forced to admit that aerial flight is one of that great class of problems with which men can never cope… I do not claim that this is a necessary conclusion from any past experience. But I do think that success must await progress of a different kind from that of invention.
[Written following Samuel Pierpoint Langley's failed attempt to launch his flying machine from a catapult device mounted on a barge in Oct 1903. The Wright Brother's success came on 17 Dec 1903.]
'The Outlook for the Flying Machine'. The Independent: A Weekly Magazine (22 Oct 1903), 2509.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aerial (10)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Brother (43)  |  Circle (110)  |  Claim (146)  |  Class (164)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Cube (13)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duplicate (8)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Experience (467)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kind (557)  |  Launch (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Past (337)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Square (70)  |  Success (302)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimately (55)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not; he must take care not to be the slave of his symbols, but always to have before his mind the realities which they merely serve to express. For these and other reasons it seems to me of the highest importance that a mathematician should be trained in no narrow school; a wide course of reading in the first few years of his mathematical study cannot fail to influence for good the character of the whole of his subsequent work.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (186)  |  Character (243)  |  Course (409)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Effort (227)  |  Express (186)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Require (219)  |  School (219)  |  Seem (145)  |  Serve (59)  |  Slave (37)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (90)  |  Train (114)  |  Trust (66)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (933)

The next decade will perhaps raise us a step above despair to a cleaner, clearer wisdom and biology cannot fail to help in this. As we become increasingly aware of the ethical problems raised by science and technology, the frontiers between the biological and social sciences are clearly of critical importance—in population density and problems of hunger, psychological stress, pollution of the air and water and exhaustion of irreplaceable resources.
As quoted in 'H. Bentley Glass', New York Times (12 Jan 1970), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cleaner (2)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Critical (66)  |  Decade (59)  |  Density (25)  |  Despair (40)  |  Environment (216)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Help (105)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Importance (286)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Next (236)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Population (110)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Step (231)  |  Stress (22)  |  Technology (257)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Pollution (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

The only time you mustn't fail is the last time you try.
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  Last (426)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)

The power of man to do work—one man-power—is, in its purely physical sense, now an insignificant accomplishment, and could only again justify his existence if other sources of power failed. … Curious persons in cloisteral seclusion are experimenting with new sources of energy, which, if ever harnessed, would make coal and oil as useless as oars and sails. If they fail in their quest, or are too late, so that coal and oil, everywhere sought for, are no longer found, and the only hope of men lay in their time-honoured traps to catch the sunlight, who doubts that galley-slaves and helots would reappear in the world once more?
Science and Life (1920), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Coal (57)  |  Curious (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Existence (456)  |  Harness (23)  |  Honour (56)  |  Hope (299)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Late (118)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Oil (59)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Purely (109)  |  Quest (39)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Slave (37)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determined (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gland (14)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Major (84)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Proper (144)  |  Removal (11)  |  Remove (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Survival (94)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Tract (5)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)

The university imparts information, but it imparts it imaginatively. At least, this is the function which it should perform for society. A university which fails in this respect has no reason for existence. This atmosphere of excitement, arising from imaginative consideration, transforms knowledge. A fact is no longer a bare fact: it is invested with all its possibilities. It is no longer a bur. den on the memory: it is energising as the poet of our dreams, and as the architect of our purposes.
In 'Universities and Their Function', The Aims of Education: & Other Essays (1917), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Arising (22)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bare (33)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dream (208)  |  Education (378)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Function (228)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impart (23)  |  Information (166)  |  Invest (18)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Memory (134)  |  Perform (121)  |  Poet (83)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Respect (207)  |  Society (326)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  University (121)

The university’s business is the conservation of useless knowledge; and what the university itself apparently fails to see is that this enterprise is not only noble but indispensable as well, that society can not exist unless it goes on.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Business (149)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exist (443)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Noble (90)  |  See (1081)  |  Society (326)  |  University (121)  |  Useless (33)

The way you learn anything is that something fails, and you figure out how not to have it fail again.
From Interview (1 Sep 2009), for the NASA Glenn History Collection, Oral History Collection, Cleveland, Ohio. As quoted an cited in Robert S. Arrighi, Pursuit of Power: NASA’s Propulsion and Systems Laboratory No. 1 and 2 (2012), 82. This quote is widely seen on the web, often incorrectly attributed to Arrighi, who was only the author of the book in which the quote by Kobak was given.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineering (175)  |  Failure (161)  |  Figure (160)  |  Figure Out (6)  |  Learn (629)  |  Something (719)  |  Way (1217)

There are many points in the history of an invention which the inventor himself is apt to overlook as trifling, but in which posterity never fail to take a deep interest. The progress of the human mind is never traced with such a lively interest as through the steps by which it perfects a great invention; and there is certainly no invention respecting which this minute information will be more eagerly sought after, than in the case of the steam-engine.
Quoted in The Origin and Progress of the Mechanical Inventions of James Watt (1854), Vol.1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Deep (233)  |  Engine (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Information (166)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Lively (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Progress (465)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)

There are other sources of psychological knowledge, which become accessible at the very point where the experimental method fails us.
Principles of Physiological Psychology (1904)
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Become (815)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Sea. It is the Gulf Stream.
Opening paragraph of The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (31)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Failure (161)  |  Flood (50)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Overflow (9)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stream (81)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Seas. It is the Gulf Stream. There is in the world no other such majestic flow of waters. Its current is more rapid than the Mississippi or the Amazon.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (31)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Cold (112)  |  Current (118)  |  Drought (13)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (5)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Mississippi (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Rapid (33)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Severe (16)  |  Stream (81)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Through it [Science] we believe that man will be saved from misery and degradation, not merely acquiring new material powers, but learning to use and to guide his life with understanding. Through Science he will be freed from the fetters of superstition; through faith in Science he will acquire a new and enduring delight in the exercise of his capacities; he will gain a zest and interest in life such as the present phase of culture fails to supply.
'Biology and the State', The Advancement of Science: Occasional Essays & Addresses (1890), 108-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Culture (143)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Delight (108)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Gain (145)  |  Guide (97)  |  Interest (386)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Misery (30)  |  New (1216)  |  Phase (36)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Science (3879)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Supply (93)  |  Through (849)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

To find the cause of our ills in something outside ourselves, something specific that can be spotted and eliminated, is a diagnosis that cannot fail to appeal. To say that the cause of our troubles is not in us but in the Jews, and pass immediately to the extermination of the Jews, is a prescription likely to find a wide acceptance.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Cause (541)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Extermination (14)  |  Find (998)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Jew (9)  |  Likely (34)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pass (238)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Specific (95)  |  Spot (17)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Wide (96)

To her friends said the Bright one in chatter,
“I have learned something new about matter:
My speed was so great,
Much increased was my weight,
Yet I failed to become any fatter!”
Collected in Baring-Gould, The Lure of the Limerick: An Uninhibited History (1967), 6. As cited in John de Pillis, 777 Mathematical Conversation Starters, 277.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Bright (79)  |  Chatter (3)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Limerick (3)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Something (719)  |  Speed (65)  |  Weight (134)

To introduce something altogether new would mean to begin all over, to become ignorant again, and to run the old, old risk of failing to learn.
Isaac Asimov, Patricia S. Warrick, Martin Harry Greenberg, Machines That Think: The Best Science Fiction Stories About Robots and Computers? (1984), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mean (809)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Risk (61)  |  Run (174)  |  Something (719)

To use a Southern euphemism, our space program has been snake-bit.
Comment on the failed launch of an unmanned rocket, only a short time after the explosion of Space Shuttle Challenger.
Al Gore
ABC television interview, Nightline (5 May 1986). In James B. Simpson, Simpson’s Contemporary Quotations (1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Disaster (51)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Launch (20)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Short (197)  |  Snake (26)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)

To use: Apply shampoo to wet hair. Massage to lather, then rinse. Repeat.
A typical hair-washing algorithm that fails to halt—in the way that computer programmers must avoid an infinite loop.
Anonymous
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature: Computer Explorations of Fractals, Chaos, Complex Systems, and Adaptation (2000), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Algorithm (5)  |  Apply (160)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Computer (127)  |  Halt (9)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Loop (6)  |  Must (1526)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

True religion is rational: if it excludes reason, it is self-condemned. And reason without religion fails of its object; since, if philosophy can find no place for religion, it can not explain man.
'An Essay On The Christian Doctrine of God', Lux Mundi: A Series of Studies in the Religion of the Incarnation (1890), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Condemn (44)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Man (2251)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Self (267)

We know that nature invariably uses the same materials in its operations. Its ingeniousness is displayed only in the variation of form. Indeed, as if nature had voluntarily confined itself to using only a few basic units, we observe that it generally causes the same elements to reappear, in the same number, in the same circumstances, and in the same relationships to one another. If an organ happens to grow in an unusual manner, it exerts a considerable influence on adjacent parts, which as a result fail to reach their standard degree of development.
'Considérations sur les pieces de la tête osseuse des animaux vertebras, et particulièrement sur celle du crane des oiseaux', Annales du Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, 1807, 10, 343. Trans. J. Mandelbaum. Quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck (1988), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Degree (276)  |  Development (422)  |  Display (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exert (39)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Influence (222)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Reach (281)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Use (766)  |  Variation (90)

We may affirm of Mr. Buffon, that which has been said of the chemists of old; though he may have failed in attaining his principal aim, of establishing a theory, yet he has brought together such a multitude of facts relative to the history of the earth, and the nature of its fossil productions, that curiosity finds ample compensation, even while it feels the want of conviction.
In History of the Earth and Animated Nature (1774, 1847), Vol. 1, 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Comte Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon (35)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fossil (136)  |  History (673)  |  History Of The Earth (3)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Principal (63)  |  Production (183)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Want (497)

We might expect that as we come close upon living nature the characters of our old records would grow legible and clear; but just when we begin to enter on the history of the physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us: a leaf has been torn out from Nature’s book, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes. [On gaps in the Pleistocene fossil record.]
As quoted by Hugh Miller in Lecture First, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bear (159)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fossil Record (10)  |  Gap (33)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Legibility (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Pleistocene (3)  |  Record (154)  |  Succession (77)  |  Torn (17)

We need to teach the highly educated man that it is not a disgrace to fail and that he must analyze every failure to find its cause. He must learn how to fail intelligently, for failing is one of the greatest arts in the world.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Cause (541)  |  Disgrace (12)  |  Education (378)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Teach (277)  |  World (1774)

We reverence ancient Greece as the cradle of western science. Here for the first time the world witnessed the miracle of a logical system which proceeded from step to step with such precision that every single one of its propositions was absolutely indubitable—I refer to Euclid’s geometry. This admirable triumph of reasoning gave the human intellect the necessary confidence in itself for its subsequent achievements. If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker.
From 'On the Method of Theoretical Physics', in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Born (33)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Failed (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greece (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Indubitable (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Logic (287)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Precision (68)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Step (231)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  System (537)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Western (45)  |  Witness (54)  |  World (1774)  |  Youthful (2)

We try never to forget that medicine is for the people. It is not for the profits. The profits follow, and if we have remembered that, they have never failed to appear. The better we have remembered it, the larger they have been.
Address to the Medical College of Virginia, Richmond (1 Dec 1950). Quoted in James C. Collins and Jerry I. Porras, Built to Last (1994, 1997), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forget (115)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Profit (52)  |  Remember (179)  |  Try (283)

What distinguishes the straight line and circle more than anything else, and properly separates them for the purpose of elementary geometry? Their self-similarity. Every inch of a straight line coincides with every other inch, and of a circle with every other of the same circle. Where, then, did Euclid fail? In not introducing the third curve, which has the same property—the screw. The right line, the circle, the screw—the representations of translation, rotation, and the two combined—ought to have been the instruments of geometry. With a screw we should never have heard of the impossibility of trisecting an angle, squaring the circle, etc.
From Letter (15 Feb 1852) to W.R. Hamilton, collected in Robert Perceval Graves, Life of W.R. Hamilton (1889), Vol. 3, 343.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Circle (110)  |  Coincide (5)  |  Combine (57)  |  Curve (49)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Line (91)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Representation (53)  |  Right (452)  |  Rotation (12)  |  Screw (17)  |  Self (267)  |  Separate (143)  |  Similar (36)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Square (70)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Translation (21)  |  Two (937)

What is it to see, in an Eagle glide
Which fills a human heart with so much pride?
Is it that it soars effortless above the Earth
That steals us from our own limits & dearth?
Trapped in our seas of befuddling sludge
We try and try but cannot budge.
And then to see a mortal; with such ease take wing
Up in a breeze that makes our failing spirits sing?
Do we, vicarious birds, search in it our childishness -
When we too were young & yearned in heart to fly?
Taking flights of fancy through adolescent nights
Listening little, heeding less, knowing not why?
From its highest perch in the forest of snow
Majestic - the Eagle soars alone.
Riding thermals, lording clouds
Till dropping silent from the sky as a stone
But we, so quick and ready to fold
Give up our wings at the whiff of age
Losing years, cursing time, wasting spirit
Living out entire lives in futile rage!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adolescent (4)  |  Age (499)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bird (149)  |  Breeze (6)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Curse (17)  |  Dearth (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropping (8)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effortless (3)  |  Entire (47)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fill (61)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fold (8)  |  Forest (150)  |  Futile (11)  |  Give Up (7)  |  Glide (4)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heed (12)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lord (93)  |  Lose (159)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Night (120)  |  Perch (7)  |  Pride (78)  |  Quick (13)  |  Rage (9)  |  Ready (39)  |  Ride (21)  |  Sea (308)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Silent (29)  |  Sing (26)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sludge (3)  |  Snow (37)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Steal (13)  |  Stone (162)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trap (6)  |  Try (283)  |  Vicarious (2)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whiff (2)  |  Why (491)  |  Wing (75)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Young (227)

When all else fails as a cure for smoking cigarettes, try carrying wet matches.
Anonymous
In E.C. McKenzie, 14,000 Quips and Quotes for Speakers, Writers, Editors, Preachers, and Teachers (1990), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Cure (122)  |  Failure (161)  |  Match (29)  |  Quit (10)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Try (283)  |  Wet (6)

When an apparent fact runs contrary to logic and common sense, it’s obvious that you have failed to interpret the fact correctly.
In Orphans of the Sky (1963, 1964), 169.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Logic (287)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Run (174)  |  Sense (770)

When legacy firms fail to innovate, start-ups jump into the market and thrive at the establishment’s expense. That’s disruption.
(SpaceX President)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disruption (3)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Expense (16)  |  Firm (47)  |  Innovate (2)  |  Jump (29)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Market (20)  |  Start (221)  |  Thrive (18)

When the number of factors coming into play in a phenomenological complex is too large, scientific method in most cases fails us. One need only think of the weather, in which case prediction even for a few days ahead is impossible. Nevertheless no one doubts that we are confronted with a causal connection whose causal components are in the main known to us.
Out of My Later Years (1995), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (19)  |  Case (99)  |  Causal (7)  |  Coming (114)  |  Complex (188)  |  Component (48)  |  Confront (17)  |  Connection (162)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Factor (46)  |  Failure (161)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Main (28)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Play (112)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Think (1086)  |  Weather (44)

When we try to imagine a chaos we fail. ... In its very fiber the mind is an order and refuses to build a chaos.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Order (632)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Try (283)

When you are famous it is hard to work on small problems. This is what did [Claude Elwood] Shannon in. After information theory, what do you do for an encore? The great scientists often make this error. They fail to continue to plant the little acorns from which the mighty oak trees grow. They try to get the big thing right off. And that isn’t the way things go. So that is another reason why you find that when you get early recognition it seems to sterilize you.
'You and Your Research', Bell Communications Research Colloquium Seminar, 7 Mar 1986.
Science quotes on:  |  Career (75)  |  Continue (165)  |  Do (1908)  |  Early (185)  |  Error (321)  |  Fame (50)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hard (243)  |  Information (166)  |  Little (707)  |  Oak (14)  |  Oak Tree (3)  |  Plant (294)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Small (477)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tree (246)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

Whenever ideas fail, men invent words.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (843)  |  Invention (369)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Word (619)

Who can fail to be uplifted by the kind of vision that the laureates in physics have provided into the outer reaches of space?
Speech at the Nobel Banquet (10 Dec 1983) for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes (1984), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysics (15)  |  Kind (557)  |  Laureate (2)  |  Outer Space (6)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Space (500)  |  Uplift (6)  |  Vision (123)

Within the nucleus [of a cell] is a network of fibers, a sap fills the interstices of the network. The network resolves itself into a definite number of threads at each division of the cell. These threads we call chromosomes. Each species of animals and plants possesses a characteristic number of these threads which have definite size and sometimes a specific shape and even characteristic granules at different levels. Beyond this point our strongest microscopes fail to penetrate.
In A Critique of the Theory of Evolution (1916), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Definite (110)  |  Different (577)  |  Division (65)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Fibers (2)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Granule (3)  |  Interstice (3)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Network (21)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Sap (3)  |  Shape (72)  |  Size (60)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Thread (32)

Without initiation into the scientific spirit one is not in possession of the best tools humanity has so far devised for effectively directed reflection. [Without these one] fails to understand the full meaning of knowledge.
Democracy and Education: an Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (1916), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Devise (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effective (59)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Possession (65)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Tool (117)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Yet is it possible in terms of the motion of atoms to explain how men can invent an electric motor, or design and build a great cathedral? If such achievements represent anything more than the requirements of physical law, it means that science must investigate the additional controlling factors, whatever they may be, in order that the world of nature may be adequately understood. For a science which describes only the motions of inanimate things but fails to include the actions of living organisms cannot claim universality.
The Human Meaning of Science (1940), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  Atom (355)  |  Build (204)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Claim (146)  |  Describe (128)  |  Design (195)  |  Electric (76)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Explain (322)  |  Great (1574)  |  Include (90)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Law (894)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Motor (23)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Law (14)  |  Possible (552)  |  Represent (155)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universality (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)

You hear headlines from time to time about the Amazon rainforest disappearing at a greater or lesser rate.... The real story is that over time the rate has stayed just the same. Year after year, decade after decade, we have failed to stop or really even decrease deforestation...
Online transcript of interview, segment 'Amazon Deforestation' on NPR radio program, Living on Earth (25 Feb 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (9)  |  Decade (59)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Failure (161)  |  Greater (288)  |  Headline (6)  |  Hear (139)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Rate (29)  |  Stop (80)  |  Story (118)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

Your aim is no better than your knowledge of chemistry.
[On being shot at by a Polish student whom Werner had failed in an examination.]
In G. B. Kauffman, Alfred Werner (1966), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Examination (98)  |  Failure (161)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Polish (15)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Student (300)

You’re aware the boy failed my grade school math class, I take it? And not that many years later he’s teaching college. Now I ask you: Is that the sorriest indictment of the American educational system you ever heard? [pauses to light cigarette.] No aptitude at all for long division, but never mind. It’s him they ask to split the atom. How he talked his way into the Nobel prize is beyond me. But then, I suppose it’s like the man says, it’s not what you know...
Karl Arbeiter (former teacher of Albert Einstein)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  American (46)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Aware (31)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Class (164)  |  College (66)  |  Division (65)  |  Educational (7)  |  Grade (11)  |  Hear (139)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Pause (6)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Split (13)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Talk (100)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

[First use of the term science fiction:] We hope it will not be long before we may have other works of Science-Fiction [like Richard Henry Horne's The Poor Artist], as we believe such books likely to fulfil a good purpose, and create an interest, where, unhappily, science alone might fail.
[Thomas] Campbell says, that “Fiction in Poetry is not the reverse of truth, but her soft and enchanting resemblance.” Now this applies especially to Science-Fiction, in which the revealed truths of Science may be given interwoven with a pleasing story which may itself be poetical and true—thus circulating a knowledge of Poetry of Science, clothed in a garb of the Poetry of life.
In A Little Earnest Book Upon a Great Old Subject (1851), 137.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Artist (90)  |  Book (392)  |  Create (235)  |  First (1283)  |  Garb (6)  |  Good (889)  |  Hope (299)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interwoven (10)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Poor (136)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Soft (29)  |  Story (118)  |  Term (349)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

[Florence Nightingale] was a great administrator, and to reach excellence here is impossible without being an ardent student of statistics. Florence Nightingale has been rightly termed the “Passionate Statistician.” Her statistics were more than a study, they were indeed her religion. For her, Quetelet was the hero as scientist, and the presentation copy of his Physique Sociale is annotated by her on every page. Florence Nightingale believed—and in all the actions of her life acted upon that belief—that the administrator could only be successful if he were guided by statistical knowledge. The legislator—to say nothing of the politician—too often failed for want of this knowledge. Nay, she went further: she held that the universe—including human communities—was evolving in accordance with a divine plan; that it was man's business to endeavour to understand this plan and guide his actions in sympathy with it. But to understand God's thoughts, she held we must study statistics, for these are the measure of his purpose. Thus the study of statistics was for her a religious duty.
In Karl Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1924), Vol. 2, 414-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Administrator (11)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Business (149)  |  Copy (33)  |  Divine (112)  |  Duty (68)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Excellence (39)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Plan (117)  |  Politician (38)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Lambert Adolphe Jacques Quételet (2)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Term (349)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)

[Should Britain fail, then the entire world would] sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister ... by the lights of perverted science.
“Finest Hour” speech after Dunkirk during WW II (18 Jun 1940). In Robert Rhodes James, ed. Winston Churchill: His Complete Speeches, 1897-1963 (1974), Vol. 6, p.6238.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (29)  |  Age (499)  |  Britain (24)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Light (607)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Perversion (2)  |  Pervert (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Sink (37)  |  World (1774)

[When nature appears complicated:] The moment we contemplate it as it is, and attain a position from which we can take a commanding view, though but of a small part of its plan, we never fail to recognize that sublime simplicity on which the mind rests satisfied that it has attained the truth.
Concluding remark in Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Plan (117)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Rest (280)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.