Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Politics is more difficult than physics.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Clarity

Clarity Quotes (47 quotes)

... in going over the history of all the inventions for which history could be obtained it became more and more clear that in addition to training and in addition to extensive knowledge, a natural quality of mind was also necessary.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 54, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Extensive (33)  |  History (673)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Quality (135)  |  Training (80)

All Nature is but Art, unknown to thee;
All Chance, Direction, which thou canst not see;
All Discord, Harmony, not understood;
All partial Evil, universal Good:
And, spite of Pride, in erring Reason’s spite,
One truth is clear, “Whatever IS, is RIGHT.”
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 515.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Chance (239)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discord (10)  |  Evil (116)  |  Existence (456)  |  Good (889)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Partial (10)  |  Pride (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Spite (55)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Whatever (234)

Among the older records, we find chapter after chapter of which we can read the characters, and make out their meaning: and as we approach the period of man’s creation, our book becomes more clear, and nature seems to speak to us in language so like our own, that we easily comprehend it. But just as we begin to enter on the history of physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us—a leaf has been torn out from nature's record, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes.
Letter 1 to William Wordsworth. Quoted in the appendix to W. Wordsworth, A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Direction for the Tourist, with Mr Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the County and Three Letters upon the Geology of the Lake District (1842), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Language (293)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Succession (77)  |  Tear (42)  |  Torn (17)

As a nation, we are too young to have true mythic heroes, and we must press real human beings into service. Honest Abe Lincoln the legend is quite a different character from Abraham Lincoln the man. And so should they be. And so should both be treasured, as long as they are distinguished. In a complex and confusing world, the perfect clarity of sports provides a focus for legitimate, utterly unambiguous support or disdain. The Dodgers are evil, the Yankees good. They really are, and have been for as long as anyone in my family can remember.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Character (243)  |  Complex (188)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Different (577)  |  Disdain (10)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evil (116)  |  Family (94)  |  Focus (35)  |  Good (889)  |  Hero (42)  |  Honest (50)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Legend (17)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Abraham Lincoln (11)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Press (21)  |  Provide (69)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Remember (179)  |  Service (110)  |  Sport (22)  |  Support (147)  |  Treasure (57)  |  True (212)  |  Unambiguous (5)  |  Utterly (15)  |  World (1774)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Young (227)

As a scientist Miss [Rosalind] Franklin was distinguished by extreme clarity and perfection in everything she undertook. Her photographs are among the most beautiful X-ray photographs of any substance ever taken.
In his Obituary for Rosalind Franklin, Nature, 1958, 182, 154. As given in Andrew Brown, J.D. Bernal: The Sage of Science (2005), 359.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Rosalind Franklin (17)  |  Miss (51)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Ray (114)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Substance (248)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Diffraction (3)

Clarity about the aims and problems of socialism is of greatest significance in our age of transition. Since, under present circumstances, free and unhindered discussion of these problems has come under a powerful taboo, I consider the foundation of this magazine to be an important public service.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consider (416)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Important (209)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Service (110)  |  Significance (113)  |  Socialism (4)  |  Taboo (5)  |  Transition (26)

Clarity is the sovereign politeness imposed on the one who wields a pen.
From the original French: “La clarté est la souveraine politesse imposée à qui manie une plume,” in 'La Nidification de Scarabée Sacré', Revue des questions scientifiques (Jul 1896), 10 (new series), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Pen (20)  |  Politeness (4)  |  Sovereign (5)  |  Wield (10)

First get a clear notion of what you desire to accomplish and then in all probability you will succeed in doing it.
As quoted in Joseph Wickham Roe, English and American Tool Builders (1916), 48-49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Doing (280)  |  First (1283)  |  Notion (113)  |  Probability (130)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Will (2355)

How do we convince people that in programming simplicity and clarity–in short: what mathematicians call ‘elegance’–are not a dispensable luxury, but a crucial matter that decides between success and failure?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Convince (41)  |  Crucial (9)  |  Decide (41)  |  Dispense (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Failure (161)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  People (1005)  |  Program (52)  |  Short (197)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Success (302)

I came to biochemistry through chemistry; I came to chemistry, partly by the labyrinthine routes that I have related, and partly through the youthful romantic notion that the natural sciences had something to do with nature. What I liked about chemistry was its clarity surrounded by darkness; what attracted me, slowly and hesitatingly, to biology was its darkness surrounded by the brightness of the givenness of nature, the holiness of life. And so I have always oscillated between the brightness of reality and the darkness of the unknowable. When Pascal speaks of God in hiding, Deus absconditus, we hear not only the profound existential thinker, but also the great searcher for the reality of the world. I consider this unquenchable resonance as the greatest gift that can be bestowed on a naturalist.
Heraclitean Fire: Sketches from a Life before Nature (1978), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Bestow (18)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biology (216)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consider (416)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Gift (104)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Holiness (6)  |  Life (1795)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reality (261)  |  Resonance (7)  |  Romantic (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Through (849)  |  World (1774)

I did try “to make things clear,” first to myself (an important point) and then to my students and somehow to make “these dry bones live.”
His response on his 80th birthday (1929) recognition of his mathematical contributions and teachings by his former students. As quoted by R.T. Glazebrook in Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society (Dec 1935), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Bone (95)  |  Dry (57)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Live (628)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Myself (212)  |  Point (580)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)

If you have to prove a theorem, do not rush. First of all, understand fully what the theorem says, try to see clearly what it means. Then check the theorem; it could be false. Examine the consequences, verify as many particular instances as are needed to convince yourself of the truth. When you have satisfied yourself that the theorem is true, you can start proving it.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Check (24)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Convince (41)  |  Do (1908)  |  Examination (98)  |  Examine (78)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Instance (33)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Need (290)  |  Particular (76)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rush (18)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Start (221)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Verification (31)  |  Verify (23)

In my view, aiming at simplicity and lucidity is a moral duty of all intellectuals: lack of clarity is a sin, and pretentiousness is a crime.
Objective Knowledge: an Evolutionary Approach (1972), 44
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Crime (38)  |  Duty (68)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Lack (119)  |  Lucidity (7)  |  Moral (195)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sin (42)  |  View (488)

In the modern world, science and society often interact in a perverse way. We live in a technological society, and technology causes political problems. The politicians and the public expect science to provide answers to the problems. Scientific experts are paid and encouraged to provide answers. The public does not have much use for a scientist who says, “Sorry, but we don’t know.” The public prefers to listen to scientists who give confident answers to questions and make confident predictions of what will happen as a result of human activities. So it happens that the experts who talk publicly about politically contentious questions tend to speak more clearly than they think. They make confident predictions about the future, and end up believing their own predictions. Their predictions become dogmas which they do not question. The public is led to believe that the fashionable scientific dogmas are true, and it may sometimes happen that they are wrong. That is why heretics who question the dogmas are needed.
Frederick S. Pardee Distinguished Lecture (Oct 2005), Boston University. Collected in 'Heretical Thoughts About Science and Society', A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2007), 43-44.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Become (815)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confident (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expert (65)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Know (1518)  |  Listen (73)  |  Live (628)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Perversity (2)  |  Political (121)  |  Politician (38)  |  Politics (112)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

In the study of ideas, it is necessary to remember that insistence on hard-headed clarity issues from sentimental feeling, as it were a mist, cloaking the perplexities of fact. Insistence on clarity at all costs is based on sheer superstition as to the mode in which human intelligence functions. Our reasonings grasp at straws for premises and float on gossamers for deductions.
In Adventure of Ideas (1933), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cost (86)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Float (30)  |  Function (228)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Mist (14)  |  Mode (41)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Premise (37)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Superstition (66)

In the whole of geophysics there is probably hardly another law of such clarity and reliability as this—that there are two preferential levels for the world’s surface which occur in alternation side by side and are represented by the continents and the ocean floors, respectively. It is therefore very surprising that scarcely anyone has tried to explain this law.
In The Origins of Continents and Oceans (4th ed. 1929), trans. John Biram (1966), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alternation (5)  |  Continent (76)  |  Continental Drift (10)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Floor (20)  |  Geophysics (4)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurence (2)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Probability (130)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Represent (155)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Side (233)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

In vertebrate paleontology, increasing knowledge leads to triumphant loss of clarity.
Synapsid Evolution and Dentition, International Colloquium on the Evolution of Mammals, Brussels (1962.)
Science quotes on:  |  Increase (210)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loss (110)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Triumphant (10)  |  Vertebrate (20)

It is clear, then, that the idea of a fixed method, or of a fixed theory of rationality, rests on too naive a view of man and his social surroundings. To those who look at the rich material provided by history, and who are not intent on impoverishing it in order to please their lower instincts, their craving for intellectual security in the form of clarity, precision, “objectivity”, “truth”, it will become clear that there is only one principle that can be defended under all circumstances and in all stages of human development. It is the principle: anything goes.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975, 1993), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Development (422)  |  Form (959)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Naive (13)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Order (632)  |  Please (65)  |  Precision (68)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Rest (280)  |  Security (47)  |  Social (252)  |  Stage (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

It is impossible to devise an experiment without a preconceived idea; devising an experiment, we said, is putting a question; we never conceive a question without an idea which invites an answer. I consider it, therefore, an absolute principle that experiments must always be devised in view of a preconceived idea, no matter if the idea be not very clear nor very well defined.
An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865, translation 1927, 1957), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Answer (366)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conceiving (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Definition (221)  |  Devise (14)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Preconceive (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Putting (2)  |  Question (621)  |  View (488)

Lack of clarity is always a sign of dishonesty.
In The Decline and Fall of Science (1976).
Science quotes on:  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Lack (119)  |  Sign (58)

Mathematics is crystallized clarity, precision personified, beauty distilled and rigorously sublimated.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Crystallize (12)  |  Distill (2)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Precision (68)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Sublimate (4)

Mathematics, among all school subjects, is especially adapted to further clearness, definite brevity and precision in expression, although it offers no exercise in flights of rhetoric. This is due in the first place to the logical rigour with which it develops thought, avoiding every departure from the shortest, most direct way, never allowing empty phrases to enter. Other subjects excel in the development of expression in other respects: translation from foreign languages into the mother tongue gives exercise in finding the proper word for the given foreign word and gives knowledge of laws of syntax, the study of poetry and prose furnish fit patterns for connected presentation and elegant form of expression, composition is to exercise the pupil in a like presentation of his own or borrowed thoughtsand their development, the natural sciences teach description of natural objects, apparatus and processes, as well as the statement of laws on the grounds of immediate sense-perception. But all these aids for exercise in the use of the mother tongue, each in its way valuable and indispensable, do not guarantee, in the same manner as mathematical training, the exclusion of words whose concepts, if not entirely wanting, are not sufficiently clear. They do not furnish in the same measure that which the mathematician demands particularly as regards precision of expression.
In Anleitung zum mathematischen Unterricht in höheren Schulen (1906), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Clear (100)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concept (221)  |  Connect (125)  |  Definite (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Departure (9)  |  Description (84)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Empty (80)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Excel (4)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flight (98)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Give (202)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Tongue (3)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perception (97)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Place (177)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precision (68)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Process (423)  |  Proper (144)  |  Prose (11)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Regard (305)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rhetoric (12)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Same (157)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sufficiently (9)  |  Syntax (2)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Training (80)  |  Translation (21)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

Owing to his lack of knowledge, the ordinary man cannot attempt to resolve conflicting theories of conflicting advice into a single organized structure. He is likely to assume the information available to him is on the order of what we might think of as a few pieces of an enormous jigsaw puzzle. If a given piece fails to fit, it is not because it is fraudulent; more likely the contradictions and inconsistencies within his information are due to his lack of understanding and to the fact that he possesses only a few pieces of the puzzle. Differing statements about the nature of things, differing medical philosophies, different diagnoses and treatments—all of these are to be collected eagerly and be made a part of the individual's collection of puzzle pieces. Ultimately, after many lifetimes, the pieces will fit together and the individual will attain clear and certain knowledge.
'Strategies of Resort to Curers in South India', contributed in Charles M. Leslie (ed.), Asian Medical Systems: A Comparative Study (1976), 185.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Availability (10)  |  Available (78)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Collection (64)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conflicting (13)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Due (141)  |  Eagerness (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Few (13)  |  Fit (134)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (404)  |  Information (166)  |  Jigsaw (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organization (114)  |  Owing (39)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Piece (38)  |  Possession (65)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Single (353)  |  Statement (142)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

Perfect clarity would profit the intellect but damage the will.
In Pensées (1670), Section 12, No. 3. As translated in W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms (1966), 347. From the original French, “La clarté parfaite ne servirait qu’à l’esprit, et nuirait à la volonté,” in Pensées de Blaise Pascal (1847),
Science quotes on:  |  Damage (34)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Profit (52)  |  Will (2355)

Perhaps the problem is the seeming need that people have of making black-and-white cutoffs when it comes to certain mysterious phenomena, such as life and consciousness. People seem to want there to be an absolute threshold between the living and the nonliving, and between the thinking and the “merely mechanical,” ... But the onward march of science seems to force us ever more clearly into accepting intermediate levels of such properties.
‘Shades of Gray Along the Consciousness Continuum’, Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought (1995), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Force (487)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Level (67)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Make (25)  |  Making (300)  |  March (46)  |  March Of Science (4)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Need (290)  |  Nonliving (4)  |  Onward (6)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Problem (676)  |  Property (168)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seem (145)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Want (497)  |  White (127)

Profundity of thought belongs to youth, clarity of thought to old age.
Human, All-To-Human, Vol. 2, Miscellaneous Maxims and Opinions (1879), 140. In Willard Huntington Wright, What Nietzsche Taught? (1917), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Belong (162)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Profundity (6)  |  Thought (953)  |  Youth (101)

Scientific observation has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences upon the environment. The task of the teacher becomes that of preparing a series of motives of cultural activity, spread over a specially prepared environment, and then refraining from obtrusive interference. Human teachers can only help the great work that is being done, as servants help the master. Doing so, they will be witnesses to the unfolding of the human soul and to the rising of a New Man who will not be a victim of events, but will have the clarity of vision to direct and shape the future of human society.
In Education For a New World (1946), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Activity (210)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Direct (225)  |  Doing (280)  |  Education (378)  |  Environment (216)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interference (21)  |  Listening (25)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Motive (59)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Process (423)  |  Rising (44)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Servant (39)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spread (83)  |  Task (147)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Victim (35)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

That small word “Force,” they make a barber's block,
Ready to put on
Meanings most strange and various, fit to shock
Pupils of Newton....
The phrases of last century in this
Linger to play tricks—
Vis viva and Vis Mortua and Vis Acceleratrix:
Those long-nebbed words that to our text books still
Cling by their titles,
And from them creep, as entozoa will,
Into our vitals.
But see! Tait writes in lucid symbols clear
One small equation;
And Force becomes of Energy a mere
Space-variation.
'Report on Tait's Lecture on Force:— B.A., 1876', reproduced in Bruce Clarke, Energy Forms: Allegory and Science in the Era of Classical Thermodynamics (2001), 19. Maxwell's verse was inspired by a paper delivered at the British Association (B.A.. He was satirizing a “considerable cofusion of nomenclature” at the time, and supported his friend Tait's desire to establish a redefinition of energy on a thermnodynamic basis.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Barber (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Block (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Clinging (3)  |  Creep (15)  |  Creeping (4)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fit (134)  |  Force (487)  |  Last (426)  |  Linger (14)  |  Lingering (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Lucidity (7)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Play (112)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pupil (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Shock (37)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Peter Guthrie Tait (10)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Title (18)  |  Trick (35)  |  Variation (90)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

The conception of objective reality … has thus evaporated … into the transparent clarity of mathematics that represents no longer the behavior of particles but rather our knowledge of this behavior.
In 'The Representation of Nature in Contemporary Physics', Daedalus (1958), 87, 95-108. As cited in Karl Popper, Quantum Theory and the Schism in Physics (1992), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Behavior (84)  |  Conception (154)  |  Evaporation (7)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Objective (91)  |  Particle (194)  |  Reality (261)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Transparency (7)  |  Transparent (16)

The final results [of work on the theory of relativity] appear almost simple; any intelligent undergraduate can understand them without much trouble. But the years of searching in the dark for a truth that one feels, but cannot express; the intense effort and the alternations of confidence and misgiving, until one breaks through to clarity and understanding, are only known to him who has himself experienced them.
Concluding remark of George Gibson lecture at the University of Glasgow, 'The Origins of the General Theory of Relativity', (20 Jun 1933). Published by Glasgow University as The Origins of the General Theory of Relativity: Being the First Lecture on the George A. Gibson Foundation in the University of Glasgow, Delivered on June 20th, 1933 (1933), 11. Also quoted in 'No Hitching Posts' The Atlantic (1936), 157, 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternation (5)  |  Appear (118)  |  Break (99)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Dark (140)  |  Effort (227)  |  Experience (467)  |  Express (186)  |  Feel (367)  |  Final (118)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intense (20)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Search (162)  |  Simple (406)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Through (849)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The history of science, like the history of all human ideas, is a history of irresponsible dreams, of obstinacy, and of error. But science is one of the very few human activities—perhaps the only one—in which errors are systematically criticized and fairly often, in time, corrected. This is why we can say that, in science, we often learn from our mistakes, and why we can speak clearly and sensibly about making progress there. In most other fields of human endeavour there is change, but rarely progress ... And in most fields we do not even know how to evaluate change.
From Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1963), 216. Reproduced in Karl Popper, Truth, Rationality and the Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1979), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Correction (40)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Error (321)  |  Field (364)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Irresponsibility (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Making (300)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obstinacy (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Progress (465)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)

The inherent unpredictability of future scientific developments—the fact that no secure inference can be drawn from one state of science to another—has important implications for the issue of the limits of science. It means that present-day science cannot speak for future science: it is in principle impossible to make any secure inferences from the substance of science at one time about its substance at a significantly different time. The prospect of future scientific revolutions can never be precluded. We cannot say with unblinking confidence what sorts of resources and conceptions the science of the future will or will not use. Given that it is effectively impossible to predict the details of what future science will accomplish, it is no less impossible to predict in detail what future science will not accomplish. We can never confidently put this or that range of issues outside “the limits of science”, because we cannot discern the shape and substance of future science with sufficient clarity to be able to say with any assurance what it can and cannot do. Any attempt to set “limits” to science—any advance specification of what science can and cannot do by way of handling problems and solving questions—is destined to come to grief.
The Limits of Science (1984), 102-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Advance (280)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Destined (42)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Future (429)  |  Grief (18)  |  Handling (7)  |  Implication (23)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inference (45)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Issue (42)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Never (1087)  |  Outside (141)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Revolution (12)  |  Security (47)  |  Set (394)  |  Shape (72)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specification (7)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

The spectacular thing about Johnny [von Neumann] was not his power as a mathematician, which was great, or his insight and his clarity, but his rapidity; he was very, very fast. And like the modern computer, which no longer bothers to retrieve the logarithm of 11 from its memory (but, instead, computes the logarithm of 11 each time it is needed), Johnny didn’t bother to remember things. He computed them. You asked him a question, and if he didn’t know the answer, he thought for three seconds and would produce and answer.
From interview with Donald J. Albers. In John H. Ewing and Frederick W. Gehring, Paul Halmos Celebrating 50 Years of Mathematics (1991), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Compute (18)  |  Computer (127)  |  Great (1574)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Memory (134)  |  Modern (385)  |  Power (746)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Remember (179)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  John von Neumann (28)

There is a clarity, a brilliance to space that simply doesn’t exist on earth, even on a cloudless summer’s day in the Rockies, and nowhere else can you realize so fully the majesty of our Earth and be so awed at the thought that it’s only one of untold thousands of planets.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Awe (43)  |  Brilliance (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fully (21)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Planet (356)  |  Realize (147)  |  Simply (53)  |  Space (500)  |  Summer (54)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Untold (6)

There is in the chemist a form of thought by which all ideas become visible in the mind as strains of an imagined piece of music. This form of thought is developed in Faraday in the highest degree, whence it arises that to one who is not acquainted with this method of thinking, his scientific works seem barren and dry, and merely a series of researches strung together, while his oral discourse when he teaches or explains is intellectual, elegant, and of wonderful clearness.
Autobiography, 257-358. Quoted in William H. Brock, Justus Von Liebig (2002), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dry (57)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Explain (322)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Form (959)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Music (129)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Series (149)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

There is nothing which Nature so clearly reveals, and upon which science so strongly insists, as the universal reign of law, absolute, universal, invariable law... Not one jot or tittle of the laws of Nature are unfulfilled. I do not believe it is possible to state this fact too strongly... Everything happens according to law, and, since law is the expression of Divine will, everything happens according to Divine will, i.e. is in some sense ordained, decreed.
Lecture 18, 'Predestination and Free-Will', Religion and Science: A Series of Sunday Lectures (1874), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (237)  |  Belief (578)  |  Decree (8)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Invariability (5)  |  Jot (3)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ordinance (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reign (23)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sense (770)  |  State (491)  |  Statement (142)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)  |  Will (2355)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Théories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drum (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

We have not known a single great scientist who could not discourse freely and interestingly with a child. Can it be that haters of clarity have nothing to say, have observed nothing, have no clear picture of even their own fields?
In John Steinbeck and Edward Flanders Ricketts, Sea of Cortez: a Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research (1941), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Discourse (18)  |  Field (364)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interest (386)  |  Known (454)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Picture (143)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)

We love to discover in the cosmos the geometrical forms that exist in the depths of our consciousness. The exactitude of the proportions of our monuments and the precision of our machines express a fundamental character of our mind. Geometry does not exist in the earthly world. It has originated in ourselves. The methods of nature are never so precise as those of man. We do not find in the universe the clearness and accuracy of our thought. We attempt, therefore, to abstract from the complexity of phenomena some simple systems whose components bear to one another certain relations susceptible of being described mathematically.
In Man the Unknown (1935), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Component (48)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Depth (94)  |  Describe (128)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Love (309)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monument (45)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Originate (36)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Relation (157)  |  Simple (406)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  System (537)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

We might expect that as we come close upon living nature the characters of our old records would grow legible and clear; but just when we begin to enter on the history of the physical changes going on before our eyes, and in which we ourselves bear a part, our chronicle seems to fail us: a leaf has been torn out from Nature’s book, and the succession of events is almost hidden from our eyes. [On gaps in the Pleistocene fossil record.]
As quoted by Hugh Miller in Lecture First, collected in Popular Geology: A Series of Lectures Read Before the Philosophical Institution of Edinburgh, with Descriptive Sketches from a Geologist's Portfolio (1859), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bear (159)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronicle (6)  |  Enter (141)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fossil Record (10)  |  Gap (33)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hidden (42)  |  History (673)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Legibility (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Change (5)  |  Pleistocene (3)  |  Record (154)  |  Succession (77)  |  Torn (17)

We now realize with special clarity, how much in error are those theorists who believe that theory comes inductively from experience.
In section 3, 'The Field Concept', Physics and Reality (1936), collected in Essays in Physics (1950), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Error (321)  |  Experience (467)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Realize (147)  |  Special (184)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)

What distinguishes the language of science from language as we ordinarily understand the word? … What science strives for is an utmost acuteness and clarity of concepts as regards their mutual relation and their correspondence to sensory data.
In Out of My Later Years (1950, 1956), 112. Footnoted on page 277 as from 'The Common Language of Science', a broadcast recording for the Science Conference, London (28 Sep 1941) and published in Advancement of Science, 2, No. 5, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Concept (221)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Data (156)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Language (293)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Striving (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Word (619)

When one begins to speak of something it sounds plausible, but when we reflect on it we find it false. The initial impression a thing makes on my mind is very important. Taking an overall view of a thing the mind sees every side of it obscurely, which is often of more value than a clear idea of only one side of it.
Aphorism 47 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 50-51.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Find (998)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impression (114)  |  Initial (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Overall (9)  |  Plausibility (7)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Reflection (90)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)

When the first mathematical, logical, and natural uniformities, the first laws, were discovered, men were so carried away by the clearness, beauty and simplification that resulted, that they believed themselves to have deciphered authentically the eternal thoughts of the Almighty.
From Lecture (Nov 1906) at the Lowell Institute, Boston. Published in 'The Present Dilemma in Philosophy',Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking: Popular Lectures on Philosophy (1907), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (23)  |  Authentic (8)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Belief (578)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Discover (553)  |  Eternal (110)  |  First (1283)  |  Law (894)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Result (677)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uniformity (37)

You must learn to talk clearly. The jargon of scientific terminology which rolls off your tongues is mental garbage
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Garbage (8)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Roll (40)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Talk (100)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Tongue (43)

[In the Royal Society, there] has been, a constant Resolution, to reject all the amplifications, digressions, and swellings of style: to return back to the primitive purity, and shortness, when men deliver'd so many things, almost in an equal number of words. They have exacted from all their members, a close, naked, natural way of speaking; positive expressions; clear senses; a native easiness: bringing all things as near the Mathematical plainness, as they can: and preferring the language of Artizans, Countrymen, and Merchants, before that, of Wits, or Scholars.
The History of the Royal Society (1667), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amplification (3)  |  Back (390)  |  Constant (144)  |  Countryman (4)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Digression (3)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Expression (175)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Member (41)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Native (38)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Plainness (2)  |  Positive (94)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Purity (14)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Return (124)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Style (23)  |  Swelling (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wit (59)  |  Word (619)

[Presently, science undergraduates] do not learn to write clearly and briefly, marshalling their points in due and aesthetically satisfying order, and eliminating inessentials. They are inept at those turns of phrase or happy analogy which throw a flying bridge across a chasm of misunderstanding and make contact between mind and mind.
From essay in Thomas Rice Henn, The Apple and the Spectroscope: Being Lectures on Poetry Designed (in the Main) for Science Students (1951), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Chasm (8)  |  Contact (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Flying (72)  |  Happy (105)  |  Inept (4)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misunderstanding (12)  |  Order (632)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (580)  |  Science (3879)  |  Throw (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  Write (230)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.