Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Inference

Inference Quotes (26 quotes)

A principle of induction would be a statement with the help of which we could put inductive inferences into a logically acceptable form. In the eyes of the upholders of inductive logic, a principle of induction is of supreme importance for scientific method: “... this principle”, says Reichenbach, “determines the truth of scientific theories. To eliminate it from science would mean nothing less than to deprive science of the power to decide the truth or falsity of its theories. Without it, clearly, science would no longer have the right to distinguish its theories from the fanciful and arbitrary creations of the poet’s mind.” Now this principle of induction cannot be a purely logical truth like a tautology or an analytic statement. Indeed, if there were such a thing as a purely logical principle of induction, there would be no problem of induction; for in this case, all inductive inferences would have to be regarded as purely logical or tautological transformations, just like inferences in inductive logic. Thus the principle of induction must be a synthetic statement; that is, a statement whose negation is not self-contradictory but logically possible. So the question arises why such a principle should be accepted at all, and how we can justify its acceptance on rational grounds.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Acceptable (5)  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Analytic (4)  |  Arbitrary (16)  |  Arise (32)  |  Case (64)  |  Clearly (17)  |  Creation (211)  |  Decide (25)  |  Deprive (9)  |  Determine (45)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Eye (159)  |  Falsity (12)  |  Fanciful (4)  |  Form (210)  |  Ground (63)  |  Help (68)  |  Importance (183)  |  Induction (45)  |  Justify (19)  |  Less (54)  |  Logic (187)  |  Logical (20)  |  Long (95)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mind (544)  |  Negation (2)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Poet (59)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Purely (15)  |  Question (315)  |  Rational (42)  |  Regard (58)  |  Right (144)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Statement (56)  |  Supreme (24)  |  Synthetic (12)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Theory (582)  |  Transformation (47)  |  Truth (750)

Certain students of genetics inferred that the Mendelian units responsible for the selected character were genes producing only a single effect. This was careless logic. It took a good deal of hammering to get rid of this erroneous idea. As facts accumulated it became evident that each gene produces not a single effect, but in some cases a multitude of effects on the characters of the individual. It is true that in most genetic work only one of these character-effects is selected for study—the one that is most sharply defined and separable from its contrasted character—but in most cases minor differences also are recognizable that are just as much the product of the same gene as is the major effect.
'The Relation of Genetics to Physiology and Medicine', Nobel Lecture (4 Jun 1934). In Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Character (82)  |  Difference (208)  |  Effect (133)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Fact (609)  |  Gene (68)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Gregor Mendel (20)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Student (131)  |  Study (331)

Gödel proved that the world of pure mathematics is inexhaustible; no finite set of axioms and rules of inference can ever encompass the whole of mathematics; given any finite set of axioms, we can find meaningful mathematical questions which the axioms leave unanswered. I hope that an analogous Situation exists in the physical world. If my view of the future is correct, it means that the world of physics and astronomy is also inexhaustible; no matter how far we go into the future, there will always be new things happening, new information coming in, new worlds to explore, a constantly expanding domain of life, consciousness, and memory.
From Lecture 1, 'Philosophy', in a series of four James Arthur Lectures, 'Lectures on Time and its Mysteries' at New York University (Autumn 1978). Printed in 'Time Without End: Physics and Biology in an Open Universe', Reviews of Modern Physics (Jul 1979), 51, 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Axiom (26)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Constantly (19)  |  Domain (21)  |  Expand (14)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Finite (22)  |  Future (229)  |  Kurt Gödel (5)  |  Hope (129)  |  Inexhaustible (10)  |  Information (102)  |  Life (917)  |  Meaningful (14)  |  Memory (81)  |  New (340)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physics (301)  |  Prove (60)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Question (315)  |  Rule (135)  |  Set (56)  |  Unanswered (3)

Historical science is not worse, more restricted, or less capable of achieving firm conclusions because experiment, prediction, and subsumption under invariant laws of nature do not represent its usual working methods. The sciences of history use a different mode of explanation, rooted in the comparative and observational richness in our data. We cannot see a past event directly, but science is usually based on inference, not unvarnished observation (you don’t see electrons, gravity, or black holes either).
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Badly (9)  |  Base (43)  |  Black Holes (3)  |  Capable (26)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Data (100)  |  Different (110)  |  Directly (15)  |  Electron (66)  |  Event (97)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Firm (19)  |  Gravity (89)  |  Historical (10)  |  History (302)  |  Invariant (3)  |  Law (418)  |  Less (54)  |  Method (154)  |  Mode (29)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Observational (2)  |  Past (109)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Represent (27)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Richness (14)  |  Root (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Subsumption (2)  |  Unvarnished (2)  |  Usually (20)  |  Work (457)

If ... the past may be no Rule for the future, all Experience becomes useless and can give rise to no Inferences or Conclusions.
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Experience (268)  |  Future (229)  |  Past (109)

Inductive inference is the only process known to us by which essentially new knowledge comes into the world.
In The Design of Experiments (1935, 1971), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1128)

Intelligence is an extremely subtle concept. It’s a kind of understanding that flourishes if it's combined with a good memory, but exists anyway even in the absence of good memory. It’s the ability to draw consequences from causes, to make correct inferences, to foresee what might be the result, to work out logical problems, to be reasonable, rational, to have the ability to understand the solution from perhaps insufficient information. You know when a person is intelligent, but you can be easily fooled if you are not yourself intelligent.
In Irv Broughton (ed.), The Writer's Mind: Interviews with American Authors (1990), Vol. 2, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Absence (16)  |  Cause (231)  |  Combine (15)  |  Concept (102)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Correct (53)  |  Flourish (10)  |  Fool (70)  |  Foresee (8)  |  Information (102)  |  Insufficient (6)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Logic (187)  |  Memory (81)  |  Problem (362)  |  Rational (42)  |  Reasonable (18)  |  Result (250)  |  Solution (168)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Understanding (317)

It might be thought … that evolutionary arguments would play a large part in guiding biological research, but this is far from the case. It is difficult enough to study what is happening now. To figure out exactly what happened in evolution is even more difficult. Thus evolutionary achievements can be used as hints to suggest possible lines of research, but it is highly dangerous to trust them too much. It is all too easy to make mistaken inferences unless the process involved is already very well understood.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 138-139.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (59)  |  Biology (150)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Guide (46)  |  Happening (32)  |  Hint (6)  |  Involved (5)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Possible (100)  |  Process (201)  |  Research (517)  |  Study (331)  |  Suggest (15)  |  Trust (40)  |  Understand (189)

One of the main purposes of scientific inference is to justify beliefs which we entertain already; but as a rule they are justified with a difference. Our pre-scientific general beliefs are hardly ever without exceptions; in science, a law with exceptions can only be tolerated as a makeshift. Scientific laws, when we have reason to think them accurate, are different in form from the common-sense rules which have exceptions: they are always, at least in physics, either differential equations, or statistical averages. It might be thought that a statistical average is not very different from a rule with exceptions, but this would be a mistake. Statistics, ideally, are accurate laws about large groups; they differ from other laws only in being about groups, not about individuals. Statistical laws are inferred by induction from particular statistics, just as other laws are inferred from particular single occurrences.
The Analysis of Matter (1927), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Average (31)  |  Belief (400)  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Difference (208)  |  Differential Equation (9)  |  Entertainment (10)  |  Exception (33)  |  Group (52)  |  Individual (177)  |  Justification (33)  |  Large (82)  |  Law (418)  |  Makeshift (2)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Physics (301)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rule (135)  |  Science (1699)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Toleration (5)

Organs, faculties, powers, capacities, or whatever else we call them; grow by use and diminish from disuse, it is inferred that they will continue to do so. And if this inference is unquestionable, then is the one above deduced from it—that humanity must in the end become completely adapted to its conditions—unquestionable also. Progress, therefore, is not an accident, but a necessity.
Social Statics: Or, The Conditions Essential to Human Happiness Specified, and the First of them Developed (1851), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Condition (119)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Diminution (4)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Growth (111)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Organ (60)  |  Power (273)  |  Progress (317)  |  Unquestionable (6)  |  Use (70)

Science gives us the grounds of premises from which religious truths are to be inferred; but it does not set about inferring them, much less does it reach the inference;Mthat is not its province. It brings before us phenomena, and it leaves us, if we will, to call them works of design, wisdom, or benevolence; and further still, if we will, to proceed to confess an Intelligent Creator. We have to take its facts, and to give them a meaning, and to draw our own conclusions from them. First comes Knowledge, then a view, then reasoning, then belief. This is why Science has so little of a religious tendency; deductions have no power of persuasion. The heart is commonly reached, not through the reason, but through the imagination, by means of direct impressions, by the testimony of facts and events, by history, by description. Persons influence us, voices melt us, looks subdue us, deeds inflame us. Many a man will live and die upon a dogma; no man will be a martyr for a conclusion.
Tamworth Reading Room (1841).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Benevolence (5)  |  Bring (53)  |  Call (68)  |  Commonly (7)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Confess (9)  |  Creator (40)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Deed (17)  |  Description (72)  |  Design (92)  |  Die (46)  |  Direct (44)  |  Dogma (25)  |  Draw (25)  |  Event (97)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  First (174)  |  Give (117)  |  Ground (63)  |  Heart (110)  |  History (302)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impression (51)  |  Infer (10)  |  Influence (110)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Leave (63)  |  Less (54)  |  Little (126)  |  Live (186)  |  Martyr (3)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Melt (15)  |  Person (114)  |  Persuasion (3)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Power (273)  |  Premise (14)  |  Proceed (25)  |  Province (11)  |  Reach (68)  |  Reason (330)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Set (56)  |  Subdue (5)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Testimony (10)  |  Truth (750)  |  View (115)  |  Voice (41)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Work (457)

Science, then, is the attentive consideration of common experience; it is common knowledge extended and refined. Its validity is of the same order as that of ordinary perception; memory, and understanding. Its test is found, like theirs, in actual intuition, which sometimes consists in perception and sometimes in intent. The flight of science is merely longer from perception to perception, and its deduction more accurate of meaning from meaning and purpose from purpose. It generates in the mind, for each vulgar observation, a whole brood of suggestions, hypotheses, and inferences. The sciences bestow, as is right and fitting, infinite pains upon that experience which in their absence would drift by unchallenged or misunderstood. They take note, infer, and prophesy. They compare prophesy with event, and altogether they supply—so intent are they on reality—every imaginable background and extension for the present dream.
The Life of Reason, or the Phases of Human Progress (1954), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (76)  |  Challenge (37)  |  Common (92)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Dream (92)  |  Event (97)  |  Experience (268)  |  Extension (20)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Intent (5)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Observation (418)  |  Perception (53)  |  Prophesy (7)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reality (140)  |  Refinement (12)  |  Suggestion (24)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Validity (22)

Scientific method, although in its more refined forms it may seem complicated, is in essence remarkably simply. It consists in observing such facts as will enable the observer to discover general laws governing facts of the kind in question. The two stages, first of observation, and second of inference to a law, are both essential, and each is susceptible of almost indefinite refinement. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Law (418)  |  Observation (418)  |  Scientific Method (155)

Scientists are not robotic inducing machines that infer structures of explanation only from regularities observed in natural phenomena (assuming, as I doubt, that such a style of reasoning could ever achieve success in principle). Scientists are human beings, immersed in culture, and struggling with all the curious tools of inference that mind permits ... Culture can potentiate as well as constrain–as Darwin’s translation of Adam Smith’s laissez-faire economic models into biology as the theory of natural selection. In any case, objective minds do not exist outside culture, so we must make the best of our ineluctable embedding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Assume (19)  |  Best (129)  |  Biology (150)  |  Case (64)  |  Constrain (6)  |  Culture (85)  |  Curious (24)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Economic (21)  |  Embed (5)  |  Exist (89)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Human Beings (19)  |  Induce (6)  |  Infer (10)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mind (544)  |  Model (64)  |  Natural (128)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Objective (49)  |  Observe (48)  |  Outside (37)  |  Permit (20)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reason (330)  |  Regularity (24)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Structure (191)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Style (15)  |  Success (202)  |  Theory (582)  |  Tool (70)  |  Translation (12)

That man is the noblest creature may also be inferred from the fact that no other creature has yet contested this claim.
Aphorism 58 in Notebook D (1773-1775), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Contest (5)  |  Creature (127)  |  Man (345)  |  Noblest (4)

The first man who said “fire burns” was employing scientific method, at any rate if he had allowed himself to be burnt several times. This man had already passed through the two stages of observation and generalization. He had not, however, what scientific technique demands—a careful choice of significant facts on the one hand, and, on the other hand, various means of arriving at laws otherwise than my mere generalization. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Law (418)  |  Observation (418)  |  Scientific Method (155)

The inherent unpredictability of future scientific developments—the fact that no secure inference can be drawn from one state of science to another—has important implications for the issue of the limits of science. It means that present-day science cannot speak for future science: it is in principle impossible to make any secure inferences from the substance of science at one time about its substance at a significantly different time. The prospect of future scientific revolutions can never be precluded. We cannot say with unblinking confidence what sorts of resources and conceptions the science of the future will or will not use. Given that it is effectively impossible to predict the details of what future science will accomplish, it is no less impossible to predict in detail what future science will not accomplish. We can never confidently put this or that range of issues outside “the limits of science”, because we cannot discern the shape and substance of future science with sufficient clarity to be able to say with any assurance what it can and cannot do. Any attempt to set “limits” to science—any advance specification of what science can and cannot do by way of handling problems and solving questions—is destined to come to grief.
The Limits of Science (1984), 102-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Advance (123)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discerning (7)  |  Effectiveness (10)  |  Future (229)  |  Handling (7)  |  Implication (14)  |  Importance (183)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Issue (37)  |  Limit (86)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Present (103)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Range (38)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  Shape (52)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Specification (5)  |  State (96)  |  Substance (73)  |  Unpredictability (5)

The statistician cannot excuse himself from the duty of getting his head clear on the principles of scientific inference, but equally no other thinking man can avoid a like obligation.
The Design of Experiments (1935), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Statistics (125)

Theories rarely arise as patient inferences forced by accumulated facts. Theories are mental constructs potentiated by complex external prods (including, in idealized cases, a commanding push from empirical reality) . But the prods often in clude dreams, quirks, and errors–just as we may obtain crucial bursts of energy from foodstuffs or pharmaceuticals of no objective or enduring value. Great truth can emerge from small error. Evolution is thrilling, liberating, and correct. And Macrauchenia is a litoptern.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (18)  |  Arise (32)  |  Burst (17)  |  Case (64)  |  Command (14)  |  Complex (78)  |  Construct (25)  |  Correct (53)  |  Crucial (8)  |  Dream (92)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Empirical (15)  |  Endure (12)  |  Energy (185)  |  Error (230)  |  Evolution (482)  |  External (45)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Great (300)  |  Include (27)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Mental (57)  |  Objective (49)  |  Obtain (21)  |  Often (69)  |  Patient (116)  |  Pharmaceutical (3)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Push (22)  |  Quirk (2)  |  Rarely (9)  |  Reality (140)  |  Small (97)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thrill (14)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

There is a mask of theory over the whole face of nature, if it be theory to infer more than we see.
The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History (1840), Vol. 1, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Face (69)  |  Mask (7)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Theory (582)  |  Whole (122)

There is nothing distinctively scientific about the hypothetico-deductive process. It is not even distinctively intellectual. It is merely a scientific context for a much more general stratagem that underlies almost all regulative processes or processes of continuous control, namely feedback, the control of performance by the consequences of the act performed. In the hypothetico-deductive scheme the inferences we draw from a hypothesis are, in a sense, its logical output. If they are true, the hypothesis need not be altered, but correction is obligatory if they are false. The continuous feedback from inference to hypothesis is implicit in Whewell’s account of scientific method; he would not have dissented from the view that scientific behaviour can be classified as appropriately under cybernetics as under logic.
Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1969), 54-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Behaviour (24)  |  Classification (79)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Context (17)  |  Control (93)  |  Correction (28)  |  Cybernetics (3)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Distinctive (8)  |  False (79)  |  Feedback (8)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Implicit (4)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Logic (187)  |  Output (9)  |  Performance (27)  |  Process (201)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Stratagem (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  William Whewell (55)

Those who are unacquainted with the details of scientific investigation have no idea of the amount of labour expended in the determination of those numbers on which important calculations or inferences depend. They have no idea of the patience shown by a Berzelius in determining atomic weights; by a Regnault in determining coefficients of expansion; or by a Joule in determining the mechanical equivalent of heat.
In Sound: A Course of Eight Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain (1867), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Weight (6)  |  Jöns Jacob Berzelius (13)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Depend (56)  |  Detail (65)  |  Determination (53)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Important (124)  |  Investigation (123)  |  James Prescott Joule (7)  |  Labor (53)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Number (179)  |  Patience (31)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientific (169)

Truly grand and powerful theories … do not and cannot rest upon single observations. Evolution is an inference from thousands of independent sources, the only conceptual structure that can make unified sense of all this disparate information. The failure of a particular claim usually records a local error, not the bankruptcy of a central theory … If I mistakenly identify your father’s brother as your own dad, you don’t become genealogically rootless and created de novo. You still have a father; we just haven’t located him properly.
Leonardo’s Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms: Essays on Natural History (1998), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Evolution (482)

We can scarcely avoid the inference that light consists in the transverse undulations of the same medium which is the cause of electric and magnetic phenomena.
'On Physical Lines of Force' (1862). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 1, 500.
Science quotes on:  |  Electromagnetism (17)  |  Light (246)  |  Light Wave (2)  |  Phenomenon (218)

We do not learn by inference and deduction, and the application of mathematics to philosophy, but by direct intercourse and sympathy.
In 'Natural History of Massachusetts', The Dial: A Magazine for Literature, Philosophy, and Religion (Jul 1842), 3, No. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Direct (44)  |  Intercourse (4)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Sympathy (15)

Whoever wishes to acquire a deep acquaintance with Nature must observe that there are analogies which connect whole branches of science in a parallel manner, and enable us to infer of one class of phenomena what we know of another. It has thus happened on several occasions that the discovery of an unsuspected analogy between two branches of knowledge has been the starting point for a rapid course of discovery.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 631.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (13)  |  Analogy (46)  |  Class (64)  |  Connection (86)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Observation (418)  |  Occasion (12)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Unsuspected (5)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.