Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Systematic

Systematic Quotes (25 quotes)

Philosophie [ist] der systematische Miίbrauch einer eigens zu diesem Zwecke ersonnenen Terminologie.
Philosophy [is] the systematic abuse of a terminology specially designed for this purpose.
In Die Philosophie der Mathematik in der Gegenwart (1932), 1. English version from Google Translate.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Designed (3)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Specially (2)  |  Terminology (7)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (28)  |  Art (205)  |  Effort (94)  |  Experiment (543)  |  First (174)  |  Humankind (7)  |  Link (29)  |  Magic (67)  |  Matter (270)  |  Modern (104)  |  Science (1699)  |  Secret (98)  |  Unlock (4)

As systematic unity is what first raises ordinary knowledge to the rank of science, that is, makes a system out of a mere aggregate of knowledge, architectonic is the doctrine of the scientific in our knowledge, and therefore necessarily forms part of the doctrine of method.
In'The Transcendental Doctrine of Method', Critique of Pure Reason (2016), 653. Note: architectonic = the art of constructing systems.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (8)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Unity (43)

At the beginning of its existence as a science, biology was forced to take cognizance of the seemingly boundless variety of living things, for no exact study of life phenomena was possible until the apparent chaos of the distinct kinds of organisms had been reduced to a rational system. Systematics and morphology, two predominantly descriptive and observational disciplines, took precedence among biological sciences during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. More recently physiology has come to the foreground, accompanied by the introduction of quantitative methods and by a shift from the observationalism of the past to a predominance of experimentation.
In Genetics and the Origin of Species (1937, 1982), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  19th Century (22)  |  Biology (150)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Description (72)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Foreground (3)  |  Introduction (31)  |  Morphology (18)  |  Observation (418)  |  Organism (126)  |  Physiology (66)  |  Precedence (2)  |  Predominance (2)  |  Rational (42)  |  Shift (21)  |  Variety (53)

Chemists have made of phlogiston a vague principle which is not at all rigorously defined, and which, in consequence, adapts itself to all explanations in which it is wished it shall enter; sometimes it is free fire, sometimes it is fire combined with the earthy element; sometimes it passes through the pores of vessels, sometimes they are impenetrable to it; it explains both the causticity and non-causticity, transparency and opacity, colours and absence of colours. It is a veritable Proteus which changes its form every instant. It is time to conduct chemistry to a more rigorous mode of reasoning ... to distinguish fact and observation from what is systematic and hypothetical.
'Réflexions sur le phlogistique', Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences, 1783, 505-38. Reprinted in Oeuvres de Lavoisier (1864), Vol. 2, 640, trans. M. P. Crosland.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Definition (152)  |  Element (129)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fire (117)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Observation (418)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reasoning (79)

Consciously and systematically Klein sought to enthrall me with the problems of mathematical physics, and to win me over to his conception of these problems as developed it in lecture courses in previous years. I have always regarded Klein as my real teacher only in things mathematical, but also in mathematical physics and in my conception of mechanics.
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 526. Cited from 'Autobiographische Skizze', Gesammelte Schriften, Vol 4, 673–682.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (55)  |  Conception (63)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Course (57)  |  Develop (55)  |  Felix Klein (5)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Mathematical Physics (3)  |  Mechanics (44)  |  Problem (362)  |  Real (95)  |  Regard (58)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Win (25)

Does the evolutionary doctrine clash with religious faith? It does not. It is a blunder to mistake the Holy Scriptures for elementary textbooks of astronomy, geology, biology, and anthropology. Only if symbols are construed to mean what they are not intended to mean can there arise imaginary, insoluble conflicts. ... the blunder leads to blasphemy: the Creator is accused of systematic deceitfulness.
In 'Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution', The American Biology Teacher (Mar 1973), 125-129.
Science quotes on:  |  Accused (2)  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Arise (32)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Biology (150)  |  Blasphemy (4)  |  Blunder (13)  |  Clash (7)  |  Conflict (49)  |  Construed (2)  |  Creator (40)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Faith (131)  |  Geology (187)  |  Holy (14)  |  Imaginary (10)  |  Insoluble (13)  |  Intended (3)  |  Lead (101)  |  Mean (63)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Religious (44)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Scripture (9)  |  Symbol (35)  |  Textbook (19)

Engineering is the professional and systematic application of science to the efficient utilization of natural resources to produce wealth.
T. J. Hoover and John Charles Lounsbury (J.C.L.) Fish, The Engineering Profession (1941), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Definition (152)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Produce (63)  |  Profession (54)  |  Science (1699)  |  Use (70)  |  Wealth (50)

In all disciplines in which there is systematic knowledge of things with principles, causes, or elements, it arises from a grasp of those: we think we have knowledge of a thing when we have found its primary causes and principles, and followed it back to its elements. Clearly, then, systematic knowledge of nature must start with an attempt to settle questions about principles.
Aristotle
In Physics Book 1, Chap 1, as translated in J.L. Ackrill, A New Aristotle Reader (1988), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (32)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Cause (231)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Element (129)  |  Find (248)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Primary (29)  |  Principle (228)  |  Question (315)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Settle (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Think (205)  |  Understand (189)

In mathematics ... we find two tendencies present. On the one hand, the tendency towards abstraction seeks to crystallise the logical relations inherent in the maze of materials ... being studied, and to correlate the material in a systematic and orderly
Geometry and the imagination (New York, 1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Correlate (3)  |  Find (248)  |  Hand (103)  |  Inherent (27)  |  Logical (20)  |  Material (124)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Maze (9)  |  Orderly (6)  |  Present (103)  |  Relation (96)  |  Seek (57)  |  Study (331)  |  Tendency (40)

In the field of thinking, the whole history of science from geocentrism to the Copernican revolution, from the false absolutes of Aristotle’s physics to the relativity of Galileo’s principle of inertia and to Einstein’s theory of relativity, shows that it has taken centuries to liberate us from the systematic errors, from the illusions caused by the immediate point of view as opposed to “decentered” systematic thinking.
As quoted in D. E. Berlyne, Structure and Direction in Thinking (1965), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Aristotle (141)  |  Century (94)  |  Decentered (2)  |  Albert Einstein (535)  |  Error (230)  |  False (79)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Inertia (10)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Oppose (16)  |  Physics (301)  |  Point Of View (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Relativity (50)  |  Theory (582)

It is the desire for explanations that are at once systematic and controllable by factual evidence that generates science; and it is the organization and classification of knowledge on the basis of explanatory principles that is the distinctive goal of the sciences.
The Structure of Science (1961), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (60)  |  Classification (79)  |  Control (93)  |  Desire (101)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Fact (609)  |  Goal (81)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Organization (79)  |  Science (1699)

It would not be difficult to come to an agreement as to what we understand by science. Science is the century-old endeavor to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thoroughgoing an association as possible. To put it boldly, it is the attempt at the posterior reconstruction of existence by the process of conceptualization. But when asking myself what religion is I cannot think of the answer so easily. And even after finding an answer which may satisfy me at this particular moment, I still remain convinced that I can never under any circumstances bring together, even to a slight extent, the thoughts of all those who have given this question serious consideration.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (29)  |  Answer (201)  |  Ask (99)  |  Association (15)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Boldly (2)  |  Bring (53)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Convinced (16)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Easily (16)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extent (30)  |  Find (248)  |  Give (117)  |  Means (109)  |  Moment (61)  |  Myself (22)  |  Particular (54)  |  Perceptible (4)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possible (100)  |  Posterior (3)  |  Process (201)  |  Question (315)  |  Reconstruction (13)  |  Religion (210)  |  Remain (77)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  Serious (37)  |  Slight (18)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Together (48)  |  Understand (189)  |  World (667)

Man, biologically considered, and whatever else he may be into the bargain, is simply the most formidable of all the beasts of prey, and, indeed, the only one that preys systematically on its own species.
From 'Remarks at The Peace Banquet' (7 Oct 1904), Boston, on the closing day of the World’s Peace Congress. Printed in Atlantic Monthly (Dec 1904), 845-846. Collected in Essays in Religion and Morality (1982), Vol. 9, 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Beast (32)  |  Biological (21)  |  Formidable (6)  |  Man (345)  |  Prey (9)  |  Species (181)

Mathematics, including not merely Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and the higher Calculus, but also the applied Mathematics of Natural Philosophy, has a marked and peculiar method or character; it is by preeminence deductive or demonstrative, and exhibits in a nearly perfect form all the machinery belonging to this mode of obtaining truth. Laying down a very small number of first principles, either self-evident or requiring very little effort to prove them, it evolves a vast number of deductive truths and applications, by a procedure in the highest degree mathematical and systematic.
In Education as a Science (1879), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (36)  |  Applied Mathematics (10)  |  Arithmetic (68)  |  Calculus (23)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Method (154)  |  Natural Philosophy (21)  |  Principle (228)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Truth (750)

Organization is simply the means by which the acts of ordinary men can be made to add up to extraordinary results. To this idea of progress that does not wait on some lucky break, some chance discovery, or some rare stroke of genius, but instead is achieved through systematic, cumulative effort, the engineer has contributed brilliantly.
In A Professional Guide for Young Engineers (1949, 1967), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Act (80)  |  Add (26)  |  Brilliance (8)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cumulative (8)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Genius (186)  |  Idea (440)  |  Luck (25)  |  Means (109)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organization (79)  |  Progress (317)  |  Rare (31)  |  Result (250)  |  Simply (34)  |  Stroke (5)  |  Waiting (9)

Our first endeavors are purely instinctive prompting of an imagination vivid and undisciplined. As we grow older reason asserts itself and we become more and more systematic and designing. But those early impulses, though not immediately productive, are o
http://web.archive.org/web/20070109161311/http://www.knowprose.com/node/12961
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (11)  |  Become (100)  |  Design (92)  |  Early (39)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  First (174)  |  Grow (66)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Old (104)  |  Productive (10)  |  Prompt (5)  |  Purely (15)  |  Reason (330)  |  Undisciplined (2)  |  Vivid (16)

Psychology … tells us that we rarely work through reasons and evidence in a systematic way; weighing information carefully and suspending the impulse to draw conclusions. Instead, much of the time we use mental shortcuts or rules of thumb that save us mental effort. These habits often work reasonably well, but they also can lead us to conclusions we might dismiss if we applied more thought.
As co-author with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, in unSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation (2007), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (12)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Dismiss (6)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Habit (78)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Information (102)  |  Mental (57)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rule Of Thumb (2)  |  Shortcut (3)  |  Thought (374)

Take the living human brain endowed with mind and thought. …. The physicist brings his tools and commences systematic exploration. All that he discovers is a collection of atoms and electrons and fields of force arranged in space and time, apparently similar to those found in inorganic objects. He may trace other physical characteristics, energy, temperature, entropy. None of these is identical with thought. … How can this collection of ordinary atoms be a thinking machine? … The Victorian physicist felt that he knew just what he was talking about when he used such terms as matter and atoms. … But now we realize that science has nothing to say as to the intrinsic nature of the atom. The physical atom is, like everything else in physics, a schedule of pointer readings.
From a Gifford Lecture, University of Edinburgh (1927), published in 'Pointer Readings: Limits of Physical Knowledge', The Nature of the Physical World (1929), 258-259.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Brain (181)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Energy (185)  |  Entropy (40)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Field (119)  |  Force (194)  |  Identical (17)  |  Inorganic (11)  |  Intrinsic (10)  |  Life (917)  |  Machine (133)  |  Matter (270)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Reading (51)  |  Temperature (42)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Tool (70)  |  Victorian (5)

Technology means the systematic application of scientific or other organized knowledge to practical tasks.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Means (109)  |  Organize (14)  |  Practical (93)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Task (68)  |  Technology (199)

The end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century were remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. ... Mathematics were at the last gasp, and Astronomy nearly so—I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.
Quoted in Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan, Memoir of Augustus De Morgan (1882), 41
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  19th Century (22)  |  Amount (20)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Chill (7)  |  Department (33)  |  Exact (38)  |  Excitement (33)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Last (19)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Movement (65)  |  Precision (38)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Research (517)  |  Routine (11)  |  Science (1699)  |  Small (97)  |  Spread (19)  |  Want (120)

The family unit is the institution for the systematic production of mental illness.
From interview on TV program, The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson. As quoted and cited in David Berg, Run, Brother, Run: A Memoir of a Murder in My Family (2013), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Family (37)  |  Institution (32)  |  Mental Illness (3)  |  Production (105)  |  Unit (25)

The life work of the engineer consists in the systematic application of natural forces and the systematic development of natural resources in the service of man.
Paper presented (15 Nov 1905) to the Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, Washington, D.C., Proceedings of the 19th Annual Convention of the Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations (1906), Vol. 19-24, 90. Initials only given in this paper for H.W. Tyler (of Massachussetts); Webmaster tentatively matched with Harry Walter Tyler of M.I.T.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Definition (152)  |  Development (228)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Natural Forces (2)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Service (54)

This is what nonscientists don’t know, and this is what scientists are too bashful to talk about publicly, at least until they grow old enough to be shameless. Science at its highest level is ultimately the organization of, the systematic pursuit of, and
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 274.
Science quotes on:  |  Grow (66)  |  High (78)  |  Know (321)  |  Least (43)  |  Level (51)  |  Nonscientist (3)  |  Old (104)  |  Organization (79)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Talk (61)  |  Ultimately (11)

When I was a little over eight years old,… I was sent to a day-school…. [By this time] my taste for natural history, and more especially for collecting, was well developed. I tried to make out the names of plants, and collected all sorts of things, shells, seals, franks, coins, and minerals. The passion for collecting which leads a man to be a systematic naturalist, a virtuoso, or a miser, was very strong in me.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (55)  |  Coin (9)  |  Collect (10)  |  Developed (8)  |  Mineral (37)  |  Miser (3)  |  Name (118)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Passion (54)  |  Plant (173)  |  School (87)  |  Seal (10)  |  Shell (35)  |  Strong (47)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.