Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Try

Try Quotes (283 quotes)

...I may perhaps venture a short word on the question much discussed in certain quarters, whether in the work of excavation it is a good thing to have cooperation between men and women ... Of a mixed dig ... I have seen something, and it is an experiment that I would be reluctant to try again. I would grant if need be that women are admirable fitted for the work, yet I would uphold that they should undertake it by themselves ... the work of an excavator on the dig and off it lays on those who share it a bond of closer daily intercourse than is conceivable ... between men and women, except in chance cases, I do not believe that such close and unavoidable companionship can ever be other than a source of irritation; at any rate, I believe that however it may affect women, the ordinary male at least cannot stand it ... A minor ... objection lies in one particular form of contraint ... moments will occur on the best regulated dig when you want to say just what you think without translation, which before the ladies, whatever their feelings about it, cannot be done.
Archaeological Excavation (1915), 63-64. In Getzel M. Cohen and Martha Sharp Joukowsky Breaking Ground (2006), 557-558. By (), 163-164.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Best (459)  |  Bond (45)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chance (239)  |  Closer (43)  |  Companionship (4)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Daily (87)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Lie (364)  |  Moment (253)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Share (75)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Stand (274)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Translation (21)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Want (497)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Women Scientists (13)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

...the scientific attitude implies what I call the postulate of objectivity—that is to say, the fundamental postulate that there is no plan, that there is no intention in the universe. Now, this is basically incompatible with virtually all the religious or metaphysical systems whatever, all of which try to show that there is some sort of harmony between man and the universe and that man is a product—predictable if not indispensable—of the evolution of the universe.
Quoted in John C. Hess, 'French Nobel Biologist Says World Based On Chance', New York Times (15 Mar 1971), 6. Cited in Herbert Marcuse, Counter-Revolution and Revolt (1972), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Call (769)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Intention (46)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Plan (117)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Product (160)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  System (537)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whatever (234)

...there is no prescribed route to follow to arrive at a new idea. You have to make the intuitive leap. But the difference is that once you’ve made the intuitive leap you have to justify it by filling in the intermediate steps. In my case, it often happens that I have an idea, but then I try to fill in the intermediate steps and find that they don’t work, so I have to give it up.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (35)  |  Case (99)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Give (202)  |  Happen (274)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Justify (24)  |  Leap (53)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Often (106)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Route (15)  |  Step (231)  |  Work (1351)

Air Chief Marshal Harris [objecting to a change in strategy recommended by statisticians]: Are we fighting this war with weapons or the slide rule?
Churchill [after puffing on his cigar]: That's a good idea. Let's try the slide rule.
During World War II, Britain lost the advantage when enemy U-boats began listening in to the aircraft radar, were forewarned, and would dive. U-boat sinkings fell to zero. Physicist Patrick S. Blackett with his Operational Research colleagues came up with a solution. Concentrate sufficient aircraft in certain areas, causing the subs to dive so frequently their air supply and batteries were exhausted, forcing them to remain on the surface and be vulnerable to attack. The strategy required diverting several squadrons from Bomber Command to Coastal Command. “Bomber” Harris voiced his objection to Churchill, who made the right choice, proved by successful results. As described by R.V. Jones, 'Churchill and Science', in Robert Blake and Wm. Roger Louis (eds.), Churchill (1996), 437.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Patrick M.S. Blackett (9)  |  Change (593)  |  Chief (97)  |  Fighting (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Rule (294)  |  Slide Rule (2)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Strategy (13)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)

Alles Gescheite ist schon gedacht worden; man muss nur versuchen, es noch einmal zu denken.
Everything that is worth thinking has already been thought; one must only try to think it again.
As translated in William Francis Henry King (ed.), Classical and Foreign Quotations: A Polyglot Manual of Historical (1904), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Everything (476)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Worth (169)

M.A. Rosanoff: Mr. Edison, please tell me what laboratory rules you want me to observe.
Edison: Hell! There ain’t no rules around here! We’re trying to accomplish somep’n.
In Martin André Rosanoff, 'Edison in His Laboratory', Harper’s Magazine (Sep 1932), 403.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Aint (4)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Observe (168)  |  Please (65)  |  Rule (294)  |  Tell (340)  |  Trying (144)  |  Want (497)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Pain (136)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

A central lesson of science is that to understand complex issues (or even simple ones), we must try to free our minds of dogma and to guarantee the freedom to publish, to contradict, and to experiment. Arguments from authority are unacceptable.
Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millenium (1998), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Central (80)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publication (101)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Unacceptable (3)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

A designer must always think about the unfortunate production engineer who will have to manufacture what you have designed; try to understand his problems.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (195)  |  Designer (6)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Must (1526)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Will (2355)

A few days afterwards, I went to him [the same actuary referred to in another quote] and very gravely told him that I had discovered the law of human mortality in the Carlisle Table, of which he thought very highly. I told him that the law was involved in this circumstance. Take the table of the expectation of life, choose any age, take its expectation and make the nearest integer a new age, do the same with that, and so on; begin at what age you like, you are sure to end at the place where the age past is equal, or most nearly equal, to the expectation to come. “You don’t mean that this always happens?”—“Try it.” He did try, again and again; and found it as I said. “This is, indeed, a curious thing; this is a discovery!” I might have sent him about trumpeting the law of life: but I contented myself with informing him that the same thing would happen with any table whatsoever in which the first column goes up and the second goes down.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Actuary (2)  |  Age (499)  |  Begin (260)  |  Choose (112)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Column (15)  |  Content (69)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Equal (83)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Highly (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inform (47)  |  Informing (5)  |  Integer (10)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  New Age (6)  |  Past (337)  |  Place (177)  |  Quote (42)  |  Send (22)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trumpet (2)  |  Up (5)  |  Whatsoever (41)

A great surgeon performs operations for stone by a single method; later he makes a statistical summary of deaths and recoveries, and he concludes from these statistics that the mortality law for this operation is two out of five. Well, I say that this ratio means literally nothing scientifically and gives us no certainty in performing the next operation; for we do not know whether the next case will be among the recoveries or the deaths. What really should be done, instead of gathering facts empirically, is to study them more accurately, each in its special determinism. We must study cases of death with great care and try to discover in them the cause of mortal accidents so as to master the cause and avoid the accidents.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 137-138. (Note that Bernard overlooks how the statistical method can be useful: a surgeon announcing a mortality rate of 40% invites comparison. A surgeon with worse outcomes should adopt this method. If a surgeon has a better results, that method should be adopted.)
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Care (186)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Death (388)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Literally (30)  |  Master (178)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performing (3)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Special (184)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

A man must cling to the belief that the incomprehensible is comprehensible; otherwise he would not try to fathom it.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Cling (6)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Incomprehensible (29)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)

A man who is convinced of the truth of his religion is indeed never tolerant. At the least, he is to feel pity for the adherent of another religion but usually it does not stop there. The faithful adherent of a religion will try first of all to convince those that believe in another religion and usually he goes on to hatred if he is not successful. However, hatred then leads to persecution when the might of the majority is behind it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Belief (578)  |  Convince (41)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Pity (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Stop (80)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

A person by study must try to disengage the subject from useless matter, and to seize on points capable of improvement. ... When subjects are viewed through the mists of prejudice, useful truths may escape.
In An Essay on Aërial Navigation, With Some Observations on Ships (1844), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Disengage (3)  |  Escape (80)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mist (14)  |  Must (1526)  |  Person (363)  |  Point (580)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Seize (15)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  View (488)

A theory is scientific only if it can be disproved. But the moment you try to cover absolutely everything the chances are that you cover nothing.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cover (37)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Everything (476)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Theory (970)

A wrench is a great tool, but don’t try to drive a nail with it.
Anonymous
Science quotes on:  |  Drive (55)  |  Great (1574)  |  Nail (7)  |  Tool (117)  |  Wrench (2)

About the use of language: it is impossible to sharpen a pencil with a blunt axe. It is equally vain to try to do it with ten blunt axes instead.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Axe (15)  |  Blunt (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equally (130)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instead (21)  |  Language (293)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Use (766)  |  Vain (83)

Again the message to experimentalists is: Be sensible but don’t be impressed too much by negative arguments. If at all possible, try it and see what turns up. Theorists almost always dislike this sort of approach.
What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Message (49)  |  Negative (63)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Turn (447)

Alice laughed: “There’s no use trying,” she said; “one can’t believe impossible things.” “I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was younger, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”
In Through the Looking-glass: And what Alice Found There (1875), 100.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alice (7)  |  Belief (578)  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Hour (186)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Practice (204)  |  Queen (14)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trying (144)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)  |  Younger (21)

Alike fantastic, if too new, or old;
Be not the first by whom the new are try'd,
Not yet the last to lay the old aside.
In An Essay on Criticism. With notes by Mr. Warburton (1749), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  First (1283)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Last (426)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)

All government, in its essence, is organized exploitation, and in virtually all its existing forms it is the implacable enemy of every industrious and well-disposed man ... The typical politician is not only a rascal but also a jackass, so he greatly values the puerile notoriety and adulation that sensible men try to avoid.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Essence (82)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exploitation (14)  |  Form (959)  |  Government (110)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Jackass (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Notoriety (2)  |  Organize (29)  |  Politician (38)  |  Rascal (3)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Typical (13)  |  Value (365)  |  Virtually (6)

All Nature bristles with the marks of interrogation—among the grass and the petals of flowers, amidst the feathers of birds and the hairs of mammals, on mountain and moorland, in sea and sky-everywhere. It is one of the joys of life to discover those marks of interrogation, these unsolved and half-solved problems and try to answer their questions.
In Riddles of Science (1932), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bristle (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Feather (12)  |  Flower (106)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hair (25)  |  Interrogation (4)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Mark (43)  |  Moorland (2)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Petal (4)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sky (161)  |  Solved (2)  |  Unsolved (15)

All that stuff I was taught about evolution, embryology, Big Bang theory, all that is lies straight from the pit of hell. It’s lies to try to keep me and all the folks who are taught that from understanding that they need a savior.
[Revealing his anti-science views, contrary to the qualifications needed to make important public policy on matters of science.]
From speech (27 Sep 2012) to a sportman's banquet at Liberty Baptist Church, Hartwell, Georgia, as quoted in Matt Pearce, 'U.S. Rep. Paul Broun: Evolution a lie ‘from the pit of hell’', Los angeles Times (7 Oct 2012).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Hell (32)  |  Lie (364)  |  Matter (798)  |  Pit (19)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Savior (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Straight (73)  |  Theory (970)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)

Anyone of common mental and physical health can practice scientific research. … Anyone can try by patient experiment what happens if this or that substance be mixed in this or that proportion with some other under this or that condition. Anyone can vary the experiment in any number of ways. He that hits in this fashion on something novel and of use will have fame. … The fame will be the product of luck and industry. It will not be the product of special talent.
In Essays of a Catholic Layman in England (1931).
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fame (50)  |  Happen (274)  |  Health (193)  |  Industry (137)  |  Luck (42)  |  Mental (177)  |  Novel (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physical (508)  |  Practice (204)  |  Product (160)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Something (719)  |  Special (184)  |  Substance (248)  |  Talent (94)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)

Anyone who thinks science is trying to make human life easier or more pleasant is utterly mistaken.
In 'Quotation Marks', New York Times (11 Oct 1931), XX2.
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easier (53)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mistaken (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Trying (144)  |  Utterly (15)

Anyone who tries to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn’t know the first thing about either.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (35)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Education (378)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  First (1283)  |  Know (1518)  |  Thing (1915)

Archaeology is the science of digging in the earth to try and find a civilization worse than ours.
Anonymous
In Evan Esar, 20,000 Quips & Quotes (1968, 1995), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Digging (11)  |  Earth (996)  |  Find (998)  |  Science (3879)  |  Worse (24)

Arithmetic is where the answer is right and everything is nice and you can look out of the window and see the blue sky—or the answer is wrong and you have to start all over and try again and see how it comes out this time.
From 'Arithmetic', Harvest Poems, 1910-1960 (1960), 115.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Blue (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Look (582)  |  Nice (13)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Sky (161)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Window (58)  |  Wrong (234)

As we push ever more deeply into the universe, probing its secrets, discovering its way, we must also constantly try to learn to cooperate across the frontiers that really divide earth’s surface.
In 'The President’s News Conference at the LBJ Ranch' (29 Aug 1965). Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson: 1965 (1966), 945.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Probe (12)  |  Push (62)  |  Really (78)  |  Secret (194)  |  Surface (209)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

Because intelligence is our own most distinctive feature, we may incline to ascribe superior intelligence to the basic primate plan, or to the basic plan of the mammals in general, but this point requires some careful consideration. There is no question at all that most mammals of today are more intelligent than most reptiles of today. I am not going to try to define intelligence or to argue with those who deny thought or consciousness to any animal except man. It seems both common and scientific sense to admit that ability to learn, modification of action according to the situation, and other observable elements of behavior in animals reflect their degrees of intelligence and permit us, if only roughly, to compare these degrees. In spite of all difficulties and all the qualifications with which the expert (quite properly) hedges his conclusions, it also seems sensible to conclude that by and large an animal is likely to be more intelligent if it has a larger brain at a given body size and especially if its brain shows greater development of those areas and structures best developed in our own brains. After all, we know we are intelligent, even though we wish we were more so.
In The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Area (31)  |  Argument (138)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Basic (138)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Care (186)  |  Common (436)  |  Compare (69)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Degree (276)  |  Deny (66)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Element (310)  |  Expert (65)  |  Feature (44)  |  General (511)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Larger (14)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observable (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permit (58)  |  Plan (117)  |  Point (580)  |  Primate (11)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Question (621)  |  Reptile (29)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Show (346)  |  Situation (113)  |  Size (60)  |  Spite (55)  |  Structure (344)  |  Superior (81)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Wish (212)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciatively (2)  |  Audience (26)  |  Back (390)  |  Basket (7)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (5)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conference (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Court (33)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Curious (91)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Game (101)  |  Graceful (3)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jump (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Leave (130)  |  Local (19)  |  Long (790)  |  March (46)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Net (11)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Promise (67)  |  Providence (18)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Routine (25)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Southern (3)  |  Start (221)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Team (15)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warming (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (933)

But for the persistence of a student of this university in urging upon me his desire to study with me the modern algebra I should never have been led into this investigation; and the new facts and principles which I have discovered in regard to it (important facts, I believe), would, so far as I am concerned, have remained still hidden in the womb of time. In vain I represented to this inquisitive student that he would do better to take up some other subject lying less off the beaten track of study, such as the higher parts of the calculus or elliptic functions, or the theory of substitutions, or I wot not what besides. He stuck with perfect respectfulness, but with invincible pertinacity, to his point. He would have the new algebra (Heaven knows where he had heard about it, for it is almost unknown in this continent), that or nothing. I was obliged to yield, and what was the consequence? In trying to throw light upon an obscure explanation in our text-book, my brain took fire, I plunged with re-quickened zeal into a subject which I had for years abandoned, and found food for thoughts which have engaged my attention for a considerable time past, and will probably occupy all my powers of contemplation advantageously for several months to come.
In Johns Hopkins Commemoration Day Address, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 3, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continent (76)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Engage (39)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Food (199)  |  Function (228)  |  Hear (139)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Less (103)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modern (385)  |  Month (88)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probably (49)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Several (32)  |  Stick (24)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Track (38)  |  Trying (144)  |  University (121)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Urge (17)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Womb (24)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)  |  Zeal (11)

By the worldly standards of public life, all scholars in their work are of course oddly virtuous. They do not make wild claims, they do not cheat, they do not try to persuade at any cost, they appeal neither to prejudice nor to authority, they are often frank about their ignorance, their disputes are fairly decorous, they do not confuse what is being argued with race, politics, sex or age, they listen patiently to the young and to the old who both know everything. These are the general virtues of scholarship, and they are peculiarly the virtues of science.
In Science and Human Values (1956).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Authority (95)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Claim (146)  |  Cost (86)  |  Course (409)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  General (511)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Old (481)  |  Politics (112)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Race (268)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Virtuous (9)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

Can one think that because we are engineers, beauty does not preoccupy us or that we do not try to build beautiful, as well as solid and long lasting structures? Aren’t the genuine functions of strength always in keeping with unwritten conditions of harmony? … Besides, there is an attraction, a special charm in the colossal to which ordinary theories of art do not apply.
As translated in Henry Petroski, Remaking the World: Adventures in Engineering (1998), 173. From the original French in interview of Eiffel by Paul Bourde, in the newspaper Le Temps (14 Feb 1887). Quoted in 'Au Jour le Jour: Les Artistes Contre la Tour Eiffel', Gazette Anecdotique, Littéraire, Artistique et Bibliographique (Feb 1887), 126, and in Gustave Eiffel, Travaux Scientifiques Exécutés à la Tour de 300 Mètres de 1889 à 1900 (1900), 14. “Parce que nous sommes des ingénieurs, croit-on donc que la beauté ne nous préoccupe pas dans nos constructions et qu'en même temps que nous faisons solide et durable nous ne nous efforçons pas rletfaire élégant? Est-ce que les véritables conditions de la force ne sont pas toujours conformes aux conditions secrètes de l'harmonie?.… Il y a du reste dans le colossal une attraction, un charme propre auxquels les théories d'art ordinaires ne sont guère applicables.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Art (657)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Build (204)  |  Charm (51)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Condition (356)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eiffel Tower (12)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Function (228)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Long (790)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Preoccupy (4)  |  Solid (116)  |  Special (184)  |  Strength (126)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)

Caves are wonderful places for lairs
For sabertooth tigers and bears
But “Try and eject us!”
Said Homo erectus,
“We need this place for our heirs!”
In sidebar to 'Evolving Toward Humans', History of Life (1989, 1991), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Cave (15)  |  Heir (12)  |  Need (290)  |  Tiger (7)  |  Wonderful (149)

Committees are dangerous things that need most careful watching. I believe that a research committee can do one useful thing and one only. It can find the workers best fitted to attack a particular problem, bring them together, give them the facilities they need, and leave them to get on with the work. It can review progress from time to time, and make adjustments; but if it tries to do more, it will do harm.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (20)  |  Attack (84)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Bring (90)  |  Careful (24)  |  Committee (15)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Do (1908)  |  Facility (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Fitted (2)  |  Harm (39)  |  Leave (130)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Particular (76)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Review (26)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Useful (250)  |  Watching (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Common-sense contents itself with the unreconciled contradiction, laughs when it can, and weeps when it must, and makes, in short, a practical compromise, without trying a theoretical solution.
From Essay, 'German Pessimism', a book review (of Der Modern Pessimismus by Edmund Pfleiderer) in Nation (7 Oct 1875), 21, No. 536, 233. Reprinted in Ralph Barton Perry (ed.), Collected Essays and Reviews by William James (1920), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Compromise (9)  |  Content (69)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Must (1526)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Solution (267)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Trying (144)  |  Weep (5)

Dad [Walter C. Alvarez] … advised me to sit every few months in my reading chair for an entire evening, close my eyes and try to think of new problems to solve. I took his advice very seriously and have been glad ever since that he did.
In Alvarez: Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Chair (24)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evening (12)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Gladness (5)  |  Month (88)  |  New (1216)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reading (133)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Think (1086)

Diabetus. Ligate pancreatic ducts of dog. Keep dogs alive till acini degenerate leaving Islets. Try to isolate the internal secretion of these to try to relieve glycosurea.
His first inspiration for his future research, while preparing a lecture on the pancreas, and recorded in his notebook. Entry, dated 31 October 1920, in Notebook held by Toronto Academy of Medicine. As quoted in Michael Bliss, The Discovery of Insulin (1982, 1992), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Dog (70)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Internal (66)  |  Pancreas (3)

Do not try the parallels in that way: I know that way all along. I have measured that bottomless night, and all the light and all the joy of my life went out there.
Having himself spent a lifetime unsuccessfully trying to prove Euclid's postulate that parallel lines do not meet, Farkas discouraged his son János from any further attempt.
Letter (4 Apr 1820), to his son, János Bolyai. In J. J. O'Connor and E. F. Robertson, 'Farkas Wolfgang Bolyai' (Mar 2004), web article in MacTutor..
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bottomless (6)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Himself (461)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Night (120)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Prove (250)  |  Spent (85)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)

Do, or do not. There is no try.
Fictional character Yoda in movie The Empire Strikes Back (1980), screenplay by Leigh Brackett and Lawrence Kasdan. As quoted in Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations: From the Inner Mind to the Outer Limits (2006), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Do (1908)

Engineering is quite different from science. Scientists try to understand nature. Engineers try to make things that do not exist in nature. Engineers stress invention. To embody an invention the engineer must put his idea in concrete terms, and design something that people can use. That something can be a device, a gadget, a material, a method, a computing program, an innovative experiment, a new solution to a problem, or an improvement on what is existing. Since a design has to be concrete, it must have its geometry, dimensions, and characteristic numbers. Almost all engineers working on new designs find that they do not have all the needed information. Most often, they are limited by insufficient scientific knowledge. Thus they study mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and mechanics. Often they have to add to the sciences relevant to their profession. Thus engineering sciences are born.
Y.C. Fung and P. Tong, Classical and Computational Solid Mechanics (2001), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biology (216)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Design (195)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Information (166)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Profession (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Stress (22)  |  Study (653)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)

Erasmus Darwin held that every so often you should try a damn-fool experiment. He played the trombone to his tulips. This particular result was, in fact, negative.
In 'The Mathematician’s Art of Work' (1967), collected in Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 194. Webmaster has looked for a primary source to verify this statement and so far has found none. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Erasmus Darwin (40)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Negative (63)  |  Play (112)  |  Result (677)  |  Tulip (2)

Even today I still get letters from young students here and there who say, Why are you people trying to program intelligence? Why don’t you try to find a way to build a nervous system that will just spontaneously create it? Finally I decided that this was either a bad idea or else it would take thousands or millions of neurons to make it work and I couldn’t afford to try to build a machine like that.
As quoted in Jeremy Bernstein, 'A.I.', The New Yorker (14 Dec 1981), 57, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afford (17)  |  Bad (180)  |  Build (204)  |  Computer Science (11)  |  Create (235)  |  Decide (41)  |  Find (998)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Letter (109)  |  Machine (257)  |  Million (114)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Neuron (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Program (52)  |  Say (984)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  System (537)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Today (314)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

Everybody now wants to discover universal laws which will explain the structure and behavior of the nucleus of the atom. But actually our knowledge of the elementary particles that make up the nucleus is tiny. The situation calls for more modesty. We should first try to discover more about these elementary particles and about their laws. Then it will be the time for the major synthesis of what we really know, and the formulation of the universal law.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Call (769)  |  Discover (553)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elementary Particle (2)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Major (84)  |  Modesty (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Particle (194)  |  Situation (113)  |  Structure (344)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Faced with a new mutation in an organism, or a fundamental change in its living conditions, the biologist is frequently in no position whatever to predict its future prospects. He has to wait and see. For instance, the hairy mammoth seems to have been an admirable animal, intelligent and well-accoutered. Now that it is extinct, we try to understand why it failed. I doubt that any biologist thinks he could have predicted that failure. Fitness and survival are by nature estimates of past performance.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Animal (617)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fitness (9)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Hairy (2)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Performance (48)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Prospect (30)  |  See (1081)  |  Survival (94)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Why (491)

For if as scientists we seek simplicity, then obviously we try the simplest surviving theory first, and retreat from it only when it proves false. Not this course, but any other, requires explanation. If you want to go somewhere quickly, and several alternate routes are equally likely to be open, no one asks why you take the shortest. The simplest theory is to be chosen not because it is the most likely to be true but because it is scientifically the most rewarding among equally likely alternatives. We aim at simplicity and hope for truth.
Problems and Projects (1972), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Ask (411)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Course (409)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Hope (299)  |  Most (1731)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prove (250)  |  Require (219)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)

From man or angel the great Architect did wisely to conceal, and not divulge his secrets to be scanned by them who ought rather admire; or if they list to try conjecture, he his fabric of the heavens left to their disputes, perhaps to move his laughter at their quaint opinions wide hereafter, when they come to model heaven calculate the stars, how they will wield the mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive to save appearances, how gird the sphere with centric and eccentric scribbled o’er, and epicycle, orb in orb.
Paradise Lost (1674, 1754), Book 8, 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Architect (29)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Epicycle (4)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Model (102)  |  Move (216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Orb (20)  |  Quaint (7)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wield (10)  |  Will (2355)

Galileo … asserts that in all these phenomena we must measure all that is measurable, and try to make measurable all that is not directly measurable.
From the original French, “Galilée … déclare que dans tous ces phénomènes il faut mesurer tout ce qui est mesurable, et tâcher de rendre mesurable tout ce qui ne l’est pas directement,” in Galilée: Les Droits de la Science et la Méthode des Sciences Physiques (1868), 289. Notice the statement is not enclosed in quotation marks; they are the author’s words, not Galileo’s. Translation by Webmaster using Internet resources. Martin’s words are often repeated as an assumed quote by Galileo: Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so. These words do not come verbatim from any known work by Galileo, and should only be used without quotation marks as Martin’s description of Galileo’s method. Nevertheless, quotation marks have been - erroneously - added in many books, for example, in the transcript of a radio talk by Hermann Weyl, 'Mathematics and the Laws of Nature', collected in Warren Weaver (ed.), The Scientists Speak (1947). Reprinted in Isabel S. Gordon and Sophie Sorkin (eds.), The Armchair Science Reader (1959), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Direct (225)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Measure (232)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Scientific Method (175)

Get a scalpel, and practice just, say, cutting a piece of meat or something like that. You sort of learn how you want to hold your fingers, and that sort of thing, and try to become graceful when you operate.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Learn (629)  |  Meat (16)  |  Practice (204)  |  Say (984)  |  Scalpel (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)

HIBERNATE, v. i. To pass the winter season in domestic seclusion. There have been many singular popular notions about the hibernation of various animals. Many believe that the bear hibernates during the whole winter and subsists by mechanically sucking its paws. It is admitted that it comes out of its retirement in the spring so lean that it has to try twice before it can cast a shadow. 
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  137.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Bear (159)  |  Cast (66)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Hibernation (3)  |  Humour (116)  |  Notion (113)  |  Pass (238)  |  Retirement (7)  |  Season (47)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Singular (23)  |  Spring (133)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winter (44)

However, before we come to [special] creation, which puts an end to all discussion: I think we should try everything else.
De Stella Nova, On the New Star (1606), Chapter 22, in Johannes Kepler Gesammelte Werke (1937-), Vol. 1, 257, ll. 23-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discussion (72)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Special (184)  |  Think (1086)

Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, “We’ve always done it this way.” I try to fight that. That’s why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.
As quoted, without citation, by Kurt W. Beyer, 'Grace Murray Hopper', in Joseph J. Thomas, Leadership Embodied: The Secrets to Success of the Most Effective Navy and Marine Corps Leaders (2005), 160.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Allergy (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Clock (47)  |  Fight (44)  |  Human (1468)  |  Love (309)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Wall (67)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

I always keep two legs going, with one trying to reach ahead.
Quoted in James Gleick, Genius: the Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1993), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (19)  |  Keep (101)  |  Leg (34)  |  Reach (281)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)

I always tried to live up to Leo Szilard's commandment, “don't lie if you don't have to.” I had to. I filled up pages with words and plans I knew I would not follow. When I go home from my laboratory in the late afternoon, I often do not know what I am going to do the next day. I expect to think that up during the night. How could I tell them what I would do a year hence?
In 'Dionysians and Apollonians', Science (2 Jun 1972), 176, 966. Reprinted in Mary Ritchie Key, The Relationship of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication (1980), 318.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Filling (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Late (118)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Page (30)  |  Plan (117)  |  Leo Szilard (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

I am afraid all we can do is to accept the paradox and try to accommodate ourselves to it, as we have done to so many paradoxes lately in modern physical theories. We shall have to get accustomed to the idea that the change of the quantity R, commonly called the 'radius of the universe', and the evolutionary changes of stars and stellar systems are two different processes, going on side by side without any apparent connection between them. After all the 'universe' is an hypothesis, like the atom, and must be allowed the freedom to have properties and to do things which would be contradictory and impossible for a finite material structure.
Kosmos (1932), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Afraid (21)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Atom (355)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Finite (59)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Material (353)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Physical (508)  |  Process (423)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Radius (4)  |  Side (233)  |  Side By Side (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stellar (4)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)

I am born into an environment–I know not whence I came nor whither I go nor who I am. This is my situation as yours, every single one of you. The fact that everyone always was in this same situation, and always will be, tells me nothing. Our burning question as to the whence and whither–all we can ourselves observe about it is the present environment. That is why we are eager to find out about it as much as we can. That is science, learning, knowledge; it is the true source of every spiritual endeavour of man. We try to find out as much as we can about the spatial and temporal surroundings of the place in which we find ourselves put by birth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Birth (147)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Eager (15)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Place (177)  |  Present (619)  |  Question (621)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Source (93)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Surroundings (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temporal (4)  |  True (212)  |  Whither (11)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Failure (161)  |  Trying (144)

I cannot imagine a God who rewards and punishes the objects of his creation, whose purposes are modeled after our own–a God, in short, who is but a reflection of human frailty. Neither can I believe that the individual survives the death of his body, although feeble souls harbor such thoughts through fear or ridiculous egotism. It is enough for me to contemplate the mystery of conscious life perpetuating itself through all eternity, to reflect upon the marvelous structure of the universe which we can dimly perceive, and to try humbly to comprehend even an infinitesimal part of the intelligence manifested in nature.
From 'What I Believe: Living Philosophies XIII', Forum and Century (Oct 1930), 84, No. 4, 194. Article in full, reprinted in Edward H. Cotton (ed.), Has Science Discovered God? A Symposium of Modern Scientific Opinion (1931), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Body (537)  |  Creation (327)  |  Death (388)  |  Enough (340)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeble (27)  |  God (757)  |  Harbor (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Individual (404)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Model (102)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Punish (9)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reward (68)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Short (197)  |  Soul (226)  |  Structure (344)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)

I did try “to make things clear,” first to myself (an important point) and then to my students and somehow to make “these dry bones live.”
His response on his 80th birthday (1929) recognition of his mathematical contributions and teachings by his former students. As quoted by R.T. Glazebrook in Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society (Dec 1935), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Bone (95)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Dry (57)  |  Explanation (234)  |  First (1283)  |  Live (628)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Myself (212)  |  Point (580)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)

I grew up in love with science, asking the same questions all children ask as they try to codify the world to find out what makes it work. “Who is the smartest person in the world?” and “Where is the tallest mountain in the world?” turned into questions like, “How big is the universe?” and “What is it that makes us alive?”
In Introduction to Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), xix.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Codify (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Learn (629)  |  Love (309)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Person (363)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Smart (26)  |  Tall (11)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

I happen to be a kind of monkey. I have a monkeylike curiosity that makes me want to feel, smell, and taste things which arouse my curiosity, then to take them apart. It was born in me. Not everybody is like that, but a scientific researchist should be. Any fool can show me an experiment is useless. I want a man who will try it and get something out of it.
Quoted in Guy Suits, ''Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Apart (7)  |  Arousal (2)  |  Birth (147)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fool (116)  |  Happen (274)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Smell (27)  |  Something (719)  |  Take (10)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

I have lived much of my life among molecules. They are good company. I tell my students to try to know molecules, so well that when they have some question involving molecules, they can ask themselves, What would I do if I were that molecule? I tell them, Try to feel like a molecule; and if you work hard, who knows? Some day you may get to feel like a big molecule!
Nobel banquet speech (10 Dec 1967). In Ragnar Granit (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1967 (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Big (48)  |  Company (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Involvement (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Question (621)  |  Student (300)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

I have patiently born with abundance of Clamour and Ralary [raillery], for beginning a new Practice here (for the Good of the Publick) which comes well Recommended, from Gentlemen of Figure & Learning, and which well agrees to Reason, when try’d & duly considered, viz. Artificially giving the Small Pocks, by Inoculation, to One of my Children, and Two of my Slaves, in order to prevent the hazard of Life… . and they never took one grain or drop of Medicine since, & are perfectly well.
By “clamour” he is referring to the public commotion in Boston reacting to his introduction of smallpox inoculation. Public statement in the Gazette (Jul 10-17), No. 85, 1721. As quoted and cited in Reginald H. Fitz, 'Zabdiel Boylston, Inoculator, and the Epidemic of Smallpox in Boston in 1721', Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (1911), 22, 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Children (200)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Drop (76)  |  Figure (160)  |  Good (889)  |  Grain (50)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Practice (204)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recommend (24)  |  Slave (37)  |  Small (477)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Two (937)

I have tried to avoid long numerical computations, thereby following Riemann’s postulate that proofs should be given through ideas and not voluminous computations.
In Report on Number Theory (1897). As given in epigraph, without citation, in Eberhard Zeidler and Juergen Quandt (trans.), Nonlinear Functional Analysis and its Applications: IV: Applications to Mathematical Physics (2013), 448.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Computation (24)  |  Idea (843)  |  Long (790)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Proof (287)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Through (849)

I love to do research, I want to do research, I have to do research, and I hate to sit down and begin to do research—I always try to put it off just as long as I can.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: an Automathography (1985), 321.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Hate (64)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Research (664)  |  Want (497)

I never allow myself to become discouraged under any circumstances. … After we had conducted thousands of experiments on a certain project without solving the problem, … we had learned something. For we had learned for a certainty that the thing couldn’t be done that way, and that we would have to try some other way. We sometimes learn a lot from our failures if we have put into the effort the best thought and work we are capable of.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Effort (227)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lot (151)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Problem (676)  |  Project (73)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

I raised the visor on my helmet cover and looked out to try to identify constellations. As I looked out into space, I was overwhelmed by the darkness. I felt the flesh crawl on my back and the hair rise on my neck.
In How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space?: All the Answers to All the Questions You Have About Living in Space (1999), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crawl (9)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Hair (25)  |  Identify (13)  |  Look (582)  |  Neck (15)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Raise (35)  |  Rise (166)  |  Space (500)

I really enjoy good murder mystery writers, usually women, frequently English, because they have a sense of what the human soul is about and why people do dark and terrible things. I also read quite a lot in the area of particle physics and quantum mechanics, because this is theology. This is about the nature of being. This is what life is all about. I try to read as widely as I possibly can.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Area (31)  |  Being (1278)  |  Dark (140)  |  Do (1908)  |  English (35)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Murder (13)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Read (287)  |  Really (78)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soul (226)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  Why (491)  |  Widely (9)  |  Woman (151)  |  Writer (86)

I shall never forget the sight. The vessel of crystallization was three quarters full of slightly muddy water—that is, dilute water-glass—and from the sandy bottom there strove upwards a grotesque little landscape of variously colored growths: a confused vegetation of blue, green, and brown shoots which reminded one of algae, mushrooms, attached polyps, also moss, then mussels, fruit pods, little trees or twigs from trees, here, and there of limbs. It was the most remarkable sight I ever saw, and remarkable not so much for its profoundly melancholy nature. For when Father Leverkühn asked us what we thought of it and we timidly answered him that they might be plants: “No,” he replied, “they are not, they only act that way. But do not think the less of them. Precisely because they do, because they try as hard as they can, they are worthy of all respect.”
It turned out that these growths were entirely unorganic in their origin; they existed by virtue of chemicals from the apothecary's shop.
Description of a “chemical garden” in Doktor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkühn, as Told by a Friend, (1947), 19.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Algae (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Brown (23)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Color (137)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Father (110)  |  Forget (115)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Green (63)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hard (243)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Moss (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mushroom (4)  |  Mussel (2)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pod (2)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Respect (207)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sight (132)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tree (246)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twig (14)  |  Upward (43)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

I thank you for your Expt on the Hedge Hog; but why do you ask me such a question, by way of solving it. I think your solution is just; but why think, why not try the Expt.
[Often seen, without context, briefly as: But why think, why not try the experiment?']
Letter to Edward Jenner (2 Aug 1775). In A. J. Harding Rains (ed.), Letters From the Past: From John Hunter to Edward Jenner (1976), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Context (29)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hedgehog (4)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thank You (8)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

I try in my prints to testify that we live in a beautiful and orderly world, and not in a formless chaos, as it sometimes appears.
(1965). As quoted in Michele Emmer and ‎Doris Schattschneider, M.C. Escher’s Legacy: A Centennial Celebration (2007), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Formless (4)  |  Live (628)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Print (17)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Testify (5)  |  World (1774)

I try to identify myself with the atoms ... I ask what I would do If I were a carbon atom or a sodium atom.
Comment made to George Gray (Rockefeller's resident science writer and publicist). Quoted In Thomas Hager, Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling (1995), 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Identification (16)  |  Myself (212)  |  Sodium (14)

I try to make a point not to talk about things I don’t understand—at least the things I do not understand at all.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Point (580)  |  Talk (100)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)

I waited for Rob and, linking arms, we took our final steps together onto the rooftop of the world. It was 8.15 am on 24 May 2004; there was nowhere higher on the planet that we could go, the world lay at our feet. Holding each other tightly, we tried to absorb where we were. To be standing here, together, exactly three years since Rob’s cancer treatment, was nothing short of a miracle. Standing on top of Everest was more than just climbing a mountain - it was a gift of life. With Pemba and Nawang we crowded together, wrapping our arms around each other. They had been more than Sherpas, they had been our guardian angels.
Jo Gambi
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Angel (44)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Climb (35)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Final (118)  |  Foot (60)  |  Gift (104)  |  Guardian (3)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rob (6)  |  Short (197)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Together (387)  |  Top (96)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Wait (58)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Year (933)

I will try to account for the degree of my aesthetic emotion. That, I conceive, is the function of the critic.
In Art (1913), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Critic (20)  |  Degree (276)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Function (228)  |  Will (2355)

I would not be confident in everything I say about the argument: but one thing I would fight for to the end, both in word and in deed if I were able—that if we believe we should try to find out what is not known, we should be better and braver and less idle than if we believed that what we do not know is impossible to find out and that we need not even try.
Socrates
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Both (493)  |  Brave (12)  |  Confident (25)  |  Deed (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Idle (33)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Less (103)  |  Need (290)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

I would picture myself as a virus, or as a cancer cell, for example, and try to sense what it would be like to be either. I would also imagine myself as the immune system, and I would try to reconstruct what I would do as an immune system engaged in combating a virus or cancer cell. When I had played through a series of such scenarios on a particular problem and had acquired new insights, I would design laboratory experiments accordingly… Based upon the results of the experiment, I would then know what question to ask next… When I observed phenomena in the laboratory that I did not understand, I would also ask questions as if interrogating myself: “Why would I do that if I were a virus or a cancer cell, or the immune system?” Before long, this internal dialogue became second nature to me; I found that my mind worked this way all the time.
In Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (1983), 7, footnote b, as quoted and cited in Roger Frantz, Two Minds: Intuition and Analysis in the History of Economic Thought (2006), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cell (138)  |  Combat (15)  |  Design (195)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immune System (3)  |  Insight (102)  |  Internal (66)  |  Interrogate (3)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Scenario (3)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Virus (27)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

I'm not a wizard or a Frankenstein tampering with Nature. We are not creating life. We have merely done what many people try to do in all kinds of medicine—to help nature. We found nature could not put an egg and sperm together, so we did it. We do not see anything immoral in doing that in the interests of the mother. I cannot see anything immoral in trying to help the patient’s problem.
As quoted by thr Associated Press after the birth of Louise Brown, the first baby born by in vitro fertilization. Reprinted in, for example,'First test-tube baby born in England', Toledo Blade (27 Jul 1978), 1. As reported, the first sentence was given in its own quote marks, followed by “Dr. Steptoe said,” so the quote may not have been delivered as a single statement.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Frankenstein (3)  |  Help (105)  |  Immoral (5)  |  Immorality (7)  |  In Vitro (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  See (1081)  |  Sperm (7)  |  Tamper (6)  |  Tampering (3)  |  Together (387)  |  Trying (144)  |  Wizard (4)

I'm not smart. I try to observe. Millions saw the apple fall but Newton was the one who asked 'why.'
Quoted in New York Post (24 Jun 1965). In Alfred J. Kolatch, Great Jewish Quotations (1996), 38-39.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Ask (411)  |  Fall (230)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Saw (160)  |  Smart (26)  |  Why (491)

If a solution fails to appear … and yet we feel success is just around the corner, try resting for a while. … Like the early morning frost, this intellectual refreshment withers the parasitic and nasty vegetation that smothers the good seed. Bursting forth at last is the flower of truth.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Burst (39)  |  Corner (57)  |  Early (185)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flower (106)  |  Frost (14)  |  Good (889)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Last (426)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nasty (7)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Refreshment (3)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seed (93)  |  Solution (267)  |  Success (302)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vegetation (23)

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again.
Anonymous
Old saying.
Science quotes on:  |  Again (3)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Research (664)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)

If I choose to impose individual blame for all past social ills, there will be no one left to like in some of the most fascinating periods of our history. For example ... if I place every Victorian anti-Semite beyond the pale of my attention, my compass of available music and literature will be pitifully small. Though I hold no shred of sympathy for active persecution, I cannot excoriate individuals who acquiesced passively in a standard societal judgment. Rail instead against the judgment, and try to understand what motivates men of decent will.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiesce (2)  |  Active (76)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blame (30)  |  Choose (112)  |  Compass (34)  |  Decent (10)  |  Example (94)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  History (673)  |  Hold (95)  |  Impose (22)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instead (21)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Leave (130)  |  Literature (103)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motivate (6)  |  Music (129)  |  Pale (9)  |  Passively (3)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Place (177)  |  Rail (4)  |  Shred (7)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Standard (57)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Understand (606)  |  Victorian (6)  |  Will (2355)

If I had my life to live over again I would not devote it to develop new industrial processes: I would try to add my humble efforts to use Science to the betterment of the human race.
I despair of the helter-skelter methods of our vaulted homo sapiens, misguided by his ignorance and his politicians. If we continue our ways, there is every possibility that the human race may follow the road of former living races of animals whose fossils proclaim that they were not fit to continue. Religion, laws and morals is not enough. We need more. Science can help us.
Letter to a friend (14 Jan 1934). In Savage Grace (1985, 2007), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Betterment (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Despair (40)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enough (340)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fit (134)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Help (105)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humble (50)  |  Humility (28)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Industry (137)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Misguiding (2)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Process (423)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Race (268)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

If I want to stop a research program I can always do it by getting a few experts to sit in on the subject, because they know right away that it was a fool thing to try in the first place.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Expert (65)  |  First (1283)  |  Fool (116)  |  Know (1518)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)

If I were a physician I would try my patients thus. I would wheel them to a window and let Nature feel their pulse. It will soon appear if their sensuous existence is sound. The sounds are but the throbbing of some pulse in me.
(26 Feb 1841). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feel (367)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Throb (6)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  Window (58)

If I would be a young man again and had to decide how to make my living, I would not try to become a scientist or scholar or teacher. I would rather choose to be a plumber or a peddler in the hope to find that modest degree of independence still available under present circumstances.
According to Ralph Keyes, The Quote Verifier: Who Said What, Where, and When (2006), 53, on other occasions Einstein said “he might rather have been a musician, or light-house keeper”; however it is a “popular misquotation” that refers to being a watchmaker.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Biography (240)  |  Career (75)  |  Choose (112)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Degree (276)  |  Find (998)  |  Hope (299)  |  Independence (34)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modest (15)  |  Plumber (10)  |  Present (619)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Still (613)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

If I’m concerned about what an electron does in an amorphous mass then I become an electron. I try to have that picture in my mind and to behave like an electron, looking at the problem in all its dimensions and scales.
Quoted in Timothy L. O’Brien, 'Not Invented here: Are U.S. Innovators Losing Their Competitive Edge?', New York Times (13 Nov 2005), B6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amorphous (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Behave (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Electron (93)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scale (121)

If that's how it all started, then we might as well face the fact that what's left out there is a great deal of shrapnel and a whole bunch of cinders (one of which is, fortunately, still hot enough and close enough to be good for tanning). Trying to find some sense and order in this mess may be as futile as trying to … reconstruct the economy of Iowa from a bowl of popcorn. [On searching for evidence of the Big Bang.]
From essay 'First Person Secular: Blocking the Gates to Heaven', Mother Jones Magazine (Jun 1986), 48. Collected in The Worst Years of our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed (1995), 267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Bowl (3)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Cinder (5)  |  Close (69)  |  Deal (188)  |  Economy (55)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Futile (11)  |  Futility (7)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hot (60)  |  Left (13)  |  Mess (13)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Reconstruction (14)  |  Sense (770)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Tanning (3)  |  Trying (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)

If there’s one thing in physics I feel more responsible for than any other, it’s this perception of how everything fits together. I like to think of myself as having a sense of judgment. I’m willing to go anywhere, talk to anybody, ask any question that will make headway. I confess to being an optimist about things, especially about someday being able to understand how things are put together. So many young people are forced to specialize in one line or another that a young person can’t afford to try and cover this waterfront — only an old fogy who can afford to make a fool of himself. If I don't, who will?
Stated during a 1983 interview. Quoted in Dennis Overbye, 'John A. Wheeler, Physicist Who Coined the Term Black Hole, Is Dead at 96', New York Times (14 Apr 2008).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Ask (411)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Confess (42)  |  Everything (476)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fool (116)  |  Himself (461)  |  Judgment (132)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Old (481)  |  Optimist (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Perception (97)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Someday (14)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Young (227)

If this seems complex, the reason is because Tao is both simple and complex. It is complex when we try to understand it, and simple when we allow ourselves to experience it.
In Gary William Flake, The Computational Beauty of Nature (2000), 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Experience (467)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Tao (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

If today you can take a thing like evolution and make it a crime to teach it in the public schools, tomorrow you can make it a crime to teach it in the private schools, and next year you can make it a crime to teach it to the hustings or in the church. At the next session you may ban books and the newspapers. Soon you may set Catholic against Protestant and Protestant against Protestant, and try to foist your own religion upon the minds of men. If you can do one you can do the other. Ignorance and fanaticism are ever busy and need feeding. Always it is feeding and gloating for more. Today it is the public school teachers; tomorrow the private. The next day the preachers and the lecturers, the magazines, the books, the newspapers. After a while, Your Honor, it is the setting of man against man and creed against creed until with flying banners and beating drums we are marching backward to the glorious ages of the sixteenth century when bigots lighted fagots to burn the men who dared to bring any intelligence and enlightenment and culture to the human mind.
Darrow’s concluding remarks before adjournment of the second day of the Scopes Monkey Trial, Dayton, Tennessee (Monday, 13 Jul 1925). In The World's Most Famous Court Trial: Tennessee Evolution Case: a Complete Stenographic Report of the Famous Court Test of the Tennessee Anti-Evolution Act, at Dayton, July 10 to 21, 1925 (1925), Second Day's Proceedings, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Banner (7)  |  Bigot (6)  |  Book (392)  |  Burn (87)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Church (56)  |  Creed (27)  |  Crime (38)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drum (8)  |  Education (378)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Flying (72)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Honor (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Lecturer (12)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Religion (361)  |  School (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Year (933)

If we drove an automobile the way we try to run civilization, I think we would face backwards, looking through the back window, admiring where we came from, and not caring where we are going. If you want a good life you must look to the future. … I think it is all right to have courses in history. But history is the “gonest” thing in the world. … Let’s keep history, but let’s take a small part of the time and study where we are going. … We can do something about the unmade history.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 256.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Back (390)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Caring (6)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Face (212)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Must (1526)  |  Right (452)  |  Run (174)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Window (58)  |  World (1774)

If we wish to imitate the physical sciences, we must not imitate them in their contemporary, most developed form; we must imitate them in their historical youth, when their state of development was comparable to our own at the present time. Otherwise we should behave like boys who try to copy the imposing manners of full-grown men without understanding their raison d’être, also without seeing that in development one cannot jump over intermediate and preliminary phases.
Gestalt Psychology (1929), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Boy (94)  |  Copy (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Form (959)  |  Historical (70)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Jump (29)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phase (36)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Present (619)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  Youth (101)

If you ask a person, “What were you thinking?” you may get an answer that is richer and more revealing of the human condition than any stream of thoughts a novelist could invent. I try to see through people’s faces into their minds and listen through their words into their lives, and what I find there is beyond imagining.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Condition (356)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Condition (6)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Invent (51)  |  Listen (73)  |  Live (628)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Novelist (6)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rich (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Word (619)

If you have to prove a theorem, do not rush. First of all, understand fully what the theorem says, try to see clearly what it means. Then check the theorem; it could be false. Examine the consequences, verify as many particular instances as are needed to convince yourself of the truth. When you have satisfied yourself that the theorem is true, you can start proving it.
In How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (2004), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Check (24)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Convince (41)  |  Do (1908)  |  Examination (98)  |  Examine (78)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Instance (33)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Need (290)  |  Particular (76)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rush (18)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Start (221)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Verification (31)  |  Verify (23)

If [science] tends to thicken the crust of ice on which, as it were, we are skating, it is all right. If it tries to find, or professes to have found, the solid ground at the bottom of the water it is all wrong. Our business is with the thickening of this crust by extending our knowledge downward from above, as ice gets thicker while the frost lasts; we should not try to freeze upwards from the bottom.
Samuel Bulter, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 329.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Business (149)  |  Crust (38)  |  Downward (4)  |  Extend (128)  |  Find (998)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Frost (14)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ice (54)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Profess (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Tend (124)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Upward (43)  |  Water (481)  |  Wrong (234)

In a class I was taking there was one boy who was much older than the rest. He clearly had no motive to work. I told him that, if he could produce for me, accurately to scale, drawings of the pieces of wood required to make a desk like the one he was sitting at, I would try to persuade the Headmaster to let him do woodwork during the mathematics hours—in the course of which, no doubt, he would learn something about measurement and numbers. Next day, he turned up with this task completed to perfection. This I have often found with pupils; it is not so much that they cannot do the work, as that they see no purpose in it.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Boy (94)  |  Class (164)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completed (30)  |  Course (409)  |  Desk (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Hour (186)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Motive (59)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Required (108)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Task (147)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wood (92)  |  Woodwork (2)  |  Work (1351)

In early times, medicine was an art, which took its place at the side of poetry and painting; to-day, they try to make a science of it, placing it beside mathematics, astronomy, and physics.
In Armand Trousseau and John Rose Cormack (trans.), Lectures on Clinical Medicine: Delivered at the Hôtel-Dieu, Paris (1869), Vol. 2, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Early (185)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Side (233)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)

In gaining knowledge you must accustom yourself to the strictest sequence. You must be familiar with the very groundwork of science before you try to climb the heights. Never start on the “next” before you have mastered the “previous.”
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Groundwork (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Next (236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Start (221)

In order that an inventory of plants may be begun and a classification of them correctly established, we must try to discover criteria of some sort for distinguishing what are called “species”. After a long and considerable investigation, no surer criterion for determining species had occurred to me than distinguishing features that perpetuate themselves in propagation from seed. Thus, no matter what variations occur in the individuals or the species, if they spring from the seed of one and the same plant, they are accidental variations and not such as to distinguish a species. For these variations do not perpetuate themselves in subsequent seeding. Thus, for example, we do not regard caryophylli with full or multiple blossoms as a species distinct from caryophylli with single blossoms, because the former owe their origin to the seed of the latter and if the former are sown from their own seed, they once more produce single-blossom caryophylli. But variations that never have as their source seed from one and the same species may finally be regarded as distinct species. Or, if you make a comparison between any two plants, plants which never spring from each other's seed and never, when their seed is sown, are transmuted one into the other, these plants finally are distinct species. For it is just as in animals: a difference in sex is not enough to prove a difference of species, because each sex is derived from the same seed as far as species is concerned and not infrequently from the same parents; no matter how many and how striking may be the accidental differences between them; no other proof that bull and cow, man and woman belong to the same species is required than the fact that both very frequently spring from the same parents or the same mother. Likewise in the case of plants, there is no surer index of identity of species than that of origin from the seed of one and the same plant, whether it is a matter of individuals or species. For animals that differ in species preserve their distinct species permanently; one species never springs from the seed of another nor vice versa.
John Ray
Historia Plantarum (1686), Vol. 1, 40. Trans. Edmund Silk. Quoted in Barbara G. Beddall, 'Historical Notes on Avian Classification', Systematic Zoology (1957), 6, 133-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Both (493)  |  Bull (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Classification (97)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Concern (228)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cow (39)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Former (137)  |  Identity (19)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Likewise (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Parent (76)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Plant (294)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Production (183)  |  Proof (287)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Required (108)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Single (353)  |  Species (401)  |  Spring (133)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vice (40)  |  Woman (151)

In school we had a name for guys trying to get in touch with themselves.
Quoted, without source, in Des MacHale, Wit (1999, 2003), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Guy (5)  |  Name (333)  |  School (219)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Touch (141)  |  Trying (144)

In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it’s the exact opposite.
As quoted, without citation, in Robert Jungk and James Cleugh (trans.), Brighter Than a Thousand Suns: A Personal History of the Atomic Scientists (1958), 22. The writing of poetry by Robert Oppenheimer was being remarked upon by Dirac, as he was talking with him.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exact (68)  |  Know (1518)  |  Opposite (104)  |  People (1005)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Tell (340)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Way (1217)

In such sad circumstances I but see myself exalted by my own enemies, for in order to defeat some small works of mine they try to make the whole rational medicine and anatomy fall, as if I were myself these noble disciplines.
'Letter to Marescotti about the dispute with Sbaraglia and others, 1689(?)', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), The Correspondence of Marcello Malpighi (1975), Vol. 4, 1561.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Fall (230)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nobility (4)  |  Noble (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Small (477)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

In the same sense that our judicial system presumes us to be innocent until proven guilty, a medical care system may work best if it starts with the presumption that most people are healthy. Left to themselves, computers may try to do it in the opposite way, taking it as given that some sort of direct, continual, professional intervention is required all the time, in order to maintain the health of each citizen, and we will end up spending all our money on nothing but this.
In 'Aspects of Biomedical Science Policy', The New England Journal of Medicine (12 Oct 1972), 4. Also published as Occasional Paper of the Institute of Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  All The Time (4)  |  Best (459)  |  Care (186)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Computer (127)  |  Continual (43)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  End (590)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Judicial (3)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Medical (26)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Presume (9)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Professional (70)  |  Prove (250)  |  Required (108)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spending (24)  |  Start (221)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In the wilderness, people think of danger from Indians, alligators, and jaguars. They are not the things you mind. It is the mosquitoes, the poisonous ants, the maribondo wasps that are perfectly awful. It is the borrachudos and plum flies—like the black flies of the north woods, only worse … The day after I threw away my spare clothing ants ate up all my underwear. These were white ants. The driver ants try to eat the man instead of his clothes.
In National Geographic, Great Adventures with National Geographic: Exploring Land, Sea, and Sk (1963), 109. The last sentences about the white and driver ants, with slightly different wording, also appear in Theodore Roosevelt, 'A Journey in Central Brazil', The Geographical Journey (Feb 1915), 45, No. 2, 104, previously read to the Royal Geographic Society (16 Jun 1914).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ant (28)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Danger (115)  |  Driver (5)  |  Eat (104)  |  Fly (146)  |  Indian (27)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  People (1005)  |  Poisonous (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  White (127)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Wood (92)  |  Worse (24)

Indeed, while Nature is wonderfully inventive of new structures, her conservatism in holding on to old ones is still more remarkable. In the ascending line of development she tries an experiment once exceedingly thorough, and then the question is solved for all time. For she always takes time enough to try the experiment exhaustively. It took ages to find how to build a spinal column or brain, but when the experiment was finished she had reason to be, and was, satisfied.
In The Whence and Whither of Man; a Brief History of his Origin and Development through Conformity to Environment; being the Morse Lectures of 1895. (1896), 173. The Morse lectureship was founded by Prof. Samuel F.B. Morse in 1865 at Union Theological Seminary, the lectures to deal with “the relation of the Bible to any of the sciences.”
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Build (204)  |  Conservatism (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Exhaustive (2)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Hold (95)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inventive (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spinal Column (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wonder (236)

IODINE
It was Courtois discover'd Iodine
(In the commencement of this century),
Which, with its sisters, bromine and chlorine,
Enjoys a common parentage - the sea;
Although sometimes 'tis found, with other things,
In minerals and many saline springs.

But yet the quantity is so minute
In the great ocean, that a chemist might,
With sensibilities the most acute,
Have never brought this element to light,
Had he not thought it were as well to try
Where ocean's treasures concentrated lie.

And Courtois found that several plants marine,
Sponges, et cetera, exercise the art
Of drawing from the sea its iodine
In quantities sufficient to impart
Its properties; and he devised a plan
Of bringing it before us - clever man!
Anonymous
Discursive Chemical Notes in Rhyme (1876) by the Author of the Chemical Review, a B.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bromine (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clever (38)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Common (436)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impart (23)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sea (308)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treasure (57)

Is any knowledge worthless? Try to think of an example.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Example (94)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Think (1086)  |  Worthless (21)

It doesn't matter if you try and try and try again, and fail. It does matter if you try and fail, and fail to try again.
Science quotes on:  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Matter (798)

It has been said repeatedly that one can never, try as he will, get around to the front of the universe. Man is destined to see only its far side, to realize nature only in retreat.
In 'The Innocent Fox,' The Star Thrower (1978).
Science quotes on:  |  Destined (42)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Realize (147)  |  See (1081)  |  Side (233)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (14)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Spring (133)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

It is characteristic of our age to endeavour to replace virtues by technology. That is to say, wherever possible we strive to use methods of physical or social engineering to achieve goals which our ancestors thought attainable only by the training of character. Thus, we try so far as possible to make contraception take the place of chastity, and anaesthetics to take the place of fortitude; we replace resignation by insurance policies and munificence by the Welfare State. It would be idle romanticism to deny that such techniques and institutions are often less painful and more efficient methods of achieving the goods and preventing the evils which unaided virtue once sought to achieve and avoid. But it would be an equal and opposite folly to hope that the take-over of virtue by technology may one day be complete, so that the necessity for the laborious acquisition of the capacity for rational choice by individuals can be replaced by the painless application of the fruits of scientific discovery over the whole field of human intercourse and enterprise.
'Mental Health in Plato's Republic', in The Anatomy of the Soul: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Mind (1973), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Age (499)  |  Anaesthetic (2)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Application (242)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chastity (5)  |  Choice (110)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contraception (2)  |  Deny (66)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Evil (116)  |  Field (364)  |  Folly (43)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idle (33)  |  Individual (404)  |  Institution (69)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Munificence (2)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rational (90)  |  Romanticism (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Engineering (2)  |  State (491)  |  Technique (80)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Training (80)  |  Use (766)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Whole (738)

It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.
Speech, 'The Strenuous Life' (10 Apr 1899), as governor of New York, before the Hamilton Club, Chicago, Illinois. In The Works of Theodore Roosevelt (1926), Vol. 13, Chap.1, 320. Also excerpted in 'Practical Talks by Practical Men: The Strenuous Life', Illustrated World (1904), 2, 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Hard (243)  |  Never (1087)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Worse (24)

It is in our genes to understand the universe if we can, to keep trying even if we cannot, and to be enchanted by the act of learning all the way.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Cannot (8)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Gene (98)  |  Learning (274)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

It is like the difference between a specialist and a philosopher. A specialist is someone who knows more and more about less and less until at last he knows everything about nothing. A philosopher is someone who knows less and less about more and more until at last he knows nothing about everything. Physics is now too philosophical. In my work I would like to reverse the process, and to try to limit the things to be found out and to make some modest discoveries which may later be useful.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Later (18)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Modest (15)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Useful (250)  |  Work (1351)

It is no good to try to stop knowledge from going forward. Ignorance is never better that knowledge.
Note: Although attributed as his viewpoint to Enrico Fermi, it is probably not a direct quote by him.
Not a direct quotation by Enrico Fermi, but his viewpoint, as described by his wife, Laura Fermi, in Atoms in the Family: My Life with Enrico Fermi (1954), 244. See it in context elsewhere on this page, in a longer quote that begins: “Some men said an atomic bomb…”
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Direct (225)  |  Forward (102)  |  Good (889)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Never (1087)  |  Quote (42)  |  Stop (80)  |  Viewpoint (12)

It is structure that we look for whenever we try to understand anything. All science is built upon this search; we investigate how the cell is built of reticular material, cytoplasm, chromosomes; how crystals aggregate; how atoms are fastened together; how electrons constitute a chemical bond between atoms. We like to understand, and to explain, observed facts in terms of structure. A chemist who understands why a diamond has certain properties, or why nylon or hemoglobin have other properties, because of the different ways their atoms are arranged, may ask questions that a geologist would not think of formulating, unless he had been similarly trained in this way of thinking about the world.
‘The Place of Chemistry In the Integration of the Sciences’, Main Currents in Modern Thought (1950), 7, 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  Aggregation (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bond (45)  |  Building (156)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Bond (5)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Cytoplasm (6)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Different (577)  |  Electron (93)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fastening (2)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Haemoglobin (4)  |  Hemoglobin (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Structure (344)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Together (387)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It means you can try to answer questions you thought the universe was going to have to do without.
On supercomputers, NY Times 3 Jul 84
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Do (1908)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Question (621)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)

It seems sensible to discard all hope of observing hitherto unobservable quantities, such as the position and period of the electron... Instead it seems more reasonable to try to establish a theoretical quantum mechanics, analogous to classical mechanics, but in which only relations between observable quantities occur.
In Helge Kragh, Quantum Generations: A History of Physics in the Twentieth Century (1999), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Classical (45)  |  Discard (29)  |  Electron (93)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Period (198)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Theory (970)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Type (167)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It would be an unsound fancy and self-contradictory to expect that things which have never yet been done can be done except by means which have never yet been tried.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 6. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Contradictory (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Never (1087)  |  Self (267)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unsound (3)

It’s like trying to describe what you feel when you’re standing on the rim of the Grand Canyon or remembering your first love or the birth of your child. You have to be there to really know what it’s like.
As quoted on the nmspacemuseum.org website of the New Mexico Museum of Space History.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Birth (147)  |  Child (307)  |  Describe (128)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand Canyon (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Love (309)  |  Rim (5)  |  Stand (274)  |  Trying (144)

I’m trying to assemble pieces of this great jigsaw puzzle of the origin of the solar system, to see if we can illuminate our own processes on the Earth more fundamentally.
In interview, Rushworth M. Kidder, 'Grounded in Space Science', Christian Science Monitor (22 Dec 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Assemble (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Jigsaw (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of The Solar System (2)  |  Piece (38)  |  Process (423)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  See (1081)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)  |  Trying (144)

Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  Become (815)  |  Belittle (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Keep (101)  |  People (1005)  |  Really (78)  |  Small (477)

Let people who have to observe sickness and death look back and try to register in their observation the appearances which have preceded relapse, attack or death, and not assert that there were none, or that there were not the right ones. A want of the habit of observing conditions and an inveterate habit of taking averages are each of them often equally misleading.
Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attack (84)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Condition (356)  |  Death (388)  |  Equally (130)  |  Habit (168)  |  Look (582)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  People (1005)  |  Register (21)  |  Relapse (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Want (497)

Looking back over the geological record it would seem that Nature made nearly every possible mistake before she reached her greatest achievement Man—or perhaps some would say her worst mistake of all. ... At last she tried a being of no great size, almost defenseless, defective in at least one of the more important sense organs; one gift she bestowed to save him from threatened extinction—a certain stirring, a restlessness, in the organ called the brain.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Defective (4)  |  Defenseless (3)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Geological Record (2)  |  Gift (104)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Important (209)  |  Last (426)  |  Least (75)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Organ (115)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reach (281)  |  Record (154)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Size (60)  |  Stir (21)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Worst (57)

Man has risen, not fallen. He can choose to develop his capacities as the highest animal and to try to rise still farther, or he can choose otherwise. The choice is his responsibility, and his alone. There is no automatism that will carry him upward without choice or effort and there is no trend solely in the right direction. Evolution has no purpose; man must supply this for himself. The means to gaining right ends involve both organic evolution and human evolution, but human choice as to what are the right ends must be based on human evolution.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Automatism (2)  |  Basis (173)  |  Both (493)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Carry (127)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farther (51)  |  Highest (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Involve (90)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Organic (158)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Right (452)  |  Rise (166)  |  Still (613)  |  Supply (93)  |  Trend (22)  |  Upward (43)  |  Will (2355)

Man is a megalomaniac among animals—if he sees mountains he will try to imitate them by pyramids, and if he sees some grand process like evolution, and thinks it would be at all possible for him to be in on that game, he would irreverently have to have his whack at that too. That daring megalomania of his—has it not brought him to his present place?
'Application and Prospects', unpublished lecture, 1916. In Philip J. Pauly, Controlling Life: Jacques Loeb and the Engineering idea in Biology (1987), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Daring (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Game (101)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Will (2355)

Man is an imperceptible atom always trying to become one with God.
Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1904, 1913), 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Become (815)  |  God (757)  |  Imperceptible (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Trying (144)

Man tries to make for himself in the fashion that suits him best a simplified and intelligible picture of the world; he then tries to some extent to substitute this cosmos of his for the world of experience, and thus to overcome it. This is what the painter, the poet, the speculative philosopher, and the natural scientist do, each in his own fashion. Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way the peace and security which he cannot find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934, 2004) 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Construction (112)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Do (1908)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Find (998)  |  Himself (461)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Scientist (5)  |  Order (632)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Painter (29)  |  Peace (108)  |  Personal (67)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poet (83)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Security (47)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Suit (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Man was made to try. Afterward he’s free to keep or throw away what pleasures or what promise that he’s found. What knowledge gained or stumbled on can be discarded or retained.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Discard (29)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Free (232)  |  Gain (145)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Promise (67)  |  Retain (56)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Throw Away (4)

Many scientists are atheists or agnostics who want to believe that the natural world they study is all there is, and being only human, they try to persuade themselves that science gives them grounds for that belief. It’s an honorable belief, but it isn’t a research finding.
In 'Oppressed by Evolution', Discover (Mar 1998), 83. Cited in Eugenie Carol Scott, Evolution vs. Creationism: an Introduction (2005), 67.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agnostic (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Ground (217)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Study (653)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

Many times every day I think of taking off in that missile. I’ve tried a thousand times to visualize that moment, to anticipate how I’ll feel if I’m first, which I very much want to be. But whether I go first or go later. I approach it now with some awe, and I’m sure I’ll approach it with even more awe on my day. In spite of the fact that I will he very busy getting set and keeping tabs on all the instruments, there’s no question that I’ll need—and will have—all my confidence.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Approach (108)  |  Awe (43)  |  Busy (28)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Later (18)  |  Missile (5)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Question (621)  |  Set (394)  |  Spite (55)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Visualize (8)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Mathematicians have tried in vain to this day to discover some order in the sequence of prime numbers, and we have reason to believe that it is a mystery into which the human mind will never penetrate.
As quoted in G. Simmons Calculus Gems (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Discover (553)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Prime Number (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)

Mathematics is not a deductive science—that’s a cliché. When you try to prove a theorem, you don’t just list the hypotheses, and then start to reason. What you do is trial and error, experiment and guesswork.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: an Automathography in Three Parts (1985), 321.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cliche (7)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Guesswork (4)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  List (10)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Start (221)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Trial (57)  |  Trial And Error (5)

Melvin [Calvin]’s marvellous technique for delivering a scientific lecture was unique. His mind must have roamed constantly, especially in planning lectures. His remarkable memory enabled him to formulate a lecture or manuscript with no breaks in the sequence of his thoughts. His lectures usually began hesitatingly, as if he had little idea of how to begin or what to say. This completely disarmed his audiences, who would try to guess what he might have to say. Soon enough, however, his ideas would coalesce, to be delivered like an approaching freight train, reaching a crescendo of information at breakneck speed and leaving his rapt audience nearly overwhelmed.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Break (99)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Completely (135)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Enough (340)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Freight (3)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Planning (20)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Roam (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speed (65)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Unique (67)  |  Usually (176)

Men who do not know the truth of things try to reach certainty about them, so that, if they cannot satisfy their intellects by science, their wills at least may rest on conscience.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 137, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Will (2355)

Motion with respect to the universal ocean of aether eludes us. We say, “Let V be the velocity of a body through the aether”, and form the various electromagnetic equations in which V is scattered liberally. Then we insert the observed values, and try to eliminate everything which is unknown except V. The solution goes on famously; but just as we have got rid of all the other unknowns, behold! V disappears as well, and we are left with the indisputable but irritating conclusion —
0 = 0
This is a favourite device that mathematical equations resort to, when we propound stupid questions.
From Gifford Lecture, Edinburgh, (1927), 'Relativity', collected in The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Aether (13)  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Device (70)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Elude (10)  |  Equation (132)  |  Everything (476)  |  Form (959)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observed (149)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Question (621)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Through (849)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Various (200)  |  Velocity (48)

Mr. Hobbes told me that the cause of his Lordship's [Francis Bacon's] death was trying an Experiment: viz. as he was taking the aire in a Coach with Dr. Witherborne (a Scotchman, Physitian to the King) towards High-gate, snow lay on the ground, and it came into my Lord's thoughts, why flesh might not be preserved in snow, as in Salt. They were resolved they would try the Experiment presently. They alighted out of the Coach and went into a poore woman's house at the bottom of Highgate hill, and bought a Hen, and made the woman exenterate it, and then stuffed the body with Snow, and my Lord did help to doe it himselfe. The Snow so chilled him that he immediately fell so extremely ill, that he could not return to his Lodging.
John Aubrey, Brief Lives (1680), edited by Oliver Lawson Dick (1949), 16.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Death (388)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gate (32)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  House (140)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Lord (93)  |  Pneumonia (7)  |  Refrigeration (3)  |  Return (124)  |  Salt (46)  |  Snow (37)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Why (491)  |  Woman (151)

Mr. Hobbes told me that the cause of his Lordship’s [Francis Bacon s] death was trying an experiment: viz., as he was taking the air in a coach with Dr. Witherborne, a Scotchman, physician to the King, towards Highgate, snow lay on the ground, and it came into my Lord’s thoughts, why flesh might not be preserved in snow as in salt. They were resolved they would try the experiment presently. They alighted out of the coach and went into a poor woman s house at the bottom of Highgate Hill and bought a hen and made the woman exenterate it, and then stuffed the body with snow, and my Lord did help to do it himself The snow so chilled him that he immediately fell so extremely ill that he could not return to his lodgings.
In Brief Lives (late 17th century), as excerpted in The Retrospective Review (1821), 292.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chill (9)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Lord (93)  |  Physician (273)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Refrigeration (3)  |  Return (124)  |  Salt (46)  |  Snow (37)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Why (491)  |  Woman (151)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Church (56)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Training (80)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Nearly every subject has a shadow, or imitation. It would, I suppose, be quite possible to teach a deaf and dumb child to play the piano. When it played a wrong note, it would see the frown of its teacher, and try again. But it would obviously have no idea of what it was doing, or why anyone should devote hours to such an extraordinary exercise. It would have learnt an imitation of music. and it would fear the piano exactly as most students fear what is supposed to be mathematics.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Deaf (4)  |  Devote (35)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fear (197)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Note (34)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Piano (12)  |  Play (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Why (491)  |  Wrong (234)

Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic.
Anonymous
Ralph Keyes, in The Quote Verifier: Who Said What, Where, and When (2007), 116, states “This is a new saw that floats about in search of an originator.” It was seen, for example, in the her advice column, shortly before Abby stopped writing her column. A variant, with only the “amateurs” and “professionals" clauses, appears as early 1984 in The World Economy, Vol. 7, 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (21)  |  Amateur (19)  |  Ark (5)  |  Build (204)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Professional (70)  |  Remember (179)  |  Something (719)  |  Titanic (4)

New, distant Scenes of endless Science rise:
So pleas'd at first, the towring Alps we try,...
In An Essay on Criticism (1711), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Alp (9)  |  Alps (8)  |  Distant (33)  |  Endless (56)  |  First (1283)  |  New (1216)  |  Pleased (3)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)

No matter how much proponents of “intelligent design” try to clothe their views in the apparel of science, it is what it is: religion. Whose intelligence? Whose design?
Atlanta Journal-Constitution, column also distributed by United Press Syndicate, American Know-How Hobbled by Know-Nothings (9 Aug 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Design (195)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Intelligent Design (5)  |  Matter (798)  |  Proponent (2)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  View (488)

No one has ever done this before, … What we are trying to do here is to create a stem cell line without injuring an embryo. Our cells can go on to become a healthy, kicking baby.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Become (815)  |  Cell (138)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Injure (3)  |  Kick (10)  |  Line (91)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)  |  Trying (144)

Now I must take you to a very interesting part of our subject—to the relation between the combustion of a candle and that living kind of combustion which goes on within us. In every one of us there is a living process of combustion going on very similar to that of a candle, and I must try to make that plain to you. For it is not merely true in a poetical sense—the relation of the life of man to a taper; and if you will follow, I think I can make this clear.
A Course of Six Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (1861), 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Candle (30)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Follow (378)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Process (423)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Will (2355)

Now, at Suiattle Pass, Brower was still talking about butterflies. He said he had raised them from time to time and had often watched them emerge from the chrysalis—first a crack in the case, then a feeler, and in an hour a butterfly. He said he had felt that he wanted to help, to speed them through the long and awkward procedure; and he had once tried. The butterflies came out with extended abdomens, and their wings were balled together like miniature clenched fists. Nothing happened. They sat there until they died. ‘I have never gotten over that,’ he said. ‘That kind of information is all over in the country, but it’s not in town.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abdomen (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Ball (62)  |  Brower (2)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Case (99)  |  Clench (2)  |  Country (251)  |  Crack (15)  |  Die (86)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeler (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Fist (3)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Help (105)  |  Hour (186)  |  Information (166)  |  Kind (557)  |  Long (790)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Often (106)  |  Pass (238)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Raise (35)  |  Say (984)  |  Sit (48)  |  Speed (65)  |  Still (613)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Town (27)  |  Want (497)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wing (75)

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“I’ll move the world,” quoth he;
“My England’s high, and rich, and great,
But greater she shall be !”
And he call’d for the pick, and he call’d for the spade,
And he call’d for his miners bold;
“ And it’s dig,” he said, “in the deep, deep earth;
You’ll find my treasures better worth
Than mines of Indian gold!”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul,
Yet not content was he;
And he said, “I’ve found what I’ve desired,
Though ’tis but one of three.”
And he call’d for water, he call’d for fire,
For smiths and workmen true:
“Come, build me engines great and strong ;
We’ll have,” quoth he, “a change ere long;
We’ll try what Steam can do.”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“’Tis fairly done,” quoth he,
When he saw the myriad wheels at work
O’er all the land and sea.
They spared the bones and strength of men,
They hammer’d, wove, and spun;
There was nought too great, too mean, or small,
The giant Steam had power for all;—
His task was never done.
From song, 'Old King Coal' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 565. To the melody of 'Old King Cole'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Bold (22)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Coal (57)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hammer (25)  |  High (362)  |  Indian (27)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Long (790)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mine (76)  |  Miner (9)  |  Move (216)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Pick (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spade (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Task (147)  |  Transport (30)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

One must learn by doing the thing; though you think you know it, you have no certainty until you try.
Sophocles
In play, 'Trachiniae', collected in George Young (trans.), The Dramas of Sophocles: Rendered in English Verse: Dramatic and Lyric (1916), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Doing (280)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Must (1526)  |  Practice (204)  |  Self-Taught (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)

One of the petty ideas of philosophers is to elaborate a classification, a hierarchy of sciences. They all try it, and they are generally so fond of their favorite scheme that they are prone to attach an absurd importance to it. We must not let ourselves be misled by this. Classifications are always artificial; none more than this, however. There is nothing of value to get out of a classification of science; it dissembles more beauty and order than it can possibly reveal.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Attach (56)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Classification (97)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Petty (9)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Value (365)

One's instinct is at first to try and get rid of a discrepancy, but I believe that experience shows such an endeavour to be a mistake. What one ought to do is to magnify a small discrepancy with a view to finding out the explanation.
General Monthly Meeting, on Argon, (1 Apr 1895), Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1895), 14, 525.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Discrepancy (7)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Magnification (9)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  View (488)

Our aim is not to make poets, but to allow people to express themselves in a meaningful and appropriate way. We try to get them to enjoy and open up to a point where they can relate—anything to reach the level of their feeling and understanding.
As given in obituary, Myrna Oliver, 'Arthur Lerner; Promoted Use of Poetry in Therapy', Los Angeles Times (8 Apr 1998).
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Allow (45)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Express (186)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Level (67)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Open (274)  |  People (1005)  |  Poet (83)  |  Poetry Therapy (10)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Relate (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)

Our knowledge of the external world must always consist of numbers, and our picture of the universe—the synthesis of our knowledge—must necessarily be mathematical in form. All the concrete details of the picture, the apples, the pears and bananas, the ether and atoms and electrons, are mere clothing that we ourselves drape over our mathematical symbols— they do not belong to Nature, but to the parables by which we try to make Nature comprehensible. It was, I think, Kronecker who said that in arithmetic God made the integers and man made the rest; in the same spirit, we may add that in physics God made the mathematics and man made the rest.
From Address (1934) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Aberdeen, 'The New World—Picture of Modern Physics'. Printed in Nature (Sep 1934) 134, No. 3384, 356. As quoted and cited in Wilbur Marshall Urban, Language and Reality: The Philosophy of Language and the Principles of Symbolism (2004), Vol. 15, 542.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apple (40)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Atom (355)  |  Banana (4)  |  Belong (162)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Consist (223)  |  Detail (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electron (93)  |  Ether (35)  |  External (57)  |  Form (959)  |  God (757)  |  Integer (10)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Leopold Kronecker (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Parable (5)  |  Pear (3)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Rest (280)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

Our way of life has been influenced by the way technology has developed. In future, it seems to me, we ought to try to reverse this and so develop our technology that it meets the needs of the sort of life we wish to lead.
Men, Machines and Sacred Cows (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  By The Way (2)  |  Develop (268)  |  Future (429)  |  Influence (222)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meet (31)  |  Need (290)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sort (49)  |  Technology (257)  |  Way (1217)  |  Way Of Life (12)  |  Wish (212)

Part of the appeal was that Medawar was not only a Nobel Laureate, but he seemed like a Nobel Laureate; he was everything one thought a Nobel Laureate ought to be. If you have ever wondered why scientists like Popper, try Medawar's exposition. Actually most Popperian scientists have probably never tried reading anything but Medawar's exposition.
'The Art of the Developable', New York Review of Books (Oct 1983). The first two sentences, slightly edited, were reprinted in A Devil's Chaplain (2004), 196.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Sir Peter B. Medawar (57)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (47)  |  Reading (133)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thought (953)  |  Why (491)  |  Wonder (236)

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise. Without them your theories are vain surmises. But while you are studying, observing, experimenting, do not remain content with the surface of things. Do not become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin. Seek obstinately for the laws that govern them.
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Content (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (146)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observe (168)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Origin (239)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surmise (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

Philosophy became a gloomy science, in the labyrinth of which people vainly tried to find the exit, called The Truth.
One Step Forward, Two Steps Backward (2003), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Exit (4)  |  Find (998)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vainly (2)

Read no newspapers, try to find a few friends who think as you do, read the wonderful writers of earlier times, Kant, Goethe, Lessing, and the classics of other lands, and enjoy the natural beauties of Munich’s surroundings. Make believe all the time that you are living, so to speak, on Mars among alien creatures and blot out any deeper interest in the actions of those creatures. Make friends with a few animals. Then you will become a cheerful man once more and nothing will be able to trouble you.
Letter (5 Apr 1933). As quoted in Jamie Sayen, Einstein in America: The Scientist’s Conscience in the Age of Hitler and Hiroshima (1985), 12. This is part of Einstein’s reply to a letter from a troubled, unemployed musician, presumably living in Munich.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Alien (34)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Classic (11)  |  Creature (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Friend (168)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (145)  |  Interest (386)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mars (44)  |  More (2559)  |  Munich (3)  |  Natural (796)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Speak (232)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Writer (86)

Reason has seldom failed us because it has seldom been tried.
In 'Philosophy, Religion, and So Forth', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (1989), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Fail (185)  |  Reason (744)  |  Seldom (65)

Religion has run out of justifications. Thanks to the telescope and the microscope, it no longer offers an explanation of anything important. Where once it used to able, by its total command of a worldview, to prevent the emergence of rivals, it can now only impede and retard—or try to turn back—the measureable advances that we have made.
In God is not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything (2007, 2009), 282.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Back (390)  |  Command (58)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Impede (4)  |  Importance (286)  |  Justification (48)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Offer (141)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Religion (361)  |  Retard (4)  |  Rival (19)  |  Run (174)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Worldview (5)

Science doesn’t purvey absolute truth. Science is a mechanism, a way of trying to improve your knowledge of nature. It’s a system for testing your thoughts against the universe, and seeing whether they match.
'Isaac Asimov Speaks' with Bill Moyers in The Humanist (Jan/Feb 1989), 49. Reprinted in Carl Howard Freedman (ed.), Conversations with Isaac Asimov (2005), 143-144. Bill Moyers asked “What’s real knowledge?” Asimov replied, “Well, we can’t be absolutely certain.” He continued answering as in the quote above.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Against (332)  |  Improve (58)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Match (29)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  System (537)  |  Test (211)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

Science gains from it [the pendulum] more than one can expect. With its huge dimensions, the apparatus presents qualities that one would try in vain to communicate by constructing it on a small [scale], no matter how carefully. Already the regularity of its motion promises the most conclusive results. One collects numbers that, compared with the predictions of theory, permit one to appreciate how far the true pendulum approximates or differs from the abstract system called 'the simple pendulum'.
In 'Demonstration Experimentale du Movement de Rotation de la Terre' (31 May 1851). In C.M. Gariel (ed.), J. Bertrand (ed.) and Harold Burstyn (trans.), Recueil des Travaux Scientifiques de Lion Foucault (1878), Vol. 2, 527.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Already (222)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Call (769)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Conclusive (11)  |  Differ (85)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gain (145)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Number (699)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Permit (58)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Result (677)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Vain (83)

Science is the search for truth. It is not a game in which one tries to beat his opponent, to do harm to others. We need to have the spirit of science in international affairs, to make the conduct of international affairs the effort to find the right solution, the just solution of international problems, not the effort by each nation to get the better of other nations, to do harm to them when it is possible.
In No More War! (1958).
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Beat (41)  |  Better (486)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Game (101)  |  Harm (39)  |  International (37)  |  Nation (193)  |  Need (290)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Problem (676)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)

Science only begins for man from the moment when his mind lays hold of matter—when he tries to subject the mass accumulated by experience to rational combinations.
In 'Introduction', Cosmos: Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe (1849), Vol. 1, 64. Translation “under the superintendence of” Edward Sabine.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Begin (260)  |  Combination (144)  |  Experience (467)  |  Hold (95)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Rational (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)

Science tries to answer the question: ‘How?’ How do cells act in the body? How do you design an airplane that will fly faster than sound? How is a molecule of insulin constructed? Religion, by contrast, tries to answer the question: ‘Why?’ Why was man created? Why ought I to tell the truth? Why must there be sorrow or pain or death? Science attempts to analyze how things and people and animals behave; it has no concern whether this behavior is good or bad, is purposeful or not. But religion is precisely the quest for such answers: whether an act is right or wrong, good or bad, and why.
Science and Imagination, ch. 4, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bad (180)  |  Behave (17)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concern (228)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Create (235)  |  Death (388)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Fly (146)  |  Good (889)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Man (2251)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pain (136)  |  People (1005)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Sound (183)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Since biological change occurs slowly and cultural changes occur in every generation, it is futile to try to explain the fleeting phenomena of culture by a racial constant. We can often explain them—in terms of contact with other peoples, of individual genius, of geography—but not by racial differences.
An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (1934), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Change (593)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contact (65)  |  Culture (143)  |  Difference (337)  |  Explain (322)  |  Futile (11)  |  Generation (242)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geography (36)  |  Individual (404)  |  Occur (150)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Race (268)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

So let us then try to climb the mountain, not by stepping on what is below us, but to pull us up at what is above us, for my part at the stars; amen.
As quoted, without citation, on the mcescher.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Amen (3)  |  Below (24)  |  Climb (35)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Pull (43)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Step (231)

Some mathematics problems look simple, and you try them for a year or so, and then you try them for a hundred years, and it turns out that they're extremely hard to solve. There's no reason why these problems shouldn't be easy, and yet they turn out to be extremely intricate. [Fermat's] Last Theorem is the most beautiful example of this.
From interview for PBS website on the NOVA program, 'The Proof'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Easy (204)  |  Example (94)  |  Extremely (16)  |  Fermat’s Last Theorem (3)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reason (744)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solve (130)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turns Out (4)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

Some recent philosophers seem to have given their moral approval to these deplorable verdicts that affirm that the intelligence of an individual is a fixed quantity, a quantity that cannot be augmented. We must protest and react against this brutal pessimism; we will try to demonstrate that it is founded on nothing.
Les idées modernes sur les enfants (1909), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Augment (12)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Deplorable (4)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pessimism (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Protest (9)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recent (77)  |  Verdict (8)  |  Will (2355)

Space exploration is risky. It’s hard. And actually, let me say here that I feel like we need to take on more risk than we have been in space exploration. The public doesn’t like risk, and they hate failure. But failures happen. They shouldn’t happen for stupid reasons. But if they happen when you were trying something risky, you learn. That teaches you something. At least it should. And you try harder next time.
On the failure of the Cosmos-1 solar sail (Jun 2005).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Happen (274)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hate (64)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Risk (61)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Exploration (13)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)

Speaking of libraries: A big open-stack academic or public library is no small pleasure to work in. You’re, say, trying to do a piece on something in Nevada, and you go down to C Floor, deep in the earth, and out to what a miner would call a remote working face. You find 10995.497S just where the card catalog and the online computer thought it would be, but that is only the initial nick. The book you knew about has led you to others you did not know about. To the ceiling the shelves are loaded with books about Nevada. You pull them down, one at a time, and sit on the floor and look them over until you are sitting on a pile five feet high, at which point you are late home for dinner and you get up and walk away. It’s an incomparable boon to research, all that; but it is also a reason why there are almost no large open-stack libraries left in the world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academic (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Big (48)  |  Book (392)  |  Boon (7)  |  C (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Card (4)  |  Catalog (5)  |  Ceiling (5)  |  Computer (127)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Five (16)  |  Floor (20)  |  Foot (60)  |  Get Up (5)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Initial (17)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Library (48)  |  Load (11)  |  Look (582)  |  Miner (9)  |  Nick (2)  |  Online (4)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Piece (38)  |  Pile (12)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Public (96)  |  Pull (43)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Shelve (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)  |  Walk (124)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Spherical space is not very easy to imagine. We have to think of the properties of the surface of a sphere—the two-dimensional case—and try to conceive something similar applied to three-dimensional space. Stationing ourselves at a point let us draw a series of spheres of successively greater radii. The surface of a sphere of radius r should be proportional to r2; but in spherical space the areas of the more distant spheres begin to fall below the proper proportion. There is not so much room out there as we expected to find. Ultimately we reach a sphere of biggest possible area, and beyond it the areas begin to decrease. The last sphere of all shrinks to a point—our antipodes. Is there nothing beyond this? Is there a kind of boundary there? There is nothing beyond and yet there is no boundary. On the earth’s surface there is nothing beyond our own antipodes but there is no boundary there
In Space, Time and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory (1920, 1921), 158-159.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fall (230)  |  Find (998)  |  Greater (288)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Series (149)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Think (1086)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimately (55)

Students who have attended my [medical] lectures may remember that I try not only to teach them what we know, but also to realise how little this is: in every direction we seem to travel but a very short way before we are brought to a stop; our eyes are opened to see that our path is beset with doubts, and that even our best-made knowledge comes but too soon to an end.
In Notes on the Composition of Scientific Papers (1904), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Best (459)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doubt (304)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Path (144)  |  Realize (147)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stop (80)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)

Suppose then I want to give myself a little training in the art of reasoning; suppose I want to get out of the region of conjecture and probability, free myself from the difficult task of weighing evidence, and putting instances together to arrive at general propositions, and simply desire to know how to deal with my general propositions when I get them, and how to deduce right inferences from them; it is clear that I shall obtain this sort of discipline best in those departments of thought in which the first principles are unquestionably true. For in all our thinking, if we come to erroneous conclusions, we come to them either by accepting false premises to start with—in which case our reasoning, however good, will not save us from error; or by reasoning badly, in which case the data we start from may be perfectly sound, and yet our conclusions may be false. But in the mathematical or pure sciences,—geometry, arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, the calculus of variations or of curves,— we know at least that there is not, and cannot be, error in our first principles, and we may therefore fasten our whole attention upon the processes. As mere exercises in logic, therefore, these sciences, based as they all are on primary truths relating to space and number, have always been supposed to furnish the most exact discipline. When Plato wrote over the portal of his school. “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter here,” he did not mean that questions relating to lines and surfaces would be discussed by his disciples. On the contrary, the topics to which he directed their attention were some of the deepest problems,— social, political, moral,—on which the mind could exercise itself. Plato and his followers tried to think out together conclusions respecting the being, the duty, and the destiny of man, and the relation in which he stood to the gods and to the unseen world. What had geometry to do with these things? Simply this: That a man whose mind has not undergone a rigorous training in systematic thinking, and in the art of drawing legitimate inferences from premises, was unfitted to enter on the discussion of these high topics; and that the sort of logical discipline which he needed was most likely to be obtained from geometry—the only mathematical science which in Plato’s time had been formulated and reduced to a system. And we in this country [England] have long acted on the same principle. Our future lawyers, clergy, and statesmen are expected at the University to learn a good deal about curves, and angles, and numbers and proportions; not because these subjects have the smallest relation to the needs of their lives, but because in the very act of learning them they are likely to acquire that habit of steadfast and accurate thinking, which is indispensable to success in all the pursuits of life.
In Lectures on Teaching (1906), 891-92.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Act (272)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Art (657)  |  Attention (190)  |  Badly (32)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Case (99)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Country (251)  |  Curve (49)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deep (233)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Duty (68)  |  England (40)  |  Enter (141)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expect (200)  |  False (100)  |  First (1283)  |  Follower (11)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Habit (168)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Inference (45)  |  Instance (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Least (75)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Let (61)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Need (290)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Plato (76)  |  Political (121)  |  Portal (7)  |  Premise (37)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Relation (157)  |  Respect (207)  |  Right (452)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Small (477)  |  Social (252)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sound (183)  |  Space (500)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Steadfast (3)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Topic (21)  |  Training (80)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Unfitted (3)  |  University (121)  |  Unquestionably (3)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Variation (90)  |  Want (497)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

Surely the mitochondrion that first entered another cell was not thinking about the future benefits of cooperation and integration; it was merely trying to make its own living in a tough Darwinian world
Wonderful Life: the Burgess Shale and the Nature of History (1990), 310.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Darwinian (9)  |  Enter (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Integration (19)  |  Living (491)  |  Merely (316)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tough (19)  |  Trying (144)  |  World (1774)

That’s the whole problem with science. You’ve got a bunch of empiricists trying to describe things of unimaginable wonder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Describe (128)  |  Empiricist (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unimaginable (7)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonder (236)

The animals of the Burgess Shale are holy objects–in the unconventional sense that this word conveys in some cultures. We do not place them on pedestals and worship from afar. We climb mountains and dynamite hillsides to find them. We quarry them, split them, carve them, draw them, and dissect them, struggling to wrest their secrets. We vilify and curse them for their damnable intransigence. They are grubby little creatures of a sea floor 530 million years old, but we greet them with awe because they are the Old Ones, and they are trying to tell us something.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afar (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Awe (43)  |  Carve (5)  |  Climb (35)  |  Convey (16)  |  Creature (233)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curse (17)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dynamite (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Floor (20)  |  Greet (6)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Holy (34)  |  Intransigence (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Million (114)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Place (177)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Sea (308)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Split (13)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Tell (340)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unconventional (4)  |  Vilify (2)  |  Word (619)  |  Worship (32)  |  Wrest (3)  |  Year (933)

The anxious precision of modern mathematics is necessary for accuracy, … it is necessary for research. It makes for clearness of thought and for fertility in trying new combinations of ideas. When the initial statements are vague and slipshod, at every subsequent stage of thought, common sense has to step in to limit applications and to explain meanings. Now in creative thought common sense is a bad master. Its sole criterion for judgment is that the new ideas shall look like the old ones, in other words it can only act by suppressing originality.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Anxious (3)  |  Application (242)  |  Bad (180)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Creative (137)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Idea (843)  |  In Other Words (9)  |  Initial (17)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Old (481)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precision (68)  |  Research (664)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sole (49)  |  Stage (143)  |  Statement (142)  |  Step (231)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Suppress (6)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  Vague (47)  |  Word (619)

The biggest danger we face is overfishing. We have too many boats out there. We literally could fish out our oceans, some scientists believe, in the next 40, 50, 60 years. We are trending in that direction. … Every year, for the first time in history, we catch fewer and fewer fish with more and more sophisticated boats going out trying to find them.
From transcript of PBS TV interview by Tavis Smiley (28 Mar 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Biggest (8)  |  Boat (16)  |  Catch (31)  |  Danger (115)  |  Direction (175)  |  Face (212)  |  Fewer (8)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  History (673)  |  Literally (30)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trend (22)  |  Trying (144)  |  Year (933)

The blood, the fountain whence the spirits flow,
The generous stream that waters every part,
And motion, vigour, and warm life conveys
To every Particle that moves or lives;
This vital fluid, thro' unnumber'd tubes
Pour'd by the heart, and to the heart again
Refunded; scourg'd forever round and round;
Enrag'd with heat and toil, at last forgets
Its balmy nature; virulent and thin
It grows; and now, but that a thousand gates
Are open to its flight, it would destroy
The parts it cherish' d and repair'd before.
Besides, the flexible and tender tubes
Melt in the mildest, most nectareous tide
That ripening Nature rolls; as in the stream
Its crumbling banks; but what the vital force
Of plastic fluids hourly batters down,
That very force, those plastic particles
Rebuild: so mutable the state of man.
For this the watchful appetite was given,
Daily with fresh materials to repair
This unavoidable expense of life,
This necessary waste of flesh and blood.
Hence the concoctive powers, with various art,
Subdue the cruder aliments to chyle;
The chyle to blood; the foamy purple tide
To liquors, which through finer arteries
To different parts their winding course pursue;
To try new changes, and new forms put on,
Or for the public, or some private use.
The Art of Preserving Health (1744), book 2, I. 12-23, p.15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Gate (32)  |  Generous (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Roll (40)  |  Spirit (265)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Toil (25)  |  Use (766)  |  Various (200)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)  |  Warm (69)  |  Waste (101)  |  Water (481)  |  Winding (8)

The canyon country does not always inspire love. To many it appears barren, hostile, repellent—a fearsome, mostly waterless land of rock and heat, sand dunes and quicksand. cactus, thornbush, scorpion, rattlesnake, and agoraphobic distances. To those who see our land in that manner, the best reply is, yes, you are right, it is a dangerous and terrible place. Enter at your own risk. Carry water. Avoid the noon-day sun. Try to ignore the vultures. Pray frequently.
The Journey Home
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Barren (30)  |  Best (459)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Canyon (9)  |  Carry (127)  |  Country (251)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Desert (56)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dune (4)  |  Enter (141)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Land (115)  |  Love (309)  |  Manner (58)  |  Noon (14)  |  Place (177)  |  Pray (16)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Repellent (4)  |  Reply (56)  |  Right (452)  |  Risk (61)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sand (62)  |  See (1081)  |  Sun (385)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thornbush (2)  |  Vulture (5)  |  Water (481)

The chances for favorable serendipity are increased if one studies an animal that is not one of the common laboratory species. Atypical animals, or preparations, force one to use non-standard approaches and non-standard techniques, and even to think nonstandard ideas. My own preference is to seek out species which show some extreme of adaptation. Such organisms often force one to abandon standard methods and standard points of view. Almost inevitably they lead one to ask new questions, and most importantly in trying to comprehend their special and often unusual adaptations one often serendipitously stumbles upon new insights.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Chance (239)  |  Common (436)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Force (487)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importantly (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Insight (102)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Often (106)  |  Organism (220)  |  Point (580)  |  Preference (28)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Question (621)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Standard (57)  |  Study (653)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Technique (80)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)

The difference between myth and science is the difference between divine inspiration of “unaided reason” (as Bertrand Russell put it) on the one hand and theories developed in observational contact with the real world on the other. It is the difference between the belief in prophets and critical thinking, between Credo quia absurdum (I believe because it is absurd–Tertullian) and De omnibus est dubitandum (Everything should be questioned–Descartes). To try to write a grand cosmical drama leads necessarily to myth. To try to let knowledge substitute ignorance in increasingly large regions of space and time is science.
In 'Cosmology: Myth or Science?' Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy (1984), 5, 79-98.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Belief (578)  |  Contact (65)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Critical (66)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Divine (112)  |  Drama (21)  |  Everything (476)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Myth (56)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observational (15)  |  Other (2236)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Substitute (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

The difference between try and triumph is a little umph.
Anonymous
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Difference (337)  |  Little (707)  |  Triumph (73)

The first question which you will ask and which I must try to answer is this, “What is the use of climbing Mount Everest ?” and my answer must at once be, “It is no use.” There is not the slightest prospect of any gain whatsoever. Oh, we may learn a little about the behavior of the human body at high altitudes, and possibly medical men may turn our observation to some account for the purposes of aviation. But otherwise nothing will come of it. We shall not bring back a single bit of gold or silver, not a gem, nor any coal or iron. We shall not find a single foot of earth that can be planted with crops to raise food. It’s no use. So, if you cannot understand that there is something in man which responds to the challenge of this mountain and goes out to meet it, that the struggle is the struggle of life itself upward and forever upward, then you won’t see why we go. What we get from this adventure is just sheer joy. And joy is, after all, the end of life. We do not live to eat and make money. We eat and make money to be able to enjoy life. That is what life means and what life is for.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  Altitude (4)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Back (390)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Bit (22)  |  Body (537)  |  Bring (90)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Climb (35)  |  Coal (57)  |  Crop (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eat (104)  |  End (590)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Foot (60)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gem (16)  |  Gold (97)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Iron (96)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medical (26)  |  Meet (31)  |  Money (170)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Raise (35)  |  Respond (12)  |  See (1081)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Silver (46)  |  Single (353)  |  Slight (31)  |  Something (719)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Upward (43)  |  Use (766)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The first thing the reasonable man must do is to be content with a very little knowledge and a very great deal of ignorance. The second thing he must do is to make the utmost possible use of the knowledge he has and not waste his energy crying for the moon. The third thing he must do is try and see clearly where his knowledge ends and his ignorance begins.
Scientific Method: An Inquiry into the Character and Validy of Natural Law (1923), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Must (1526)  |  Possible (552)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)

The following story is true. There was a little boy, and his father said, “Do try to be like other people. Don’t frown.” And he tried and tried, but could not. So his father beat him with a strap; and then he was eaten up by lions. Reader, if young, take warning by his sad life and death. For though it may be an honour to be different from other people, if Carlyle’s dictum about the 30 million be still true, yet other people do not like it. So, if you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. In particular, if you are going to write a book, remember the wooden-headed. So be rigorous; that will cover a multitude of sins. And do not frown.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beat (41)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Boy (94)  |  Thomas Carlyle (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Death (388)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Father (110)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hide (69)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Honour (56)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lion (22)  |  Little (707)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reader (40)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Sin (42)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Still (613)  |  Story (118)  |  Strap (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Warning (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worship (32)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)  |  Young (227)

The human mind delights in finding pattern–so much so that we often mistake coincidence or forced analogy for profound meaning. No other habit of thought lies so deeply within the soul of a small creature trying to make sense of a complex world not constructed for it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Delight (108)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Habit (168)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Profound (104)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trying (144)  |  World (1774)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inner (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (80)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Summer (54)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)

The long-range trend toward federal regulation, which found its beginnings in the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 and the Sherman Act of 1890, which was quickened by a large number of measures in the Progressive era, and which has found its consummation in our time, was thus at first the response of a predominantly individualistic public to the uncontrolled and starkly original collectivism of big business. In America the growth of the national state and its regulative power has never been accepted with complacency by any large part of the middle-class public, which has not relaxed its suspicion of authority, and which even now gives repeated evidence of its intense dislike of statism. In our time this growth has been possible only under the stress of great national emergencies, domestic or military, and even then only in the face of continuous resistance from a substantial part of the public. In the Progressive era it was possible only because of widespread and urgent fear of business consolidation and private business authority. Since it has become common in recent years for ideologists of the extreme right to portray the growth of statism as the result of a sinister conspiracy of collectivists inspired by foreign ideologies, it is perhaps worth emphasizing that the first important steps toward the modern organization of society were taken by arch-individualists—the tycoons of the Gilded Age—and that the primitive beginning of modern statism was largely the work of men who were trying to save what they could of the eminently native Yankee values of individualism and enterprise.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  America (127)  |  Arch (11)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Business (149)  |  Class (164)  |  Collectivism (2)  |  Commerce (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Conspiracy (4)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Era (51)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Face (212)  |  Fear (197)  |  Federal (6)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gilded (2)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ideology (14)  |  Important (209)  |  Individualism (3)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Intense (20)  |  Large (394)  |  Largely (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Range (2)  |  Measure (232)  |  Middle-Class (2)  |  Military (40)  |  Modern (385)  |  National (26)  |  Native (38)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Organization (114)  |  Original (58)  |  Part (222)  |  Portray (4)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Private (23)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Public (96)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Range (99)  |  Recent (77)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Relax (2)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Response (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Save (118)  |  Sinister (8)  |  Society (326)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Stress (22)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toward (45)  |  Trend (22)  |  Trying (144)  |  Uncontrolled (2)  |  Urgent (13)  |  Value (365)  |  Widespread (22)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)  |  Yankee (2)  |  Year (933)

The mathematically formulated laws of quantum theory show clearly that our ordinary intuitive concepts cannot be unambiguously applied to the smallest particles. All the words or concepts we use to describe ordinary physical objects, such as position, velocity, color, size, and so on, become indefinite and problematic if we try to use them of elementary particles.
In Across the Frontiers (1974), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Concept (221)  |  Describe (128)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physical (508)  |  Position (77)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Show (346)  |  Size (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unambiguously (2)  |  Use (766)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Word (619)

The members of the department became like the Athenians who, according to the Apostle Paul, “spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing.” Anyone who thought he had a bright idea rushed out to try it out on a colleague. Groups of two or more could be seen every day in offices, before blackboards or even in corridors, arguing vehemently about these 'brain storms.' It is doubtful whether any paper ever emerged for publication that had not run the gauntlet of such criticism. The whole department thus became far greater than the sum of its individual members.
Obituary of Gilbert Newton Lewis, Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Science (1958), 31, 212.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brainstorm (2)  |  Bright (79)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Department (92)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hear (139)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Gilbert Newton Lewis (9)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obituary (10)  |  Office (71)  |  Paper (182)  |  Publication (101)  |  Run (174)  |  Spent (85)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Sum (102)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)

The method of inquiry which all our ingenious Theorists of the Earth have pursued is certainly erroneous. They first form an hypothesis to solve the phenomena, but in fact the Phenomena are always used as a prop to the hypothesis.
Instead therefore of attempting to cut the gordian knot by Hypothetical analysis, we shall follow the synthetic method of inquiry and content ourselves with endeavouring to establish facts rather than attempt solutions and try by experiments how far that method may leave us thro' the mazes of this subject
Introduction to his lecture course. In Robert Jameson, edited by H. W. Scott, Lectures on Geology, (1966), 27. In Patrick Wyse Jackson, Four Centuries of Geological Travel (2007), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Cut (114)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knot (11)  |  Method (505)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Solve (130)  |  Subject (521)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)

The negative cautions of science are never popular. If the experimentalist would not commit himself, the social philosopher, the preacher, and the pedagogue tried the harder to give a short-cut answer.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Caution (24)  |  Commit (41)  |  Cut (114)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Give (202)  |  Hard (243)  |  Himself (461)  |  Negative (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Popular (29)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Social (252)

The only time you mustn't fail is the last time you try.
Science quotes on:  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Last (426)  |  Success (302)  |  Time (1877)

The physician should look upon the patient as a besieged city and try to rescue him with every means that art and science place at his command.
Attributed. Peter McDonald, In The Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  City (78)  |  Command (58)  |  Look (582)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Science (3879)

The physicist cannot simply surrender to the philosopher the critical contemplation of the theoretical foundations for he himself knows best and feels most surely where the shoe pinches. … he must try to make clear in his own mind just how far the concepts which he uses are justified … The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking. It is for this reason that the critical thinking of the physicist cannot possibly be restricted by the examination of the concepts of his own specific field. He cannot proceed without considering critically a much more difficult problem, the problem of analyzing the nature of everyday thinking.
‘Physics and Reality’, Franklin Institute Journal (Mar 1936). Collected in Out of My Later Years (1950), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Clear (100)  |  Concept (221)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Critical (66)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Examination (98)  |  Feel (367)  |  Field (364)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Himself (461)  |  Justify (24)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Pinch (5)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reason (744)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Specific (95)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surrender (20)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Best (459)  |  Brief (36)  |  Compelling (11)  |  Creature (233)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fall (230)  |  Good (889)  |  Higher (37)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pain (136)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Polite (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Save (118)  |  Serve (59)  |  Society (326)  |  Stand (274)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The problem of values arises only when men try to fit together their need to be social animals with their need to be free men. There is no problem, and there are no values, until men want to do both. If an anarchist wants only freedom, whatever the cost, he will prefer the jungle of man at war with man. And if a tyrant wants only social order, he will create the totalitarian state.
Science and Human Values (1961), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Both (493)  |  Cost (86)  |  Create (235)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fit (134)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Order (632)  |  Problem (676)  |  Social (252)  |  State (491)  |  Together (387)  |  Value (365)  |  Want (497)  |  War (225)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

The question of relevance comes before that of truth, because to ask whether a statement is true or false presupposes that it is relevant (so that to try to assert the truth or falsity of an irrelevant statement is a form of confusion)...
From Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980, 2002), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Form (959)  |  Irrelevance (4)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Statement (142)  |  Truth (1057)

The reason why new concepts in any branch of science are hard to grasp is always the same; contemporary scientists try to picture the new concept in terms of ideas which existed before.
In 'Innovation in Physics', Scientific American, 1958, 199, 76. Collected in From Eros to Gaia (1993).
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (150)  |  Concept (221)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (843)  |  Innovation (42)  |  New (1216)  |  Picture (143)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Why (491)

The routine produces. But each day, nevertheless, when you try to get started you have to transmogrify, transpose yourself; you have to go through some kind of change from being a normal human being, into becoming some kind of slave.
I simply don’t want to break through that membrane. I’d do anything to avoid it. You have to get there and you don’t want to go there because there’s so much pressure and so much strain and you just want to stay on the outside and be yourself. And so the day is a constant struggle to get going.
And if somebody says to me, You’re a prolific writer—it seems so odd. It’s like the difference between geological time and human time. On a certain scale, it does look like I do a lot. But that’s my day, all day long, sitting there wondering when I’m going to be able to get started. And the routine of doing this six days a week puts a little drop in a bucket each day, and that’s the key. Because if you put a drop in a bucket every day, after three hundred and sixty-five days, the bucket’s going to have some water in it.
https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/5997/john-mcphee-the-art-of-nonfiction-no-3-john-mcphee
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Break (99)  |  Bucket (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Constant (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Drop (76)  |  Geological (11)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Key (50)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Normal (28)  |  Odd (13)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Routine (25)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Seem (145)  |  Simply (53)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Slave (37)  |  Somebody (8)  |  Start (221)  |  Stay (25)  |  Strain (11)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transpose (2)  |  Want (497)  |  Water (481)  |  Week (70)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Writer (86)

The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations, describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work—that is, correctly to describe phenomena from a reasonably wide area. Furthermore, it must satisfy certain esthetic criteria—that is, in relation to how much it describes, it must be rather simple.
From 'Method in the Physical Sciences', in John von Neumann and L. Leary (ed.), The Unity of Knowledge (1955), 158. Reprinted in John Von Neumann, F. Bródy (ed.) and Tibor Vámos (ed.), The Neumann Compendium (2000), 628.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Construct (124)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Esthetics (2)  |  Expect (200)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Justification (48)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)

The scientist’s task is to find ways to try to disprove things that seem to make sense.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 230.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Find (998)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Contact (65)  |  Elsewhere (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Life (1795)  |  Never (1087)  |  Sign (58)  |  Universe (857)

The trick in discovering evolutionary laws is the same as it is in discovering laws of physics or chemistry—namely, finding the right level of generalization to make prediction possible. We do not try to find a law that says when and where explosions will occur. We content ourselves with saying that certain sorts of compounds are explosive under the right conditions, and we predict that explosions will occur whenever those conditions are realized.
In 'Paleoanthropology: Science or Mythical Charter?', Journal of Anthropological Research (Summer 2002), 58, No. 2, 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Find (998)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Occur (150)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Realization (43)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Trick (35)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)

The trouble about always trying to preserve the health of the body is that it is so difficult to do it without destroying the health of the mind.
In 'The Health of the Mind', Illustrated London News (10 Aug 1929), collected in Selected Essays (1955), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Health (193)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Trying (144)

The whole question of imagination in science is often misunderstood by people in other disciplines. They try to test our imagination in the following way. They say, “Here is a picture of some people in a situation. What do you imagine will happen next?” When we say, “I can’t imagine,” they may think we have a weak imagination. They overlook the fact that whatever we are allowed to imagine in science must be consistent with everything else we know; that the electric fields and the waves we talk about are not just some happy thoughts which we are free to make as we wish, but ideas which must be consistent with all the laws of physics we know. We can’t allow ourselves to seriously imagine things which are obviously in contradiction to the laws of nature. And so our kind of imagination is quite a difficult game. One has to have the imagination to think of something that has never been seen before, never been heard of before. At the same time the thoughts are restricted in a strait jacket, so to speak, limited by the conditions that come from our knowledge of the way nature really is. The problem of creating something which is new, but which is consistent with everything which has been seen before, is one of extreme difficulty
In The Feynman Lectures in Physics (1964), Vol. 2, Lecture 20, p.20-10 to p.20-11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Create (235)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electric Field (3)  |  Everything (476)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Free (232)  |  Game (101)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happy (105)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Physics (3)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Misunderstand (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Overlook (31)  |  People (1005)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Situation (113)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weak (71)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

There are still psychologists who, in a basic misunderstanding, think that gestalt theory tends to underestimate the role of past experience. Gestalt theory tries to differentiate between and-summative aggregates, on the one hand, and gestalten, structures, on the other, both in sub-wholes and in the total field, and to develop appropriate scientific tools for investigating the latter. It opposes the dogmatic application to all cases of what is adequate only for piecemeal aggregates. The question is whether an approach in piecemeal terms, through blind connections, is or is not adequate to interpret actual thought processes and the role of the past experience as well. Past experience has to be considered thoroughly, but it is ambiguous in itself; so long as it is taken in piecemeal, blind terms it is not the magic key to solve all problems.
In Productive Thinking (1959), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Application (242)  |  Approach (108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Basic (138)  |  Blind (95)  |  Both (493)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Develop (268)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Dogmatic (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  Gestalt (3)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Key (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Magic (86)  |  Misunderstanding (12)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Piecemeal (3)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Psychologist (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Role (86)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solve (130)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Tend (124)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Total (94)  |  Underestimate (7)  |  Whole (738)

There are three schools of magic. One: State a tautology, then ring the changes on its corollaries; that's philosophy. Two: Record many facts. Try to find a pattern. Then make a wrong guess at the next fact; that's science. Three: Be aware that you live in a malevolent Universe controlled by Murphy's Law, sometimes offset by Brewster's Factor; that's engineering.
Anonymous
Circulated as an e-mail 'fortune cookie', an interesting remark included with the signature.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Corollary (5)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Guess (61)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Magic (86)  |  Murphy’s Law (4)  |  Next (236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Record (154)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wrong (234)

There are two processes which we adopt consciously or unconsciously when we try to prophesy. We can seek a period in the past whose conditions resemble as closely as possible those of our day, and presume that the sequel to that period will, save for some minor alterations, be similar. Secondly, we can survey the general course of development in our immediate past, and endeavor to prolong it into the near future. The first is the method the historian; the second that of the scientist. Only the second is open to us now, and this only in a partial sphere.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Course (409)  |  Development (422)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Historian (54)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Method (505)  |  Minor (10)  |  Open (274)  |  Partial (10)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Possible (552)  |  Presume (9)  |  Process (423)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sequel (2)  |  Similar (36)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Survey (33)  |  Two (937)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Will (2355)

There are, at present, fundamental problems in theoretical physics … the solution of which … will presumably require a more drastic revision of our fundmental concepts than any that have gone before. Quite likely, these changes will be so great that it will be beyond the power of human intelligence to get the necessary new ideas by direct attempts to formulate the experimental data in mathematical terms. The theoretical worker in the future will, therefore, have to proceed in a more direct way. The most powerful method of advance that can be suggested at present is to employ all the resources of pure mathematics in attempts to perfect and generalize the mathematical formalism that forms the existing basis of theoretical physics, and after each success in this direction, to try to interpret the new mathematical features in terms of physical entities.
At age 28.
Proceedings of the Royal Society (1931), A133, 60. In A. Pais, 'Playing With Equations, the Dirac Way'. Behram N. Kursunoglu (Ed.) and Eugene Paul Wigner (Ed.), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist (1990), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Change (593)  |  Concept (221)  |  Data (156)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Employ (113)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Formalism (7)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Require (219)  |  Revision (6)  |  Solution (267)  |  Success (302)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

There is another form of temptation even more fraught with danger. This is the disease of curiosity. ... It is this which drives us on to try to discover the secrets of nature, those secrets which are beyond our understanding, which can avail us nothing and which men should not wish to learn.
In Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Danger (115)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Form (959)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Secret (194)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)

There is no fun in psychiatry. If you try to get fun out of it, you pay a considerable price for your unjustifiable optimism.
The Psychiatric Interview (1954, 1970), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  Considerable (75)  |  Fun (38)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Price (51)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Unjustifiable (2)

There is no story in my life. It has always been just one step at a time—one thing which I have tried to do as well as I could and which has led on to something else. It has all been in the day’s work.
Told to an interviewer in her late seventies. As quoted in Joan T. Mark, A Stranger in Her Native Land: Alice Fletcher and the American Indians (1988), 355.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Life (1795)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Story (118)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

There is not, we believe, a single example of a medicine having been received permanently into the Materia Medica upon the sole ground of its physical, chemical, or physiological properties. Nearly every one has become a popular remedy before being adopted or even tried by physicians; by far the greater number were first employed in countries which were and are now in a state of scientific ignorance....
Therapeutics and Materia Medica (2006), 31
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Country (251)  |  Employ (113)  |  Example (94)  |  Far (154)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (699)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Popular (29)  |  Property (168)  |  Receive (114)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Sole (49)  |  State (491)

There is one experiment which I always like to try, because it proves something whichever way it goes. A solution of iodine in water is shaken with bone-black, filtered and tested with starch paste. If the colorless solution does not turn the starch blue, the experiment shows how completely charcoal extracts iodine from aqueous solution. If the starch turns blue, the experiment shows that the solution, though apparently colorless, still contains iodine which can be detected by means of a sensitive starch test.
Applied Colloid Chemistry (1921), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Aqueous (8)  |  Bone (95)  |  Charcoal (10)  |  Completely (135)  |  Detect (44)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extract (40)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Paste (4)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Show (346)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Test (211)  |  Turn (447)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

There is something sublime in the secrecy in which the really great deeds of the mathematician are done. No popular applause follows the act; neither contemporary nor succeeding generations of the people understand it. The geometer must be tried by his peers, and those who truly deserve the title of geometer or analyst have usually been unable to find so many as twelve living peers to form a jury. Archimedes so far outstripped his competitors in the race, that more than a thousand years elapsed before any man appeared, able to sit in judgment on his work, and to say how far he had really gone. And in judging of those men whose names are worthy of being mentioned in connection with his,—Galileo, Descartes, Leibnitz, Newton, and the mathematicians created by Leibnitz and Newton’s calculus,—we are forced to depend upon their testimony of one another. They are too far above our reach for us to judge of them.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 86, 223.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Analyst (8)  |  Appear (118)  |  Applause (9)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Competitor (4)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Create (235)  |  Deed (34)  |  Depend (228)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Elapse (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Great (1574)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Jury (3)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Outstrip (3)  |  Peer (12)  |  People (1005)  |  Popular (29)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Really (78)  |  Say (984)  |  Secrecy (2)  |  Sit (48)  |  Something (719)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Title (18)  |  Truly (116)  |  Unable (24)  |  Understand (606)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (933)

There is, then, one great purpose for man and for us today, and that is to try to discover man’s purpose by every means in our power. That is the ultimate relevance of science, and not only of science, but of every branch of learning which can improve our understanding. In the words of Tolstoy, “The highest wisdom has but one science, the science of the whole, the science explaining the Creation and man’s place in it.”
In The Times, June 21,1975.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Branch (150)  |  Creation (327)  |  Discover (553)  |  Great (1574)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Power (746)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Today (314)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Word (619)

There must be some bond of union between mass and the chemical elements; and as the mass of a substance is ultimately expressed (although not absolutely, but only relatively) in the atom, a functional dependence should exist and be discoverable between the individual properties of the elements and their atomic weights. But nothing, from mushrooms to a scientific dependence can be discovered without looking and trying. So I began to look about and write down the elements with their atomic weights and typical properties, analogous elements and like atomic weights on separate cards, and soon this convinced me that the properties of the elements are in periodic dependence upon their atomic weights; and although I had my doubts about some obscure points, yet I have never doubted the universality of this law, because it could not possibly be the result of chance.
Principles of Chemistry (1905), Vol. 2, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Bond (45)  |  Card (4)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Express (186)  |  Individual (404)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mass (157)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Point (580)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Property (168)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Separate (143)  |  Soon (186)  |  Substance (248)  |  Trying (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Union (51)  |  Universality (22)  |  Weight (134)  |  Write (230)

There’s Nature and she’s going to come out the way She is. So therefore when we go to investigate we shouldn’t predecide what it is we’re looking for only to find out more about it. Now you ask: “Why do you try to find out more about it?” If you began your investigation to get an answer to some deep philosophical question, you may be wrong. It may be that you can’t get an answer to that particular question just by finding out more about the character of Nature. But that’s not my interest in science; my interest in science is to simply find out about the world and the more I find out the better it is, I like to find out...
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Character (243)  |  Deep (233)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finding Out (5)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Looking (189)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particular (76)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simply (53)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

These thoughts did not come in any verbal formulation. I rarely think in words at all. A thought comes, and I may try to express it in words afterward.
As quoted as a comment to an unnamed friend, “when discussing the genesis of his ideas,” in Howard W. Eves Mathematical Circles Adieu, (1977), 59. Eves also states that “Dr. Gerald Holton, professor of physics at Harvard University, believed Einstein’s habit, from infancy on, of thinking in concepts rather than words played a key role in Einstein’s scientific work.”
Science quotes on:  |  Afterward (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Express (186)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Word (619)

They are a fairly aggressive conservation organization that was started to protect the great whales particularly, but in general all marine life around the world. So those are the people I’m trying to attach my name to.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aggressive (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Attach (56)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Fairly (4)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marine (9)  |  Name (333)  |  Organization (114)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Protect (58)  |  Start (221)  |  Trying (144)  |  Whale (32)  |  World (1774)

This is really the cornerstone of our situation. Now, I believe what we should try to bring about is the general conviction that the first thing you have to abolish is war at all costs, and every other point of view must be of secondary importance.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abolish (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bring (90)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cornerstone (6)  |  Cost (86)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Importance (286)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Really (78)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Situation (113)  |  Thing (1915)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)

Those who know physicists and mountaineers know the traits they have in common: a “dream-and-drive” spirit, a bulldog tenacity of purpose, and an openness to try any route to the summit.
In obituary 'Albert Einstein', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs, Vol. 51, (1980), 98-99.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drive (55)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mountaineer (2)  |  Openness (7)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Route (15)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Summit (25)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Trait (22)

Throughout the last four hundred years, during which the growth of science had gradually shown men how to acquire knowledge of the ways of nature and mastery over natural forces, the clergy have fought a losing battle against science, in astronomy and geology, in anatomy and physiology, in biology and psychology and sociology. Ousted from one position, they have taken up another. After being worsted in astronomy, they did their best to prevent the rise of geology; they fought against Darwin in biology, and at the present time they fight against scientific theories of psychology and education. At each stage, they try to make the public forget their earlier obscurantism, in order that their present obscurantism may not be recognized for what it is.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 6. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Battle (34)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Biology (216)  |  Clergy (4)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Education (378)  |  Fight (44)  |  Force (487)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgeting (2)  |  Geology (220)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Forces (6)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obscurantism (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Prevention (35)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Public (96)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Stage (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Available (78)  |  Book (392)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Data (156)  |  Descent (27)  |  Directly (22)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  First (1283)  |  Historical (70)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Increase (210)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Middle (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orchid (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Record (154)  |  Render (93)  |  Several (32)  |  Single (353)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sum (102)  |  Sum Up (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worm (42)

To err is human; to try to prevent recurrence of error is science.
Anonymous
Saying. In Ashton Applewhite, William R. Evans and Andrew Frothingham, And I Quote (2003), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (321)  |  Human (1468)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Science (3879)

To overturn orthodoxy is no easier in science than in philosophy, religion, economics, or any of the other disciplines through which we try to comprehend the world and the society in which we live.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Live (628)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overturn (2)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Through (849)  |  World (1774)

To produce a really good biological theory one must try to see through the clutter produced by evolution to the basic mechanisms lying beneath them, realizing that they are likely to be overlaid by other, secondary mechanisms. What seems to physicists to be a hopelessly complicated process may have been what nature found simplest, because nature could only build on what was already there.
In What Mad Pursuit (1990), 139.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Basic (138)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Build (204)  |  Clutter (5)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Good (889)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)

To this I may add another form of temptation, manifold in its dangers … There exists in the soul … a cupidity which does not take delight in the carnal pleasure but in perceptions acquired through the flesh. It is a vain inquisitiveness dignified with the title of knowledge and science. As this is rooted in the appetite for knowing, and as among the senses the eyes play a leading role in acquiring knowledge, the divine word calls it “the lust of the eyes” (I John, 2: 16) … To satisfy this diseased craving … people study the operations of nature, which lie beyond our grasp when there is no advantage in knowing and the investigators simply desire knowledge for its own sake. This motive is again at work if, using a perverted science for the same end, people try to achieve things by magical arts.
From Confessions (c.397), Book X, Chap. 35 (54-55), as given in Henry Chadwick, Confessions: A New Translation by Henry Chadwick (1991), 210-212.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Art (657)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bible (91)  |  Call (769)  |  Danger (115)  |  Delight (108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Divine (112)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Inquisitiveness (5)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lust (7)  |  Magic (86)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  People (1005)  |  Perception (97)  |  Pervert (7)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Research (664)  |  Role (86)  |  Root (120)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soul (226)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Vain (83)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

To try to make a model of an atom by studying its spectrum is like trying to make a model of a grand piano by listening to the noise it makes when thrown downstairs.
Anonymous
In Oliver Lodge in Atoms and Rays (1924), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Downstairs (3)  |  Listening (25)  |  Model (102)  |  Noise (37)  |  Piano (12)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Throw (43)  |  Trying (144)

Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that, behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable. Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion. To that extent I am, in point of fact, religious.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secret (194)  |  Something (719)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Veneration (2)  |  Will (2355)

Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value. He is considered successful in our day who gets more out of life than he puts in. But a man of value will give more than he receives."
In William Miller, 'Old Man's Advice to Youth: Never Lose a Holy Curiosity', Life (2 May 1955), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Consider (416)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Receive (114)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Try to find pleasure in the speed that you’re not used to. Changing the way you do routine things allows a new person to grow inside of you.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 236
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Change (593)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Grow (238)  |  Inside (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Routine (25)  |  Speed (65)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (476)  |  Learn (629)  |  Something (719)

Trying to determine the structure of a protein by UV spectroscopy was like trying to determine the structure of a piano by listening to the sound it made while being dropped down a flight of stairs.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Determine (144)  |  Down (456)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Flight (98)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Piano (12)  |  Protein (54)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Stairs (2)  |  Structure (344)  |  Trying (144)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Describe (128)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We can continue to try and clean up the gutters all over the world and spend all of our resources looking at just the dirty spots and trying to make them clean. Or we can lift our eyes up and look into the skies and move forward in an evolutionary way.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Clean (50)  |  Clean Up (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Eye (419)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gutter (3)  |  Lift (55)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Move (216)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sky (161)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spot (17)  |  Trying (144)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

We can trace the development of a nervous system, and correlate with it the parallel phenomena of sensation and thought. We see with undoubting certainty that they go hand in hand. But we try to soar in a vacuum the moment we seek to comprehend the connexion between them … Man the object is separated by an impassable gulf from man the subject.
In 'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast' (19 Aug 1874), in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 194-195.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Connection (162)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Development (422)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Object (422)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Separation (57)  |  Soar (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vacuum (39)

We come finally, however, to the relation of the ideal theory to real world, or “real” probability. If he is consistent a man of the mathematical school washes his hands of applications. To someone who wants them he would say that the ideal system runs parallel to the usual theory: “If this is what you want, try it: it is not my business to justify application of the system; that can only be done by philosophizing; I am a mathematician”. In practice he is apt to say: “try this; if it works that will justify it”. But now he is not merely philosophizing; he is committing the characteristic fallacy. Inductive experience that the system works is not evidence.
In A Mathematician’s Miscellany (1953). Reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Business (149)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Merely (316)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Practice (204)  |  Probability (130)  |  Real World (14)  |  Relation (157)  |  Run (174)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

We do live in a conceptual trough that encourages such yearning for unknown and romanticized greener pastures of other times. The future doesn’t seem promising, if only because we can extrapolate some disquieting present trends in to further deterioration: pollution, nationalism, environmental destruction, and aluminum bats. Therefore, we tend to take refuge in a rose-colored past ... I do not doubt the salutary, even the essential, properties of this curiously adaptive human trait, but we must also record the down side. Legends of past golden ages become impediments when we try to negotiate our current dilemma.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptive (3)  |  Age (499)  |  Aluminum (6)  |  Bat (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Current (118)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Dilemma (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Down (456)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Environment (216)  |  Essential (199)  |  Extrapolate (2)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (429)  |  Golden (45)  |  Golden Age (10)  |  Green (63)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Legend (17)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nationalism (6)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Property (168)  |  Record (154)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Romanticize (2)  |  Rose (34)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Seem (145)  |  Side (233)  |  Tend (124)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trait (22)  |  Trend (22)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

We do not know why we are born into the world, but we can try to find out what sort of a world it is—at least in its physical aspects.
As quoted in Gale E. Christianson, Edwin Hubble: Mariner of the Nebulae (1996), 183. Cited as from Edwin P. Hubble Manuscript Collection, Henry Huntington Library. San Manno, California, in writings of Grace Burke Hubble on E.P H. Characteristics, 2: 82(9). Box 7, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Born (33)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Physical (508)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

We have reason not to be afraid of the machine, for there is always constructive change, the enemy of machines, making them change to fit new conditions.
We suffer not from overproduction but from undercirculation. You have heard of