Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Twig

Twig Quotes (14 quotes)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (105)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edge (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Green (63)  |  Growing (98)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Vague (47)  |  Victim (35)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

Ants are more like the parts of an animal than entities on their own. They are mobile cells, circulating through a dense connective tissue of other ants in a matrix of twigs. The circuits are so intimately interwoven that the anthill meets all the essential criteria of an organism.
In 'Antaeus in Manhattan', The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ant (28)  |  Anthill (3)  |  Cell (138)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Circulate (2)  |  Entity (35)  |  Essential (199)  |  Interwoven (10)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mobile (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Through (849)  |  Tissue (45)

Each pregnant Oak ten thousand acorns forms
Profusely scatter’d by autumnal storms;
Ten thousand seeds each pregnant poppy sheds
Profusely scatter’d from its waving heads;
The countless Aphides, prolific tribe,
With greedy trunks the honey’d sap imbibe;
Swarm on each leaf with eggs or embryons big,
And pendent nations tenant every twig ...
—All these, increasing by successive birth,
Would each o’erpeople ocean, air, and earth.
So human progenies, if unrestrain’d,
By climate friended, and by food sustain’d,
O’er seas and soils, prolific hordes! would spread
Erelong, and deluge their terraqueous bed;
But war, and pestilence, disease, and dearth,
Sweep the superfluous myriads from the earth...
The births and deaths contend with equal strife,
And every pore of Nature teems with Life;
Which buds or breathes from Indus to the Poles,
And Earth’s vast surface kindles, as it rolls!
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 4, lines 347-54, 367-74, 379-82, pages 156-60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Breathe (45)  |  Climate (97)  |  Countless (36)  |  Death (388)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Disease (328)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egg (69)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Friend (168)  |  Honey (15)  |  Human (1468)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oak (14)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Pestilence (14)  |  Poem (96)  |  Pole (46)  |  Roll (40)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seed (93)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spread (83)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Successive (73)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Surface (209)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)

Every leaf and twig was this morning covered with a sparkling ice armor; even the grasses in exposed fields were hung with innumerable diamond pendants, which jingled merrily when brushed by the foot of the traveler. It was literally the wreck of jewels and the crash of gems.
(21 Jan 1838). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 224.
Science quotes on:  |  Armor (3)  |  Cover (37)  |  Crash (9)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Field (364)  |  Foot (60)  |  Gem (16)  |  Grass (46)  |  Ice (54)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Literally (30)  |  Morning (94)  |  Pendant (2)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Wreck (7)

I am not insensible to natural beauty, but my emotional joys center on the improbable yet sometimes wondrous works of that tiny and accidental evolutionary twig called Homo sapiens. And I find, among these works, nothing more noble than the history of our struggle to understand nature—a majestic entity of such vast spatial and temporal scope that she cannot care much for a little mammalian afterthought with a curious evolutionary invention, even if that invention has, for the first time in so me four billion years of life on earth, produced recursion as a creature reflects back upon its own production and evolution. Thus, I love nature primarily for the puzzles and intellectual delights that she offers to the first organ capable of such curious contemplation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (27)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Back (390)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Billion (95)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Care (186)  |  Center (33)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Creature (233)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delight (108)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  First Time (10)  |  History (673)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invention (369)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life On Earth (9)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Beauty (5)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Offer (141)  |  Organ (115)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Scope (45)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Temporal (4)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I like to summarize what I regard as the pedestal-smashing messages of Darwin’s revolution in the following statement, which might be chanted several times a day, like a Hare Krishna mantra, to encourage penetration into the soul: Humans are not the end result of predictable evolutionary progress, but rather a fortuitous cosmic afterthought, a tiny little twig on the enormously arborescent bush of life, which, if replanted from seed, would almost surely not grow this twig again, or perhaps any twig with any property that we would care to call consciousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Bush (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Care (186)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Encourage (40)  |  End (590)  |  Enormously (4)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hare (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Message (49)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Progress (465)  |  Property (168)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Seed (93)  |  Several (32)  |  Soul (226)  |  Statement (142)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Surely (101)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)

I shall never forget the sight. The vessel of crystallization was three quarters full of slightly muddy water—that is, dilute water-glass—and from the sandy bottom there strove upwards a grotesque little landscape of variously colored growths: a confused vegetation of blue, green, and brown shoots which reminded one of algae, mushrooms, attached polyps, also moss, then mussels, fruit pods, little trees or twigs from trees, here, and there of limbs. It was the most remarkable sight I ever saw, and remarkable not so much for its profoundly melancholy nature. For when Father Leverkühn asked us what we thought of it and we timidly answered him that they might be plants: “No,” he replied, “they are not, they only act that way. But do not think the less of them. Precisely because they do, because they try as hard as they can, they are worthy of all respect.”
It turned out that these growths were entirely unorganic in their origin; they existed by virtue of chemicals from the apothecary's shop.
Description of a “chemical garden” in Doktor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkühn, as Told by a Friend, (1947), 19.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Algae (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Brown (23)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Color (137)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Father (110)  |  Forget (115)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Glass (92)  |  Green (63)  |  Growth (187)  |  Hard (243)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Moss (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mushroom (4)  |  Mussel (2)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pod (2)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Respect (207)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sight (132)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tree (246)  |  Try (283)  |  Turn (447)  |  Upward (43)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

Included in this ‘almost nothing,’ as a kind of geological afterthought of the last few million years, is the first development of self-conscious intelligence on this planet–an odd and unpredictable invention of a little twig on the mammalian evolutionary bush. Any definition of this uniqueness, embedded as it is in our possession of language, must involve our ability to frame the world as stories and to transmit these tales to others. If our propensity to grasps nature as story has distorted our perceptions, I shall accept this limit of mentality upon knowledge, for we receive in trade both the joys of literature and the core of our being.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accept (191)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Bush (9)  |  Core (18)  |  Definition (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Distort (22)  |  Embed (7)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  First (1283)  |  Frame (26)  |  Geological (11)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Include (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Invention (369)  |  Involve (90)  |  Joy (107)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Last (426)  |  Limit (280)  |  Literature (103)  |  Little (707)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Million (114)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Odd (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Planet (356)  |  Possession (65)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Receive (114)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Conscious (3)  |  Story (118)  |  Tale (16)  |  Trade (31)  |  Transmit (11)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Run the tape again, and let the tiny twig of Homo sapiens expire in Africa. Other hominids may have stood on the threshold of what we know as human possibilities, but many sensible scenarios would never generate our level of mentality. Run the tape again, and this time Neanderthal perishes in Europe and Homo erectus in Asia (as they did in our world). The sole surviving human stock, Homo erectus in Africa, stumbles along for a while, even prospers, but does not speciate and therefore remains stable. A mutated virus then wipes Homo erectus out, or a change in climate reconverts Africa into inhospitable forest. One little twig on the mammalian branch, a lineage with interesting possibilities that were never realized, joins the vast majority of species in extinction. So what? Most possibilities are never realized, and who will ever know the difference? Arguments of this form lead me to the conclusion that biology's most profound insight into human nature, status, and potential lies in the simple phrase, the embodiment of contingency: Homo sapiens is an entity, not a tendency.
Wonderful Life (1989), 320.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  Argument (138)  |  Biology (216)  |  Branch (150)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Difference (337)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Entity (35)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Forest (150)  |  Form (959)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Insight (102)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Majority (66)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neanderthal (7)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Potential (69)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Remain (349)  |  Run (174)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sole (49)  |  Species (401)  |  Stable (30)  |  Status (35)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Vast (177)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The Gombe Stream chimpanzees … in their ability to modify a twig or stick to make it suitable for a definite purpose, provide the first examples of free-ranging nonhuman primates actually making very crude tools.
In 'Chimpanzees of the Gombe Stream Reserve', collected in Primate Behavior: Field Studies of Monkeys and Apes (1965), 473.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Actually (27)  |  Animal Behavior (10)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Crude (31)  |  Definite (110)  |  Example (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Free (232)  |  Gombe (2)  |  Making (300)  |  Modify (15)  |  Primate (11)  |  Provide (69)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Stick (24)  |  Stream (81)  |  Tool (117)

The seed of a tree has the nature of a branch or twig or bud. While it grows upon the tree it is a part of the tree: but if separated and set in the earth to be better nourished, the embryo or young tree contained in it takes root and grows into a new tree.
As quoted in Roderick W. Home, Electricity and Experimental Physics in Eighteenth-century Europe (1992), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Botany (57)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bud (6)  |  Contain (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Grow (238)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nourish (16)  |  Part (222)  |  Root (120)  |  Seed (93)  |  Set (394)  |  Tree (246)  |  Young (227)

This single Stick, which you now behold ingloriously lying in that neglected Corner, I once knew in a flourishing State in a Forest: It was full of Sap, full of Leaves, and full of Boughs: But now, in vain does the busy Art of Man pretend to vie with Nature, by tying that withered Bundle of Twigs to its sapless Trunk: It is at best but the Reverse of what it was; a Tree turned upside down, the Branches on the Earth, and the Root in the Air.
'A Meditation Upon a Broom-stick: According to The Style and Manner of the Honorable Robert Boyle's Meditations' (1703), collected in 'Thoughts On Various Subjects', The Works of Jonathan Swift (1746), Vol. 1, 55-56.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Behold (18)  |  Best (459)  |  Bough (9)  |  Bundle (7)  |  Busy (28)  |  Corner (57)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Forest (150)  |  Full (66)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Lying (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Root (120)  |  Sap (3)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  Stick (24)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turned (2)  |  Tying (2)  |  Upside Down (8)  |  Vain (83)

’T is education forms the common mind:
Just as the twig is bent the tree’s inclined.
'Epistle I: Of the Knowledge and Character of Man', The Works of Alexander Pope (1881), Vol. 3, 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Common (436)  |  Education (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Tree (246)

“Planning” is simply the result of experience read backward and projected into the future. To me the “purposive” action of a beehive is simply the summation and integration of its units, and Natural Selection has put higher and higher premiums on the most “purposeful” integration. It is the same way (to me) in the evolution of the middle ear, the steps in the Cynodonts (clearly shown by me in 1910 and by you later in Oudenodon) make it easier to see how such a wonderful device as the middle ear could arise without any predetermination or human-like planning, and in fact in the good old Darwinian way, if only we admit that as the “twig is bent the tree’s inclined” and that each stage conserves the advantages of its predecessors… The simple idea that planning is only experience read backward and combined by selection in suitable or successful combinations takes the mystery out of Nature and out of men’s minds.
Letter to Robert Broom [1933]. In Ronald Rainger, An Agenda for Antiquity (1991), 238.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beehive (2)  |  Combination (144)  |  Device (70)  |  Ear (68)  |  Easier (53)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Integration (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Planning (20)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Project (73)  |  Read (287)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Selection (128)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Summation (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.