Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Neglect

Neglect Quotes (23 quotes)

But however secure and well-regulated civilized life may become, bacteria, Protozoa, viruses, infected fleas, lice, ticks, mosquitoes, and bedbugs will always lurk in the shadows ready to pounce when neglect, poverty, famine, or war lets down the defenses.
Rats, Lice and History (1934), 13-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Bedbug (2)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Defense (15)  |  Famine (8)  |  Flea (8)  |  Infection (18)  |  Lurk (2)  |  Mosquito (12)  |  Pounce (3)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Protozoa (3)  |  Secure (13)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Tick (5)  |  Virus (22)  |  War (144)

I came from Paris in the Spring of 1884, and was brought in intimate contact with him [Thomas Edison]. We experimented day and night, holidays not excepted. His existence was made up of alternate periods of work and sleep in the laboratory. He had no hobby, cared for no sport or amusement of any kind and lived in utter disregard of the most elementary rules of hygiene. There can be no doubt that, if he had not married later a woman of exceptional intelligence, who made it the one object of her life to preserve him, he would have died many years ago from consequences of sheer neglect. So great and uncontrollable was his passion for work.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (20)  |  Care (73)  |  Death (270)  |  Disregard (8)  |  Thomas Edison (74)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Hobby (4)  |  Holiday (3)  |  Hygiene (8)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Marriage (31)  |  Night (73)  |  Passion (54)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Sport (9)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Woman (94)  |  Work (457)

If the term education may be understood in so large a sense as to include all that belongs to the improvement of the mind, either by the acquisition of the knowledge of others or by increase of it through its own exertions, we learn by them what is the kind of education science offers to man. It teaches us to be neglectful of nothing — not to despise the small beginnings, for they precede of necessity all great things in the knowledge of science, either pure or applied.
'Science as a Branch of Education', lecture to the Royal Institution, 11 Jun 1858. Reprinted in The Mechanics Magazine (1858), 49, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (32)  |  Applied (15)  |  Education (280)  |  Exertion (8)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Increase (107)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Pure (62)  |  Science (1699)  |  Understanding (317)

In a world that is rightly so concerned about climate change and the atmosphere, to be so ignorant and neglectful of our oceans is deeply troubling. However, … having woken up to this living disaster and having realized that there are limits to how much abuse we can inflict, it’s not too late to turn things around.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Climate Change (56)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Disaster (36)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Limit (86)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Realize (43)

In my opinion the separation of the c- and ac-stars is the most important advancement in stellar classification since the trials by Vogel and Secchi ... To neglect the c-properties in classifying stellar spectra, I think, is nearly the same thing as if a zoologist, who has detected the deciding differences between a whale and a fish, would continue classifying them together.
Letter to Edward Pickering (22 Jul 1908). In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Classification (79)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fish (85)  |  Importance (183)  |  Antonia Maury (2)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Property (96)  |  Separation (32)  |  Star (251)  |  Whale (21)  |  Zoologist (10)

In the Choice of … Things, neglect not any, tho’ the most ordinary and trivial; the Commonest Peble or Flint, Cockle or Oyster-shell, Grass, Moss, Fern or Thistle, will be as useful, and as proper to be gathered and sent, as any the rarest production of the Country. Only take care to choose of each the fairest of its kind, and such as are perfect or whole.
In Brief Instructions for Making Observations in all Parts of the World (1696), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Fern (4)  |  Flint (6)  |  Grass (30)  |  Moss (8)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Oyster (7)  |  Pebble (17)  |  Shell (35)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Trivial (30)

It has often been said that, to make discoveries, one must be ignorant. This opinion, mistaken in itself, nevertheless conceals a truth. It means that it is better to know nothing than to keep in mind fixed ideas based on theories whose confirmation we constantly seek, neglecting meanwhile everything that fails to agree with them.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (29)  |  Conceal (10)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Failing (5)  |  Fixed (11)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Seeking (30)  |  Theory (582)  |  Truth (750)

Men who have excessive faith in their theories or ideas are not only ill prepared for making discoveries; they also make very poor observations. Of necessity, they observe with a preconceived idea, and when they devise an experiment, they can see, in its results,only a confirmation of their theory. In this way they distort observation and often neglect very important facts because they do not further their aim.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (58)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distortion (10)  |  Excessive (7)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Faith (131)  |  Idea (440)  |  Importance (183)  |  Observation (418)  |  Poor (46)  |  Preconceived (3)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Result (250)  |  Theory (582)

Men who have excessive faith in their theories … make poor observations, because they choose among the results of their experiments only what suits their object, neglecting whatever is unrelated to it and carefully setting aside everything which might tend toward the idea they wish to combat
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (73)  |  Choose (35)  |  Combat (9)  |  Excessive (7)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Faith (131)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ignoring (5)  |  Object (110)  |  Observation (418)  |  Poor (46)  |  Result (250)  |  Suit (7)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unrelated (6)  |  Wish (62)

Said M. Waldman, “…Chemistry is that branch of natural philosophy in which the greatest improvements have been and may be made; it is on that account that I have made it my peculiar study; but at the same time, I have not neglected the other branches of science. A man would make but a very sorry chemist if he attended to that department of human knowledge alone. If your wish is to become really a man of science and not merely a petty experimentalist, I should advise you to apply to every branch of natural philosophy, including mathematics.”
In Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus (1823), Vol. 1, 73-74. Webmaster note: In the novel, when the fictional characters meet, M. Waldman, professor of chemistry, sparks Victor Frankenstein’s interest in science. Shelley was age 20 when the first edition of the novel was published anonymously (1818).
Science quotes on:  |  Branch (61)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Experimentalist (11)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Natural Philosophy (21)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Study (331)

Science would have us believe that such accuracy, leading to certainty, is the only criterion of knowledge, would make the trial of Galileo the paradigm of the two points of view which aspire to truth, would suggest, that is, that the cardinals represent only superstition and repression, while Galileo represents freedom. But there is another criterion which is systematically neglected in this elevation of science. Man does not now—and will not ever—live by the bread of scientific method alone. He must deal with life and death, with love and cruelty and despair, and so must make conjectures of great importance which may or may not be true and which do not lend themselves to experimentation: It is better to give than to receive; Love thy neighbor as thyself; Better to risk slavery through non-violence than to defend freedom with murder. We must deal with such propositions, must decide whether they are true, whether to believe them, whether to act on them—and scientific method is no help for by their nature these matters lie forever beyond the realm of science.
In The End of the Modern Age (1973), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Act (80)  |  Belief (400)  |  Cardinal (4)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Criterion (10)  |  Cruelty (14)  |  Deal (25)  |  Death (270)  |  Decide (25)  |  Despair (25)  |  Elevation (4)  |  Experimentation (6)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Love (164)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Realm (40)  |  Repression (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Trial (23)  |  Truth (750)

So far from science being irreligious, as many think, it is the neglect of science that is irreligious—it is the refusal to study the surrounding creation that is irreligious.
'What Knowledge is of Most Worth'. Lectures in Education delivered at the Royal Institution (1855). In The Westminster Review (Jul 1859), 22. Collected in Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects (1911), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (211)  |  Irreligious (2)  |  Refusal (20)  |  Science (1699)  |  Study (331)  |  Surrounding (11)

Students using astrophysical textbooks remain essentially ignorant of even the existence of plasma concepts, despite the fact that some of them have been known for half a century. The conclusion is that astrophysics is too important to be left in the hands of astrophysicists who have gotten their main knowledge from these textbooks. Earthbound and space telescope data must be treated by scientists who are familiar with laboratory and magnetospheric physics and circuit theory, and of course with modern plasma theory.
[Lamenting the traditional neglect of plasma physics]
Quoted in Anthony L. Peratt, 'Dean of the Plasma Dissidents', Washington Times, supplement: The World and I (May 1988),197.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysicist (7)  |  Astrophysics (12)  |  Circuit (12)  |  Concept (102)  |  Data (100)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fact (609)  |  Ignorant (27)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Plasma (7)  |  Student (131)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Textbook (19)  |  Theory (582)

Such is the tendency of the human mind to speculation, that on the least idea of an analogy between a few phenomena, it leaps forward, as it were, to a cause or law, to the temporary neglect of all the rest; so that, in fact, almost all our principal inductions must be regarded as a series of ascents and descents, and of conclusions from a few cases, verified by trial on many.
In A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), 164-165.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (46)  |  Ascent (5)  |  Case (64)  |  Cause (231)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Descent (14)  |  Fact (609)  |  Forward (21)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Idea (440)  |  Induction (45)  |  Law (418)  |  Leap (23)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Principal (15)  |  Regarded (2)  |  Series (38)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Trial (23)

That physician will hardly be thought very careful of the health of others who neglects his own.
Galen
From Lib. 5, De Sanitate tuenda (Of Protecting the Health). As quoted and cited in François Rabelais translated by Sir Thomas Urquhart and Motteux, The Works of Francis Rabelais (1849), Vol. 2, 191. Stated under 'Galen' in Peter McDonald, Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 38. (Note by Webmaster: The quote appears in some 19th century quotation collections attributed to Rabelais himself—and this continues to the present (e.g. by Asimov)—but in the first book above, Rabelais clearly cites it to Galen.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (12)  |  Health (136)  |  Physician (232)

That science has long been neglected and declining in England, is not an opinion originating with me, but is shared by many, and has been expressed by higher authority than mine. (1830)
In Reflections on the Decline of Science in England, and on Some of Its Causes (1830), Preface, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (50)  |  Decline (11)  |  England (31)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Science (1699)  |  Share (30)

The fact is that up to now the free society has not been good for the intellectual. It has neither accorded him a superior status to sustain his confidence nor made it easy for him to acquire an unquestioned sense of social usefulness. For he derives his sense of usefulness mainly from directing, instructing, and planning-from minding other people’s business-and is bound to feel superfluous and neglected where people believe themselves competent to manage individual and communal affairs, and are impatient of supervision and regulation. A free society is as much a threat to the intellectual’s sense of worth as an automated economy is to the workingman’s sense of worth. Any social order that can function with a minimum of leadership will be anathema to the intellectual.
In 'Concerning Individual Freedom', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Acquire (19)  |  Affair (24)  |  Belief (400)  |  Bind (18)  |  Communal (7)  |  Competent (10)  |  Confidence (32)  |  Derive (18)  |  Direct (44)  |  Easy (56)  |  Economy (46)  |  Fact (609)  |  Feel (93)  |  Free (59)  |  Function (90)  |  Good (228)  |  Impatient (2)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Leadership (5)  |  Mainly (6)  |  Manage (10)  |  Mind (544)  |  Minimum (10)  |  People (269)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Sense (240)  |  Social (93)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (188)  |  Status (18)  |  Superfluous (8)  |  Superior (30)  |  Supervision (3)  |  Sustain (13)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Threat (24)  |  Unquestioned (4)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Workingmans (2)  |  Worth (74)

The landed classes neglected technical education, taking refuge in classical studies; as late as 1930, for example, long after Ernest Rutherford at Cambridge had discovered the atomic nucleus and begun transmuting elements, the physics laboratory at Oxford had not been wired for electricity. Intellectual neglect technical education to this day.
[Describing C.P. Snow's observations on the neglect of technical education.]
In Visions of Technology (1999), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Cambridge (11)  |  Class (64)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Element (129)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Nucleus (30)  |  Oxford (8)  |  Physics (301)  |  Baron C.P. Snow (17)  |  Transmutation (13)

The starting point of Darwin’s theory of evolution is precisely the existence of those differences between individual members of a race or species which morphologists for the most part rightly neglect. The first condition necessary, in order that any process of Natural Selection may begin among a race, or species, is the existence of differences among its members; and the first step in an enquiry into the possible effect of a selective process upon any character of a race must be an estimate of the frequency with which individuals, exhibiting any given degree of abnormality with respect to that, character, occur. The unit, with which such an enquiry must deal, is not an individual but a race, or a statistically representative sample of a race; and the result must take the form of a numerical statement, showing the relative frequency with which the various kinds of individuals composing the race occur.
Biometrika: A Joumal for the Statistical Study of Biological Problems (1901), 1, 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  Composition (52)  |  Condition (119)  |  Charles Darwin (284)  |  Difference (208)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  First (174)  |  Form (210)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Individual (177)  |  Kind (99)  |  Member (27)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Number (179)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Precision (38)  |  Process (201)  |  Race (76)  |  Relative (24)  |  Representative (9)  |  Result (250)  |  Sample (8)  |  Species (181)  |  Start (68)  |  Starting Point (6)  |  Statement (56)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Step (67)  |  Theory (582)  |  Various (25)

The surgeon may harden himself whilst performing an operation, for he knows that he is acting for the good of his patient; but if we were intentionally to neglect the weak and helpless, it could only be for a contingent benefit, with an overwhelming present evil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contingent (8)  |  Evil (67)  |  Good (228)  |  Helpless (6)  |  Intentionally (3)  |  Know (321)  |  Operation (96)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Patient (116)  |  Perform (27)  |  Present (103)  |  Surgeon (43)  |  Weak (36)  |  Whilst (3)

When we have to do with an art whose end is the saving of human life, any neglect to make ourselves thorough masters of it becomes a crime.
Quoted without citation in United States Medical Investigator (1885), 21, 521. Seen in various other later publications, but also without citation. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Crime (20)  |  Human Life (25)  |  Master (55)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Saving (19)  |  Thorough (7)

Why then be concerned about the conservation of wildlife when for all practical purposes we would be much better off if humans and their domestic animals and pets were the only living creatures on the face of the earth? There is no obvious and demolishing answer to this rather doubtful logic although in practice the destruction of all wild animals would certainly bring devastating changes to our existence on this planet as we know it today...The trouble is that everything in nature is completely interdependent. Tinker with one part of it and the repercussions ripple out in all directions...Wildlife - and that includes everything from microbes to blue whales and from a fungus to a redwood tree - has been so much part of life on the earth that we are inclined to take its continued existence for granted...Yet the wildlife of the world is disappearing, not because of a malicious and deliberate policy of slaughter and extermination, but simply because of a general and widespread ignorance and neglect.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Answer (201)  |  Better (131)  |  Bring (53)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Completely (19)  |  Concern (76)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Continue (38)  |  Creature (127)  |  Deliberate (10)  |  Demolish (2)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Devastating (4)  |  Direction (56)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Doubtful (5)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Existence (254)  |  Extermination (10)  |  Face Of The Earth (3)  |  Fungus (4)  |  General (92)  |  Grant (21)  |  Human (445)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Inclined (7)  |  Include (27)  |  Interdependent (2)  |  Know (321)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Logic (187)  |  Malicious (2)  |  Microbe (17)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Part (146)  |  Pet (7)  |  Planet (199)  |  Policy (23)  |  Practical (93)  |  Practice (67)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Repercussion (4)  |  Ripple (3)  |  Simply (34)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Tinker (5)  |  Today (86)  |  Tree (143)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Widespread (9)  |  Wild (39)  |  Wildlife (11)  |  World (667)

[A]s you know, scientific education is fabulously neglected … This is an evil that is inherited, passed on from generation to generation. The majority of educated persons are not interested in science, and are not aware that scientific knowledge forms part of the idealistic background of human life. Many believe—in their complete ignorance of what science really is—that it has mainly the ancillary task of inventing new machinery, or helping to invent it, for improving our conditions of life. They are prepared to leave this task to the specialists, as they leave the repairing of their pipes to the plumber. If persons with this outlook decide upon the curriculum of our children, the result is necessarily such as I have just described it.
Opening remarks of the second of four public lectures for the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies at University College, Dublin (Feb 1950), The Practical Achievements of Science Tending to Obliterate its True Import', collected in Science and Humanism: Physics in Our Time (1951). Reprinted in 'Nature and the Greeks' and 'Science and Humanism' (1996), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Awareness (23)  |  Background (24)  |  Belief (400)  |  Child (189)  |  Condition (119)  |  Curriculum (9)  |  Evil (67)  |  Generation (111)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Interest (170)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Machinery (25)  |  Outlook (12)  |  Pass (60)  |  Pipe (6)  |  Plumber (7)  |  Repair (7)  |  Result (250)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science Education (11)  |  Specialist (20)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.