Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Observe

Observe Quotes (76 quotes)

...what would be observed (if not with one’s actual eyes at least with those of the mind) if an eagle, carried by the force of the wind, were to drop a rock from its talons?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (48)  |  Carry (59)  |  Drop (40)  |  Eagle (13)  |  Eye (222)  |  Force (249)  |  Least (74)  |  Mind (760)  |  Rock (125)  |  Talon (2)  |  Wind (80)

A possible explanation for the observed excess noise is the one given by Dicke, Peebles, Roll, and Wilkinson (1965) in a companion letter in this issue.
[The low-key announcement of the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation which is the afterglow of the Big Bang. Co-author with Robert Wilson. They received the 1978 Nobel Prize for their discovery.]
'A measurement of excess antenna temperature at 4080 Mc/s'. In Astrophysical Journal (1965). Reprinted in R. B. Partridge, 3 K the cosmic microwave background radiation? (1995), Appendix A, 355.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (10)  |  Background Radiation (2)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Co-Author (2)  |  Companion (13)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Detection (12)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Excess (9)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Give (201)  |  Issue (42)  |  Letter (51)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Nobel Prize (28)  |  Noise (31)  |  Possible (158)  |  Receive (60)  |  Roll (17)

All are born to observe order, but few are born to establish it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (67)  |  Establish (56)  |  Order (242)

But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call the attention of all astronomers and philosophers, is this: namely, that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any one of the astronomers before my time, which have their orbits round a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round the sun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which facts were discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening my mind.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (23)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Attention (121)  |  Behind (38)  |  Discover (199)  |  Enlighten (4)  |  Especially (31)  |  Excite (15)  |  Fact (733)  |  Four (6)  |  Front (16)  |  Great (534)  |  Jupiter (21)  |  Know (556)  |  Mercury (44)  |  Mind (760)  |  Orbit (69)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Planet (263)  |  Previously (11)  |  Star (336)  |  Sun (276)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Time (595)  |  Venus (15)

Children are told that an apple fell on Isaac Newton’s head and he was led to state the law of gravity. This, of course, is pure foolishness. What Newton discovered was that any two particles in the universe attract each other with a force that is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This is not learned from a falling apple, but by observing quantities of data and developing a mathematical theory that can be verified by additional data. Data gathered by Galileo on falling bodies and by Johannes Kepler on motions of the planets were invaluable aids to Newton. Unfortunately, such false impressions about science are not universally outgrown like the Santa Claus myth, and some people who don’t study much science go to their graves thinking that the human race took until the mid-seventeenth century to notice that objects fall.
In How to Tell the Liars from the Statisticians (1983), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Additional (6)  |  Aid (42)  |  Apple (35)  |  Attract (22)  |  Body (247)  |  Child (252)  |  Data (120)  |  Discover (199)  |  Distance (77)  |  Fall (120)  |  False (99)  |  Foolish (22)  |  Force (249)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Gather (39)  |  Grave (26)  |  Head (81)  |  Human Race (69)  |  Impression (72)  |  Invaluable (7)  |  Inversely Proportional (3)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law Of Gravity (9)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Motion (160)  |  Myth (48)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notice (37)  |  Object (175)  |  Particle (99)  |  Planet (263)  |  Product (82)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Santa Claus (2)  |  Science (2067)  |  Square (24)  |  Study (476)  |  Theory (696)  |  Think (347)  |  Unfortunately (18)  |  Universe (686)  |  Verify (17)

Every great advance of science opens our eyes to facts which we had failed before to observe, and makes new demands on our powers of interpretation.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (165)  |  Demand (76)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fail (58)  |  Great (534)  |  Interpretation (70)  |  New (496)  |  Open (66)  |  Power (366)  |  Science (2067)

First of all, we ought to observe, that mathematical propositions, properly so called, are always judgments a priori, and not empirical, because they carry along with them necessity, which can never be deduced from experience. If people should object to this, I am quite willing to confine my statements to pure mathematics, the very concept of which implies that it does not contain empirical, but only pure knowledge a priori.
In Critique of Pure Reason (1900), 720.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Call (128)  |  Carry (59)  |  Concept (146)  |  Confine (26)  |  Contain (67)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Empirical (27)  |  Experience (342)  |  First (314)  |  Imply (16)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Object (175)  |  People (390)  |  Properly (20)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Pure (103)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Statement (76)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Character (118)  |  Chief (38)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Desk (13)  |  Drive (55)  |  First (314)  |  Force (249)  |  Fund (12)  |  Institution (39)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Observation (450)  |  Professional (37)  |  Project (31)  |  Raise (35)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Second (59)  |  Sky (124)  |  Spend (43)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Time (595)

For man being the minister and interpreter of nature, acts and understands so far as he has observed of the order, the works and mind of nature, and can proceed no further; for no power is able to loose or break the chain of causes, nor is nature to be conquered but by submission: whence those twin intentions, human knowledge and human power, are really coincident; and the greatest hindrance to works is the ignorance of causes.
In The Great lnstauration.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (117)  |  Break (54)  |  Cause (285)  |  Chain (50)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Conquer (23)  |  Great (534)  |  Hindrance (6)  |  Human (550)  |  Ignorance (213)  |  Intention (28)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Loose (14)  |  Mind (760)  |  Minister (9)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Order (242)  |  Power (366)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Submission (3)  |  Twin (8)  |  Understand (340)  |  Work (635)

From the rocket we can see the huge sphere of the planet in one or another phase of the Moon. We can see how the sphere rotates, and how within a few hours it shows all its sides successively ... and we shall observe various points on the surface of the Earth for several minutes and from different sides very closely. This picture is so majestic, attractive and infinitely varied that I wish with all my soul that you and I could see it. (1911)
As translated in William E. Burrows, The Survival Imperative: Using Space to Protect Earth (2007), 147. From Tsiolkovsky's 'The Investigation of Universal Space by Means of Reactive Devices', translated in K.E. Tsiolkovsky, Works on Rocket Technology (NASA, NASATT F-243, n.d.), 76-77.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (8)  |  Earth (638)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Moon (199)  |  Phase (16)  |  Picture (77)  |  Planet (263)  |  Rocket (34)  |  Rotate (6)  |  See (369)  |  Soul (166)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Surface (101)  |  Varied (6)  |  Wish (92)

Have you ever observed a humming-bird moving about in an aerial dance among the flowers—a living prismatic gem that changes its colour with every change of position— … its exquisite form, its changeful splendour, its swift motions and intervals of aërial suspension, it is a creature of such fairy-like loveliness as to mock all description.
In Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest (1916),
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (5)  |  Change (364)  |  Color (99)  |  Creature (155)  |  Dance (26)  |  Description (84)  |  Exquisite (15)  |  Fairy (8)  |  Flower (77)  |  Form (314)  |  Gem (13)  |  Hummingbird (3)  |  Interval (13)  |  Living (56)  |  Loveliness (5)  |  Mock (7)  |  Motion (160)  |  Position (76)  |  Prismatic (2)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Suspension (5)  |  Swift (12)

I am born into an environment–I know not whence I came nor whither I go nor who I am. This is my situation as yours, every single one of you. The fact that everyone always was in this same situation, and always will be, tells me nothing. Our burning question as to the whence and whither–all we can ourselves observe about it is the present environment. That is why we are eager to find out about it as much as we can. That is science, learning, knowledge; it is the true source of every spiritual endeavour of man. We try to find out as much as we can about the spatial and temporal surroundings of the place in which we find ourselves put by birth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (67)  |  Birth (93)  |  Burn (41)  |  Eager (15)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Environment (181)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Fact (733)  |  Find (408)  |  Find Out (20)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Place (175)  |  Present (176)  |  Question (404)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Single (120)  |  Situation (52)  |  Source (91)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Surroundings (5)  |  Tell (110)  |  Temporal (4)  |  True (208)  |  Try (141)  |  Whither (3)

I concluded that I might take as a general rule the principle that all things which we very clearly and obviously conceive are true: only observing, however, that there is some difficulty in rightly determining the objects which we distinctly conceive.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), as translated by J. Veitch, A Discourse on Method (1912), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Conclude (16)  |  Determine (76)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Distinct (46)  |  General (160)  |  Object (175)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Principle (292)  |  Rule (177)  |  True (208)

I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration; the connection and dependence of ideas should be followed till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along; …
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (82)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bring (90)  |  Closely (12)  |  Coherence (10)  |  Connection (111)  |  Deep (124)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Dependence (37)  |  Follow (124)  |  Habit (112)  |  Idea (580)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Manage (15)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mention (23)  |  Mind (760)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Occasion (23)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (471)  |  Settle (18)  |  Single (120)  |  Sort (49)  |  Source (91)  |  Study (476)  |  Think (347)  |  Train (45)  |  Transfer (12)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

I scrutinize life.
Part of a longer quote that begins, “You disembowel the animal…” on the Jean-Henri Fabre Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (49)  |  Animal (359)  |  Blue (56)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Death (302)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Horror (9)  |  Life (1131)  |  Love (224)  |  Object (175)  |  Observation (450)  |  Pity (13)  |  Scrutinize (5)  |  Sky (124)  |  Song (27)  |  Study (476)  |  Torture (16)  |  Work (635)  |  Workshop (8)

I would picture myself as a virus, or as a cancer cell, for example, and try to sense what it would be like to be either. I would also imagine myself as the immune system, and I would try to reconstruct what I would do as an immune system engaged in combating a virus or cancer cell. When I had played through a series of such scenarios on a particular problem and had acquired new insights, I would design laboratory experiments accordingly… Based upon the results of the experiment, I would then know what question to ask next… When I observed phenomena in the laboratory that I did not understand, I would also ask questions as if interrogating myself: “Why would I do that if I were a virus or a cancer cell, or the immune system?” Before long, this internal dialogue became second nature to me; I found that my mind worked this way all the time.
In Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (1983), 7, footnote b, as quoted and cited in Roger Frantz, Two Minds: Intuition and Analysis in the History of Economic Thought (2006), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (49)  |  Cell (137)  |  Combat (13)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Immune System (2)  |  Insight (73)  |  Interrogate (3)  |  Intuition (57)  |  New (496)  |  Question (404)  |  Result (389)  |  Scenario (3)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Understand (340)  |  Virus (23)

Iamblichus in his treatise On the Arithmetic of Nicomachus observes p. 47- “that certain numbers were called amicable by those who assimilated the virtues and elegant habits to numbers.” He adds, “that 284 and 220 are numbers of this kind; for the parts of each are generative of each other according to the nature of friendship, as was shown by Pythagoras. For some one asking him what a friend was, he answered, another I (ετεϑος εγω) which is demonstrated to take place in these numbers.” [“Friendly” thus: Each number is equal to the sum of the factors of the other.]
In Theoretic Arithmetic (1816), 122. (Factors of 284 are 1, 2, 4 ,71 and 142, which give the sum 220. Reciprocally, factors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11 ,22, 44, 55 and 110, which give the sum 284.) Note: the expression “alter ego” is Latin for “the other I.”
Science quotes on:  |  According (9)  |  Addition (29)  |  Answer (249)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Demonstrate (53)  |  Elegant (16)  |  Factor (46)  |  Friend (86)  |  Friendship (11)  |  Generative (2)  |  Habit (112)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nomenclature (138)  |  Number (282)  |  Place (175)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Virtue (61)

If the entire Mandelbrot set were placed on an ordinary sheet of paper, the tiny sections of boundary we examine would not fill the width of a hydrogen atom. Physicists think about such tiny objects; only mathematicians have microscopes fine enough to actually observe them.
In 'Can We See the Mandelbrot Set?', The College Mathematics Journal (Mar 1995), 26, No. 2, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (48)  |  Atom (280)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Entire (47)  |  Examine (44)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fine (33)  |  Hydrogen (44)  |  Mandelbrot Set (2)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Object (175)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Section (11)  |  Think (347)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Width (5)

In general the actions which we see ever taking place around us are complex, or due to the simultaneous action of many causes. When, as in astronomy, we endeavour to ascertain these causes by simply watching their effects, we observe; when, as in our laboratories, we interfere arbitrarily with the causes or circumstances of a phenomenon, we are said to experiment.
In William Thomson and Peter Guthrie Tait, Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1867), Vol. 1, 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Arbitrary (21)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Cause (285)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Complex (95)  |  Effect (166)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Interfere (11)  |  Laboratory (132)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Simultaneous (18)  |  Watch (65)

In order to see birds it is necessary to become a part of the silence. One has to sit still like a mystic and wait. One soon learns that fussing, instead of achieving things, merely prevents things from happening.
First essay collected in Solomon in All his Glory (1922), 12. Also seen reprinted titled 'Kingfisher' in The New Statesman (1921), 17, 619. “Solomon in All His Glory” refers to a kingfisher, the subject of the essay.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (64)  |  Bird (120)  |  Fuss (4)  |  Happening (32)  |  Mystic (12)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Prevent (40)  |  Silence (43)  |  Wait (58)

In symbols one observes an advantage in discovery which is greatest when they express the exact nature of a thing briefly and, as it were, picture it; then indeed the labor of thought is wonderfully diminished.
In letter to Tschirnhaus. As quoted in George F. Simmons Calculus Gems (1992), 156, citing Dirk Jan Struik, 281-282.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (77)  |  Brief (20)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Exact (68)  |  Express (65)  |  Labor (73)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Picture (77)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Thought (546)  |  Wonderfully (2)

In the world of science different levels of esteem are accorded to different kinds of specialist. Mathematicians have always been eminently respectable, and so are those who deal with hard lifeless theories about what constitutes the physical world: the astronomers, the physicists, the theoretical chemists. But the more closely the scientist interests himself in matters which are of direct human relevance, the lower his social status. The real scum of the scientific world are the engineers and the sociologists and the psychologists. Indeed, if a psychologist wants to rate as a scientist he must study rats, not human beings. In zoology the same rules apply. It is much more respectable to dissect muscle tissues in a laboratory than to observe the behaviour of a living animal in its natural habitat.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Behaviour (27)  |  Chemist (89)  |  Close (67)  |  Constitute (29)  |  Different (186)  |  Direct (84)  |  Dissection (29)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Habitat (14)  |  Human (550)  |  Human Being (73)  |  Interest (237)  |  Laboratory (132)  |  Level (67)  |  Lifeless (11)  |  Live (272)  |  Low (24)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Matter (343)  |  Muscle (35)  |  Natural (173)  |  Physical World (12)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Psychologist (15)  |  Rat (21)  |  Rate (29)  |  Real (149)  |  Relevance (14)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Rule (177)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Social (108)  |  Sociologist (3)  |  Specialist (25)  |  Status (20)  |  Study (476)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Theory (696)  |  Tissue (27)  |  Want (176)  |  Zoology (31)

It is curious to observe how differently these great men [Plato and Bacon] estimated the value of every kind of knowledge. Take Arithmetic for example. Plato, after speaking slightly of the convenience of being able to reckon and compute in the ordinary transactions of life, passes to what he considers as a far more important advantage. The study of the properties of numbers, he tells us, habituates the mind to the contemplation of pure truth, and raises us above the material universe. He would have his disciples apply themselves to this study, not that they may be able to buy or sell, not that they may qualify themselves to be shop-keepers or travelling merchants, but that they may learn to withdraw their minds from the ever-shifting spectacle of this visible and tangible world, and to fix them on the immutable essences of things.
Bacon, on the other hand, valued this branch of knowledge only on account of its uses with reference to that visible and tangible world which Plato so much despised. He speaks with scorn of the mystical arithmetic of the later Platonists, and laments the propensity of mankind to employ, on mere matters of curiosity, powers the whole exertion of which is required for purposes of solid advantage. He advises arithmeticians to leave these trifles, and employ themselves in framing convenient expressions which may be of use in physical researches.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (68)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Advise (7)  |  Apply (77)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Arithmetician (3)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Branch (107)  |  Buy (20)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consider (81)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Convenience (34)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Curious (43)  |  Despise (13)  |  Different (186)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Employ (35)  |  Essence (55)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Example (94)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expression (110)  |  Fix (25)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (534)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immutable (13)  |  Important (205)  |  Kind (140)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Lament (9)  |  Late (52)  |  Learn (288)  |  Leave (128)  |  Life (1131)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Material (156)  |  Matter (343)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Mere (82)  |  Mind (760)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Number (282)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Pass (93)  |  Physical (134)  |  Plato (76)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Power (366)  |  Propensity (8)  |  Property (126)  |  Pure (103)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (85)  |  Research (590)  |  Scorn (7)  |  Sell (14)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Solid (50)  |  Speak (92)  |  Spectacle (14)  |  Study (476)  |  Tangible (8)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Truth (928)  |  Universe (686)  |  Value (242)  |  Visible (38)  |  Whole (192)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  World (898)

It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions:"Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."
Vitruvius
In Vitruvius Pollio and Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), 'Book VI: Introduction', Vitruvius, the Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 167. From the original Latin, “Aristippus philosophus Socraticus, naufragio cum ejectus ad Rhodiensium litus animaduertisset Geometrica schemata descripta, exclama uisse ad comites ita dicitur, Bene speremus, hominum enim vestigia video.” In De Architectura libri decem (1552), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (56)  |  Aristippus The Cyrenaic (4)  |  Coast (13)  |  Companion (13)  |  Draw (55)  |  Exclaim (4)  |  Figure (69)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Man (373)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  See (369)  |  Shipwreck (7)  |  Shore (24)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Trace (53)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (54)  |  Arrangement (60)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Author (62)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Birth (93)  |  Book (257)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (160)  |  Child (252)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (110)  |  Connect (33)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (84)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (106)  |  Daughter (16)  |  Delay (11)  |  Destined (11)  |  Destiny (36)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (86)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Examine (44)  |  Existence (299)  |  Expectation (55)  |  Fall (120)  |  Father (60)  |  Find (408)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Follow (124)  |  Girl (20)  |  Good (345)  |  Happen (82)  |  Hole (16)  |  Hour (71)  |  Indian (20)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (100)  |  Late (52)  |  Leave (128)  |  Life (1131)  |  Lucky (12)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (170)  |  Natural (173)  |  Occasion (23)  |  Operation (121)  |  Order (242)  |  Pass (93)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Precious (32)  |  Promise (38)  |  Quality (95)  |  Remain (113)  |  Roll (17)  |  Say (228)  |  Second (59)  |  Separate (74)  |  Short (51)  |  Small (163)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (76)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (595)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Unfortunate (14)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (28)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (293)  |  Write (154)

It is the theory that decides what can be observed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Decide (40)  |  Theory (696)

It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man, so weak, but it mates, and masters, the fear of death; and therefore, death is no such terrible enemy, when a man hath so many attendants about him, that can win the combat of him. Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupieth it.
In 'Of Death', Essays (1625, 1883), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspire (8)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Combat (13)  |  Death (302)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Fear (142)  |  Grief (11)  |  Honor (31)  |  Love (224)  |  Master (98)  |  Mate (6)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  Passion (71)  |  Preoccupy (2)  |  Revenge (8)  |  Slight (31)  |  Terrible (19)  |  Triumph (46)  |  Weak (44)  |  Win (38)  |  Worthy (34)

It isn’t important in which sea or lake you observe a slick of pollution, or in the forests of which country afire breaks out, or on which continent a hurricane arises. You are standing guard over the whole of our Earth.
In Jack Hassard and Julie Weisberg , Environmental Science on the Net: The Global Thinking Project (1999), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (49)  |  Break (54)  |  Continent (52)  |  Country (147)  |  Earth (638)  |  Forest (107)  |  Guard (18)  |  Hurricane (4)  |  Important (205)  |  Lake (18)  |  Pollution (43)  |  Sea (188)  |  Stand (108)  |  Whole (192)

It seemed that animals always behave in a manner showing the rightness of the philosophy entertained by the man who observes them… . Throughout the reign of Queen Victoria all apes were virtuous monogamists, but during the dissolute twenties their morals underwent a disastrous deterioration.
From 'Theory of Knowledge', My Philosophical Development (1959), collected in Robert E. Egner and Lester E. Denonn (eds), The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (1961), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Behavior (9)  |  Ape (42)  |  Deterioration (8)  |  Moral (124)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Virtuous (3)

It then came into my mind what that most careful observer of natural phenomena [Amontons] had written about the correction of the barometer; for he had observed that the height of the column of mercury in the barometer was a little (though sensibly enough) altered by the varying temperature of the mercury. From this I gathered that a thermometer might be perhaps constructed with mercury.
From 'Experimenta circa gradum caloris liquorum nonnullorum ebullientium instituta', Philosophical Transactions (1724), 33, 1, as translated in William Francis Magie, A Source Book in Physics (1935), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (23)  |  Guillaume Amontons (3)  |  Barometer (4)  |  Careful (24)  |  Column (15)  |  Construct (41)  |  Correction (31)  |  Height (32)  |  Invention (324)  |  Little (188)  |  Mercury (44)  |  Mind (760)  |  Natural (173)  |  Observer (42)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Temperature (47)  |  Thermometer (9)  |  Vary (26)

Men will never disappoint us if we observe two rules: (i) To find out what they are; (2) to expect them to be just that.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Disappoint (2)  |  Expect (44)  |  Find (408)  |  Rule (177)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (34)  |  Biography (232)  |  Biology (168)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Experience (342)  |  Help (103)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Interest (237)  |  Military (29)  |  Operation (121)  |  Patient (125)  |  Result (389)  |  Talk (100)  |  Tissue (27)  |  Transplantation (4)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (16)  |  Behind (38)  |  Caterpillar (3)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (67)  |  Cluster (14)  |  Complex (95)  |  Construct (41)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (199)  |  Ear (29)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (23)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (342)  |  Eye (222)  |  Feel (167)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (63)  |  Grass (35)  |  Hand (142)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Help (103)  |  Include (40)  |  Intricate (21)  |  Involve (48)  |  Large (130)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Leave (128)  |  Lecture (68)  |  Listen (41)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (44)  |  Muse (6)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (14)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (6)  |  Replace (30)  |  Rhythm (18)  |  Rich (61)  |  Roll (17)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (321)  |  Smell (18)  |  Spider (11)  |  Strand (5)  |  Stream (40)  |  Student (203)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (120)  |  Together (79)  |  Vary (26)  |  Verbal (9)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (65)  |  Water (293)  |  Web (15)  |  Weve (13)  |  Work (635)

Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (39)  |  Apply (77)  |  Argument (82)  |  Class (84)  |  Close (67)  |  Common (122)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Descend (11)  |  Detail (87)  |  Disposition (15)  |  Domestic (13)  |  Endow (14)  |  Fact (733)  |  Force (249)  |  Form (314)  |  Habit (112)  |  Natural (173)  |  Naturalist (54)  |  Numerous (29)  |  Progenitor (3)  |  Race (104)  |  Same (156)  |  Small (163)  |  Species (221)  |  Taste (48)

Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.
In (George Long, trans.), The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus (1869), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (364)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Nature (1223)  |  New (496)  |  Universe (686)

Observe the practice of many physicians; do not implicitly believe the mere assertion of your master; be something better than servile learner; go forth yourselves to see and compare!
In Armand Trousseau, as translated by P. Victor and John Rose Cormack, Lectures on Clinical Medicine: Delivered at the Hôtel-Dieu, Paris (1873), Vol. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (32)  |  Belief (504)  |  Compare (38)  |  Implicit (7)  |  Learner (10)  |  Master (98)  |  Mere (82)  |  Physician (243)  |  Practice (94)  |  See (369)  |  Servile (3)  |  Yourself (6)

Obvious facts are apt to be over-rated. System-makers see the gravitation of history, and fail to observe its chemistry, of greater though less evident power.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Evident (29)  |  Fact (733)  |  Fail (58)  |  Gravity (100)  |  Greater (42)  |  History (369)  |  Less (102)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Power (366)  |  System (191)

On principle, there is nothing new in the postulate that in the end exact science should aim at nothing more than the description of what can really be observed. The question is only whether from now on we shall have to refrain from tying description to a clear hypothesis about the real nature of the world. There are many who wish to pronounce such abdication even today. But I believe that this means making things a little too easy for oneself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (89)  |  Belief (504)  |  Clear (98)  |  Description (84)  |  Easy (102)  |  End (195)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Little (188)  |  Means (176)  |  Nature (1223)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Oneself (5)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Principle (292)  |  Pronounce (5)  |  Question (404)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Refrain (7)  |  Tie (24)  |  Today (117)  |  Wish (92)  |  World (898)

One will weave the canvas; another will fell a tree by the light of his ax. Yet another will forge nails, and there will be others who observe the stars to learn how to navigate. And yet all will be as one. Building a boat isn’t about weaving canvas, forging nails, or reading the sky. It’s about giving a shared taste for the sea, by the light of which you will see nothing contradictory but rather a community of love.
From the French, “Celui-là tissera des toiles, l’autre dans la forêt par l’éclair de sa hache couchera l’arbre. L’autre, encore, forgera des clous, et il en sera quelque part qui observeront les étoiles afin d’apprendre à gouverner. Et tous cependant ne seront qu’un. Créer le navire ce n’est point tisser les toiles, forger les clous, lire les astres, mais bien donner le goût de la mer qui est un, et à la lumière duquel il n’est plus rien qui soit contradictoire mais communauté dans l’amour.” In Citadelle (1948), Sect. 75, 687. An English edition was published as “Wisdom of the Sands.” The translation in the subject quote is given the website quoteinvestigator.com which discusses how it may have been paraphrased anonymously to yield the commonly seen quote as “If you want to build a ship, don’t recruit the men to gather the wood, divide the work and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for vast and endless sea.”
Science quotes on:  |  Axe (15)  |  Boat (15)  |  Build (117)  |  Community (82)  |  Forge (4)  |  Learn (288)  |  Love (224)  |  Nail (7)  |  Navigate (2)  |  Sail (21)  |  Sea (188)  |  Share (49)  |  Star (336)  |  Taste (48)  |  Tree (171)

Our physicians have observed that, in process of time, some diseases have abated of their virulence, and have, in a manner, worn out their malignity, so as to be no longer mortal.
Science quotes on:  |  Abate (2)  |  Disease (275)  |  Manner (57)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Physician (243)  |  Process (267)  |  Time (595)  |  Virulence (3)

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise. Without them your theories are vain surmises. But while you are studying, observing, experimenting, do not remain content with the surface of things. Do not become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin. Seek obstinately for the laws that govern them.
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Content (69)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Fact (733)  |  Law (515)  |  Mere (82)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Origin (88)  |  Penetrate (30)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Remain (113)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seek (107)  |  Study (476)  |  Surface (101)  |  Surmise (3)  |  Theory (696)  |  Vain (30)

Phony psychics like Uri Geller have had particular success in bamboozling scientists with ordinary stage magic, because only scientists are arrogant enough to think that they always observe with rigorous and objective scrutiny, and therefore could never be so fooled–while ordinary mortals know perfectly well that good performers can always find a way to trick people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrogant (3)  |  Find (408)  |  Fool (85)  |  Good (345)  |  Know (556)  |  Magic (78)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Objective (66)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Particular (76)  |  People (390)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Performer (2)  |  Phony (3)  |  Psychic (6)  |  Rigorous (23)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Scrutiny (14)  |  Stage (55)  |  Success (250)  |  Think (347)  |  Trick (24)

Physics tries to discover the pattern of events which controls the phenomena we observe. But we can never know what this pattern means or how it originates; and even if some superior intelligence were to tell us, we should find the explanation unintelligible.
In Physics And Philosophy: the Revolution In Modern Science (1942), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (114)  |  Discover (199)  |  Event (116)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Know (556)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Origin (88)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Physics (348)  |  Superior (41)  |  Unintelligible (10)

Saturated with that speculative spirit then pervading the Greek mind, he [Pythagoras] endeavoured to discover some principle of homogeneity in the universe. Before him, the philosophers of the Ionic school had sought it in the matter of things; Pythagoras looked for it in the structure of things. He observed the various numerical relations or analogies between numbers and the phenomena of the universe. Being convinced that it was in numbers and their relations that he was to find the foundation to true philosophy, he proceeded to trace the origin of all things to numbers. Thus he observed that musical strings of equal lengths stretched by weights having the proportion of 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, produced intervals which were an octave, a fifth and a fourth. Harmony, therefore, depends on musical proportion; it is nothing but a mysterious numerical relation. Where harmony is, there are numbers. Hence the order and beauty of the universe have their origin in numbers. There are seven intervals in the musical scale, and also seven planets crossing the heavens. The same numerical relations which underlie the former must underlie the latter. But where number is, there is harmony. Hence his spiritual ear discerned in the planetary motions a wonderful “Harmony of spheres.”
In History of Mathematics (1893), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (60)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cross (15)  |  Depend (90)  |  Discern (17)  |  Discover (199)  |  Ear (29)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fifth (3)  |  Find (408)  |  Foundation (108)  |  Fourth (8)  |  Greek (73)  |  Harmony (72)  |  Heaven (153)  |  Homogeneous (6)  |  Interval (13)  |  Length (22)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Matter (343)  |  Mind (760)  |  Motion (160)  |  Musical (10)  |  Mysterious (33)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Number (282)  |  Numerical (15)  |  Octave (3)  |  Order (242)  |  Origin (88)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Planet (263)  |  Planetary (10)  |  Principle (292)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Produce (102)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Relation (154)  |  Scale (63)  |  School (119)  |  Seek (107)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Stretch (20)  |  String (20)  |  Structure (225)  |  Trace (53)  |  True (208)  |  Universe (686)  |  Various (47)  |  Weight (77)  |  Wonderful (60)

Scientists are not robotic inducing machines that infer structures of explanation only from regularities observed in natural phenomena (assuming, as I doubt, that such a style of reasoning could ever achieve success in principle). Scientists are human beings, immersed in culture, and struggling with all the curious tools of inference that mind permits ... Culture can potentiate as well as constrain–as Darwin’s translation of Adam Smith’s laissez-faire economic models into biology as the theory of natural selection. In any case, objective minds do not exist outside culture, so we must make the best of our ineluctable embedding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (64)  |  Assume (38)  |  Best (173)  |  Biology (168)  |  Case (99)  |  Constrain (9)  |  Culture (104)  |  Curious (43)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Economic (26)  |  Embed (7)  |  Exist (148)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Immerse (4)  |  Induce (14)  |  Infer (12)  |  Inference (32)  |  Machine (157)  |  Mind (760)  |  Model (81)  |  Natural (173)  |  Natural Selection (90)  |  Objective (66)  |  Outside (48)  |  Permit (31)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Principle (292)  |  Reason (471)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Structure (225)  |  Struggle (78)  |  Style (22)  |  Success (250)  |  Theory (696)  |  Tool (87)  |  Translation (15)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (165)  |  Appearance (85)  |  Argument (82)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (12)  |  Color (99)  |  Concern (110)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Draw (55)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (181)  |  Find (408)  |  Give (201)  |  Habit (112)  |  Hold (94)  |  Idea (580)  |  Influence (140)  |  Inquiry (45)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (188)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Omit (7)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (123)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (176)  |  Probability (106)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Quantity (65)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (86)  |  Rest (93)  |  Result (389)  |  See (369)  |  Separate (74)  |  Show (93)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (476)  |  Summary (5)  |  Thought (546)  |  Truth (928)  |  Usually (31)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (171)

Thanks to the sharp eyes of a Minnesota man, it is possible that two identical snowflakes may finally have been observed. While out snowmobiling, Oley Skotchgaard noticed a snowflake that looked familiar to him. Searching his memory, he realized it was identical to a snowflake he had seen as a child in Vermont. Weather experts, while excited, caution that the match-up will be difficult to verify.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (21)  |  Child (252)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Excite (15)  |  Expert (50)  |  Eye (222)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Identical (19)  |  Memory (106)  |  Possible (158)  |  Realize (90)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Snowflake (13)  |  Thanks (8)  |  Verify (17)  |  Weather (32)

The examples which a beginner should choose for practice should be simple and should not contain very large numbers. The powers of the mind cannot be directed to two things at once; if the complexity of the numbers used requires all the student’s attention, he cannot observe the principle of the rule which he is following.
In Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1902), chap. 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (121)  |  Beginner (9)  |  Choose (60)  |  Complexity (91)  |  Contain (67)  |  Direct (84)  |  Example (94)  |  Follow (124)  |  Large (130)  |  Mind (760)  |  Number (282)  |  Power (366)  |  Practice (94)  |  Principle (292)  |  Require (85)  |  Rule (177)  |  Simple (178)  |  Student (203)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)

The ideas which these sciences, Geometry, Theoretical Arithmetic and Algebra involve extend to all objects and changes which we observe in the external world; and hence the consideration of mathematical relations forms a large portion of many of the sciences which treat of the phenomena and laws of external nature, as Astronomy, Optics, and Mechanics. Such sciences are hence often termed Mixed Mathematics, the relations of space and number being, in these branches of knowledge, combined with principles collected from special observation; while Geometry, Algebra, and the like subjects, which involve no result of experience, are called Pure Mathematics.
In The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1868), Part 1, Bk. 2, chap. 1, sect. 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Branch (107)  |  Call (128)  |  Change (364)  |  Collect (16)  |  Combine (35)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Experience (342)  |  Extend (44)  |  External (57)  |  Form (314)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Idea (580)  |  Involve (48)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Large (130)  |  Law (515)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mechanic (23)  |  Mix (19)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Number (282)  |  Object (175)  |  Observation (450)  |  Often (106)  |  Optics (20)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Portion (24)  |  Principle (292)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Relation (154)  |  Result (389)  |  Science (2067)  |  Space (257)  |  Special (77)  |  Subject (240)  |  Term (122)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Treat (34)  |  World (898)

The more the subject is examined the more complex must we suppose the constitution of matter in order to explain the remarkable effects observed.
In Radio-activity (1905), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (95)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Effect (166)  |  Examine (44)  |  Explain (107)  |  Matter (343)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Subject (240)  |  Suppose (49)

The natural attitude of inspection is prone; we do not often observe accurately any object that rises much above the level of the eye.
Concerning observing human nature. In The Characters of Theophrastus: Illustrated With Physionomical Sketches (1881), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurately (7)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Eye (222)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Level (67)  |  Natural (173)  |  Prone (7)

The next object which I have observed is the essence or substance of the Milky Way. By the aid of a telescope anyone may behold this in a manner which so distinctly appeals to the senses that all the disputes which have tormented philosophers through so many ages are exploded at once by the irrefragable evidence of our eyes, and we are freed from wordy disputes upon this subject, for the Galaxy is nothing else but a mass of innumerable stars planted together in clusters.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Behold (18)  |  Cluster (14)  |  Essence (55)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Eye (222)  |  Galaxy (46)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Irrefragable (2)  |  Mass (78)  |  Milky Way (24)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Star (336)  |  Substance (87)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Torment (14)

The observing mind is not a physical system, it cannot interact with any physical system. And it might be better to reserve the term ‘subject ‘ for the observing mind ... For the subject, if anything, is the thing that senses and thinks. Sensations and thoughts do not belong to the ‘world of energy.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (53)  |  Better (192)  |  Energy (214)  |  Interact (8)  |  Mind (760)  |  Physical (134)  |  Reserve (15)  |  Sensation (29)  |  Sense (321)  |  Subject (240)  |  System (191)  |  Term (122)  |  Think (347)  |  Thought (546)  |  World (898)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (146)  |  Confidence (41)  |  Develop (107)  |  Discover (199)  |  Dogma (32)  |  Enrich (11)  |  Experience (342)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Know (556)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Limited (18)  |  Mastery (28)  |  Material (156)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  New (496)  |  Problem (497)  |  Prove (109)  |  Ready (38)  |  Regularity (29)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (21)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Strengthen (22)  |  Student (203)  |  Subject (240)  |  Theorem (90)  |  Think (347)  |  Topic (12)  |  Work (635)

The statistics of nihilism … “No matter how many times something new has been observed, it cannot be believed until it has been observed again.” I have also reduced my attitude toward this form of statistics to an axiom: “No matter how bad a thing you say about it, it is not bad enough.”
In Seeing Red: Redshifts, Cosmology and Academic Science (1998), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (59)  |  Axiom (52)  |  Bad (99)  |  Belief (504)  |  New (496)  |  Nihilism (3)  |  Statistics (147)

There cannot be mental atrophy in any person who continues to observe, to remember what he observes, and to seek answers for his unceasing hows and whys about things.
From interview with Mary R. Mullett, 'How to Keep Young Mentally', The American Magazine (Dec 1921), 92, 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Atrophy (6)  |  Mental (78)  |  Remember (82)  |  Seek (107)  |  Unceasing (3)

There is the immense sea of energy ... a multidimensional implicate order, ... the entire universe of matter as we generally observe it is to be treated as a comparatively small pattern of excitation. This excitation pattern is relatively autonomous and gives rise to approximately recurrent, stable separable projections into a three-dimensional explicate order of manifestation, which is more or less equivalent to that of space as we commonly experience it.
Wholeness and the Implicate Order? (1981), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Dimension (38)  |  Energy (214)  |  Entire (47)  |  Equivalent (17)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experience (342)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (201)  |  Immense (42)  |  Manifestation (35)  |  Matter (343)  |  More Or Less (8)  |  Observation (450)  |  Order (242)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Projection (5)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Rise (70)  |  Sea (188)  |  Separable (3)  |  Small (163)  |  Space (257)  |  Stable (17)  |  Three-Dimensional (2)  |  Treat (34)  |  Universe (686)

Things of all kinds are subject to a universal law which may be called the law of large numbers. It consists in the fact that, if one observes very considerable numbers of events of the same nature, dependent on constant causes and causes which vary irregularly, sometimes in one direction, sometimes in the other, it is to say without their variation being progressive in any definite direction, one shall find, between these numbers, relations which are almost constant.
Poisson’s Law of Large Numbers (16 Nov 1837), in Recherches sur la Probabilités (1837), 7. English version by Webmaster using Google Translate, from the original French, “Les choses de toutes natures sont soumises à une loi universelle qu’on) peut appeler la loi des grands nombres. Elle consiste en ce que, si l’on observe des nombres très considérables d’événements d’une même nature, dépendants de causes constantes et de causes qui varient irrégulièrement, tantôt dans un sens, tantôt daus l’autre, c’est-à-dire sans que leur variation soit progressive dans aucun sens déterminé, on trouvera, entre ces nombres, des rapports a très peu près constants.”
Science quotes on:  |  Call (128)  |  Cause (285)  |  Considerable (20)  |  Constant (58)  |  Definite (43)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Event (116)  |  Find (408)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Probability (106)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Relation (154)  |  Subject (240)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Variation (63)  |  Vary (26)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Available (25)  |  Book (257)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Data (120)  |  Descent (15)  |  Directly (22)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Effect (166)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  First (314)  |  Historical (15)  |  Imperfection (24)  |  Increase (146)  |  Little (188)  |  Middle (16)  |  Object (175)  |  Orchid (2)  |  Principle (292)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Record (68)  |  Render (33)  |  Several (31)  |  Single (120)  |  Stage (55)  |  Sum Up (3)  |  Time (595)  |  Try (141)  |  Work (635)  |  Worm (25)

To set foot on the soil of the asteroids, to lift by hand a rock from the Moon, to observe Mars from a distance of several tens of kilometers, to land on its satellite or even on its surface, what can be more fantastic? From the moment of using rocket devices a new great era will begin in astronomy: the epoch of the more intensive study of the firmament.
(1896). As quoted in Firmin Joseph Krieger, Behind the Sputniks: A Survey of Soviet Space Science (1958), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Astronomy (204)  |  Begin (108)  |  Epoch (21)  |  Era (18)  |  Fantastic (11)  |  Firmament (12)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (534)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Land (115)  |  Mars (34)  |  Moon (199)  |  Rock (125)  |  Rocket (34)  |  Satellite (23)  |  Soil (64)  |  Study (476)  |  Surface (101)

We cannot doubt the existence of an ultimate reality. It is the universe forever masked. We are a part of it, and the masks figured by us are the universe observing and understanding itself from a human point of view.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doubt (160)  |  Existence (299)  |  Figure (69)  |  Forever (60)  |  Human (550)  |  Mask (7)  |  Part (222)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Reality (190)  |  Ultimate (84)  |  Understand (340)  |  Universe (686)

We cannot observe external things without some degree of Thought; nor can we reflect upon our Thoughts, without being influenced in the course of our reflection by the Things which we have observed.
In The Elements of Morality (1845), Vol 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Course (84)  |  Degree (82)  |  External (57)  |  Influence (140)  |  Observation (450)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Reflection (60)  |  Thought (546)

We think the heavens enjoy their spherical
Their round proportion, embracing all;
But yet their various and perplexed course,
Observed in divers ages, doth enforce
Men to find out so many eccentric parts,
Such diverse downright lines, such overthwarts,
As disproportion that pure form.
From poem, 'An Anatomy of the World: The First Anniversary', lines 251-257, as collected in The Poems of John Donne (1896), Vol. 2, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Course (84)  |  Disproportion (3)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Embrace (33)  |  Enforce (8)  |  Find Out (20)  |  Form (314)  |  Heavens (18)  |  Line (90)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Pure (103)  |  Round (26)  |  Sphere (58)  |  Various (47)

What I chiefly admired, and thought altogether unaccountable, was the strong disposition I observed in them [the mathematicians of Laputa] towards news and politics; perpetually inquiring into public affairs; giving their judgments in matters of state; and passionately disputing every inch of party opinion. I have indeed observed the same disposition among most of the mathematicians I have known in Europe, although I could never discover the least analogy between the two sciences.
In Gulliver's Travels, Part 8, chap. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Analogy (60)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Discover (199)  |  Disposition (15)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Europe (43)  |  Give (201)  |  Inch (9)  |  Inquire (9)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Know (556)  |  Least (74)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Matter (343)  |  New (496)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Party (18)  |  Passionately (3)  |  Perpetually (3)  |  Politics (96)  |  Public Affairs (2)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  State (137)  |  Strong (72)  |  Thought (546)

When I observe the luminous progress and expansion of natural science in modern times, I seem to myself like a traveller going eastwards at dawn, and gazing at the growing light with joy, but also with impatience; looking forward with longing to the advent of the full and final light, but, nevertheless, having to turn away his eyes when the sun appeared, unable to bear the splendour he had awaited with so much desire.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197-198.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Await (5)  |  Bear (67)  |  Dawn (16)  |  Desire (142)  |  East (18)  |  Expansion (26)  |  Gaze (16)  |  Growing (15)  |  Impatience (12)  |  Joy (88)  |  Light (347)  |  Luminous (11)  |  Modern (162)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Progress (368)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Turn (118)  |  Unable (24)

When I was young I observed that nine out of every ten things I did were failures, so I did ten times more work.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (138)  |  Time (595)  |  Work (635)  |  Young (100)

When the child outgrows the narrow circle of family life … then comes the period of the school, whose object is to initiate him into the technicalities of intercommunication with his fellow-men, and to familiarize him with the ideas that underlie his civilization, and which he must use as tools of thought if he would observe and understand the phases of human life around him; for these … are invisible to the human being who has not the aid of elementary ideas with which to see them.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (252)  |  Circle (56)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Education (347)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Family (47)  |  Fellow (37)  |  Human (550)  |  Idea (580)  |  Initiate (6)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Life (1131)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Object (175)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Period (66)  |  Phase (16)  |  School (119)  |  See (369)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Thought (546)  |  Tool (87)  |  Underlie (6)  |  Understand (340)

When the solution is simple, God is answering. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Answer (249)  |  Art (294)  |  Ask (160)  |  Cease (39)  |  Enter (32)  |  Face (108)  |  Free (92)  |  God (535)  |  Hope (174)  |  Personal (66)  |  Realm (55)  |  Scene (14)  |  Science (2067)  |  Simple (178)  |  Solution (216)  |  Wish (92)  |  World (898)

When we survey our lives and endeavours we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advantage (77)  |  Alone (106)  |  Animal (359)  |  Beast (38)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Belief (504)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (93)  |  Build (117)  |  Capacity (64)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Communicate (17)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Conceive (39)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Create (153)  |  Degree (82)  |  Desire (142)  |  Direct (84)  |  Eat (52)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Existence (299)  |  Fact (733)  |  Feelings (14)  |  Food (154)  |  Grave (26)  |  Great (534)  |  Grow (99)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (153)  |  House (43)  |  Human Beings (21)  |  Human Society (5)  |  Individual (221)  |  Individuality (13)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Language (228)  |  Leave (128)  |  Live (272)  |  Material (156)  |  Medium (12)  |  Member (40)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Owe (23)  |  Part (222)  |  People (390)  |  Poor (58)  |  Primitive (42)  |  Principal (28)  |  Remain (113)  |  Resemble (29)  |  See (369)  |  Significance (71)  |  Social (108)  |  Soon (34)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Survey (20)  |  Thought (546)  |  Virtue (61)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (192)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Admire (18)  |  Art (294)  |  Ask (160)  |  Cease (39)  |  Communicate (17)  |  Connection (111)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Engage (25)  |  Enter (32)  |  Experience (342)  |  Face (108)  |  Form (314)  |  Free (92)  |  Hope (174)  |  Language (228)  |  Logic (260)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Mind (760)  |  Personal (66)  |  Portray (3)  |  Realm (55)  |  Recognize (69)  |  Scene (14)  |  Science (2067)  |  See (369)  |  Wish (92)  |  World (898)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (185)  |  Aim (89)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (249)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (49)  |  Belief (504)  |  Best (173)  |  Better (192)  |  Break (54)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (11)  |  Connect (33)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (83)  |  Country (147)  |  Decision (72)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (43)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Demand (76)  |  Deny (42)  |  Describe (57)  |  Design (115)  |  Different (186)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Dominate (19)  |  Easy (102)  |  Element (162)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (13)  |  Existence (299)  |  Explain (107)  |  Explanation (177)  |  Fact (733)  |  First (314)  |  Form (314)  |  Gradually (21)  |  Group (72)  |  Human (550)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (221)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intention (28)  |  Learn (288)  |  Likely (33)  |  Merely (82)  |  Method (239)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Movement (83)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (242)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (84)  |  Pattern (79)  |  People (390)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Possible (158)  |  Prejudice (66)  |  Problem (497)  |  Produce (102)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (16)  |  Region (36)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Result (389)  |  Room (39)  |  Seek (107)  |  Seem (143)  |  Show (93)  |  Single (120)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Science (31)  |  Society (228)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (16)  |  Technical (42)  |  Theoretical (21)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (546)  |  Totality (10)  |  Track (15)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (141)  |  Type (52)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wild (49)

Who will observe the observers?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Observer (42)

Would you have a man reason well, you must use him to it betimes; exercise his mind in observing the connection between ideas, and following them in train. Nothing does this better than mathematics, which therefore, I think should be taught to all who have the time and opportunity, not so much to make them mathematicians, as to make them reasonable creatures; for though we all call ourselves so, because we are born to it if we please, yet we may truly say that nature gives us but the seeds of it, and we are carried no farther than industry and application have carried us.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (170)  |  Better (192)  |  Born (31)  |  Carry (59)  |  Connection (111)  |  Creature (155)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (124)  |  Give (201)  |  Idea (580)  |  Industry (109)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mind (760)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Please (24)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Say (228)  |  Seed (63)  |  Teach (188)  |  Think (347)  |  Time (595)  |  Train (45)  |  Truly (33)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

[In 1909,] Paris was the center of the aviation world. Aeronautics was neither an industry nor even a science; both were yet to come. It was an “art” and I might say a “passion”. Indeed, at that time it was a miracle. It meant the realization of legends and dreams that had existed for thousands of years and had been pronounced again and again as impossible by scientific authorities. Therefore, even the brief and unsteady flights of that period were deeply impressive. Many times I observed expressions of joy and tears in the eyes of witnesses who for the first time watched a flying machine carrying a man in the air.
In address (16 Nov 1964) presented to the Wings Club, New York City, Recollections and Thoughts of a Pioneer (1964), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (190)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Brief (20)  |  Carry (59)  |  Center (34)  |  Dream (167)  |  Expression (110)  |  Eye (222)  |  Flight (65)  |  Flying Machine (10)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Impressive (20)  |  Industry (109)  |  Joy (88)  |  Legend (10)  |  Man (373)  |  Miracle (66)  |  Paris (11)  |  Passion (71)  |  Realization (37)  |  Science And Art (181)  |  Tear (23)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Witness (32)  |  World (898)  |  Year (299)

[Napoleon] directed Bourrienne to leave all his letters unopened for three weeks, and then observed with satisfaction how large a part of the correspondence had thus disposed of itself, and no longer required an answer.
Lecture, 'Napoleon', collected in Representative Men (1850), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (19)  |  Communication (76)  |  Correspondence (15)  |  Direct (84)  |  Dispose (9)  |  Large (130)  |  Leave (128)  |  Letter (51)  |  Long (174)  |  Part (222)  |  Require (85)  |  Satisfaction (56)  |  Unopened (3)  |  Week (13)

… just as the astronomer, the physicist, the geologist, or other student of objective science looks about in the world of sense, so, not metaphorically speaking but literally, the mind of the mathematician goes forth in the universe of logic in quest of the things that are there; exploring the heights and depths for facts—ideas, classes, relationships, implications, and the rest; observing the minute and elusive with the powerful microscope of his Infinitesimal Analysis; observing the elusive and vast with the limitless telescope of his Calculus of the Infinite; making guesses regarding the order and internal harmony of the data observed and collocated; testing the hypotheses, not merely by the complete induction peculiar to mathematics, but, like his colleagues of the outer world, resorting also to experimental tests and incomplete induction; frequently finding it necessary, in view of unforeseen disclosures, to abandon one hopeful hypothesis or to transform it by retrenchment or by enlargement:—thus, in his own domain, matching, point for point, the processes, methods and experience familiar to the devotee of natural science.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 26
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (48)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Calculus (51)  |  Class (84)  |  Colleague (23)  |  Complete (87)  |  Data (120)  |  Depth (51)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Disclosure (5)  |  Domain (42)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Experience (342)  |  Experimental (20)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Fact (733)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Find (408)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Geologist (47)  |  Guess (48)  |  Harmony (72)  |  Height (32)  |  Hopeful (2)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Idea (580)  |  Implication (22)  |  Incomplete (15)  |  Induction (60)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Infinitesimal (15)  |  Internal (25)  |  Limitless (8)  |  Literally (8)  |  Located (2)  |  Logic (260)  |  Match (16)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Merely (82)  |  Metaphor (25)  |  Method (239)  |  Microscope (74)  |  Mind (760)  |  Minute (44)  |  Natural Science (90)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Objective (66)  |  Order (242)  |  Outer (13)  |  Peculiar (45)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Point (123)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Process (267)  |  Quest (32)  |  Regard (95)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Resort (8)  |  Rest (93)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sense (321)  |  Speak (92)  |  Student (203)  |  Telescope (82)  |  Test (125)  |  Transform (35)  |  Unforeseen (6)  |  Universe (686)  |  Vast (89)  |  View (171)  |  World (898)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.