Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Observe

Observe Quotes (168 quotes)

...what would be observed (if not with one’s actual eyes at least with those of the mind) if an eagle, carried by the force of the wind, were to drop a rock from its talons?
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actual (117)  |  Carry (127)  |  Drop (76)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Eye (419)  |  Force (487)  |  Least (75)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observed (149)  |  Rock (161)  |  Talon (2)  |  Wind (128)

M.A. Rosanoff: Mr. Edison, please tell me what laboratory rules you want me to observe.
Edison: Hell! There ain’t no rules around here! We’re trying to accomplish somep’n.
In Martin André Rosanoff, 'Edison in His Laboratory', Harper’s Magazine (Sep 1932), 403.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Aint (4)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Please (65)  |  Rule (294)  |  Tell (340)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Want (497)

Question: How would you disprove, experimentally, the assertion that white light passing through a piece of coloured glass acquires colour from the glass? What is it that really happens?
Answer: To disprove the assertion (so repeatedly made) that “white light passing through a piece of coloured glass acquires colour from the glass,” I would ask the gentleman to observe that the glass has just as much colour after the light has gone through it as it had before. That is what would really happen.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 178, Question 8. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Assertion (32)  |  Color (137)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Examination (98)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Glass (92)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Howler (15)  |  Light (607)  |  Observation (555)  |  Passing (76)  |  Question (621)  |  Really (78)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Through (849)  |  White (127)  |  White Light (5)

A possible explanation for the observed excess noise is the one given by Dicke, Peebles, Roll, and Wilkinson (1965) in a companion letter in this issue.
[The low-key announcement of the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation which is the afterglow of the Big Bang. Co-author with Robert Wilson. They received the 1978 Nobel Prize for their discovery.]
'A measurement of excess antenna temperature at 4080 Mc/s'. In Astrophysical Journal (1965). Reprinted in R. B. Partridge, 3 K the cosmic microwave background radiation? (1995), Appendix A, 355.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (15)  |  Author (167)  |  Background (43)  |  Background Radiation (3)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Co-Author (2)  |  Companion (19)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Detection (16)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Excess (22)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Give (202)  |  Issue (42)  |  Letter (109)  |  Low (80)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Noise (37)  |  Observed (149)  |  Possible (552)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Receive (114)  |  Roll (40)

About thirty years ago there was much talk that geologists ought only to observe and not theorise; and I well remember some one saying that at this rate a man might as well go into a gravel-pit and count the pebbles and describe the colours. How odd it is that anyone should not see that all observation must be for or against some view if it is to be of any service!
Letter to Henry Fawcett (18 Sep 1861). In Charles Darwin, Francis Darwin, Albert Charles Seward, More Letters of Charles Darwin (1903), Vol. 1, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Color (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Pit (19)  |  Remember (179)  |  See (1081)  |  Service (110)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

All are born to observe order, but few are born to establish it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Establish (57)  |  Order (632)

An observer situated in a nebula and moving with the nebula will observe the same properties of the universe as any other similarly situated observer at any time.
'Review of Cosmology', Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 1948, 108, 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Other (2236)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Any one, if he will only observe, can find some little thing he does not understand as a starter for an investigation.
From Address (22 May 1914) to the graduating class of the Friends’ School, Washington, D.C. Printed in 'Discovery and Invention', The National Geographic Magazine (1914), 25, 650.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (998)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Little (707)  |  Observation (555)  |  Start (221)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

Anyone who has examined into the history of the theories of earth evolution must have been astounded to observe the manner in which the unique and the difficultly explainable has been made to take the place of the common and the natural in deriving the framework of these theories.
Earth Evolution and Facial Expression (1921), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Astound (7)  |  Common (436)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Framework (31)  |  Geology (220)  |  History (673)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unique (67)

Aristotle’s opinion … that comets were nothing else than sublunary vapors or airy meteors … prevailed so far amongst the Greeks, that this sublimest part of astronomy lay altogether neglected; since none could think it worthwhile to observe, and to give an account of the wandering and uncertain paths of vapours floating in the Ether.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Comet (54)  |  Ether (35)  |  Greek (107)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Think (1086)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Vapour (16)  |  Worthwhile (18)

As historians, we refuse to allow ourselves these vain speculations which turn on possibilities that, in order to be reduced to actuality, suppose an overturning of the Universe, in which our globe, like a speck of abandoned matter, escapes our vision and is no longer an object worthy of our regard. In order to fix our vision, it is necessary to take it such as it is, to observe well all parts of it, and by indications infer from the present to the past.
'Second Discours: Histoire et Theorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Ginerale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 1, 98-9. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Actuality (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Escape (80)  |  Historian (54)  |  Indication (33)  |  Matter (798)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Regard (305)  |  Speck (23)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Turn (447)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vain (83)  |  Vision (123)

Behold the mighty dinosaur,
Famous in prehistoric lore,
Not only for his power and strength
But for his intellectual length.
You will observe by these remains
The creature had two sets of brains—
One in his head (the usual place),
The other at his spinal base.
Thus he could reason 'A priori'
As well as 'A posteriori'.
No problem bothered him a bit
He made both head and tail of it.
So wise was he, so wise and solemn,
Each thought filled just a spinal column.
If one brain found the pressure strong
It passed a few ideas along.
If something slipped his forward mind
'Twas rescued by the one behind.
And if in error he was caught
He had a saving afterthought.
As he thought twice before he spoke
He had no judgment to revoke.
Thus he could think without congestion
Upon both sides of every question.
Oh, gaze upon this model beast
Defunct ten million years at least.
'The Dinosaur: A Poem' (1912). In E. H. Colbert (ed.), The Dinosaur Book (1951), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  A Posteriori (2)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Base (117)  |  Beast (55)  |  Behind (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Bother (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Congestion (2)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Error (321)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Head (81)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Power (746)  |  Prehistoric (10)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Solemnity (5)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Spinal Column (2)  |  Spine (9)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Tail (18)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Twice (17)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Year (933)

But many of our imaginations and investigations of nature are futile, especially when we see little living animals and see their legs and must judge the same to be ten thousand times thinner than a hair of my beard, and when I see animals living that are more than a hundred times smaller and am unable to observe any legs at all, I still conclude from their structure and the movements of their bodies that they do have legs... and therefore legs in proportion to their bodies, just as is the case with the larger animals upon which I can see legs... Taking this number to be about a hundred times smaller, we therefore find a million legs, all these together being as thick as a hair from my beard, and these legs, besides having the instruments for movement, must be provided with vessels to carry food.
Letter to N. Grew, 27 Sep 1678. In The Collected Letters of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1957), Vol. 2, 391.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carry (127)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  Futile (11)  |  Futility (7)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Judge (108)  |  Leg (34)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Proportion (136)  |  See (1081)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Vessel (63)

But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call the attention of all astronomers and philosophers, is this: namely, that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any one of the astronomers before my time, which have their orbits round a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round the sun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which facts were discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening my mind.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Excite (15)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Four (6)  |  Front (16)  |  God (757)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Previously (11)  |  Star (427)  |  Sun (385)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Venus (20)  |  Will (2355)

By destroying the biological character of phenomena, the use of averages in physiology and medicine usually gives only apparent accuracy to the results. From our point of view, we may distinguish between several kinds of averages: physical averages, chemical averages and physiological and pathological averages. If, for instance, we observe the number of pulsations and the degree of blood pressure by means of the oscillations of a manometer throughout one day, and if we take the average of all our figures to get the true or average blood pressure and to learn the true or average number of pulsations, we shall simply have wrong numbers. In fact, the pulse decreases in number and intensity when we are fasting and increases during digestion or under different influences of movement and rest; all the biological characteristics of the phenomenon disappear in the average. Chemical averages are also often used. If we collect a man's urine during twenty-four hours and mix all this urine to analyze the average, we get an analysis of a urine which simply does not exist; for urine, when fasting, is different from urine during digestion. A startling instance of this kind was invented by a physiologist who took urine from a railroad station urinal where people of all nations passed, and who believed he could thus present an analysis of average European urine! Aside from physical and chemical, there are physiological averages, or what we might call average descriptions of phenomena, which are even more false. Let me assume that a physician collects a great many individual observations of a disease and that he makes an average description of symptoms observed in the individual cases; he will thus have a description that will never be matched in nature. So in physiology, we must never make average descriptions of experiments, because the true relations of phenomena disappear in the average; when dealing with complex and variable experiments, we must study their various circumstances, and then present our most perfect experiment as a type, which, however, still stands for true facts. In the cases just considered, averages must therefore be rejected, because they confuse, while aiming to unify, and distort while aiming to simplify. Averages are applicable only to reducing very slightly varying numerical data about clearly defined and absolutely simple cases.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Average (82)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blood (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consider (416)  |  Data (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distort (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fasting (3)  |  Figure (160)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Stand (274)  |  Startling (15)  |  Station (29)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (167)  |  Unify (6)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

By night the Glass
Of Galileo … observes
Imagin’d Land and Regions in the Moon.
Paradise Lost, Book 5, lines 261-263. In Books V and VI, edited by A. W. Verity,(1910), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Crater (8)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Glass (92)  |  Moon (237)  |  Telescope (98)

Children are told that an apple fell on Isaac Newton’s head and he was led to state the law of gravity. This, of course, is pure foolishness. What Newton discovered was that any two particles in the universe attract each other with a force that is proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This is not learned from a falling apple, but by observing quantities of data and developing a mathematical theory that can be verified by additional data. Data gathered by Galileo on falling bodies and by Johannes Kepler on motions of the planets were invaluable aids to Newton. Unfortunately, such false impressions about science are not universally outgrown like the Santa Claus myth, and some people who don’t study much science go to their graves thinking that the human race took until the mid-seventeenth century to notice that objects fall.
In How to Tell the Liars from the Statisticians (1983), 127.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  17th Century (16)  |  Additional (6)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apple (40)  |  Attract (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Century (310)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Course (409)  |  Data (156)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  False (100)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Foolishness (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Gather (72)  |  Grave (52)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Head (81)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Impression (114)  |  Invaluable (11)  |  Inversely Proportional (7)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myth (56)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notice (77)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Product (160)  |  Proportional (4)  |  Pure (291)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Race (268)  |  Santa Claus (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Square (70)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Universe (857)  |  Verify (23)

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. … All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It’s an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no “why” in those examples. We don’t understand why electricity travels. We don’t know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  All (4108)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Computer (127)  |  Constant (144)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Example (94)  |  Forever (103)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Light (607)  |  Machine (257)  |  Need (290)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Ship (62)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Speed (65)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Travel (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

Every great advance of science opens our eyes to facts which we had failed before to observe, and makes new demands on our powers of interpretation.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Demand (123)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Power (746)  |  Science (3879)

First of all, we ought to observe, that mathematical propositions, properly so called, are always judgments a priori, and not empirical, because they carry along with them necessity, which can never be deduced from experience. If people should object to this, I am quite willing to confine my statements to pure mathematics, the very concept of which implies that it does not contain empirical, but only pure knowledge a priori.
In Critique of Pure Reason (1900), 720.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confine (26)  |  Contain (68)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Imply (17)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  People (1005)  |  Properly (20)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Statement (142)  |  Willing (44)

First, the chief character, who is supposed to be a professional astronomer, spends his time fund raising and doing calculations at his desk, rather than observing the sky. Second, the driving force of a scientific project is institutional self-aggrandizement rather than intellectual curiosity.
[About the state of affairs in academia.]
In Marc J. Madou, Fundamentals of Microfabrication: the Science of Miniaturization (2nd ed., 2002), 535
Science quotes on:  |  Academia (4)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Character (243)  |  Chief (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Desk (13)  |  Doing (280)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Fund (18)  |  Institution (69)  |  Institutional (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Observation (555)  |  Professional (70)  |  Project (73)  |  Raise (35)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sky (161)  |  Spend (95)  |  State (491)  |  State Of affairs (5)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Time (1877)

For man being the minister and interpreter of nature, acts and understands so far as he has observed of the order, the works and mind of nature, and can proceed no further; for no power is able to loose or break the chain of causes, nor is nature to be conquered but by submission: whence those twin intentions, human knowledge and human power, are really coincident; and the greatest hindrance to works is the ignorance of causes.
In The Great lnstauration.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Being (1278)  |  Break (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hindrance (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Intention (46)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Loose (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minister (9)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Power (746)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Submission (4)  |  Twin (15)  |  Understand (606)  |  Work (1351)

From the rocket we can see the huge sphere of the planet in one or another phase of the Moon. We can see how the sphere rotates, and how within a few hours it shows all its sides successively ... and we shall observe various points on the surface of the Earth for several minutes and from different sides very closely. This picture is so majestic, attractive and infinitely varied that I wish with all my soul that you and I could see it. (1911)
As translated in William E. Burrows, The Survival Imperative: Using Space to Protect Earth (2007), 147. From Tsiolkovsky's 'The Investigation of Universal Space by Means of Reactive Devices', translated in K.E. Tsiolkovsky, Works on Rocket Technology (NASA, NASATT F-243, n.d.), 76-77.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Hour (186)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moon (237)  |  Phase (36)  |  Picture (143)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Rotate (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Varied (6)  |  Various (200)  |  Wish (212)

From whatever I have been able to observe up to this time the series of strata which form the visible crust of the earth appear to me classified in four general and successive orders. These four orders can be conceived to be four very large strata, as they really are, so that wherever they are exposed, they are disposed one above the other, always in the same order.
Quoted in Francesco Rodolico, 'Arduino', In Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (97)  |  Crust (38)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Geology (220)  |  Large (394)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Series (149)  |  Strata (35)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Visible (84)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wherever (51)

Go into a room where the shutters are always shut (in a sick-room or a bed-room there should never be shutters shut), and though the room be uninhabited—though the air has never been polluted by the breathing of human beings, you will observe a close, musty smell of corrupt air—of air unpurified by the effect of the sun's rays.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 120.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Being (1278)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Effect (393)  |  Health (193)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Light (607)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sick (81)  |  Smell (27)  |  Sun (385)  |  Will (2355)

Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em,
And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum.
And the great fleas themselves, in turn have, greater fleas to go on;
While these again have greater still, and greater still, and so on.
[He was imitating: 'So, naturalists observe, a flea Has smaller fleas that on him prey; And these have smaller still to bite 'em; And so proceed ad infinitum.' Poetry, a Rhapsody, by Jonathan Swift.]
A Budget of Paradoxes (1915), first published 1872, Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Ad Infinitum (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Bite (17)  |  Flea (11)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Little (707)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Still (613)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Turn (447)

Have you ever observed a humming-bird moving about in an aerial dance among the flowers—a living prismatic gem that changes its colour with every change of position— … its exquisite form, its changeful splendour, its swift motions and intervals of aërial suspension, it is a creature of such fairy-like loveliness as to mock all description.
In Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest (1916),
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (10)  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dance (32)  |  Description (84)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Fairy (9)  |  Flower (106)  |  Form (959)  |  Gem (16)  |  Humming (5)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Interval (13)  |  Living (491)  |  Loveliness (6)  |  Mock (7)  |  Motion (310)  |  Observed (149)  |  Position (77)  |  Prismatic (2)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Swift (12)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Proœmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Known (454)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

I am born into an environment–I know not whence I came nor whither I go nor who I am. This is my situation as yours, every single one of you. The fact that everyone always was in this same situation, and always will be, tells me nothing. Our burning question as to the whence and whither–all we can ourselves observe about it is the present environment. That is why we are eager to find out about it as much as we can. That is science, learning, knowledge; it is the true source of every spiritual endeavour of man. We try to find out as much as we can about the spatial and temporal surroundings of the place in which we find ourselves put by birth.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Birth (147)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Eager (15)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Environment (216)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Place (177)  |  Present (619)  |  Question (621)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Source (93)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Surroundings (5)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temporal (4)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Whither (11)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

I believe that mathematical reality lies outside us, that our function is to discover or observe it, and that the theorems which we prove, and which we describe grandiloquently as our “creations,” are simply the notes of our observations.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (327)  |  Describe (128)  |  Discover (553)  |  Function (228)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Observation (555)  |  Outside (141)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reality (261)  |  Theorem (112)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Complex (188)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Construct (124)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fall (230)  |  Final (118)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Omit (11)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reach (281)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Review (26)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scope (45)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)

I concluded that I might take as a general rule the principle that all things which we very clearly and obviously conceive are true: only observing, however, that there is some difficulty in rightly determining the objects which we distinctly conceive.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), as translated by J. Veitch, A Discourse on Method (1912), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distinct (97)  |  General (511)  |  Object (422)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  True (212)

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. “When I hear you give your reasons,” I remarked, “the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled, until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours.”
“Quite so,” he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an arm-chair. “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room.”
“Frequently.”
“How often?”
“'Well, some hundreds of times.”
“Then how many are there?”
“How many! I don't know.”
“Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed.”
From 'Adventure I.—A Scandal in Bohemia', Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, in The Strand Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly (Jul 1891), Vol. 2, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Arm (81)  |  Both (493)  |  Chair (24)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Eye (419)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Myself (212)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Step (231)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)

I had observed that there were different lines exhibited in the spectra of different metals when ignited in the voltaic arc; and if I had had any reasonable amount of wit I ought to have seen the converse, viz., that by ignition different bodies show in their spectral lines the materials of which they are formed. If that thought had occured to my mind, I should have discovered the spectroscope before Kirchoff; but it didn’t.
Address, in 'Report to the Chemical Society's Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, 493. Words as in original text, occured and Kirchoff are sic.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Arc (12)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Converse (8)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Form (959)  |  Ignite (3)  |  Ignition (3)  |  Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (4)  |  Line (91)  |  Material (353)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observed (149)  |  Occur (150)  |  Overlook (31)  |  Realize (147)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Research (664)  |  Show (346)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscope (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Thought (953)  |  Voltaic (9)  |  Wit (59)

I have always loved to begin with the facts, to observe them, to walk in the light of experiment and demonstrate as much as possible, and to discuss the results.
Quoted in Francesco Rodolico, 'Arduino', In Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Light (607)  |  Observation (555)  |  Possible (552)  |  Result (677)  |  Walk (124)

I have mentioned mathematics as a way to settle in the mind a habit of reasoning closely and in train; not that I think it necessary that all men should be deep mathematicians, but that, having got the way of reasoning which that study necessarily brings the mind to, they might be able to transfer it to other parts of knowledge, as they shall have occasion. For in all sorts of reasoning, every single argument should be managed as a mathematical demonstration; the connection and dependence of ideas should be followed till the mind is brought to the source on which it bottoms, and observes the coherence all along; …
In The Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bottom (33)  |  Bring (90)  |  Closely (12)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Connection (162)  |  Deep (233)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Follow (378)  |  Habit (168)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manage (23)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Settle (19)  |  Single (353)  |  Sort (49)  |  Source (93)  |  Study (653)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)

I have taken your advice, and the names used are anode cathode anions cations and ions; the last I shall have but little occasion for. I had some hot objections made to them here and found myself very much in the condition of the man with his son and ass who tried to please every body; but when I held up the shield of your authority, it was wonderful to observe how the tone of objection melted away.
Letter to William Whewell, 15 May 1834. In Frank A. J. L. James (ed.), The Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1993), Vol. 2, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Anion (4)  |  Anode (4)  |  Authority (95)  |  Body (537)  |  Cation (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Electrolysis (7)  |  Hot (60)  |  Ion (21)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myself (212)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Please (65)  |  Shield (6)  |  Tone (22)  |  William Whewell (70)  |  Wonderful (149)

I scrutinize life.
Part of a longer quote that begins, “You disembowel the animal…” on the Jean-Henri Fabre Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Animal (617)  |  Blue (56)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Death (388)  |  Dismemberment (3)  |  Horror (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pity (14)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Sky (161)  |  Song (37)  |  Study (653)  |  Torture (29)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workshop (14)

I shall explain a System of the World differing in many particulars from any yet known, answering in all things to the common Rules of Mechanical Motions: This depends upon three Suppositions. First, That all Cœlestial Bodies whatsoever, have an attraction or gravitating power towards their own Centers, whereby they attract not only their own parts, and keep them from flying from them, as we may observe the Earth to do, but that they do also attract all the other Cœlestial bodies that are within the sphere of their activity; and consequently that not only the Sun and Moon have an influence upon the body and motion the Earth, and the Earth upon them, but that Mercury also Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter by their attractive powers, have a considerable influence upon its motion in the same manner the corresponding attractive power of the Earth hath a considerable influence upon every one of their motions also. The second supposition is this, That all bodies whatsoever that are put into a direct and simple motion, will continue to move forward in a streight line, till they are by some other effectual powers deflected and bent into a Motion, describing a Circle, Ellipse, or some other more compounded Curve Line. The third supposition is, That these attractive powers are so much the more powerful in operating, by how much the nearer the body wrought upon is to their own Centers. Now what these several degrees are I have not yet experimentally verified; but it is a notion, which if fully prosecuted as it ought to be, will mightily assist the Astronomer to reduce all the Cœlestial Motions to a certain rule, which I doubt will never be done true without it. He that understands the nature of the Circular Pendulum and Circular Motion, will easily understand the whole ground of this Principle, and will know where to find direction in Nature for the true stating thereof. This I only hint at present to such as have ability and opportunity of prosecuting this Inquiry, and are not wanting of Industry for observing and calculating, wishing heartily such may be found, having myself many other things in hand which I would first compleat and therefore cannot so well attend it. But this I durst promise the Undertaker, that he will find all the Great Motions of the World to be influenced by this Principle, and that the true understanding thereof will be the true perfection of Astronomy.
An Attempt to Prove the Motion of the Earth from Observations (1674), 27-8. Based on a Cutlerian Lecture delivered by Hooke at the Royal Society four years earlier.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curve (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hint (21)  |  Industry (137)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Venus (20)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I will insist particularly upon the following fact, which seems to me quite important and beyond the phenomena which one could expect to observe: The same [double sulfate of uranium and potassium] crystalline crusts, arranged the same way [as reported to the French academy on 24 Feb 1896] with respect to the photographic plates, in the same conditions and through the same screens, but sheltered from the excitation of incident rays and kept in darkness, still produce the same photographic images … [when kept from 26 Feb 1896] in the darkness of a bureau drawer. … I developed the photographic plates on the 1st of March, expecting to find the images very weak. Instead the silhouettes appeared with great intensity.
It is important to observe that it appears this phenomenon must not be attributed to the luminous radiation emitted by phosphorescence … One hypothesis which presents itself to the mind naturally enough would be to suppose that these rays, whose effects have a great similarity to the effects produced by the rays studied by M. Lenard and M. Röntgen, are invisible rays …
[Having eliminated phosphorescence as a cause, he has further revealed the effect of the as yet unknown radioactivity.]
Read at French Academy of Science (2 Mar 1896). In Comptes Rendus (1896), 122, 501. As translated by Carmen Giunta on the Classic Chemistry web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Condition (356)  |  Crust (38)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enough (340)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Image (96)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Luminous (18)  |  March (46)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Phosphorescence (2)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Present (619)  |  Produced (187)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Ray (114)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Silhouette (3)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Through (849)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weak (71)  |  Will (2355)

I would have you to observe that the difficulty & mystery which often appear in matters of science & learning are only owing to the terms of art used in them, & if many gentlemen had not been rebuted by the uncouth dress in which science was offered to them, we must believe that many of these who now shew an acute & sound judgement in the affairs of life would also in science have excelled many of those who are devoted to it & who were engaged in it only by necessity & a phlegmatic temper. This is particularly the case with respect to chemistry, which is as easy to be comprehended as any of the common affairs of life, but gentlemen have been kept from applying to it by the jargon in which it has been industriously involved.
Cullen MSS, No. 23, Glasgow University library. In A. L. Donovan, Philosophical Chemistry In the Scottish Enlightenment: The Doctrines and Discoveries of Wllliam Cullen and Joseph Black (1975), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Common (436)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Easy (204)  |  Involved (90)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Offer (141)  |  Owing (39)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sound (183)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

I would picture myself as a virus, or as a cancer cell, for example, and try to sense what it would be like to be either. I would also imagine myself as the immune system, and I would try to reconstruct what I would do as an immune system engaged in combating a virus or cancer cell. When I had played through a series of such scenarios on a particular problem and had acquired new insights, I would design laboratory experiments accordingly… Based upon the results of the experiment, I would then know what question to ask next… When I observed phenomena in the laboratory that I did not understand, I would also ask questions as if interrogating myself: “Why would I do that if I were a virus or a cancer cell, or the immune system?” Before long, this internal dialogue became second nature to me; I found that my mind worked this way all the time.
In Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (1983), 7, footnote b, as quoted and cited in Roger Frantz, Two Minds: Intuition and Analysis in the History of Economic Thought (2006), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Cell (138)  |  Combat (15)  |  Design (195)  |  Dialogue (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immune System (3)  |  Insight (102)  |  Internal (66)  |  Interrogate (3)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observed (149)  |  Picture (143)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Result (677)  |  Scenario (3)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Virus (27)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

I'm not smart. I try to observe. Millions saw the apple fall but Newton was the one who asked 'why.'
Quoted in New York Post (24 Jun 1965). In Alfred J. Kolatch, Great Jewish Quotations (1996), 38-39.
Science quotes on:  |  Apple (40)  |  Ask (411)  |  Fall (230)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Saw (160)  |  Smart (26)  |  Try (283)  |  Why (491)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

Iamblichus in his treatise On the Arithmetic of Nicomachus observes p. 47- “that certain numbers were called amicable by those who assimilated the virtues and elegant habits to numbers.” He adds, “that 284 and 220 are numbers of this kind; for the parts of each are generative of each other according to the nature of friendship, as was shown by Pythagoras. For some one asking him what a friend was, he answered, another I (ετεϑος εγω) which is demonstrated to take place in these numbers.” [“Friendly” thus: Each number is equal to the sum of the factors of the other.]
In Theoretic Arithmetic (1816), 122. (Factors of 284 are 1, 2, 4 ,71 and 142, which give the sum 220. Reciprocally, factors of 220 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11 ,22, 44, 55 and 110, which give the sum 284.) Note: the expression “alter ego” is Latin for “the other I.”
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Addition (66)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Asking (73)  |  Assimilate (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Factor (46)  |  Friend (168)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Generative (2)  |  Habit (168)  |  Kind (557)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Place (177)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sum (102)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Virtue (109)

If the entire Mandelbrot set were placed on an ordinary sheet of paper, the tiny sections of boundary we examine would not fill the width of a hydrogen atom. Physicists think about such tiny objects; only mathematicians have microscopes fine enough to actually observe them.
In 'Can We See the Mandelbrot Set?', The College Mathematics Journal (Mar 1995), 26, No. 2, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Atom (355)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Enough (340)  |  Entire (47)  |  Examine (78)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fine (33)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Mandelbrot Set (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Object (422)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Section (11)  |  Set (394)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Width (5)

In every enterprise … the mind is always reasoning, and, even when we seem to act without a motive, an instinctive logic still directs the mind. Only we are not aware of it, because we begin by reasoning before we know or say that we are reasoning, just as we begin by speaking before we observe that we are speaking, and just as we begin by seeing and hearing before we know what we see or what we hear.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Begin (260)  |  Direct (225)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Know (1518)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Still (613)

In fact, we will have to give up taking things for granted, even the apparently simple things. We have to learn to understand nature and not merely to observe it and endure what it imposes on us. Stupidity, from being an amiable individual defect, has become a social crime.
The Origin of Life (1967), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Amiable (10)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Crime (38)  |  Defect (31)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Grant (73)  |  Individual (404)  |  Learn (629)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Simple (406)  |  Social (252)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

In general the actions which we see ever taking place around us are complex, or due to the simultaneous action of many causes. When, as in astronomy, we endeavour to ascertain these causes by simply watching their effects, we observe; when, as in our laboratories, we interfere arbitrarily with the causes or circumstances of a phenomenon, we are said to experiment.
In William Thomson and Peter Guthrie Tait, Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1867), Vol. 1, 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Experiment (695)  |  General (511)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  See (1081)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Watch (109)

In order to see birds it is necessary to become a part of the silence. One has to sit still like a mystic and wait. One soon learns that fussing, instead of achieving things, merely prevents things from happening.
First essay collected in Solomon in All his Glory (1922), 12. Also seen reprinted titled 'Kingfisher' in The New Statesman (1921), 17, 619. “Solomon in All His Glory” refers to a kingfisher, the subject of the essay.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Fuss (4)  |  Happening (58)  |  Learn (629)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Order (632)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Prevent (94)  |  See (1081)  |  Silence (56)  |  Soon (186)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wait (58)

In symbols one observes an advantage in discovery which is greatest when they express the exact nature of a thing briefly and, as it were, picture it; then indeed the labor of thought is wonderfully diminished.
In letter to Tschirnhaus. As quoted in George F. Simmons Calculus Gems (1992), 156, citing Dirk Jan Struik, 281-282.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Brief (36)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exact (68)  |  Express (186)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Labor (107)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Picture (143)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wonderfully (2)

In the history of science and throughout the whole course of its progress we see certain epochs following one another more or less rapidly. Some important view is expressed, it may be original or only revived; sooner or later it receives recognition; fellow-Workers spring up; the outcome of it finds its way into the schools; it is taught and handed down; and we observe, unhappily, that it does not in the least matter whether the view be true or false. In either case its course is the same; in either case it comes in the end to he a mere phrase, a lifeless word stamped on the memory.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Course (409)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Express (186)  |  False (100)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Important (209)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Matter (798)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mere (84)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Original (58)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Teach (277)  |  Throughout (98)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

In the world of science different levels of esteem are accorded to different kinds of specialist. Mathematicians have always been eminently respectable, and so are those who deal with hard lifeless theories about what constitutes the physical world: the astronomers, the physicists, the theoretical chemists. But the more closely the scientist interests himself in matters which are of direct human relevance, the lower his social status. The real scum of the scientific world are the engineers and the sociologists and the psychologists. Indeed, if a psychologist wants to rate as a scientist he must study rats, not human beings. In zoology the same rules apply. It is much more respectable to dissect muscle tissues in a laboratory than to observe the behaviour of a living animal in its natural habitat.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Close (69)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Deal (188)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Habitat (16)  |  Hard (243)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Level (67)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Low (80)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Psychologist (15)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rate (29)  |  Real (149)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Respectable (6)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Sociologist (3)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Status (35)  |  Study (653)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)

It is a right, yes a duty, to search in cautious manner for the numbers, sizes, and weights, the norms for everything [God] has created. For He himself has let man take part in the knowledge of these things ... For these secrets are not of the kind whose research should be forbidden; rather they are set before our eyes like a mirror so that by examining them we observe to some extent the goodness and wisdom of the Creator.
Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. In Michael B. Foster, Mystery and Philosophy, 61. Cited by Max Casper and Doris Hellman, trans., ed. Kepler (1954), 381. Cited by Gerald J. Galgan, Interpreting the Present: Six Philosophical Essays (1993), 105. Gerald J. Galgan
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (24)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Duty (68)  |  Everything (476)  |  Examination (98)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  God (757)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Himself (461)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Number (699)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Search (162)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Size (60)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wisdom (221)

It is clear that in maize, seemingly blending is really segregating inheritance, but with entire absence of dominance, and it seems probably that the same will be found to be true among rabbits and other mammals; failure to observe it hitherto is probably due to the fact that the factors concerned are numerous. For the greater the number of factors concerned, the more nearly will the result obtained approximate a complete and permanent blend. As the number of factors approaches infinity, the result will become identical with a permanent blend.
Heredity: In Relation to Evolution and Animal Breeding (1911), 138-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Become (815)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concern (228)  |  Due (141)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Failure (161)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Identical (53)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Maize (4)  |  Mammal (37)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Result (677)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Will (2355)

It is curious to observe how differently these great men [Plato and Bacon] estimated the value of every kind of knowledge. Take Arithmetic for example. Plato, after speaking slightly of the convenience of being able to reckon and compute in the ordinary transactions of life, passes to what he considers as a far more important advantage. The study of the properties of numbers, he tells us, habituates the mind to the contemplation of pure truth, and raises us above the material universe. He would have his disciples apply themselves to this study, not that they may be able to buy or sell, not that they may qualify themselves to be shop-keepers or travelling merchants, but that they may learn to withdraw their minds from the ever-shifting spectacle of this visible and tangible world, and to fix them on the immutable essences of things.
Bacon, on the other hand, valued this branch of knowledge only on account of its uses with reference to that visible and tangible world which Plato so much despised. He speaks with scorn of the mystical arithmetic of the later Platonists, and laments the propensity of mankind to employ, on mere matters of curiosity, powers the whole exertion of which is required for purposes of solid advantage. He advises arithmeticians to leave these trifles, and employ themselves in framing convenient expressions which may be of use in physical researches.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Advise (7)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arithmetician (3)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Buy (20)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Despise (13)  |  Different (577)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Employ (113)  |  Essence (82)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Example (94)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fix (25)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Important (209)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lament (11)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Number (699)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Physical (508)  |  Plato (76)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Research (664)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Sell (15)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Solid (116)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Study (653)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Visible (84)  |  Whole (738)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  World (1774)

It is curious to observe with what different degrees of architectonic skill Providence has endowed birds of the same genus, and so nearly correspondent in their general mode of life! for while the swallow and the house-martin discover the greatest address in raising and securely fixing crusts or shells of loam as cunabula for their young, the bank-martin terebrates a round and regular hole in the sand or earth, which is serpentine, horizontal, and about two feet deep. At the inner end of this burrow does this bird deposit, in a good degree of safety, her rude nest, consisting of fine grasses and feathers, usually goose-feathers, very inartificially laid together.
In Letter to Daines Barrington, (26 Feb 1774), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Bird (149)  |  Crust (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Feather (12)  |  General (511)  |  Genus (25)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  Grass (46)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Horizontal (9)  |  House (140)  |  Inner (71)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Nest (23)  |  Observation (555)  |  Providence (18)  |  Regular (46)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sand (62)  |  Shell (63)  |  Skill (109)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Young (227)

It is interesting to observe the result of habit in the peculiar shape and size of the giraffe (Camelo-pardalis): this animal, the largest of the mammals, is known to live in the interior of Africa in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, so that it is obliged to browse on the leaves on the trees and to make constant efforts to reach them. From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is lengthened to such a degree that the giraffe, without standing up on its hind legs, attains a height of six metres (nearly 20 feet).
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 256, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 122.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arid (6)  |  Attain (125)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Constant (144)  |  Degree (276)  |  Effort (227)  |  Giraffe (4)  |  Habit (168)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interior (32)  |  Known (454)  |  Largest (39)  |  Leg (34)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Neck (15)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tree (246)

It is interesting to transport one’s self back to the times when Astronomy began; to observe how discoveries were connected together, how errors have got mixed up with truth, have delayed the knowledge of it, and retarded its progress; and, after having followed the various epochs and traversed every climate, finally to contemplate the edifice founded on the labours of successive centuries and of various nations.
Description of Bailly’s plan when writing his history of astronomy books, quoted by François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, in 'Bailly', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 114. Arago first presented this biography of Bailly when he read it to the Academy of Sciences (26 Feb 1844).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Century (310)  |  Climate (97)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Delay (20)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Error (321)  |  Follow (378)  |  Founded (20)  |  History Of Astronomy (2)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mixed (6)  |  Nation (193)  |  Observation (555)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retarded (5)  |  Self (267)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Transport (30)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)

It is most interesting to observe into how small a field the whole of the mysteries of nature thus ultimately resolve themselves. The inorganic has one final comprehensive law, GRAVITATION. The organic, the other great department of mundane things, rests in like manner on one law, and that is,—DEVELOPMENT. Nor may even these be after all twain, but only branches of one still more comprehensive law, the expression of that unity which man's wit can scarcely separate from Deity itself.
Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (1844), 360.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Creation (327)  |  Deity (22)  |  Department (92)  |  Development (422)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expression (175)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Separate (143)  |  Small (477)  |  Still (613)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Unity (78)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wit (59)

It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions:"Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."
Vitruvius
In Vitruvius Pollio and Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), 'Book VI: Introduction', Vitruvius, the Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 167. From the original Latin, “Aristippus philosophus Socraticus, naufragio cum ejectus ad Rhodiensium litus animaduertisset Geometrica schemata descripta, exclama uisse ad comites ita dicitur, Bene speremus, hominum enim vestigia video.” In De Architectura libri decem (1552), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Aristippus The Cyrenaic (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cast (66)  |  Coast (13)  |  Companion (19)  |  Draw (137)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Figure (160)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Good (889)  |  Man (2251)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  See (1081)  |  Shipwreck (7)  |  Shore (24)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Trace (103)

It is said that the composing of the Lilavati was occasioned by the following circumstance. Lilavati was the name of the author’s daughter, concerning whom it appeared, from the qualities of the ascendant at her birth, that she was destined to pass her life unmarried, and to remain without children. The father ascertained a lucky hour for contracting her in marriage, that she might be firmly connected and have children. It is said that when that hour approached, he brought his daughter and his intended son near him. He left the hour cup on the vessel of water and kept in attendance a time-knowing astrologer, in order that when the cup should subside in the water, those two precious jewels should be united. But, as the intended arrangement was not according to destiny, it happened that the girl, from a curiosity natural to children, looked into the cup, to observe the water coming in at the hole, when by chance a pearl separated from her bridal dress, fell into the cup, and, rolling down to the hole, stopped the influx of water. So the astrologer waited in expectation of the promised hour. When the operation of the cup had thus been delayed beyond all moderate time, the father was in consternation, and examining, he found that a small pearl had stopped the course of the water, and that the long-expected hour was passed. In short, the father, thus disappointed, said to his unfortunate daughter, I will write a book of your name, which shall remain to the latest times—for a good name is a second life, and the ground-work of eternal existence.
In Preface to the Persian translation of the Lilavati by Faizi (1587), itself translated into English by Strachey and quoted in John Taylor (trans.) Lilawati, or, A Treatise on Arithmetic and Geometry by Bhascara Acharya (1816), Introduction, 3. [The Lilavati is the 12th century treatise on mathematics by Indian mathematician, Bhaskara Acharya, born 1114.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Appear (118)  |  Approach (108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Ascendant (2)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Astrologer (10)  |  Author (167)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Birth (147)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Coming (114)  |  Compose (17)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contract (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Cup (7)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daughter (29)  |  Delay (20)  |  Destined (42)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Disappointed (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Dress (9)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Examine (78)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Fall (230)  |  Father (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Firmly (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Hole (16)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indian (27)  |  Influx (2)  |  Intend (16)  |  Jewel (10)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Late (118)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pearl (6)  |  Precious (41)  |  Promise (67)  |  Quality (135)  |  Remain (349)  |  Roll (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Separate (143)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  Son (24)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subside (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  United (14)  |  Unmarried (3)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Wait (58)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)

It is the theory that decides what can be observed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Decide (41)  |  Observed (149)  |  Theory (970)

It is usual to say that the two sources of experience are Observation and Experiment. When we merely note and record the phenomena which occur around us in the ordinary course of nature we are said to observe. When we change the course of nature by the intervention of our will and muscular powers, and thus produce unusual combinations and conditions of phenomena, we are said to experiment. [Sir John] Herschel has justly remarked that we might properly call these two modes of experience passive and active observation. In both cases we must certainly employ our senses to observe, and an experiment differs from a mere observation in the fact that we more or less influence the character of the events which we observe. Experiment is thus observation plus alteration of conditions.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Combination (144)  |  Condition (356)  |  Course (409)  |  Definition (221)  |  Differ (85)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Sir John Herschel (23)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plus (43)  |  Power (746)  |  Record (154)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Source (93)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Will (2355)

It is well to observe the force and virtue and consequence of discoveries, and these are to be seen nowhere more conspicuously than in those three which were unknown to the ancients, and of which the origins, although recent, are obscure and inglorious; namely, printing, gunpowder, and the magnet. For these three have changed the whole face and state of things throughout the world; the first in literature, the second in warfare, the third in navigation; whence have followed innumerable changes, insomuch that no empire, no sect, no star seems to have exerted greater power and influence in human affairs than these mechanical discoveries.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 129. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Change (593)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exert (39)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Invention (369)  |  Literature (103)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Origin (239)  |  Power (746)  |  Printing (22)  |  Recent (77)  |  Star (427)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Warfare (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man, so weak, but it mates, and masters, the fear of death; and therefore, death is no such terrible enemy, when a man hath so many attendants about him, that can win the combat of him. Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupieth it.
In 'Of Death', Essays (1625, 1883), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspire (13)  |  Attendant (3)  |  Combat (15)  |  Death (388)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Fear (197)  |  Grief (18)  |  Honor (54)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Mate (6)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mind Of Man (7)  |  Passion (114)  |  Preoccupy (4)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Slight (31)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Weak (71)  |  Win (52)  |  Worthy (34)

It isn’t important in which sea or lake you observe a slick of pollution, or in the forests of which country afire breaks out, or on which continent a hurricane arises. You are standing guard over the whole of our Earth.
In Jack Hassard and Julie Weisberg , Environmental Science on the Net: The Global Thinking Project (1999), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Break (99)  |  Continent (76)  |  Country (251)  |  Earth (996)  |  Forest (150)  |  Guard (18)  |  Hurricane (4)  |  Important (209)  |  Lake (32)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stand (274)  |  Whole (738)

It must be admitted that science has its castes. The man whose chief apparatus is the differential equation looks down upon one who uses a galvanometer, and he in turn upon those who putter about with sticky and smelly things in test tubes. But all of these, and most biologists too, join together in their contempt for the pariah who, not through a glass darkly, but with keen unaided vision, observes the massing of a thundercloud on the horizon, the petal as it unfolds, or the swarming of a hive of bees. And yet sometimes I think that our laboratories are but little earthworks which men build about themselves, and whose puny tops too often conceal from view the Olympian heights; that we who work in these laboratories are but skilled artisans compared with the man who is able to observe, and to draw accurate deductions from the world about him.
The Anatomy of Science (1926), 170- 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Bee (40)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Build (204)  |  Caste (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Down (456)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equation (132)  |  Flower (106)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Puny (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Together (387)  |  Top (96)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It seemed that animals always behave in a manner showing the rightness of the philosophy entertained by the man who observes them… . Throughout the reign of Queen Victoria all apes were virtuous monogamists, but during the dissolute twenties their morals underwent a disastrous deterioration.
From 'Theory of Knowledge', My Philosophical Development (1959), collected in Robert E. Egner and Lester E. Denonn (eds), The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (1961), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Behavior (10)  |  Ape (53)  |  Deterioration (10)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moral (195)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reign (23)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Virtuous (9)

It then came into my mind what that most careful observer of natural phenomena [Amontons] had written about the correction of the barometer; for he had observed that the height of the column of mercury in the barometer was a little (though sensibly enough) altered by the varying temperature of the mercury. From this I gathered that a thermometer might be perhaps constructed with mercury.
From 'Experimenta circa gradum caloris liquorum nonnullorum ebullientium instituta', Philosophical Transactions (1724), 33, 1, as translated in William Francis Magie, A Source Book in Physics (1935), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Guillaume Amontons (3)  |  Barometer (5)  |  Careful (24)  |  Column (15)  |  Construct (124)  |  Correction (40)  |  Enough (340)  |  Gather (72)  |  Height (32)  |  Invention (369)  |  Little (707)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Observed (149)  |  Observer (43)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thermometer (11)  |  Vary (27)

It was on the 25th November 1740 that I cut the first polyp. I put the two parts in a flat glass, which only contained water to the height of four to five lignes. It was thus easy for me to observe these portions of the polyp with a fairly powerful lens.
I shall indicate farther on the precautions I took in making my experiments on these cut polyps and the technique I adopted to cut them. It will suffice to say here that I cut the polyp concerned transversely, a little nearer the anterior than the posterior end. The first part was thus a little shorter than the second.
The instant that I cut the polyp, the two parts contracted so that at first they only appeared like two little grains of green matter at the bottom of the glass in which I put them—for green, as I have already said, is the colour of the first polyps that I possessed. The two parts expanded on the same day on which I separated them. They were very easy to distinguish from one another. The first had its anterior end adorned with the fine threads that serve the polyp as legs and arms, which the second had none.
The extensions of the first part was not the only sign of life that it gave on the same day that it was separated from the other. I saw it move its arms; and the next day, the first time I came to observe it, I found that it had changed its position; and shortly afterwards I saw it take a step. The second part was extended as on the previous day and in the same place. I shook the glass a little to see if it were still alive. This movement made it contract, from which I judged that it was alive. Shortly afterwards it extended again. On the following days I .’ saw the same thing.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Already (222)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cut (114)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grain (50)  |  Green (63)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instant (45)  |  Leg (34)  |  Lens (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precaution (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

Laplace considers astronomy a science of observation, because we can only observe the movements of the planets; we cannot reach them, indeed, to alter their course and to experiment with them. “On earth,” said Laplace, “we make phenomena vary by experiments; in the sky, we carefully define all the phenomena presented to us by celestial motion.” Certain physicians call medicine a science of observations, because they wrongly think that experimentation is inapplicable to it.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 18. A footnote cites Laplace, Système du monde, Chap. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Call (769)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  Defining (3)  |  Earth (996)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimentation (7)  |  Inapplicable (2)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (62)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Observation (555)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physician (273)  |  Planet (356)  |  Present (619)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sky (161)  |  Think (1086)  |  Variation (90)  |  Wrongly (2)

Let people who have to observe sickness and death look back and try to register in their observation the appearances which have preceded relapse, attack or death, and not assert that there were none, or that there were not the right ones. A want of the habit of observing conditions and an inveterate habit of taking averages are each of them often equally misleading.
Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attack (84)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Condition (356)  |  Death (388)  |  Equally (130)  |  Habit (168)  |  Look (582)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  People (1005)  |  Register (21)  |  Relapse (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)

Matters of fact, which as Mr Budgell somewhere observes, are very stubborn things.
In copy of the Will of Matthew Tindal (1733), 23. As cited in Kate Louise Roberts, Hoyt's New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations (1922), 570.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1210)  |  Matter (798)  |  Observation (555)  |  Stubborn (13)  |  Thing (1915)

Men who have excessive faith in their theories or ideas are not only ill prepared for making discoveries; they also make very poor observations. Of necessity, they observe with a preconceived idea, and when they devise an experiment, they can see, in its results,only a confirmation of their theory. In this way they distort observation and often neglect very important facts because they do not further their aim.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distort (22)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Making (300)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Observation (555)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preconceived (3)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Theory (970)  |  Way (1217)

Men will never disappoint us if we observe two rules: (i) To find out what they are; (2) to expect them to be just that.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Disappoint (14)  |  Expect (200)  |  Find (998)  |  Never (1087)  |  Rule (294)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

My interest in the biology of tissue and organ transplantation arose from my [WW II] military experience at Valley Forge General Hospital in Pennsylvania … a major plastic surgical center. While there, I spent all my available spare time on the plastic surgical wards which were jammed with hundreds of battle casualties. I enjoyed talking to the patients, helping with dressings, and observing the results of the imaginative reconstructive surgical operations.
As a First Lieutenant with only a nine-month surgical internship, randomly assigned to VFGH to await overseas duty. In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Available (78)  |  Battle (34)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biology (216)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forge (9)  |  General (511)  |  Help (105)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Interest (386)  |  Major (84)  |  Military (40)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Patient (199)  |  Plastic (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Spent (85)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Transplantation (4)  |  Valley (32)  |  Ward (7)

Nature, … in order to carry out the marvelous operations [that occur] in animals and plants has been pleased to construct their organized bodies with a very large number of machines, which are of necessity made up of extremely minute parts so shaped and situated as to form a marvelous organ, the structure and composition of which are usually invisible to the naked eye without the aid of a microscope. … Just as Nature deserves praise and admiration for making machines so small, so too the physician who observes them to the best of his ability is worthy of praise, not blame, for he must also correct and repair these machines as well as he can every time they get out of order.
'Reply to Doctor Sbaraglia' in Opera Posthuma (1697), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 568.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Aid (97)  |  Animal (617)  |  Best (459)  |  Blame (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Carry (127)  |  Composition (84)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Correction (40)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Eye (419)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Large (394)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Minute (125)  |  Minuteness (8)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked Eye (12)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organization (114)  |  Out Of Order (2)  |  Part (222)  |  Physician (273)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Praise (26)  |  Repair (11)  |  Shape (72)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)

Newton supposed that the case of the planet was similar to that of [a ball spun around on the end of an elastic string]; that it was always pulled in the direction of the sun, and that this attraction or pulling of the sun produced the revolution of the planet, in the same way that the traction or pulling of the elastic string produces the revolution of the ball. What there is between the sun and the planet that makes each of them pull the other, Newton did not know; nobody knows to this day; and all we are now able to assert positively is that the known motion of the planet is precisely what would be produced if it were fastened to the sun by an elastic string, having a certain law of elasticity. Now observe the nature of this discovery, the greatest in its consequences that has ever yet been made in physical science:—
I. It begins with an hypothesis, by supposing that there is an analogy between the motion of a planet and the motion of a ball at the end of a string.
II. Science becomes independent of the hypothesis, for we merely use it to investigate the properties of the motion, and do not trouble ourselves further about the cause of it.
'On Some of the Conditions of Mental Development,' a discourse delivered at the Royal Institution, 6 Mar 1868, in Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays, by the Late William Kingdon Clifford (1886), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Ball (62)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elasticity (8)  |  End (590)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Merely (316)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Planet (356)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Produced (187)  |  Pull (43)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sun (385)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

No video, no photographs, no verbal descriptions, no lectures can provide the enchantment that a few minutes out-of-doors can: watch a spider construct a web; observe a caterpillar systematically ravaging the edge of a leaf; close your eyes, cup your hands behind your ears, and listen to aspen leaves rustle or a stream muse about its pools and eddies. Nothing can replace plucking a cluster of pine needles and rolling them in your fingers to feel how they’re put together, or discovering that “sedges have edges and grasses are round,” The firsthand, right-and-left-brain experience of being in the out-of-doors involves all the senses including some we’ve forgotten about, like smelling water a mile away. No teacher, no student, can help but sense and absorb the larger ecological rhythms at work here, and the intertwining of intricate, varied and complex strands that characterize a rich, healthy natural world.
Into the Field: A Guide to Locally Focused Teaching
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Caterpillar (4)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Close (69)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Complex (188)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cup (7)  |  Description (84)  |  Discover (553)  |  Door (93)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Eddy (4)  |  Edge (47)  |  Enchantment (8)  |  Experience (467)  |  Eye (419)  |  Feel (367)  |  Finger (44)  |  Firsthand (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Grass (46)  |  Hand (143)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Help (105)  |  Include (90)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Involve (90)  |  Large (394)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Listen (73)  |  Mile (39)  |  Minute (125)  |  Muse (10)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural World (25)  |  Needle (5)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Pine (9)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Pool (15)  |  Provide (69)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Replace (31)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Rich (62)  |  Right (452)  |  Roll (40)  |  Round (26)  |  Rustle (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smell (27)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strand (9)  |  Stream (81)  |  Student (300)  |  Systematically (7)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Together (387)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Video (2)  |  Watch (109)  |  Water (481)  |  Web (16)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Not only such Actions as were at first Indifferent to us, but even such as were Painful, will by Custom and Practice become Pleasant. Sir Francis Bacon observes in his Natural Philosophy, that our Taste is never pleased better, than with those things which at first created a Disgust in it. He gives particular Instances of Claret, Coffee, and other Liquors, which the Palate seldom approves upon the first Taste; but when it has once got a Relish of them, generally retains it for Life.
In The Spectator (2 Aug 1712), No. 447, collected in The Spectator (9th ed., 1728), Vol. 6, 225-226.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Addiction (5)  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Approval (10)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Custom (42)  |  Disgust (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Palate (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Practice (204)  |  Relish (4)  |  Retain (56)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Argument (138)  |  Class (164)  |  Close (69)  |  Common (436)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Descend (47)  |  Detail (146)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Habit (168)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Progenitor (5)  |  Race (268)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.
In (George Long, trans.), The Thoughts of the Emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus (1869), 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Consider (416)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Love (309)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universe (857)

Observe the practice of many physicians; do not implicitly believe the mere assertion of your master; be something better than servile learner; go forth yourselves to see and compare!
In Armand Trousseau, as translated by P. Victor and John Rose Cormack, Lectures on Clinical Medicine: Delivered at the Hôtel-Dieu, Paris (1873), Vol. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (32)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Compare (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Learner (10)  |  Master (178)  |  Mere (84)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  See (1081)  |  Servile (3)  |  Something (719)  |  Yourself (7)

Obvious facts are apt to be over-rated. System-makers see the gravitation of history, and fail to observe its chemistry, of greater though less evident power.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Less (103)  |  Maker (34)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Power (746)  |  Rat (37)  |  See (1081)  |  System (537)

On principle, there is nothing new in the postulate that in the end exact science should aim at nothing more than the description of what can really be observed. The question is only whether from now on we shall have to refrain from tying description to a clear hypothesis about the real nature of the world. There are many who wish to pronounce such abdication even today. But I believe that this means making things a little too easy for oneself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Belief (578)  |  Clear (100)  |  Description (84)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Exact Science (10)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tie (38)  |  Today (314)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

On the most usual assumption, the universe is homogeneous on the large scale, i.e. down to regions containing each an appreciable number of nebulae. The homogeneity assumption may then be put in the form: An observer situated in a nebula and moving with the nebula will observe the same properties of the universe as any other similarly situated observer at any time.
From 'Review of Cosmology,', Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (1948), 107-8; as quoted and cited in Hermann Friedmann, Wissenschaft und Symbol, Biederstein (1949), 472.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciable (2)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Containing (4)  |  Down (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Large (394)  |  Most (1731)  |  Moving (11)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observer (43)  |  Other (2236)  |  Property (168)  |  Region (36)  |  Same (157)  |  Scale (121)  |  Similar (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

One of the greatest experimental scientists of the time who was really doing something, William Harvey, said that what Bacon said science was, was the science that a lord-chancellor would do. He [Bacon] spoke of making observations, but omitted the vital factor of judgment about what to observe and what to pay attention to.
From address (1966) at the 14th Annual Convention of the National Science Teachers Association, New York City, printed in 'What is science?', The Physics Teacher (1969), 7, No. 6, 321.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (190)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Chancellor (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Factor (46)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Lord (93)  |  Making (300)  |  Observation (555)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)

One will weave the canvas; another will fell a tree by the light of his ax. Yet another will forge nails, and there will be others who observe the stars to learn how to navigate. And yet all will be as one. Building a boat isn’t about weaving canvas, forging nails, or reading the sky. It’s about giving a shared taste for the sea, by the light of which you will see nothing contradictory but rather a community of love.
From the French, “Celui-là tissera des toiles, l’autre dans la forêt par l’éclair de sa hache couchera l’arbre. L’autre, encore, forgera des clous, et il en sera quelque part qui observeront les étoiles afin d’apprendre à gouverner. Et tous cependant ne seront qu’un. Créer le navire ce n’est point tisser les toiles, forger les clous, lire les astres, mais bien donner le goût de la mer qui est un, et à la lumière duquel il n’est plus rien qui soit contradictoire mais communauté dans l’amour.” In Citadelle (1948), Sect. 75, 687. An English edition was published as “Wisdom of the Sands.” The translation in the subject quote is given the website quoteinvestigator.com which discusses how it may have been paraphrased anonymously to yield the commonly seen quote as “If you want to build a ship, don’t recruit the men to gather the wood, divide the work and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for vast and endless sea.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Axe (15)  |  Boat (16)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Community (104)  |  Forge (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Nail (7)  |  Navigate (3)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reading (133)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Sky (161)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Taste (90)  |  Tree (246)  |  Weave (19)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Will (2355)

Our physicians have observed that, in process of time, some diseases have abated of their virulence, and have, in a manner, worn out their malignity, so as to be no longer mortal.
Science quotes on:  |  Abate (2)  |  Disease (328)  |  Manner (58)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Observed (149)  |  Physician (273)  |  Process (423)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virulence (3)

Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise. Without them your theories are vain surmises. But while you are studying, observing, experimenting, do not remain content with the surface of things. Do not become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin. Seek obstinately for the laws that govern them.
Translation of a note, 'Bequest of Pavlov to the Academic Youth of his Country', written a few days before his death for a student magazine, The Generation of the Victors. As published in 'Pavlov and the Spirit of Science', Nature (4 Apr 1936), 137, 572.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Content (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (146)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obstinately (2)  |  Origin (239)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Recorder (4)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surmise (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wing (75)

Phony psychics like Uri Geller have had particular success in bamboozling scientists with ordinary stage magic, because only scientists are arrogant enough to think that they always observe with rigorous and objective scrutiny, and therefore could never be so fooled–while ordinary mortals know perfectly well that good performers can always find a way to trick people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrogant (3)  |  Enough (340)  |  Find (998)  |  Fool (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Know (1518)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Particular (76)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Performer (2)  |  Phony (3)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Stage (143)  |  Success (302)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trick (35)  |  Way (1217)

Physical concepts are free creations of the human mind, and are not, however it may seem, uniquely determined by the external world. In our endeavour to understand reality we are somewhat like a man trying to understand the mechanism of a closed watch. He sees the face and the moving hands, even hears its ticking, but he has no way of opening the case. If he is ingenious he may form some picture of a mechanism which could be responsible for all the things he observes, but he may never be quite sure his picture is the only one which could explain his observations. He will never be able to compare his picture with the real mechanism and he cannot even imagine the possibility or the meaning of such a comparison. But he certainly believes that, as his knowledge increases, his picture of reality will become simpler and simpler and will explain a wider and wider range of his sensuous impressions. He may also believe in the existence of the ideal limit of knowledge and that it is approached by the human mind. He may call this ideal limit the objective truth.
Albert Einstein and Leopold Infeld, The Evolution of Physics (1938), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Closed (38)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Concept (221)  |  Creation (327)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impression (114)  |  Increase (210)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Trying (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Physics tries to discover the pattern of events which controls the phenomena we observe. But we can never know what this pattern means or how it originates; and even if some superior intelligence were to tell us, we should find the explanation unintelligible.
In Physics And Philosophy: the Revolution In Modern Science (1942), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (167)  |  Discover (553)  |  Event (216)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Find (998)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Originate (36)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Superior (81)  |  Tell (340)  |  Unintelligible (15)

Saturated with that speculative spirit then pervading the Greek mind, he [Pythagoras] endeavoured to discover some principle of homogeneity in the universe. Before him, the philosophers of the Ionic school had sought it in the matter of things; Pythagoras looked for it in the structure of things. He observed the various numerical relations or analogies between numbers and the phenomena of the universe. Being convinced that it was in numbers and their relations that he was to find the foundation to true philosophy, he proceeded to trace the origin of all things to numbers. Thus he observed that musical strings of equal lengths stretched by weights having the proportion of 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, produced intervals which were an octave, a fifth and a fourth. Harmony, therefore, depends on musical proportion; it is nothing but a mysterious numerical relation. Where harmony is, there are numbers. Hence the order and beauty of the universe have their origin in numbers. There are seven intervals in the musical scale, and also seven planets crossing the heavens. The same numerical relations which underlie the former must underlie the latter. But where number is, there is harmony. Hence his spiritual ear discerned in the planetary motions a wonderful “Harmony of spheres.”
In History of Mathematics (1893), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Cross (16)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discover (553)  |  Ear (68)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fifth (3)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fourth (8)  |  Greek (107)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Interval (13)  |  Length (23)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Musical (10)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observed (149)  |  Octave (3)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pervade (10)  |  Pervading (7)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Relation (157)  |  Scale (121)  |  School (219)  |  Seek (213)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stretch (39)  |  String (21)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  True (212)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wonderful (149)

Science has so accustomed us to devising and accepting theories to account for the facts we observe, however fantastic, that our minds must begin their manufacture before we are aware of it.
Seven American Nights (1978). In the collection, David G. Hartwell (Ed.), The Dark Descent (1997), 653.
Science quotes on:  |  Accepting (22)  |  Account (192)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Begin (260)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)

Scientists are not robotic inducing machines that infer structures of explanation only from regularities observed in natural phenomena (assuming, as I doubt, that such a style of reasoning could ever achieve success in principle). Scientists are human beings, immersed in culture, and struggling with all the curious tools of inference that mind permits ... Culture can potentiate as well as constrain–as Darwin’s translation of Adam Smith’s laissez-faire economic models into biology as the theory of natural selection. In any case, objective minds do not exist outside culture, so we must make the best of our ineluctable embedding.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Assume (38)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Biology (216)  |  Case (99)  |  Constrain (9)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curious (91)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Economic (81)  |  Embed (7)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Immerse (4)  |  Induce (22)  |  Infer (12)  |  Inference (45)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observed (149)  |  Outside (141)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Potentiate (2)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Style (23)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Translation (21)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Omit (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Partial (10)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

Since the measuring device has been constructed by the observer … we have to remember that what we observe is not nature itself but nature exposed to our method of questioning. Our scientific work in physics consists in asking questions about nature in the language that we possess and trying to get an answer from experiment by the means that are at our disposal.
Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Asking (73)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construct (124)  |  Device (70)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Language (293)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Question (621)  |  Remember (179)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Trying (144)  |  Work (1351)

So far as I have been able to observe thus far, the series of strata which compose the earth’s visible crust, seem to me to be divided into four general or successive, orders, without taking into consideration the sea. These four orders can be thought of as being four enormous strata ... which, wherever they are found, are seen to be placed one above the other, in a consistently uniform manner.
'Lettere Seconda ... sopra varie sue Osservazioni fatti in diverse parti del Territorio di Vicenza, ad altrove, appartenenti alIa Teoria terrestre, ed alIa Mineralogia') Nuova Raccolta di Opuscoli Scientificie Filologici, 1760,6,158, trans. Ezio Vaccari.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Crust (38)  |  Divided (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  General (511)  |  Geology (220)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sea (308)  |  Series (149)  |  Strata (35)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thought (953)  |  Visible (84)  |  Wherever (51)

Thanks to the sharp eyes of a Minnesota man, it is possible that two identical snowflakes may finally have been observed. While out snowmobiling, Oley Skotchgaard noticed a snowflake that looked familiar to him. Searching his memory, he realized it was identical to a snowflake he had seen as a child in Vermont. Weather experts, while excited, caution that the match-up will be difficult to verify.
In Napalm and Silly Putty (2002), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (24)  |  Child (307)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Excite (15)  |  Expert (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Identical (53)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Memory (134)  |  Observed (149)  |  Possible (552)  |  Realize (147)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Two (937)  |  Verify (23)  |  Weather (44)  |  Will (2355)

That ability to impart knowledge … what does it consist of? … a deep belief in the interest and importance of the thing taught, a concern about it amounting to a sort of passion. A man who knows a subject thoroughly, a man so soaked in it that he eats it, sleeps it and dreams it—this man can always teach it with success, no matter how little he knows of technical pedagogy. That is because there is enthusiasm in him, and because enthusiasm is almost as contagious as fear or the barber’s itch. An enthusiast is willing to go to any trouble to impart the glad news bubbling within him. He thinks that it is important and valuable for to know; given the slightest glow of interest in a pupil to start with, he will fan that glow to a flame. No hollow formalism cripples him and slows him down. He drags his best pupils along as fast as they can go, and he is so full of the thing that he never tires of expounding its elements to the dullest.
This passion, so unordered and yet so potent, explains the capacity for teaching that one frequently observes in scientific men of high attainments in their specialties—for example, Huxley, Ostwald, Karl Ludwig, Virchow, Billroth, Jowett, William G. Sumner, Halsted and Osler—men who knew nothing whatever about the so-called science of pedagogy, and would have derided its alleged principles if they had heard them stated.
In Prejudices: third series (1922), 241-2.
For a longer excerpt, see H.L. Mencken on Teaching, Enthusiasm and Pedagogy.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Barber (5)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Theodor Billroth (2)  |  Call (769)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consist (223)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Deep (233)  |  Derision (8)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Eat (104)  |  Element (310)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fan (2)  |  Fear (197)  |  Flame (40)  |  Formalism (7)  |  Glow (14)  |  William Stewart Halsted (2)  |  High (362)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Impart (23)  |  Imparting (6)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interest (386)  |  Itch (10)  |  Benjamin Jowett (11)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Sir William Osler (35)  |  Ostwald_Carl (2)  |  Passion (114)  |  Pedagogy (2)  |  Potent (12)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Slow (101)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Start (221)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Value (365)  |  Rudolf Virchow (50)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

That man can interrogate as well as observe nature was a lesson slowly learned in his evolution. Of the two methods by which he can do this, the mathematical and the experimental, both have been equally fruitful—by the one he has gauged the starry heights and harnessed the cosmic forces to his will; by the other he has solved many of the problems of life and lightened many of the burdens of humanity.
In 'The Evolution of the Idea of Experiment in Medicine', in C.G. Roland, Sir William Osler, 1849-1919: A Selection for Medical Students (1982), 103. As cited in William Osler and Mark E. Silverman (ed.), The Quotable Osler (2002), 249
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Burden (27)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Force (487)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Harness (23)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Interrogation (4)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (676)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)

The astronomer is, in some measure, independent of his fellow astronomer; he can wait in his observatory till the star he wishes to observe comes to his meridian; but the meteorologist has his observations bounded by a very limited horizon, and can do little without the aid of numerous observers furnishing him contemporaneous observations over a wide-extended area.
Second Report on Meteorology to the Secretary of the Navy (1849), US Senate Executive Document 39, 31st Congress, 1st session. Quoted in J. R. Fleming, Meteorology in America: 1800-1870 (1990), vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Bound (119)  |  Do (1908)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Little (707)  |  Measure (232)  |  Meridian (4)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Star (427)  |  Wide (96)

The endeavour to observe oneself must inevitably introduce changes into the course of mental events,—changes which could not have occurred without it, and whose usual consequence is that the very process which was to have been observed disappears from consciousness.
In Principles of Physiological Psychology (1873, 1904), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Event (216)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Process (423)

The examples which a beginner should choose for practice should be simple and should not contain very large numbers. The powers of the mind cannot be directed to two things at once; if the complexity of the numbers used requires all the student’s attention, he cannot observe the principle of the rule which he is following.
In Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1902), chap. 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginner (11)  |  Choose (112)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Contain (68)  |  Direct (225)  |  Example (94)  |  Follow (378)  |  Large (394)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Require (219)  |  Rule (294)  |  Simple (406)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)

The faith of scientists in the power and truth of mathematics is so implicit that their work has gradually become less and less observation, and more and more calculation. The promiscuous collection and tabulation of data have given way to a process of assigning possible meanings, merely supposed real entities, to mathematical terms, working out the logical results, and then staging certain crucial experiments to check the hypothesis against the actual empirical results. But the facts which are accepted by virtue of these tests are not actually observed at all. With the advance of mathematical technique in physics, the tangible results of experiment have become less and less spectacular; on the other hand, their significance has grown in inverse proportion. The men in the laboratory have departed so far from the old forms of experimentation—typified by Galileo's weights and Franklin's kite—that they cannot be said to observe the actual objects of their curiosity at all; instead, they are watching index needles, revolving drums, and sensitive plates. No psychology of 'association' of sense-experiences can relate these data to the objects they signify, for in most cases the objects have never been experienced. Observation has become almost entirely indirect; and readings take the place of genuine witness.
Philosophy in a New Key; A Study in Inverse the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (1942), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Collection (64)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Data (156)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Drum (8)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Merely (316)  |  Meter (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Tabulation (2)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Technique (80)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Witness (54)  |  Work (1351)

The general root of superstition [is that] men observe when things hit, and not when they miss, and commit to memory the one, and pass over the other.
In The Works of Francis Bacon (1819), Vol. 2, 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Commit (41)  |  General (511)  |  Hit (20)  |  Memory (134)  |  Miss (51)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Root (120)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Thing (1915)

The ideas which these sciences, Geometry, Theoretical Arithmetic and Algebra involve extend to all objects and changes which we observe in the external world; and hence the consideration of mathematical relations forms a large portion of many of the sciences which treat of the phenomena and laws of external nature, as Astronomy, Optics, and Mechanics. Such sciences are hence often termed Mixed Mathematics, the relations of space and number being, in these branches of knowledge, combined with principles collected from special observation; while Geometry, Algebra, and the like subjects, which involve no result of experience, are called Pure Mathematics.
In The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1868), Part 1, Bk. 2, chap. 1, sect. 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Collect (16)  |  Combine (57)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extend (128)  |  External (57)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Involve (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mix (19)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Often (106)  |  Optics (23)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Portion (84)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relation (157)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Subject (521)  |  Term (349)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Treat (35)  |  World (1774)

The main thing that induces me to question the safeness of the vulgar methodus medendi in many cases is the consideration of the nature of those Helps they usually employ, and some of which are honoured with the title of Generous Remedies. These helps are Bleeding, Vomiting, Purging, Sweating, and Spitting, of which I briefly observe in General, that they are sure to weaken or discompose when they are imployed, but do not certainly cure afterwards.
RSMS 199, Folio 177v. Michael Hunter identfies as passages or a suppressed work, Considerations and Doubts Touching the Vulgar Method of Physick. Quoted In Barbara Kaplan (ed.), Divulging of Useful Truths in Physick: The Medical Agenda of Robert Boyle (1993), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Cure (122)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Employ (113)  |  General (511)  |  Generous (17)  |  Honour (56)  |  Induce (22)  |  Main Thing (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vomiting (3)  |  Vulgar (33)

The more the subject is examined the more complex must we suppose the constitution of matter in order to explain the remarkable effects observed.
In Radio-activity (1905), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Effect (393)  |  Examine (78)  |  Explain (322)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)

The natural attitude of inspection is prone; we do not often observe accurately any object that rises much above the level of the eye.
Concerning observing human nature. In The Characters of Theophrastus: Illustrated With Physionomical Sketches (1881), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurately (7)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Level (67)  |  Natural (796)  |  Object (422)  |  Prone (7)  |  Rise (166)

The next object which I have observed is the essence or substance of the Milky Way. By the aid of a telescope anyone may behold this in a manner which so distinctly appeals to the senses that all the disputes which have tormented philosophers through so many ages are exploded at once by the irrefragable evidence of our eyes, and we are freed from wordy disputes upon this subject, for the Galaxy is nothing else but a mass of innumerable stars planted together in clusters.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Behold (18)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Essence (82)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Eye (419)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Irrefragable (2)  |  Mass (157)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plant (294)  |  Sense (770)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Torment (18)  |  Way (1217)

The observing mind is not a physical system, it cannot interact with any physical system. And it might be better to reserve the term ‘subject ‘ for the observing mind ... For the subject, if anything, is the thing that senses and thinks. Sensations and thoughts do not belong to the ‘world of energy.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Better (486)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Interact (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  World (1774)

The one who stays in my mind as the ideal man of science is, not Huxley or Tyndall, Hooker or Lubbock, still less my friend, philosopher and guide Herbert Spencer, but Francis Galton, whom I used to observe and listen to—I regret to add, without the least reciprocity—with rapt attention. Even to-day. I can conjure up, from memory’s misty deep, that tall figure with its attitude of perfect physical and mental poise; the clean-shaven face, the thin, compressed mouth with its enigmatical smile; the long upper lip and firm chin, and, as if presiding over the whole personality of the man, the prominent dark eyebrows from beneath which gleamed, with penetrating humour, contemplative grey eyes. Fascinating to me was Francis Galton’s all-embracing but apparently impersonal beneficence. But, to a recent and enthusiastic convert to the scientific method, the most relevant of Galton’s many gifts was the unique contribution of three separate and distinct processes of the intellect; a continuous curiosity about, and rapid apprehension of individual facts, whether common or uncommon; the faculty for ingenious trains of reasoning; and, more admirable than either of these, because the talent was wholly beyond my reach, the capacity for correcting and verifying his own hypotheses, by the statistical handling of masses of data, whether collected by himself or supplied by other students of the problem.
In My Apprenticeship (1926), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beneficence (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clean (50)  |  Collected (2)  |  Common (436)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Conjuring (3)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Convert (22)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dark (140)  |  Data (156)  |  Deep (233)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Enthusiastic (6)  |  Eye (419)  |  Eyebrow (2)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Figure (160)  |  Firm (47)  |  Friend (168)  |  Sir Francis Galton (18)  |  Gift (104)  |  Grey (10)  |  Guide (97)  |  Handling (7)  |  Himself (461)  |  Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (12)  |  Humour (116)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Impersonal (5)  |  Individual (404)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lip (4)  |  Listen (73)  |  Long (790)  |  John Lubbock (Lord Avebury) (26)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personality (62)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Physical (508)  |  Poise (4)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recent (77)  |  Reciprocity (2)  |  Regret (30)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smile (31)  |  Herbert Spencer (37)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Student (300)  |  Talent (94)  |  Tall (11)  |  Thin (16)  |  Train (114)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Unique (67)  |  Upper (4)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wholly (88)

The person who observes a clock, sees in it not only the pendulum swinging to and fro, and the dial-plate, and the hands moving, for a child can see all this; but he sees also the parts of the clock, and in what connexion the suspended weight stands to the wheel-work, and the pendulum to the moving hands.
'The Study of the Natural Sciences: An Introductory Lecture to the Course of Experimental Chemistry in the University of Munich, for the Winter Session of 1852-53,' as translated and republished in The Medical Times and Gazette (22 Jan 1853), N.S. Vol. 6, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Child (307)  |  Clock (47)  |  Dial (9)  |  Hand (143)  |  Movement (155)  |  Observation (555)  |  Part (222)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Person (363)  |  See (1081)  |  Stand (274)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)

The phenomena in these exhausted tubes reveal to physical science a new world—a world where matter may exist in a fourth state, where the corpuscular theory of light may be true, and where light does not always move in straight lines, but where we can never enter, and with which we must be content to observe and experiment from the outside.
'On the Illumination of Lines of Molecular Pressure and the Trajectory of Molecules', Philosophical Transactions 1879, 170, 164.
Science quotes on:  |  Enter (141)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Move (216)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  World (1774)

The professor may choose familiar topics as a starting point. The students collect material, work problems, observe regularities, frame hypotheses, discover and prove theorems for themselves. … the student knows what he is doing and where he is going; he is secure in his mastery of the subject, strengthened in confidence of himself. He has had the experience of discovering mathematics. He no longer thinks of mathematics as static dogma learned by rote. He sees mathematics as something growing and developing, mathematical concepts as something continually revised and enriched in the light of new knowledge. The course may have covered a very limited region, but it should leave the student ready to explore further on his own.
In A Concrete Approach to Abstract Algebra (1959), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (112)  |  Collect (16)  |  Concept (221)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Course (409)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Experience (467)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frame (26)  |  Growing (98)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prove (250)  |  Ready (39)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Revise (6)  |  Rote (4)  |  Secure (22)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Static (8)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Think (1086)  |  Topic (21)  |  Work (1351)

The Reader may here observe the Force of Numbers, which can be successfully applied, even to those things, which one would imagine are subject to no Rules. There are very few things which we know, which are not capable of being reduc’d to a Mathematical Reasoning, and when they cannot, it’s a sign our Knowledge of them is very small and confus’d; and where a mathematical reasoning can be had, it’s as great folly to make use of any other, as to grope for a thing in the dark when you have a Candle standing by you.
Of the Laws of Chance, or, a Method of the Hazards of Game (1692), Preface.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Being (1278)  |  Candle (30)  |  Capable (168)  |  Dark (140)  |  Folly (43)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rule (294)  |  Small (477)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)

The statistics of nihilism … “No matter how many times something new has been observed, it cannot be believed until it has been observed again.” I have also reduced my attitude toward this form of statistics to an axiom: “No matter how bad a thing you say about it, it is not bad enough.”
In Seeing Red: Redshifts, Cosmology and Academic Science (1998), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Attitude (82)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Bad (180)  |  Belief (578)  |  Enough (340)  |  Form (959)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Nihilism (3)  |  Observed (149)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)

The Sun is no lonelier than its neighbors; indeed, it is a very common-place star,—dwarfish, though not minute,—like hundreds, nay thousands, of others. By accident the brighter component of Alpha Centauri (which is double) is almost the Sun's twin in brightness, mass, and size. Could this Earth be transported to its vicinity by some supernatural power, and set revolving about it, at a little less than a hundred million miles' distance, the star would heat and light the world just as the Sun does, and life and civilization might go on with no radical change. The Milky Way would girdle the heavens as before; some of our familiar constellations, such as Orion, would be little changed, though others would be greatly altered by the shifting of the nearer stars. An unfamiliar brilliant star, between Cassiopeia and Perseus would be—the Sun. Looking back at it with our telescopes, we could photograph its spectrum, observe its motion among the stars, and convince ourselves that it was the same old Sun; but what had happened to the rest of our planetary system we would not know.
The Solar System and its Origin (1935), 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Alpha Centauri (2)  |  Alter (62)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Altered (32)  |  Back (390)  |  Brightness (12)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cassiopeia (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Component (48)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Convince (41)  |  Distance (161)  |  Double (15)  |  Dwarf (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mile (39)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Million (114)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Nearness (3)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perseus (2)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Radical (25)  |  Rest (280)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Set (394)  |  Shift (44)  |  Size (60)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  System (537)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transport (30)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Twin (15)  |  Unfamiliar (16)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The Vermin only teaze and pinch
Their foes superior by an Inch.
So, Naturalists observe, a Flea
Hath smaller Fleas that on him prey,
And these have smaller Fleas to bite 'em.
And so proceed ad infinitum.
On Poetry: A Rhapsody (1735), lines 339-44.
Science quotes on:  |  Ad Infinitum (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Bite (17)  |  Flea (11)  |  Foe (9)  |  Inch (9)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pinch (5)  |  Prey (13)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Superior (81)  |  Vermin (3)

The word “chance” then expresses only our ignorance of the causes of the phenomena that we observe to occur and to succeed one another in no apparent order. Probability is relative in part to this ignorance, and in part to our knowledge.
'Mémoire sur les Approximations des Formules qui sont Fonctions de Très Grands Nombres' (1783, published 1786). In Oeuvres complète de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 10, 296, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparent (84)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chance (239)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Probability (130)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Word (619)

Theory and fact are equally strong and utterly interdependent; one has no meaning without the other. We need theory to organize and interpret facts, even to know what we can or might observe. And we need facts to validate theories and give them substance.
Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms: Essays on Natural History (1998), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Equally (130)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Interdependent (2)  |  Interpret (19)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Observation (555)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Strong (174)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)

There are something like ten million million million million million million million million million million million million million million (1 with eighty zeroes after it) particles in the region of the universe that we can observe. Where did they all come from? The answer is that, in quantum theory, particles can be created out of energy in the form of particle/antiparticle pairs. But that just raises the question of where the energy came from. The answer is that the total energy of the universe is exactly zero. The matter in the universe is made out of positive energy. However, the matter is all attracting itself by gravity. Two pieces of matter that are close to each other have less energy than the same two pieces a long way apart, because you have to expend energy to separate them against the gravitational force that is pulling them together. Thus, in a sense, the gravitational field has negative energy. In the case of a universe that is approximately uniform in space, one can show that this negative gravitational energy exactly cancels the positive energy represented by the matter. So the total energy of the universe is zero.
A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes (1988), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Antiparticle (4)  |  Energy (344)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Negative (63)  |  Nuclear Particle (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Positive (94)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Question (621)  |  Represent (155)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Theory (970)  |  Together (387)  |  Total (94)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Zero (37)

There cannot be mental atrophy in any person who continues to observe, to remember what he observes, and to seek answers for his unceasing hows and whys about things.
From interview with Mary R. Mullett, 'How to Keep Young Mentally', The American Magazine (Dec 1921), 92, 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Continue (165)  |  Mental (177)  |  Person (363)  |  Remember (179)  |  Seek (213)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unceasing (3)  |  Why (491)

There is the immense sea of energy ... a multidimensional implicate order, ... the entire universe of matter as we generally observe it is to be treated as a comparatively small pattern of excitation. This excitation pattern is relatively autonomous and gives rise to approximately recurrent, stable separable projections into a three-dimensional explicate order of manifestation, which is more or less equivalent to that of space as we commonly experience it.
Wholeness and the Implicate Order? (1981), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Commonly (9)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entire (47)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Experience (467)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (202)  |  Immense (86)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Projection (5)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separable (3)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stable (30)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Treat (35)  |  Universe (857)

Things of all kinds are subject to a universal law which may be called the law of large numbers. It consists in the fact that, if one observes very considerable numbers of events of the same nature, dependent on constant causes and causes which vary irregularly, sometimes in one direction, sometimes in the other, it is to say without their variation being progressive in any definite direction, one shall find, between these numbers, relations which are almost constant.
Poisson’s Law of Large Numbers (16 Nov 1837), in Recherches sur la Probabilités (1837), 7. English version by Webmaster using Google Translate, from the original French, “Les choses de toutes natures sont soumises à une loi universelle qu’on) peut appeler la loi des grands nombres. Elle consiste en ce que, si l’on observe des nombres très considérables d’événements d’une même nature, dépendants de causes constantes et de causes qui varient irrégulièrement, tantôt dans un sens, tantôt daus l’autre, c’est-à-dire sans que leur variation soit progressive dans aucun sens déterminé, on trouvera, entre ces nombres, des rapports a très peu près constants.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constant (144)  |  Definite (110)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Direction (175)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Probability (130)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Relation (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universal Law (3)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vary (27)

Thus, we have three principles for increasing adequacy of data: if you must work with a single object, look for imperfections that record historical descent; if several objects are available, try to render them as stages of a single historical process; if processes can be directly observed, sum up their effects through time. One may discuss these principles directly or recognize the ‘little problems’ that Darwin used to exemplify them: orchids, coral reefs, and worms–the middle book, the first, and the last.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Available (78)  |  Book (392)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Data (156)  |  Descent (27)  |  Directly (22)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exemplify (5)  |  First (1283)  |  Historical (70)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Increase (210)  |  Last (426)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Middle (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orchid (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Record (154)  |  Render (93)  |  Several (32)  |  Single (353)  |  Stage (143)  |  Sum (102)  |  Sum Up (3)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worm (42)

To behold is not necessarily to observe, and the power of comparing and combining is only to be obtained by education. It is much to be regretted that habits of exact observation are not cultivated in our schools; to this deficiency may be traced much of the fallacious reasoning, the false philosophy which prevails.
As quoted in Inaugural Address, Edward C.C. Stanford, 'Glasgow Philosophical Meeting' (8 Dec 1873), The Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science (2 Jan 1874), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Behold (18)  |  Combine (57)  |  Compare (69)  |  Deficiency (12)  |  Education (378)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  False (100)  |  Habit (168)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  School (219)  |  Trace (103)

To find out what happens to a system when you interfere with it you have to interfere with it (not just passively observe it).
Use and Abuse of Regression (1966), 629.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Happen (274)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Observation (555)  |  Passive (7)  |  Research (664)  |  System (537)

To pick a hole–say in the 2nd law of Ωcs, that if two things are in contact the hotter cannot take heat from the colder without external agency.
Now let A & B be two vessels divided by a diaphragm and let them contain elastic molecules in a state of agitation which strike each other and the sides. Let the number of particles be equal in A & B but let those in A have equal velocities, if oblique collisions occur between them their velocities will become unequal & I have shown that there will be velocities of all magnitudes in A and the same in B only the sum of the squares of the velocities is greater in A than in B.
When a molecule is reflected from the fixed diaphragm CD no work is lost or gained.
If the molecule instead of being reflected were allowed to go through a hole in CD no work would be lost or gained, only its energy would be transferred from the one vessel to the other.
Now conceive a finite being who knows the paths and velocities of all the molecules by simple inspection but who can do no work, except to open and close a hole in the diaphragm, by means of a slide without mass.
Let him first observe the molecules in A and when lie sees one coming the square of whose velocity is less than the mean sq. vel. of the molecules in B let him open a hole & let it go into B. Next let him watch for a molecule in B the square of whose velocity is greater than the mean sq. vel. in A and when it comes to the hole let him draw and slide & let it go into A, keeping the slide shut for all other molecules.
Then the number of molecules in A & B are the same as at first but the energy in A is increased and that in B diminished that is the hot system has got hotter and the cold colder & yet no work has been done, only the intelligence of a very observant and neat fingered being has been employed. Or in short if heat is the motion of finite portions of matter and if we can apply tools to such portions of matter so as to deal with them separately then we can take advantage of the different motion of different portions to restore a uniformly hot system to unequal temperatures or to motions of large masses. Only we can't, not being clever enough.
Letter to Peter Guthrie Tait (11 Dec 1867). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 331-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Agitation (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cold (112)  |  Collision (15)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Contact (65)  |  Deal (188)  |  Different (577)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Employ (113)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Finite (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maxwell’s Demon (2)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Path (144)  |  Portion (84)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Square (70)  |  State (491)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sum (102)  |  System (537)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Watch (109)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To set foot on the soil of the asteroids, to lift by hand a rock from the Moon, to observe Mars from a distance of several tens of kilometers, to land on its satellite or even on its surface, what can be more fantastic? From the moment of using rocket devices a new great era will begin in astronomy: the epoch of the more intensive study of the firmament.
(1896). As quoted in Firmin Joseph Krieger, Behind the Sputniks: A Survey of Soviet Space Science (1958), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Asteroid (13)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Begin (260)  |  Device (70)  |  Distance (161)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Era (51)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Kilometer (10)  |  Land (115)  |  Lift (55)  |  Mars (44)  |  Moment (253)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Set (394)  |  Soil (86)  |  Study (653)  |  Surface (209)  |  Will (2355)

To study men, we must look close by; to study man, we must learn to look afar; if we are to discover essential characteristics, we must first observe differences.
Essai sur l'origine des langues (1781), 384
Science quotes on:  |  Afar (6)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Close (69)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Essential (199)  |  First (1283)  |  Learn (629)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Study (653)

Until I became a published writer, I remained completely ignorant of books on how to write and courses on the subject ... they would have spoiled my natural style; made me observe caution; would have hedged me with rules.
In Isaac Asimov and Janet Asimov (ed.), It's Been a Good Life (2002), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Caution (24)  |  Completely (135)  |  Course (409)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Natural (796)  |  Publication (101)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rule (294)  |  Spoil (7)  |  Style (23)  |  Subject (521)  |  Write (230)  |  Writer (86)

We cannot doubt the existence of an ultimate reality. It is the universe forever masked. We are a part of it, and the masks figured by us are the universe observing and understanding itself from a human point of view.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doubt (304)  |  Existence (456)  |  Figure (160)  |  Forever (103)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mask (12)  |  Part (222)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Reality (261)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)

We cannot observe external things without some degree of Thought; nor can we reflect upon our Thoughts, without being influenced in the course of our reflection by the Things which we have observed.
In The Elements of Morality (1845), Vol 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Course (409)  |  Degree (276)  |  External (57)  |  Influence (222)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)

We have no other notion of cause and effect, but that of certain objects, which have always conjoin’d together, and which in all past instances have been found inseparable. We cannot penetrate into the reason of the conjunction. We only observe the thing itself, and always find that from the constant conjunction the objects acquire an union in the imagination.
A Treatise on Human Nature (1739-40), ed. L. A. Selby-Bigge (1888), book 1, part 3, section 6, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Constant (144)  |  Effect (393)  |  Find (998)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Reason (744)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Union (51)

We know that nature invariably uses the same materials in its operations. Its ingeniousness is displayed only in the variation of form. Indeed, as if nature had voluntarily confined itself to using only a few basic units, we observe that it generally causes the same elements to reappear, in the same number, in the same circumstances, and in the same relationships to one another. If an organ happens to grow in an unusual manner, it exerts a considerable influence on adjacent parts, which as a result fail to reach their standard degree of development.
'Considérations sur les pieces de la tête osseuse des animaux vertebras, et particulièrement sur celle du crane des oiseaux', Annales du Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, 1807, 10, 343. Trans. J. Mandelbaum. Quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck (1988), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Degree (276)  |  Development (422)  |  Display (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exert (39)  |  Fail (185)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happen (274)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Influence (222)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Organ (115)  |  Reach (281)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Use (766)  |  Variation (90)

We may observe in some of the abrupt grounds we meet with, sections of great masses of strata, where it is as easy to read the history of the sea, as it is to read the history of Man in the archives of any nation.
'Geological Letters, Addressed to Professor Blumenbach, Letter 2', The British Critic, 1794, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Easy (204)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nation (193)  |  Read (287)  |  Sea (308)  |  Strata (35)

We never really see time. We see only clocks. If you say this object moves, what you really mean is that this object is here when the hand of your clock is here, and so on. We say we measure time with clocks, but we see only the hands of the clocks, not time itself. And the hands of a clock are a physical variable like any other. So in a sense we cheat because what we really observe are physical variables as a function of other physical variables, but we represent that as if everything is evolving in time.
Quoted by Tim Folger in 'Newsflash: Time May Not Exist', Discover Magazine (Jun 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Cheat (13)  |  Clock (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Function (228)  |  Mean (809)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variable (34)

We often observe in lawyers, who as Quicquid agunt homines is the matter of law suits, are sometimes obliged to pick up a temporary knowledge of an art or science, of which they understood nothing till their brief was delivered, and appear to be much masters of it.
In The Life of Samuel Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218. The Latin phrase translates as “what people do.”
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Brief (36)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Delivery (6)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)

We ought to observe that practice which is the hardest of all—especially for young physicians—we ought to throw in no medicine at all—to abstain—to observe a wise and masterly inactivity.
Speech (25 Jan 1828), in Register of Debates in Congress, Vol. 4, Col. 1170.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstain (7)  |  Abstinence (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Especially (31)  |  Hard (243)  |  Inactivity (3)  |  Masterly (2)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Wise (131)  |  Young (227)

We see the universe the way it is because if it were different, we would not be here to observe it.
In the Washington Post, April 15, 1988.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  See (1081)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

We think the heavens enjoy their spherical
Their round proportion, embracing all;
But yet their various and perplexed course,
Observed in divers ages, doth enforce
Men to find out so many eccentric parts,
Such diverse downright lines, such overthwarts,
As disproportion that pure form.
From poem, 'An Anatomy of the World: The First Anniversary', lines 251-257, as collected in The Poems of John Donne (1896), Vol. 2, 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Course (409)  |  Disproportion (3)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Line (91)  |  Observed (149)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Round (26)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Think (1086)  |  Various (200)

What I chiefly admired, and thought altogether unaccountable, was the strong disposition I observed in them [the mathematicians of Laputa] towards news and politics; perpetually inquiring into public affairs; giving their judgments in matters of state; and passionately disputing every inch of party opinion. I have indeed observed the same disposition among most of the mathematicians I have known in Europe, although I could never discover the least analogy between the two sciences.
In Gulliver's Travels, Part 8, chap. 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Europe (43)  |  Give (202)  |  Inch (9)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Least (75)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  News (36)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Party (18)  |  Passionately (3)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Politics (112)  |  Public Affairs (2)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)

When I observe the luminous progress and expansion of natural science in modern times, I seem to myself like a traveller going eastwards at dawn, and gazing at the growing light with joy, but also with impatience; looking forward with longing to the advent of the full and final light, but, nevertheless, having to turn away his eyes when the sun appeared, unable to bear the splendour he had awaited with so much desire.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 197-198.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Await (5)  |  Bear (159)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desire (204)  |  East (18)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Eye (419)  |  Final (118)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Growing (98)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Joy (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Longing (19)  |  Looking (189)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Modern (385)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traveler (30)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unable (24)

When I was young I observed that nine out of every ten things I did were failures, so I did ten times more work.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Failure (161)  |  More (2559)  |  Observed (149)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)  |  Young (227)

When the child outgrows the narrow circle of family life … then comes the period of the school, whose object is to initiate him into the technicalities of intercommunication with his fellow-men, and to familiarize him with the ideas that underlie his civilization, and which he must use as tools of thought if he would observe and understand the phases of human life around him; for these … are invisible to the human being who has not the aid of elementary ideas with which to see them.
In Psychologic Foundations of Education: An Attempt to Show the Genesis of the Higher Faculties of the Mind (1907), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Being (1278)  |  Child (307)  |  Circle (110)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Familiarize (3)  |  Family (94)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Idea (843)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Period (198)  |  Phase (36)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Technicality (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tool (117)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Understand (606)  |  Use (766)

When the solution is simple, God is answering. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Answer (366)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cease (79)  |  Enter (141)  |  Face (212)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Personal (67)  |  Realm (85)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

When we survey our lives and endeavours we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Create (235)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direct (225)  |  Eat (104)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Food (199)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (362)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Leave (130)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Medium (12)  |  Member (41)  |  Mental (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Poor (136)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principal (63)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resemble (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Survey (33)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (738)

Where the untrained eye will see nothing but mire and dirt, Science will often reveal exquisite possibilities. The mud we tread under our feet in the street is a grimy mixture of clay and sand, soot and water. Separate the sand, however, as Ruskinn observes—let the atoms arrange themselves in peace according to their nature—and you have the opal. Separate the clay, and it becomes a white earth, fit for the finest porcelain; or if it still further purifies itself, you have a sapphire. Take the soot, and it properly treated it will give you a diamond. While lastly, the water, purified and distilled, will become a dew-drop, or crystallize into a lovely star. Or, again, you may see as you will in any shallow pool either the mud lying at the bottom, or the image of the heavens above.
The Pleasures of Life (1887, 2007), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Atom (355)  |  Become (815)  |  Crystallize (12)  |  Dew (9)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Drop (76)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fit (134)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Image (96)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Mud (26)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Peace (108)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sapphire (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Soot (9)  |  Star (427)  |  Still (613)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tread (17)  |  Untrained (2)  |  Water (481)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Admire (18)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cease (79)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experience (467)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hope (299)  |  Language (293)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Personal (67)  |  Portray (4)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Whether you can observe a thing or not depends on the theory which you use. It is the theory which decides what can be observed.
Quoted in Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (1971), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (228)  |  Obervation (4)  |  Observed (149)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (366)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (158)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Broken (56)  |  Call (769)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (13)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (112)  |  Country (251)  |  Decision (91)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (110)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Demand (123)  |  Deny (66)  |  Describe (128)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Element (310)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instance (33)  |  Intention (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Likely (34)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observed (149)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (144)  |  Pattern (110)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Produce (104)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Region (36)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Room (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Technical (43)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Totality (15)  |  Track (38)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (283)  |  Type (167)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)

Who will observe the observers?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Observer (43)  |  Will (2355)

Whoever wishes to acquire a deep acquaintance with Nature must observe that there are analogies which connect whole branches of science in a parallel manner, and enable us to infer of one class of phenomena what we know of another. It has thus happened on several occasions that the discovery of an unsuspected analogy between two branches of knowledge has been the starting point for a rapid course of discovery.
Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874, 2nd ed., 1913), 631.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Class (164)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Course (409)  |  Deep (233)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enable (119)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Inference (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Science (3879)  |  Two (937)  |  Unsuspected (7)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Whole (738)

Without my attempts in natural science, I should never have learned to know mankind such as it is. In nothing else can we so closely approach pure contemplation and thought, so closely observe the errors of the senses and of the understanding, the weak and strong points of character.
Fri 13 Feb 1829. Johann Peter Eckermann, Conversations with Goethe, ed. J. K. Moorhead and trans. J. Oxenford (1971), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Character (243)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Error (321)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Point (580)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Weak (71)

Without tracing back to the Tower of Babel, one can observe that the very idea of building a very tall tower has long haunted human imagination. That kind of victory over the formidable law of gravity that tethers man to the ground has always appeared to him a symbol of the force and the challenges overcome.
From the original French, “Sans remonter à la Tour de Babel, on peut observer que l’idée même de la construction d’une tour de très grande hauteur a depuis longtemps hanté l'imagination des hommes. Celle sorte de victoire sur cette terrible loi de la pesanteur qui attache l’homme au sol lui a toujours paru un symbole de la force et des difficultés vaincues.” First sentences of Chap. 1, in Travaux Scientifiques Exécutés à la Tour de 300 Mètres de 1889 à 1900 (1900), 1. English translation by Webmaster using online resources.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Eiffel Tower (12)  |  Force (487)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Ground (217)  |  Haunt (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tall (11)  |  Tower (42)  |  Tower Of Babel (2)  |  Victory (39)

Would you have a man reason well, you must use him to it betimes; exercise his mind in observing the connection between ideas, and following them in train. Nothing does this better than mathematics, which therefore, I think should be taught to all who have the time and opportunity, not so much to make them mathematicians, as to make them reasonable creatures; for though we all call ourselves so, because we are born to it if we please, yet we may truly say that nature gives us but the seeds of it, and we are carried no farther than industry and application have carried us.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Better (486)  |  Born (33)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Connection (162)  |  Creature (233)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Far (154)  |  Farther (51)  |  Follow (378)  |  Give (202)  |  Idea (843)  |  Industry (137)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Please (65)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Say (984)  |  Seed (93)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Truly (116)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

You can observe a lot by watching.
Remark to a reporter after the 1963 baseball season. In When You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It! (2002), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Lot (151)  |  Observation (555)  |  Watching (10)

You disembowel the animal and I study it alive; you make it an object of horror and pity, and I make it love you; you work in a torture and dismemberment workshop, I observe under the blue sky, on the cicadas’ song; … you scrutinize death, I scrutinize life.
From the original French, “Vous éventrez la bête et moi je l'étudie vivante ; vous en faites un objet d'horreur et de pitié, et moi je la fais aimer; vous travaillez dans un atelier de torture et de dépècement, j'observe sous le ciel bleu, au chant des cigales; … vous scrutez la mort, je scrute la vie.” In 'L’Harmas', Nouveaux Souvenirs entomologiques: Études sur l’instinct et les mœurs des Insectes (1882), 3. English version by Webmaster using Google translate.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Animal (617)  |  Death (388)  |  Horror (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Object (422)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Sky (161)  |  Song (37)  |  Study (653)  |  Torture (29)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workshop (14)

You will never find anybody who can give you a clear and compelling reason why we observe “Daylight Saving Time.”
From newspaper column '25 Things I Have Learned in 50 Years' (Oct 1998), collected in Dave Barry Turns Fifty (2010), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Compelling (11)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Find (998)  |  Never (1087)  |  Reason (744)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

[In 1909,] Paris was the center of the aviation world. Aeronautics was neither an industry nor even a science; both were yet to come. It was an “art” and I might say a “passion”. Indeed, at that time it was a miracle. It meant the realization of legends and dreams that had existed for thousands of years and had been pronounced again and again as impossible by scientific authorities. Therefore, even the brief and unsteady flights of that period were deeply impressive. Many times I observed expressions of joy and tears in the eyes of witnesses who for the first time watched a flying machine carrying a man in the air.
In address (16 Nov 1964) presented to the Wings Club, New York City, Recollections and Thoughts of a Pioneer (1964), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Both (493)  |  Brief (36)  |  Carry (127)  |  Center (33)  |  Dream (208)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Joy (107)  |  Legend (17)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paris (11)  |  Passion (114)  |  Period (198)  |  Realization (43)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Watch (109)  |  Witness (54)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

[Napoleon] directed Bourrienne to leave all his letters unopened for three weeks, and then observed with satisfaction how large a part of the correspondence had thus disposed of itself, and no longer required an answer.
Lecture, 'Napoleon', collected in Representative Men (1850), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (19)  |  Communication (94)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Napoleon (16)  |  Observed (149)  |  Part (222)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Unopened (3)  |  Week (70)

[The internet] ought to be like clay, rather than a sculpture that you observe from a distance.
From archive interview (Nov 1999) rebroadcast on PBS radio program Science Friday (14 Mar 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  Clay (9)  |  Distance (161)  |  Internet (17)  |  Observation (555)  |  Sculpture (12)

… just as the astronomer, the physicist, the geologist, or other student of objective science looks about in the world of sense, so, not metaphorically speaking but literally, the mind of the mathematician goes forth in the universe of logic in quest of the things that are there; exploring the heights and depths for facts—ideas, classes, relationships, implications, and the rest; observing the minute and elusive with the powerful microscope of his Infinitesimal Analysis; observing the elusive and vast with the limitless telescope of his Calculus of the Infinite; making guesses regarding the order and internal harmony of the data observed and collocated; testing the hypotheses, not merely by the complete induction peculiar to mathematics, but, like his colleagues of the outer world, resorting also to experimental tests and incomplete induction; frequently finding it necessary, in view of unforeseen disclosures, to abandon one hopeful hypothesis or to transform it by retrenchment or by enlargement:—thus, in his own domain, matching, point for point, the processes, methods and experience familiar to the devotee of natural science.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 26
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Class (164)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Complete (204)  |  Data (156)  |  Depth (94)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Disclosure (6)  |  Domain (69)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Find (998)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Guess (61)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Height (32)  |  Hopeful (6)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Implication (23)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Internal (66)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Literally (30)  |  Located (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Look (582)  |  Making (300)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Objective (91)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Point (580)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Process (423)  |  Quest (39)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Resort (8)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Student (300)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transform (73)  |  Unforeseen (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

“Crawling at your feet,” said the Gnat … “you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. …”
“And what does it live on?”
“Weak tea with cream in it.”
A new difficulty came into Alice's head. “Supposing it couldn't find any?” she suggested.
“Then it would die, of course.”
“But that must happen very often,” Alice remarked thoughtfully.
“It always happens,” said the Gnat.
In Through the Looking Glass: And what Alice Found There (1893), 66-67.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alice In Wonderland (6)  |  Bread (39)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Course (409)  |  Crawling (2)  |  Cream (6)  |  Death (388)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habitat Destruction (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Often (106)  |  Tea (12)  |  Weak (71)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.